Survey Video Is Most Common Mag App for Mobile Action Codes

first_imgMore than half of the monthly magazines that use “mobile action codes”-such as 2D bar codes, QR codes and Microsoft Tag-are using them to deliver video, according to Nellymoser, Inc. a Boston-based tech firm that specializes in turning printed action codes into applications on mobile phones. Beyond video, 23.1 percent of publishers are using action codes to deliver micro sites while 16.6 percent are offering sweepstakes through action codes. Just 3.6 percent of monthly magazines are delivering coupons via action codes, while 2.4 percent are offering e-commerce or an electronic storefront. However, action codes are used more often by advertisers (59 percent) than editorial 41.5 percent). The two action codes that use a smartphone app-QR codes and Microsoft Tag-account for 95 percent of the action codes appearing in monthly magazines (with Microsoft Tag accounting for 81.6 percent of that). Meanwhile, some other publishers are moving beyond printed action codes. In its September issue, Marie Claire offered a “Shop the Ads” program that leveraged services from advertising technology company Pongr that lets consumers use mobile cameras to share images of designated products across social networks as well as request information on the product from the brand as well as contact editors. The promotion-which grew from an editorial program called “Shop the Shoot”-didn’t use bar codes, apps or required consumers to have a smartphone. Twenty-seven pages in Marie Claire’s September issue were designated for the program, featuring more than 200 products from brands such as Armani. A copy of the Nellymoser report is available here.last_img read more

Amazon to buy Eero maker of home WiFi hardware

first_img1:53 Now playing: Watch this: Tags An Eero Beacon extender. Josh Miller/CNET Amazon has signed an agreement to buy Eero, a San Francisco-based maker of home Wi-Fi hardware, the companies announced Monday.Eero makes simply designed white Wi-Fi router pucks that people can plug in around their homes. An Eero Wi-Fi system is meant to provide more reliable Wi-Fi in every nook and cranny of a home, providing better coverage than a single Wi-Fi router.Read more: Wi-Fi 6: Better, faster internet is coming this year — here’s everything you need to know  The total value of the deal wasn’t disclosed. Eero, which was founded in 2014, has raised $90 million in funding, according to Crunchbase.The deal offers another clear indication of Amazon’s ambitions to control as many aspects of the connected home as it can. It already makes Echo smart speakers — which dominate the US market — as well as Fire TV streamers and even an Alexa-connected microwave. With Eero, it’s pushing into Wi-Fi networking equipment, too. That equipment has likely become even more important for Amazon, since Wi-Fi is the foundation for all the smart-home gear Amazon is selling. Based on its $90 million in funding, the Eero deal appears to be smaller than Amazon’s last notable smart-home acquisition. In April last year, the e-commerce giant purchased Ring, a maker of video doorbells and other security equipment, for $839 million. Ring had raised $209 million prior to the acquisition, according to Crunchbase.Amazon previously worked to promote Eero in 2015, when it started its Launchpad landing page for products made by startups. Eero gained a leading spot on the page, helping bring the young company attention from Amazon’s huge customer base.Amazon is expanding it smart-home tech principally through its Alexa voice assistant. The company said in January there are now more than 28,000 smart home devices from more than 4,500 brands that work with Alexa. That’s up from over 20,000 and 3,500, since September. Also, more than 150 products now have Alexa built in, including headphones, thermostats, PCs, cars and light switches.First published at 2:04 p.m. PT.Update at 2:44 p.m. PT: Adds more details throughout.CES 2019: See all of CNET’s coverage of the year’s biggest tech show.Everything about Fortnite: What you need to know about the hit game. Google, Amazon’s main rival in smart home, already sells a competing — and much cheaper — system called Google Wifi.The Eero acquisition also points to Amazon’s work to keep building its Wi-Fi Simple Setup feature, which is intended to make setting up new smart-home devices easier. Right now, most users need to go through a tedious process of downloading a new app, going through a lengthy setup and pairing new hardware with their voice assistant. Wi-Fi Simple Setup should help cut out a lot of those steps, allowing folks to plug in a new device and have it start working immediately.While this hassle clearly falls into the category of First World problems, it’s a point of friction that prevents more mainstream customers from hooking up their homes with Wi-Fi-connected lights and appliances.”We have a shared vision that the smart-home experience can get even easier, and we’re committed to continue innovating on behalf of customers,” Amazon’s hardware chief Dave Limp said in a statement Monday.The deal raised concerns about Eero users’ internet data privacy, as the startup will be joining a tech giant that already takes in a lot of user data through its Amazon Web Services cloud-computing business and its other smart-home devices.Looking to allay those worries, Eero confirmed on Twitter that it doesn’t track customers’ internet activity and that policy won’t change after the acquisition. Share your voice Amazon Fire TV Amazon’s Eero takeover will feed its smart home obsession News • Apple Music is now available on Amazon Fire TV Hi Steve! eero and Amazon take customer privacy very seriously and we will continue to protect it. eero does not track customers’ internet activity and this policy will not change with the acquisition.— eero support 👋 (@eerosupport) February 11, 2019 Smart Home Comments Review • Amazon Fire TV: Affordable Alexa-infused 4K streaming 6last_img read more

New Graduate Program Shows The Intersection Of Engineering And Medicine

New Graduate Program Shows The Intersection Of Engineering And Medicine

first_img Share Kenneth Livingston, Lamees El Nihum, and Cannon Woodbury are medical students with Texas A&M. The three are piloting classes for the new EnHealth Program.The Texas Medical Center will soon be home not only to doctors, but engineers as well with an partnership between Texas A&M and Houston Methodist. The graduate program, dubbed “EnHealth,” will train graduate students not only in medicine, but also engineering. The goal of the program is to move away from a sole focus on biology as a means to address health issues. Using an engineering design process and technology, researchers hope to bring forward solutions that biological solutions like drugs are unable to offer. “I think when applied to medicine [engineering] provides startlingly quick and really important breakthroughs,” said Texas A&M President Michael Young.Davis LandDirector of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at the National Institutes of Health Roderic Pettigrew addresses attendees of EnHealth’s launch. Pettigrew will lead the program as CEO and Dean.Young said the idea of a combined approach has been around for a while, but so far hasn’t been applied in higher education. The new program will find a home inside an 18-story building newly acquired by the university in the medical center. Students are piloting classes in the program right now. The inaugural class is expected to start in twenty-nineteen.last_img read more

Rep Iden local fire department officials testify in support of first responder

Rep Iden local fire department officials testify in support of first responder

first_img Categories: Iden News,News State Rep. Brandt Iden was joined by local fire department officials in testifying for the first responder protection bills before the House Law and Justice Committee today.Iden, of Oshtemo Township, is the sponsor for one of the three bills under consideration, which will make it a felony, punishable by up to two years of incarceration, for anyone who targets or intimidates a member of the police and fire department and emergency medical service personnel.“We are seeing increased incidents in Michigan and across the country where first responders are being attacked while in the course of performing their duties or simply for wearing the uniform,” said Iden. “These are individuals put their lives on the line for us. We need to show these men and women that the state of Michigan has their back.”Joining Iden before the committee were Mark Barnes, fire chief for the Charter Township of Oshtemo, and Jed Wild of the Covert Township Fire Department.“The folks that do these acts, I don’t think they’re going to read (state law) because they’re just going to act,” said Barnes. “What we hope and pray will happen will be getting the perpetrators of these kind of actions off the streets to allow us to do our jobs safely.”Wild, the lead training officer for Covert Township, spoke to the committee on the dangers for personnel responding to a mass shooting incident where secondary devices may be set to specifically harm first responders indiscriminately.“That is not the specific emphasis of this legislation, but this happens across our country,” Wild said. “Evil will reside in our communities year and year out, but we’re going to continue to do our job. We appreciate and recognize you are trying to protect us.”The House Bills 4585, sponsored by state Rep. Jeff Yaroch, of Richmond; HB 4590, sponsored by state Rep. Klint Kesto; and 4591, sponsored by Iden, remain under consideration of the committee. 26Sep Rep. Iden, local fire department officials testify in support of first responder protection billslast_img read more