CeCe Winans Let Them Fall In Love For The Record

CeCe Winans Let Them Fall In Love For The Record

first_img For The Record: Jennifer Lopez And Marc Anthony For The Record: CeCe Winans’ ‘Let Them Fall …’ cece-winans-let-them-fall-love-record-0 For The Record: CeCe Winans, ‘Let Them Fall … ‘ Winans’ GRAMMY win for her 2017 gospel album arrived 30 years after her win for the 1987 hit “For Always” that she sang with her brother, BeBe WinansPhilip MerrillGRAMMYs Feb 22, 2018 – 4:34 pm After close to a decade concentrating on ministry at Nashville Life Church with husband Alvin Love, the 2017 album Let Them Fall In Love restated the strength of CeCe Winans’ musical and devotional message. It won Best Gospel Album at the 60th GRAMMY Awards and its track “Never Have To Be Alone” won for Best Gospel Performance/Song. Dave Chappelle For The Record: ‘The Age Of Spin …’ For The Record: Little Big Town’s ‘The Road …” For The Record: Harrison’s ‘All Things Must Pass’ Metallica: “One” | For The Record For The Record: Juan Gabriel Bob Marley & The Wailers’ ‘Exodus’: For The Record Revisit Janet Jackson’s ‘Rhythm Nation 1814’ For The Record: Michael Jackson For The Record: ‘The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill’ For The Record: B.B. King’s “Auld Lang Syne” For The Record: CeCe Winans, ‘Let Them Fall … ‘ For The Record: B.B. King’s “Auld Lang Syne” For The Record: Pink Floyd’s ‘The Wall’ Metallica: “One” | For The Record For The Record: Pink Floyd’s ‘The Wall’ For The Record: Bruno Mars’ ’24K Magic’ Madonna: ‘Ray Of Light’ | For The Record For The Record: Eminem’s “Lose Yourself” For The Record: Linda Ronstadt’s ‘Canciones …’ Alanis Morissette: ‘Jagged Little Pill’ For The Record: Bruno Mars’ ’24K Magic’ For The Record: Jennifer Lopez And Marc Anthony Kendrick Lamar, ‘DAMN.’: For The Record For The Record: Pink Floyd’s ‘The Wall’ David Bowie’s ‘…Ziggy Stardust…’ | For The Record Kendrick Lamar, ‘DAMN.’: For The Record Winans’ GRAMMY wins began with the 1987 hit “For Always” performed with her brother, BeBe Winans. Still going strong 30 years later, her total GRAMMY wins so far have risen to an even dozen. And fittingly, “For Always” describes the impact she has had on American gospel and R&B music and on listeners’ hearts.CeCe Winans’ family of gospel-enthused recording artists and performers has a complex, marvelous history. Her 1984 album, Lord Lift Us Up, with BeBe drew a Best Soul Gospel Performance By A Duo Or Group nomination at the 27th GRAMMY Awards, their first. BeBe has six career GRAMMYs, as does brother Marvin. As a group, the Winans — Carvin, Michael, Marvin, and Ronald — have five GRAMMY wins.Additional family members, including the parents and the siblings’ children, account for many more GRAMMY nominations. That’s some spirit, accompanied by a gospel legacy almost too awesome to absorb.Taking a look at CeCe’s half-dozen gospel album GRAMMY wins before Let Them Fall In Love, they are bookmarked by collaborations with BeBe — 1991’s Different Lifestyles and 2009’s Still. Between those years, four of her solo albums won — her first solo LP, 1995’s Alone In His Presence, followed by CeCe Winans (2001), Purified (2005), and Thy Kingdom Come (2008).We don’t have to imagine the faith that produced this rich collection of excellence because we can listen to it. NPR described just one track of CeCe Winans’ latest as “a mighty blast of joy,” so step right up. Read more Metallica: “One” | For The Record For The Record: ‘From A Room: Volume 1′ For The Record: Calle 13 For The Record: Bee Gees’ ‘Saturday Night Fever’ News For The Record: Beck’s ‘Morning Phase’ Bob Marley & The Wailers’ ‘Exodus’: For The Record Pearl Jam: ‘Ten’ | For The Record For The Record Madonna: ‘Ray Of Light’ | For The Record Dave Chappelle For The Record: ‘The Age Of Spin …’ For The Record: Eminem’s “Lose Yourself” For The Record: Adele, ’25’ For The Record: Calle 13 For The Record: Carlos Santana Revisit Janet Jackson’s ‘Rhythm Nation 1814’ Nirvana’s ‘Nevermind’: For The Record Nirvana’s ‘Nevermind’: For The Record For The Record: Adele, ’25’ For The Record: Juan Gabriel For The Record: CeCe Winans, ‘Let Them Fall … ‘ Facebook For The Record: Bee Gees’ ‘Saturday Night Fever’ For The Record: ‘From A Room: Volume 1′ For The Record: Adele, ’25’ For The Record: John Coltrane’s ‘A Love Supreme’ Madonna: ‘Ray Of Light’ | For The Record For The Record: Carlos Santana For The Record: B.B. King’s “Auld Lang Syne” Pearl Jam: ‘Ten’ | For The Record For The Record: N.W.A’s ‘Straight Outta Compton’ For The Record: Calle 13 For The Record: Shakira For The Record: Bee Gees’ ‘Saturday Night Fever’ Prev Next Kendrick Lamar, ‘DAMN.’: For The Record For The Record: John Coltrane’s ‘A Love Supreme’ Twitter For The Record: Cole’s “The Christmas Song” For The Record: Harrison’s ‘All Things Must Pass’ Bob Marley & The Wailers’ ‘Exodus’: For The Record Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs” For The Record: ‘O Brother, Where Art Thou?’ David Bowie’s ‘…Ziggy Stardust…’ | For The Record For The Record: ‘O Brother, Where Art Thou?’ Pearl Jam: ‘Ten’ | For The Record For The Record: Little Big Town’s ‘The Road …” For The Record: Taylor Swift’s ‘1989’ For The Record: Linda Ronstadt’s ‘Canciones …’ Alanis Morissette: ‘Jagged Little Pill’ For The Record: Shakira For The Record: Little Big Town’s ‘The Road …” For The Record: Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back To Black’ For The Record: N.W.A’s ‘Straight Outta Compton’ For The Record: ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’ Email For The Record: Taylor Swift’s ‘1989’ Revisit The Beatles’ ‘Revolver’ For The Record: ‘O Brother, Where Art Thou?’ Revisit Janet Jackson’s ‘Rhythm Nation 1814’ For The Record: Cole’s “The Christmas Song” For The Record: ‘The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill’ For The Record: Juan Gabriel David Bowie’s ‘…Ziggy Stardust…’ | For The Record For The Record: Carlos Santana For The Record: Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back To Black’ For The Record: Linda Ronstadt’s ‘Canciones …’ For The Record: Cole’s “The Christmas Song” For The Record: Beck’s ‘Morning Phase’ For The Record: Amy Winehouse’s ‘Back To Black’ For The Record: Harrison’s ‘All Things Must Pass’ For The Record: Bruno Mars’ ’24K Magic’ Revisit The Beatles’ ‘Revolver’ For The Record: John Coltrane’s ‘A Love Supreme’ NETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Feb 22, 2018 – 4:29 pm For The Record: CeCe Winans, ‘Let Them Fall … ‘ For The Record: ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’ Revisit The Beatles’ ‘Revolver’ For The Record: N.W.A’s ‘Straight Outta Compton’ For The Record: Beck’s ‘Morning Phase’ For The Record: Jennifer Lopez And Marc Anthony Daft Punk For The Record: ‘Random Access Memories’ For The Record: Michael Jackson For The Record: ‘From A Room: Volume 1’ For The Record: ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’ For The Record: Shakira Nirvana’s ‘Nevermind’: For The Record For The Record: ‘The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill’ For The Record: Eminem’s “Lose Yourself” Dave Chappelle For The Record: ‘The Age Of Spin …’ For The Record: Taylor Swift’s ‘1989’ CeCe Winans, ‘Let Them Fall In Love’: For The Record Alanis Morissette: ‘Jagged Little Pill’ For The Record: Michael Jackson Daft Punk For The Record: ‘Random Access Memories’ Daft Punk For The Record: ‘Random Access Memories’last_img read more

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Former Selectman Mike Champoux Endorses Greg Bendel Kevin Caira

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Former Selectman Mike Champoux Endorses Greg Bendel Kevin Caira

first_imgDear Editor,In Wilmington, at least in recent times, it is unusual to see so many candidates vying for the office of Board of Selectman. One might argue that having a larger pool of candidates to choose from is a positive thing illustrating a revived interest in local civics among the broader population. But, all one needs to do is do a bit of a deeper dive into the candidate list and, in my opinion, it becomes clear that the actual choices are far more limited than it may appear. Specifically, for the two three-year seats in contest,  I will be voting with great enthusiasm for Selectman Greg Bendel and Selectman Kevin Caira to maintain their seats on our Board of Selectmen. Here are just a few reasons.I served with Greg and Kevin on the Board. While I had known both gentlemen socially before they ran for the office three years ago, it was when serving side-by-side with them where I developed a very high level of respect and admiration for them both. In times when there were challenging and sometime opposing views on matters between us as members of the Board, these gentlemen remained professional, polite and respectful, even as we sometimes cast opposing votes. Their ability and desire to make their arguments with seriousness and passion while staying away from being confrontational shows them to be of tremendous character. In the contentious society we live in today that has been on display in social media and in public, it is refreshing to see Government officials who are unpaid volunteers in service to their neighbors, be able to disagree with colleagues or others without being disagreeable. They serve as an example of how we all should conduct ourselves in public and online.I have seen it suggested that the town needs to move in a different direction. That somehow, our community is in bad shape. While that may be a politically sexy thing to say, it is simply untrue. Wilmington is fortunate to be in a position where home values have continuously been on the rise.  For many residents, our homes represent our greatest asset and our nestegg.  I don’t know about you, but I would rather see my property value increasing than decreasing.  We maintain high level services throughout the community and schools all while maintaining a desirable residential tax-rate compared to a number of similar sized nearby communities.  We maintain a strong operational reserve account.  This protects the town if we experience another economic down turn.  We will be able to maintain services and staffing levels by having access to these “rainy day” funds.  Additionally, being prudent in maintaining these reserves is viewed favorably by the credit rating agencies.  So, when the town eventually seeks to borrow funds for any municipal construction projects in the future (Fire sub-station, School administration building, senior center, etc), our enviable AA+ bond rating will afford us the most favorable borrowing rates.  I could go on with more examples of how the town is being, and has been well managed for many years.  But, the point I am making is that these and other positive attributes of our town government are in place because of the stewardship and direction set by Greg Bendel and Kevin Caira on the Board of Selectmen.  I would argue that if the train is running well on the track it is on, it makes no sense at all to change to a new set of tracks.Greg Bendel and Kevin Caira have my full confidence and they should have yours too.  I encourage Wilmington Residents to vote for the men of reason, respect and honor, Greg Bendel and Kevin Caira for Selectman.Sincerely,Mike ChampouxLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSELECTMEN NEWS: New Finance Director & Town Accountant AppointedIn “Government”LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Bendel & Caira Are Trustworthy & Keep Their Campaign PromisesIn “Letter To The Editor”SELECTMEN NEWS: Board Supports Fire & Police Substation In North Wilmington; Town To Vote On Project In April 2020?In “Government”last_img read more

University teacher suspended over sexual harassment allegation

University teacher suspended over sexual harassment allegation

first_imgCumilla University gate. File PhotoA teacher of Cumilla University has been suspended on allegations of harassing two female students sexually, reports UNB. Cumilla University (CU) authorities took the decision and suspended the teacher on Wednesday night, said Abu Taher, acting registrar of the university. Talking to media, Taher said that two female students submitted a written complaint against Management Studies department assistant professor and the provost of Kazi Nazrul Islam Hall GM Azmal Kawsar. On the basis of the written allegations, the university authorities suspended GM Kawsar temporarily for violating rules and regulations of the university. Kawsar would not take part in any academic and administrative activities until further notice, he said. Earlier on 9 April, the two female students of evening EMBA course submitted written complaints, accusing Azmal Kawsar of harassing them by sending obscene pictures and messages over Facebook.last_img read more

Miguel to lead strong pack

Miguel to lead strong pack

first_imgSpanish pro Miguel Ángel Jiménez, one of the most charismatic players in world golf, will headline a strong field comprising players from Europe and Asia as the Hero Indian Open gets underway here next month.The 51st edition of India’s national open will be held from February 19 to 22 at the historic Delhi Golf Club in the national capital. The Hero India Open, which carries an enhanced prize purse of US $ 1.5 million, will also be making its debut on the European Tour from this year. The announcement was made at a press conference held in the Capital on 21 January. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Continuing its association with Golf in general and the Hero Indian Open in particular, for the tenth year in succession, Pawan Munjal, Vice Chairman, Managing Director & Chief Executive Officer, Hero MotoCorp Ltd said, “Golf is fast emerging as a popular sport among the youth in India, and we are glad to have played a catalyst role in this movement. Hero MotoCorp has been associated with golf for close to two decades now, thereby nurturing the game since its nascent stage. The Hero Indian Open being co-sanctioned by the European Tour from this year is an acknowledgement of the rising stature of Indian golf in the world arena. We look forward to seeing some top-class golf at the Hero Indian Open 2015.” Even as entries continue to come in, some of the top stars, including Sidikkur who won the event in 2013, are expected to feature in the coming edition. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixSSP Chowrasia and Anirban Lahiri, who were both tied second and Rashid Khan and Chiragh Kumar, who were tied fourth, on that occasion, are also expected to tee up at the event. The field is also expected to include the likes of Jeev Milkha Singh, Arjun Atwal and Jyoti Randhawa, the only three-time Indian winner of the Hero Indian Open. Over the next few weeks, as the entries come in, more top names from European and Asian Tours will be confirmed. Nimbus Sport, which has promoted the Hero Indian Open since 2011, has acquired the rights to manage the tournament for the next three editions from 2015 to 2017. The Hero Indian Open has been synonymous with the rise of golf in India, and has been at the forefront of unearthing some of the best golfing talents that the country has seen, including the likes of Arjun Atwal, Jeev Milkha Singh, Jyoti Randhawa, Shiv Kapur and Gaganjeet Bhullar.last_img read more

Intl child trafficking racket Kingpin held from Gujarat

Intl child trafficking racket Kingpin held from Gujarat

first_imgKolkata: Kolkata Police has arrested a person from Gujrat for allegedly kidnapping and selling several children in foreign countries. The accused Mayur Vyas was arrested on Saturday.According to the sources, a case was registered regarding child trafficking around a month ago. Kolkata Police came to about the racket through an e-mail from the American Consulate in Kolkata. Consulate informed that a few months ago several children were taken to the US with fake passports. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeWhile checking with the passports, the US police identified that the passports were fake. The identities of the children were not matching as per the information on the passport. Upon being informed, the anti-human trafficking unit of Kolkata Police initiated a probe. During November Kolkata Police tracked down four persons. They were arrested from India Exchange Place. The four persons identified as Azad Chowdhury, Shahaziya Chowdhury, Nasir Hossain and Sanjay Kumar Singh. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedAzad and Shahziya are husband and wife. Sources informed that both of them used to pose as the parents of the trafficked children. Hossain and Singh used to prepare fake documents to procure passports for the children. After everything was arranged, the couple used to take the children to the US and sell them against a sum of money. The four are being remanded to police custody till December 5. During police custody, they were interrogated thoroughly to know more about the racket. The four told police about others who are working in the racket. From them police came to about Vyas and started tracking him. The other state police were also informed. A few days ago, Kolkata Police came to know that Vyas was in Gujrat. Immediately, a team of Kolkata Police got in touch with Gujrat Police and asked for assistance. According to the sources, upon receiving the information, Gujrat Police detained Vyas and handed him over to Kolkata Police on Saturday. He was arrested and produced before a local court in Gujrat with an appeal for transit remand which was granted. On Sunday, Vyas was brought to Kolkata and produced before a court with a prayer for police custody. The sleuths suspect several more persons are connected with this racket.last_img read more

State to develop electronic hardware parks for IT boost

State to develop electronic hardware parks for IT boost

first_imgKolkata: The State Information Technology and Electronics (IT&E) department recently held a meeting to chalk out plans of expanding the Electronics System Design and Manufacturing (ESDM) sector in Bengal through establishment of electronic and hardware parks at various locations.The meeting, chaired by state additional Chief Secretary of IT & E department Debashis Sen, saw representatives from electronic manufacturing industry and industry bodies/ associations. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseOrganisations such as KOTRA, ELMA, Compass and Infrastructure Leasing and Financial Services attended the meet and expressed their views on the prospect of ESDM sector in Bengal. In August last year, the state IT department had come up with an IT policy intending to transform Bengal into a knowledge-driven technologically enabled welfare society with extensive use of IT for increasing employment opportunities and promoting the state as a preferred investment destination. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe state IT department has established two electronic parks — one at Naihati and another at Falta with an aim to promote electronic manufacturing industry in the state. Lands of both these parks are owned by state government. “We have also come up with a hardware park at Sonarpur on 10.72 acres. We will soon start construction of another hardware park at Kalyani,” a senior official of the IT& E department said. Senior officials in the IT department mentioned about the huge opportunity in solar electronics and mobile manufacturing industry and by creating physical IT infrastructure with a nominal lease premium rate. “We are trying to build up a conductive environment for electronic manufacturing sector. The industry representatives present in the meeting expressed their interest in this initiative and in developing a holistic ESDM eco-system together with the state government,” the official added. The rates of land lease premium for various electronic and hardware parks were revealed in the meeting that was held at Webel Bhavan in Sector V. The state IT department has already prepared brochures for highlighting the high quality infrastructure of the electronic parks and the procedure to get space in the park which was released during the Bengal Global Business Summit held this month.last_img read more

Will You Be the Next Great EducationTech Entrepreneur

first_img 4 min read Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Are you an investor looking for the next best socially minded business or an entrepreneur looking for hot industries where you can have a big impact? Then education should be near the top of your list.The education-technology sector is ripe for disruption, investment and rapid growth, while offering the coveted opportunity to dramatically alter people’s lives and the global economy.The number of new startups and funding arriving to the field is undeniable (according to CB Insights, industry funding reached $1.25 billion last year). Yet it’s one of a few sectors that have not caught up with the wave of innovation that has transformed the manufacturing, media and health care industries.  Related: Cornering a Missed Pocket of the Ed-Tech MarketU.S. education is poised for change. Teachers and students alike are increasingly disillusioned, disheartened and disengaged. American students’ performance on standardized tests has been disappointing.Professors cite incoming students’ lack of college readiness and business leaders point to a significant gap between the skills employees need and those possessed by job seekers.  Yet, the possibility of improving education has never been brighter. Leaders are calling for more rigorous standards, greater accountability and innovation. Schools and colleges are ready to change the status quo and technology can play a critical role in this transformation.Educational institutions need better curriculum materials; streamlined systems; tools that empower educators, students and parents; and a commitment to embrace the change.Technology combined with educational expertise can have a powerful effect on learning.  The Center for Digital Education estimates that U.S. public elementary schools and colleges and universities will spend $20.4 billion on ed tech in 2014. The greatest areas of growth in this field are being driven by two emerging educational models: blended learning, a combination of face-to-face and online instruction, and personalized learning, educational activities tailored to students’ individual needs as determined by frequent assessments.To be clear, no technology can outperform a great educator. The best ed-tech offerings must reflect this by freeing up educators’ time and empowering them with data and tools that enhance their ability to teach.Imagine the impact on student achievement and outcomes if educators and institutions were armed with the caliber of technology that doctors and hospitals are starting to embrace.The challenges in education require an infusion of passionate new ideas and voices.Related: Why Everyone Wants a Piece of Ed TechBefore jumping headlong into ed tech, understand some unique market conditions in this burgeoning sector. State governmental regulations can create a significant barrier to innovation, as can the slow pace of institutional decision making.System-wide purchasing cycles in schools and districts and colleges and universities last nearly a year. That’s why many startups focus on freemium-pricing models and letting individual educators adopt their tools as opposed to institution-wide procurement.Additionally, standards and policies vary across states, which can increase development costs and complicate the sales process. That said, the adoption of Common Core State Standards for kindergarten through grade 12 has allowed for some efficiencies.To succeed in ed tech, investors, entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial companies must take into account these guidelines:Offer solutions that challenge the status quo and foster innovation among educators. New technologies can’t simply digitize a paper-based system.Entrepreneurs who think they know education because they went to school will fail. This is a complex ecosystem with ever-changing needs. Understand current issues, policies and trends. Spend time in schools or on college campuses and talk with education professionals.The voices of educators, students and parents are integral to identifying real educational needs and for product development and implementation.Understand as well that there has been a legacy of great educators and administrators. Yet, technology with the power to change education can fit seamlessly into an institution’s workflow and enhance instruction, instead of seeking to replace it.Establish a clear and realistic path to generating revenue that factors in sales cycles, institutions’ and educators’ funding sources and budgets and perceived value.Authenticity is paramount. Be motivated by mission, not money.  America’s students and education institutions deserve the best. More entrepreneurs with new ideas and innovations are needed — as well as real solutions that will help educators and students. Do you have what it takes to be the next great ed-tech entrepreneur? Related: This Is Bill and Melinda Gates’ Prediction for the Future of Online Education  Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. February 20, 2015 Register Now »last_img read more

Half of US internet homes now own a connected TV d

Half of US internet homes now own a connected TV d

first_imgHalf of US internet homes now own a connected TV device, such as a games console, streaming media player or smart TV, according to NPD Group.The new research claims that the smart TV industry was a “primary driver” of growth and that the total number of US homes with a connected TV device is now 46 million, a 4 million home increase from Q2 2014.“The increase in the number of homes that use a TV with apps is the result of three very important factors. Sales of TVs with apps have skyrocketed, their user interfaces have improved and there has been a surge in available premium services and programming,” said NPD’s executive director, Connected Intelligence, John Buffone.According to NPD’s Retail Tracking Service, 45% of TVs sold in the US during Q2 supported apps, up from 34% last year and 24% two years ago, with more consumers also now connecting their smart TVs to the web.In Q2, some 69% of all installed internet-capable TVs were connected, compared to 61% last year and 45% two years ago, said the research.Netflix remained the “most commonly used” service among US homes with connected TVs in Q2, followed by YouTube, Amazon Prime/Instant Video, Hulu and HBO Go or HBO Now.“We’re living in the golden age of TV where significant investments are being made in developing original series. This is being enabled by growth in online services such as Hulu and Amazon Video as well as industry leading TV networks benefiting from the large pay TV subscriber base and fast developing over-the-top audience that uses apps on TV,” Buffone.last_img read more

In This Issue Fed drops considerable time ph

first_imgIn This Issue * Fed drops “considerable time” phrase. * Where were the negative prints hiding? * RBNZ moves to a neutral bias. * India to have a Current Account Surplus? And Now. Today’s A Pfennig For Your Thoughts Cheap Oil Helps India! Good Day!…  And a Tub Thumpin’ Thursday to you! I’m hoping for a Tub Thumpin’ Thursday for me here, but we’ll have to see how that goes.. I forwarded all the messages to Chris regarding Happy Birthday wishes from dear readers yesterday, I hear he was treated like a king in the office. Hmmm.  I’m never in the office when my birthday comes along, as I spend that time in Florida attending spring training games.  I have had birthday cakes made for me when I return though, so that’s always fun!  The FOMC met yesterday, talk about a letdown.  (for me that is!) And other than that, the currencies and metals markets didn’t know what to do, so everything went flat on the day With the FOMC Meeting hogging all the media and the markets attention yesterday, we might as well talk about it, Front and Center today,  but it won’t take us long! The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) made no changes to their Fed Funds rate, and removed the reference of the fed funds rate being held at a the current range for “a considerable time following the end of QE”. And they replaced it with. Talk that they (the Fed) can be patient about hiking rates, and that rates will NOT be raised in March or April. and June could be the earliest.   OK. who wants to take the bet that June passes us by, and rates don’t get hiked?  I want all the action! Because I don’t believe rates will be raised in June. But that’s 5 months away. let’s not get ahead of ourselves The reason, I say that is simply that, by the time June rolls around, the economic data is going to tell a completely different story on the economy, that the Fed sounded so upbeat about yesterday. I guess all those negative prints lately were pushed under a pile of papers so that the Fed didn’t see them.  Yeah, that’s the ticket! And my first wife was a young Elizabeth Taylor, yeah, that’s it, that’s the ticket! So, that was yesterday. (I’m sure there’s a song there, but can’t think of any right now.. HA!) Today, the currencies and metals are once again a mixed bag-o-nuts, and the euro ekes out a gain, but the Aussie dollar (A$) sees a small loss. The Chinese renminbi was weakened overnight, and Gold is down another day, booking a $7 loss as I type. The Beatles song, All You Need Is love greeted me this morning. And how apropos, eh? That’s all the currencies and metals need is Love.  Gold was receiving some love on a daily basis the first 3 weeks of this year, but Gold’s lover has left. Let’s hope Gold’s lover is feeling guilty, and comes back soon! The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (RBNZ) met overnight and while they kept their rates unchanged they did, as I told you they probably would, change their bias to neutral, from tightening. RBNZ Gov. Wheeler, said that he expects the RBNZ to keep the OCR (official cash rate) on hold for some time. And then hung the chances of any future rate hikes on the economic data. That’s the usual MO for Central Bankers. tell everyone that rate hikes depend on economic data, which could very easily be looked at differently by two different people! That way, the Central Bank gets to cherry pick what data they want to point out. I find this method to be the Chicken Hawk way of doing things. Boy! I Think I saw a Chicken Hawk! The N.Z. dollar/ kiwi wasn’t treated too kindly after Wheeler’s announcement and subsequent statement about moving his bias to neutral. Longtime readers know that I do not hold RBNZ Gov. Wheeler in high esteem, and I’m sure he doesn’t lose any sleep over this.  The euro has eked out a gain this morning, and is trading above 1.13. Yesterday, the euro was well into the 1.13 handle, and the single unit held that position until the overnight session, where Greece was the subject on most traders’ minds, and when that happens, the euro suffers. But then this morning, things changed, and the euro pushed back. I’m expecting to see the first run of consumer inflation from Germany this morning. I’m not expecting it to be good either. So, this pushing back of the euro, might soon turn to the euro getting shoved around again Well, while I was typing, Gold’s loss of $7 has turned to a loss of $16 this morning.. UGH! That’s crazy stuff folks. The conflict in Ukraine has picked up intensity, but Gold loses ground? The Greeks elect a rogue party that ran on a platform of no austerity, or leave the euro, and Gold loses ground? I hope when I grow up, I fully understand how this can be. you know sort of like when I grew up and found out that there was no.  No wait! That can’t be!  Please tell me that what the kids said at school isn’t true! Whew! I was scared to death that I might get crossed off his list, if I said I didn’t believe! Silver is in the same boat as its kissin’ cousin, Gold. I read on Google+ last night that India alone, imported 7,063 tonnes of Silver in 2014. That’s up 15% VS the previous year. And India was out of the importing metals game for a few months in 2014, which makes this result even that more impressive! But the same thing holds true here. Truckloads of physical buying going on in both Silver and Gold, but they are searching for terra firma. I shake my head in disgust, and know of no other thing I can do to change/ rectify this Speaking of the conflict in Ukraine. This fighting surprises me, in that I thought that in the dead of winter, there would not be the will to keep fighting. And just to give you proof that the fighting has intensified, the Russian ruble is getting a daily whacking once again, and has fallen to a 69 handle, with a lot of that loss coming in the past 10 days.  Two weeks ago, there was talk that Europe was ready to drop their sanctions against Russia, (trust me when I tell you that these sanctions are hurting Europe more than they are hurting Russia),  and things were looking as though we could all take our guns and tanks and go home for the winter. And then things heated up again Well.. A longtime reader sent me a note yesterday of an article written by Gary North. You know, I’ve never met Gary North, but he’s been a respected analyst and writer for longer than I’ve been writing a letter. leading up to Y2K, Gary warned everyone to be self-sufficient for he feared the worst would happen with Y2K. of course none of that bad stuff happened, and a lot of critics talked bad about Gary, calling him “scary Gary”, and they said he was so wrong about Y2K. Well, that might be, but was he wrong to bring it to everyone’s attention? To get them to think about what might happen? To be prepared? No. he wasn’t. and for that he should be hailed for bringing this Corporations’ attention so they could make the programing changes they needed to make ahead of Y2K! Well, that wasn’t the article. What the longtime readers sent me was an article where Gary talks about the renminbi not having a chance to replace the dollar as the reserve currency. Uh-Oh. Now thems fightin words!  Well, not really, I’m not a fighter, any longer, although in my younger days, I was known to participate in fisticuffs from time to time. As I recall, they usually took place at a drinking establishment!  Ok, enough about my youth!  What I wanted to point out is that there was someone saying something opposite of what I’m saying. And to be fair and balanced, I talked about it right here!  How about that? I was going to talk about the Aussie dollar (A$) and the band, Midnight Oil came on the iPod, playing their song: Beds Are Burning. Talk about great timing!  Well, yesterday, I told you about the risks that the next Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) meeting would carry, and then I made a major faux pas by saying that “the RBA meets tonight, I think”.  Well, I didn’t think clearly! The RBA meets on Mondays and I know that! I guess I was all caught up in the “risks”  and knew the RBNZ was meeting last night, and well, the sun was in my eyes, I tripped on a rock, and my glove had a hole in it!  Excuses never won a ballgame for anybody, as the old football coach used to tell us. So no excuses, I was just ahead of myself. The RBA meets next Monday. So, keep those “risks” in mind The A$ can’t find any terra firma for more than 24 hours these days. And if my fears of what the RBA might say next week come to fruition, then the A$ might find that it’s in the middle of the sea, and finding terra firma is impossible!  And in India, things just keeping looking brighter with the help of cheaper Oil. I read a report yesterday that talked about India possibly booking a Current Account Surplus if the price of Oil remained low. WOW! I didn’t think that in my remaining lifetime I would see India with a Current Account Surplus! The rupee isn’t feeling too much like celebrating this morning, but I think that has more to do with the fact that the Chinese renminbi weakened overnight. I told you the other day how the cheaper Oil was allowing PM Modi the opportunity to finally implement some of his reforms that hopefully unlock the Indian economy. So, I would tell the rupee. the same thing Charlotte told Wilbur. Chin up! The U.S. Data Cupboard is basically empty today. We get the usual Weekly Initial Jobless Claims, and that’s about it. So, from here on out, we get to hear all the rate hike campers shouting from the rooftops that the Fed is going to hike rates in June. Chuck says no way! But we might as well get ready for this onslaught of rate hike talk I’m having connection problems again this morning. it comes and goes, very spotty. I have to look into a more reliable ISP/ wireless system. Unfortunately, the ISP comes with the building, so I doubt I can be a rogue tenant and opt for a different ISP. But maybe if I whine and complain enough, the current ISP will look into the problem. think that might happen?  Yeah, right, and I’ve got a bridge to sell For What It’s Worth. Well today, I have a special treat for you. I have a couple of snippets of an article that I found on zerohedge.com  that features Ron Paul talking about the Fed and Gold. You can, and probably should read the whole article here: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-01-28/ron-paul-gold-feds-failed-utopian-dream “Over the last 100 years the Fed has had many mandates and policy changes in its pursuit of becoming the chief central economic planner for the United States. Not only has it pursued this utopian dream of planning the US economy and financing every boondoggle conceivable in the welfare/warfare state, it has become the manipulator of the premier world reserve currency As Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke explained to me, the once profoundly successful world currency – gold – was no longer money. This meant that he believed, and the world has accepted, the fiat dollar as the most important currency of the world, and the US has the privilege and responsibility for managing it. He might even believe, along with his Fed colleagues, both past and present, that the fiat dollar will replace gold for millennia to come. I remain unconvinced At its inception the Fed got its marching orders: to become the ultimate lender of last resort to banks and business interests. And to do that it needed an “elastic” currency.  The supporters of the new central bank in 1913 were well aware that commodity money did not “stretch” enough to satisfy the politician’s appetite for welfare and war spending. A printing press and computer, along with the removal of the gold standard, would eventually provide the tools for a worldwide fiat currency. We’ve been there since 1971 and the results are not good Many modifications of policy mandates occurred between 1913 and 1971, and the Fed continues today in a desperate effort to prevent the total unwinding and collapse of a monetary system built on sand. A storm is brewing and when it hits, it will reveal the fragility of the entire world financial system.” – Ron Paul Chuck again. I always liked Ron Paul, as he was the ONLY Austrian economics trained politician in Washington D.C, but now he’s retired, UGH! Well, we all deserve to retire while we can still have fun, right? To recap. The FOMC left out the “considerable time” phrase but talked about being patient with regards to hiking rates. Chuck takes bets that the Fed won’t raise rates in June. So, have all the negative economic prints been hidden under a pile of paper at the Fed?  Gold is getting whacked this morning, but why? And Silver follows right behind. the currencies are mixed again today, the euro has eked out a gain, while the A$ is down, along with the renminbi. And things keep getting brighter in India, with the help of cheap Oil Currencies today 1/29/15. American Style: A$ .7790, kiwi .7290, C$ .7975, euro 1.1310, sterling 1.5135, Swiss  $1.0870, . European Style: rand 11.6290, krone 7.7905, SEK 8.2455, forint 276.05, zloty 3.7450, koruna 24.59, RUB 69.27, yen 118.15, sing 1.3535, HKD 7.7525, INR 61.87, China 6.1335, pesos 14.83, BRL 2.5960, Dollar Index 94.63, Oil $44.51, 10-year 1.72%, Silver $17.53, Platinum $1,245.50, Palladium $788.80, and Gold. $1,270.54 That’s it for today. Well, the NHL finally gets back to work after 9 days off, our Blues will finally play again tonight. You know I missed a birthday earlier in the week. Colleague, and friend, Suzanne Lee, celebrated a birthday on Monday. She told me the other night that her birthday was the same as my sister’s. I was confused at first as to how she would know when my sister’s birthday was, but then I remembered, I talked about it in the Pfennig!  Well, while getting caught up in the hoopla of Chris Gaffney’s birthday, and the FOMC meeting yesterday, I forgot to send along my condolences on the loss of our colleague’s father in law. Aaron Stevenson’s Wife, Diana, lost her father suddenly this past weekend. It’s always sad when you lose someone, and so my thoughts and prayers go out to the Stevensons, as they deal with this loss. On a lighter note.. Grandson Everett, wanted to know why I didn’t come home with his Mimi (Kathy) the other day. that didn’t register with him that we weren’t together. And with that, I’ll get out of your hair for today. I hope you have a Tub Thumpin’ Thursday! Chuck Butler President EverBank World Marketslast_img read more

Are eggs good or bad for you

first_imgBy Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDMar 19 2019To have eggs or not is the question! There have been endless debates on whether having eggs regularly could raise the risk of heart disease. In a study in 2017, eggs were deemed safe for the heart. Now a new study shows that having at least three eggs per week can raise the risk of early deaths. The results of the study were published in the latest issue of the JAMA. Related StoriesHeart disease is still the number 1 killer in Australia, according to latest figuresIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockThe study comes from Northwestern University researchers from the department of Preventive Medicine and finds that consuming 300 milligrams or more of cholesterol a day or three eggs per week can raise the risk of deaths. Victor Zhong, the study’s lead author explains that a single large egg contains around 186 milligrams of cholesterol.The team of researchers looked at over 29000 participants and followed them up for an average of 17 years. Over the duration of the study there were 5,400 cardiovascular events which included 1,302 strokes, 1,897 cases of heart failure and 113 deaths due to heart disease. In addition 6132 participants also died of other causes.Statistical analysis revealed that taking in an extra 300 milligrams of dietary cholesterol per day could be associated with a 3.2 percent raised risk of getting heart disease and a 4.4 percent greater risk of dying early due to any cause. Dr. Norrina Allen, Associate Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine, one of the researchers on the team said in a statement, “…we want to remind people there is cholesterol in eggs, specifically yolks, and this has a harmful effect. As part of a healthy diet, people need to consume lower amounts of cholesterol. People who consume less cholesterol have a lower risk of heart disease.” Zhong said other food items rich in dietary cholesterol include high fat dairy products such as butter, whipped cream etc. and processed and red meats.Associate professor Norrina Allen explained that taking two eggs a day can raise the risk of heart disease by 27 percent. She added as a caveat that this was an observational study and there could be other factors responsible that may have led to the raised risk of deaths among the participants. All the factors, she explained, including age, sex, ethnicity, alcohol and tobacco use, levels of exercise and dietary patterns were self-reported by the participants. “The take-home message is really about cholesterol, which happens to be high in eggs and specifically yolks,” said Allen. Image Credit: Ildi Papp / Shutterstockcenter_img Source:https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2728465last_img read more

Lethal plans When seniors turn to suicide in longterm care

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 9 2019When Larry Anders moved into the Bay at Burlington nursing home in late 2017, he wasn’t supposed to be there long. At 77, the stoic Wisconsin machinist had just endured the death of his wife of 51 years and a grim new diagnosis: throat cancer, stage 4.His son and daughter expected him to stay two weeks, tops, before going home to begin chemotherapy. From the start, they were alarmed by the lack of care at the center, where, they said, staff seemed indifferent, if not incompetent — failing to check on him promptly, handing pills to a man who couldn’t swallow.Anders never mentioned suicide to his children, who camped out day and night by his bedside to monitor his care.But two days after Christmas, alone in his nursing home room, Anders killed himself. He didn’t leave a note.The act stunned his family. His daughter, Lorie Juno, 50, was so distressed that, a year later, she still refused to learn the details of her father’s death. The official cause was asphyxiation.”It’s sad he was feeling in such a desperate place in the end,” Juno said.In a nation where suicide continues to climb, claiming more than 47,000 lives in 2017, such deaths among older adults — including the 2.2 million who live in long-term care settings — are often overlooked. A six-month investigation by Kaiser Health News and PBS NewsHour finds that older Americans are quietly killing themselves in nursing homes, assisted living centers and adult care homes.If You Need HelpIf you or someone you know has talked about contemplating suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, or use the online Lifeline Crisis Chat, both available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.People 60 and older can call the Institute on Aging’s 24-hour, toll-free Friendship Line at 800-971-0016. IOA also makes ongoing outreach calls to lonely older adults.Poor documentation makes it difficult to tell exactly how often such deaths occur. But a KHN analysis of new data from the University of Michigan suggests that hundreds of suicides by older adults each year — nearly one per day — are related to long-term care. Thousands more people may be at risk in those settings, where up to a third of residents report suicidal thoughts, research shows.Each suicide results from a unique blend of factors, of course. But the fact that frail older Americans are managing to kill themselves in what are supposed to be safe, supervised havens raises questions about whether these facilities pay enough attention to risk factors like mental health, physical decline and disconnectedness — and events such as losing a spouse or leaving one’s home. More controversial is whether older adults in those settings should be able to take their lives through what some fiercely defend as “rational suicide.”Tracking suicides in long-term care is difficult. No federal regulations require reporting of such deaths and most states either don’t count — or won’t divulge — how many people end their own lives in those settings.Briana Mezuk, an associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan, found in 2015 that the rate of suicide in older adults in nursing homes in Virginia was nearly the same as the rate in the general population, despite the greater supervision the facilities provide.In research they presented at the 2018 Gerontological Society of America annual meeting, Mezuk’s team looked at nearly 50,000 suicides among people 55 and older in the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) from 2003 to 2015 in 27 states. They found that 2.2% of those suicides were related to long-term care. The people who died were either people living in or transitioning to long-term care, or caregivers of people in those circumstances.KHN extrapolated the finding to the entire U.S., where 16,500 suicides were reported among people 55 and older in 2017, according to federal figures. That suggests that at least 364 suicides a year occur among people living in or moving to long-term care settings, or among their caregivers. The numbers are likely higher, Mezuk said, since the NVDRS data did not include such states as California and Florida, which have large populations of elders living in long-term care sites.But representatives of the long-term care industry point out that by any measure, such suicides are rare.The deaths are “horrifically tragic” when they occur, said Dr. David Gifford, of the American Health Care Association. But, he added, the facilities offer “a very supervised environment,” and settings that receive Medicare or Medicaid funding are required to assess and monitor patients for suicidal behavior.”I think the industry is pretty attuned to it and paying attention to it,” Gifford said, noting that mental health issues among older adults in general must be addressed. “I don’t see this data as pointing to a problem in the facilities.”KHN examined over 500 attempted and completed suicides in long-term care settings from 2012 to 2017 by analyzing thousands of death records, medical examiner reports, state inspections, court cases and incident reports.Even in supervised settings, records show, older people find ways to end their own lives. Many used guns, sometimes in places where firearms weren’t allowed or should have been securely stored. Others hanged themselves, jumped from windows, overdosed on pills or suffocated themselves with plastic bags. (The analysis did not examine medical aid-in-dying, a rare and restricted method by which people who are terminally ill and mentally competent can get a doctor’s prescription for lethal drugs. That is legal only in seven states and the District of Columbia.)Descriptions KHN unearthed in public records shed light on residents’ despair: Some told nursing home staff they were depressed or lonely; some felt that their families had abandoned them or that they had nothing to live for. Others said they had just lived long enough: “I am too old to still be living,” one patient told staff. In some cases, state inspectors found nursing homes to blame for failing to heed suicidal warning signs or evicting patients who tried to kill themselves.A better understanding is crucial: Experts agree that late-life suicide is an under-recognized problem that is poised to grow.By 2030, all baby boomers will be older than 65 and 1 in 5 U.S. residents will be of retirement age, according to census data. Of those who reach 65, two-thirds can expect to need some type of long-term care. And, for poorly understood reasons, that generation has had higher rates of suicide at every stage, said Dr. Yeates Conwell, director of the Office for Aging Research and Health Services at the University of Rochester.”The rise in rates in people in middle age is going to be carried with them into older adulthood,” he said.Long-term care settings could be a critical place to intervene to avert suicide — and to help people find meaning, purpose and quality of life, Mezuk argued: “There’s so much more that can be done. It would be hard for us to be doing less.”‘In A Desperate Place’In Wisconsin, Larry Anders’ children chose to speak publicly because they felt the nursing home failed their father.Anders, a taciturn Army veteran, lived a low-key retirement in Waukesha, outside of Milwaukee. He grew asparagus, watched “Wheel of Fortune” with his wife, Lorna, in matching blue recliners and played the slot machines at a Chinese restaurant.Following the November 2017 death of his wife, and his throat cancer diagnosis, he initially refused treatment, but then agreed to give it a try.Anders landed at the Bay at Burlington, 40 minutes from his home, the closest facility his Medicare Advantage plan would cover. The first day, Lorie Juno grew worried when no one came to greet her father after the ambulance crew wheeled him to his room. The room had no hand sanitizer and the sink had no hot water.In his week in the Burlington, Wis., center, Anders wrestled with anxiety and insomnia. Anders, who rarely complained, called his daughter in a panic around 2 a.m. one day, saying that he couldn’t sleep and that “they don’t know what the hell they’re doing here,” according to Juno. When she called, staff assured her that Anders had just had a “snack,” which she knew wasn’t true because he ate only through a feeding tube.His children scrambled to transfer him elsewhere, but they ran out of time. On Dec. 27, Mike Anders, 48, woke up in an armchair next to his father’s bed after spending the night. He left for his job as a machinist between 5 and 6 a.m. At 6:40 a.m., Larry Anders was found dead in his room.”I firmly believe that had he had better care, it would’ve been a different ending,” Mike Anders said.Research shows events like losing a spouse and a new cancer diagnosis put people at higher risk of suicide, but close monitoring requires resources that many facilities don’t have.Nursing homes already struggle to provide enough staffing for basic care. Assisted living centers that promote independence and autonomy can miss warning signs of suicide risk, experts warn.In the weeks before and after Anders’ death, state inspectors found a litany of problems at the facility, including staffing shortages. When inspectors found a patient lying on the floor, they couldn’t locate any staff in the unit to help.Champion Care, the New York firm that runs the Bay at Burlington and other Wisconsin nursing homes, noted that neither police nor state health officials found staff at fault in Anders’ death.Merely having a suicide on-site does not mean a nursing home broke federal rules. But in some suicides KHN reviewed, nursing homes were penalized for failing to meet requirements for federally funded facilities, such as maintaining residents’ well-being, preventing avoidable accidents and telling a patient’s doctor and family if they are at risk of harm.For example: This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Most suicide prevention funding targets young or middle-aged people, in part because those groups have so many years ahead of them. But it’s also because of ageist attitudes that suggest such investments and interventions are not as necessary for older adults, said Jerry Reed, a nationally recognized suicide expert with the nonprofit Education Development Center.”Life at 80 is just as possible as life at 18,” Reed said. “Our suicide prevention strategies need to evolve. If they don’t, we’re going to be losing people we don’t need to lose.”Even when there are clear indications of risk, there’s no consensus on the most effective way to respond. The most common responses — checking patients every 15 minutes, close observation, referring patients to psychiatric hospitals — may not be effective and may even be harmful, research shows.But intervening can make a difference, said Eleanor Feldman Barbera, a New York psychologist who works in long-term care settings.She recalled a 98-year-old woman who entered a local nursing home last year after suffering several falls. The transition from the home she shared with her elderly brother was difficult. When the woman developed a urinary tract infection, her condition worsened. Anxious and depressed, she told an aide she wanted to hurt herself with a knife. She was referred for psychological services and improved. Weeks later, after a transfer to a new unit, she was found in her room with the cord of a call bell around her neck.After a brief hospitalization, she returned to the nursing home and was surrounded by increased care: a referral to a psychiatrist, extra oversight by aides and social workers, regular calls from her brother. During weekly counseling sessions, the woman now reports she feels better. Barbera considers it a victory.”She enjoys the music. She hangs out with peers. She watches what’s going on,” Barbera said. “She’s 99 now — and she’s looking toward 100.”If you or someone you know has talked about contemplating suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, or use the online Lifeline Crisis Chat, both available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. People 60 and older can call the Institute on Aging’s 24-hour, toll-free Friendship Line at 800-971-0016. IOA also makes ongoing outreach calls to lonely older adults. Know What To DoFamilies of people living in or transitioning to long-term care receive little advice about signs of suicide risk – or ways to prevent it. Here are steps to keep your loved one safe, based on interviews with suicide prevention researchers.Know what’s normal. Depression and thoughts of suicide are not an inevitable part of aging or of living in long-term care. Consider treatment for depression if the person experiences trouble sleeping, muscle aches, headache, changes in appetite or weight, restlessness or agitation.Don’t be afraid to ask about it. Asking someone about suicidal thoughts is unlikely to cause them to act on them. Start the conversation. Ask about the facilities, the activities, the food. Ask what would help them look forward to waking up or want to be alive.If you have concerns, speak up. Let staff members know if your loved one talks about wanting to die, or about actual plans to end their lives. Work with the team collaboratively to discuss solutions.Ask about suicide protocols. Facilities should have a plan for assessing, monitoring and preventing suicide risk. What’s the protocol if someone is actively or passively suicidal? Fifteen-minute checks? Close observation? Hospitalization? What’s the readmission policy?Plan for safety. If suicide is a concern, restrict access to lethal means, including weapons, medications, chemicals, cords and plastic bags. Ensure that windows, stairwells and exits are secure.center_img Prevention needs to start long before these deaths occur, with thorough screenings upon entry to the facilities and ongoing monitoring, Conwell said. The main risk factors for senior suicide are what he calls “the four D’s”: depression, debility, access to deadly means and disconnectedness.”Pretty much all of the factors that we associate with completed suicide risk are going to be concentrated in long-term care,” Conwell said.Most seniors who choose to end their lives don’t talk about it in advance, and they often die on the first attempt, he said.’I Choose This “Shortcut”‘That was the case for the Rev. Milton P. Andrews Jr., a former Seattle pastor, who “gave no hint” he wanted to end his life six years ago at a Wesley Homes retirement center in nearby Des Moines, Wash. Neither his son, Paul Andrews, nor the staff at the center had any suspicions, they said.”My father was an infinitely deliberate person,” said Paul Andrews, 69, a retired Seattle journalist. “There’s no way once he decided his own fate that he was going to give a clue about it, since that would have defeated the whole plan.”At 90, the Methodist minister and human rights activist had a long history of making what he saw as unpopular but morally necessary decisions. He drew controversy in the pulpit in the 1950s for inviting African Americans into his Seattle sanctuary. He opposed the Vietnam War and was arrested for protesting nuclear armament. His daughter was once called a “pinko” because Andrews demanded equal time on a local radio station to rebut a conservative broadcaster.In 2013, facing a possible second bout of congestive heart failure and the decline of his beloved wife, Ruth, who had dementia, Andrews made his final decision. On Valentine’s Day, he took a handful of sleeping pills, pulled a plastic bag over his head and died.Milton Andrews wrote a goodbye note on the cover of his laptop computer in bold, black marker.”Fare-well! I am ready to die! I choose this ‘shortcut,'” it read in part. “I love you all, and do not wish a long, protracted death — with my loved ones waiting for me to die.”Christine Tremain, a spokeswoman for Wesley Homes, said Andrews’ death has been the only suicide reported in her 18 years at the center.Related StoriesIn secret, seniors discuss ‘rational suicide’Five ways to help keep senior citizens safe during summerMachine learning can be a modern approach in cognitive brain health assessment”Elder suicide is an issue that we take seriously and work to prevent through the formal and informal support systems that we have in place,” she said.At first, Paul Andrews said he was shocked, devastated and even angry about his dad’s death. Now, he just misses him.”I always feel like he was gone too soon, even though I don’t think he felt like that at all,” he said.Andrews has come to believe that elderly people should be able to decide when they’re ready to die.”I think it’s a human right,” he said. “If you go out when you’re still functioning and still have the ability to choose, that may be the best way to do it and not leave it to other people to decide.”That’s a view shared by Dena Davis, 72, a bioethics professor at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania. Suicide “could be a rational choice for anyone of any age if they feel that the benefits of their continued life are no longer worth it,” she said.”The older you get, the more of your life you’ve already lived — hopefully, enjoyed — the less of it there is to look forward to,” said Davis, who has publicly discussed her desire to end her own life rather than die of dementia, as her mother did.But Conwell, a leading geriatric psychiatrist, finds the idea of rational suicide by older Americans “really troublesome.” “We have this ageist society, and it’s awfully easy to hand over the message that they’re all doing us a favor,” he said.’So Preventable’When older adults struggle with mental illness, families often turn to long-term care to keep them safe.A jovial social worker who loved to dance, Ellen Karpas fell into a catatonic depression after losing her job at age 74 and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Concerned that she was “dwindling away” at home, losing weight and skipping medications, her children persuaded her to move to an assisted living facility in Minneapolis in 2017.Karpas enjoyed watching the sunset from the large, fourth-story window of her room at Ebenezer Loren on Park. But she had trouble adjusting to the sterile environment, according to son Timothy Schultz, 52.“I do not want to live here for the rest of my life,” she told him.On Oct. 4, 2017, less than a month after she moved in, Karpas was unusually irritable during a visit, her daughter, Sandy Pahlen, 54, recalled. Pahlen and her husband left the room briefly. When they returned, Karpas was gone. Pahlen looked out an open window and saw her mother on the ground below.Karpas, 79, was declared dead at the scene.Schultz said he thinks the death was premeditated, because his mother took off her eyeglasses and pulled a stool next to the window. Escaping was easy: She just had to retract a screen that rolled up like a roller blind and open the window with a hand crank.Pahlen said she believes medication mismanagement — the staff’s failure to give Karpas her regular mood stabilizer pills — contributed to her suicide. But a state health department investigation found staffers were not at fault in the death. Eric Schubert, a spokesman for Fairview Health Services, which owns the facility, called Karpas’ death “very tragic” but said he could not comment further because the family has hired a lawyer. Their lawyer, Joel Smith, said the family plans to sue the facility and may pursue state legislation to make windows suicide-proof at similar places.“Where do I even begin to heal from something that is so painful, because it was so preventable?” said Raven Baker, Karpas’ 26-year-old granddaughter.Nationwide, about half of people who die by suicide had a known mental health condition, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mental health is a significant concern in U.S. nursing homes: Nearly half of residents are diagnosed with depression, according to a 2013 CDC report.That often leads caregivers, families and patients themselves to believe that depression is inevitable, so they dismiss or ignore signs of suicide risk, said Conwell.”Older adulthood is not a time when it’s normal to feel depressed. It’s not a time when it’s normal to feel as if your life has no meaning,” he said. “If those things are coming across, that should send up a red flag.”SolutionsStill, not everyone with depression is suicidal, and some who are suicidal don’t appear depressed, said Julie Rickard, a psychologist in Wenatchee, Wash., who founded a regional suicide prevention coalition in 2012. She’s launching one of the nation’s few pilot projects to train staff and engage fellow residents to address suicides in long-term care.In the past 18 months, three suicides occurred at assisted living centers in the rural central Washington community of 50,000 people. That included Roland K. Tiedemann, 89, who jumped from the fourth-story window of a local center on Jan. 22, 2018.”He was very methodical. He had it planned out,” Rickard said. “Had the staff been trained, they would have been able to prevent it. Because none of them had been trained, they missed all the signs.”Tiedemann, known as “Dutch,” lived there with his wife, Mary, who has dementia. The couple had nearly exhausted resources to pay for their care and faced moving to a new center, said their daughter, Jane Davis, 45, of Steamboat Springs, Colo. Transitions into or out of long-term care can be a key time for suicide risk, data shows.After Tiedemann’s death, Davis moved her mother to a different facility in a nearby city.  Mary Tiedemann, whose dementia is worse, doesn’t understand that her husband died, Davis said. “At first I would tell her.  And I was telling her over and over,” she said.  “Now I just tell her he’s hiking.”At the facility where Tiedemann died, Rickard met with the residents, including many who reported thoughts of suicide.”The room was filled with people who wanted to die,” she said. “These people came to me to say: ‘Tell me why I should still live.'” An 81-year-old architect fatally shot himself while his roommate was nearby in their shared room in a Massachusetts nursing home in 2016. The facility was fined $66,705. A 95-year-old World War II pilot hanged himself in an Ohio nursing home in 2016, six months after a previous attempt in the same location. The facility was fined $42,575. An 82-year-old former aircraft mechanic, who had a history of suicidal ideation, suffocated himself with a plastic bag in a Connecticut nursing home in 2015. The facility was fined $1,020.last_img read more

Opinion AI like HAL 9000 can never exist because real emotions arent

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. Going back to AI, as emotions cannot be truly implemented in a program – no matter how sophisticated it may be – the reasoning of the computer can never be changed by its feelings. One possible interpretation of HAL’s strange “emotional” behaviour is that it was programmed to simulate emotions in extreme situations, where it would need to manipulate humans not on the basis of reasoning but by calling upon their emotional self, when human reason fails. This is the only way I can see that real world AI could convincingly simulate emotions in such circumstances. In my opinion, we will not, ever, build a machine that feels, hopes, is scared, or happy. And because that is an absolute prerequisite to any claim that we have engendered artificial general intelligence, we will never create an artificial mind outside life.This is precisely where the magic of 2001: A Space Odyssey lies. For a moment, we are led to believe the impossible, that pure science fiction can override the facts of the world we live in. In fact, viewers begin to feel that Bowman is killing HAL. The disconnection feels like a vengeful termination, after witnessing the film’s earlier events. But though HAL makes emotional statements, a real world AI would certainly be limited to having only the ability to reason, and make decisions. The cold, hard truth is that – despite what computer scientists say – we will never be able to program emotions in the way HAL’s fictional creators did because we do not understand them. Psychologists and neuroscientists are certainly trying to learn how emotions interact with cognition, but still they remain a mystery. Emotional suppression reduces memory of negative events HAL is capable of speech production and comprehension, facial recognition, lip reading – and playing chess. Its superior computational ability is boosted by uniquely human traits, too. It can interpret emotional behaviour, reason and appreciate art.By giving HAL emotions, writer Arthur C. Clarke and filmmaker Stanley Kubrick made it one of the most human-like fictional technologies ever created. In one of the most beautiful scenes in sci-fi history, it says it is “afraid” when mission commander Dr. David Bowman starts disconnecting its memory modules following a series of murderous events.HAL is programmed to deliver optimal assistance to the crew of the spaceship Discovery. It has control over the entire vessel, and staggering intelligence to aid it in its task. Yet soon after we become acquainted with HAL, we cannot help feeling that it is worried – it even claims it is experiencing fear – and that it has an ability to empathise, however small. But while there is nothing to preclude the idea that such an emotional AI could see the light of day, if such depth of feelings were to be included in real world technology, they would have to be entirely fake.A ‘perfect’ AIWhen, during the film, Bowman starts to manually override HAL’s functions, it asks him to stop, and after we witness a fascinating obliteration of HAL’s “mental” faculties, the AI seemingly tries to comfort itself by singing Daisy Bell – reportedly the first ever song produced by a computer. Citation: Opinion: AI like HAL 9000 can never exist because real emotions aren’t programmable (2018, April 9) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-opinion-ai-hal-real-emotions.html Explore further HAL 9000 is one of the best-known artificial intelligence characters of modern film. This superior form of sentient computer embarks on a mission to Jupiter, along with a human crew, in Stanley Kubrick’s iconic film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which is currently celebrating its 50th year since release. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Take our own research, for example. In a study conducted with Chinese-English bilinguals, we explored how the emotional value of words can change unconscious mental operation. When we presented our participants with positive and neutral words, such as “holiday” or “tree”, they unconsciously retrieved these word forms in Chinese. But when the words had a negative meaning, such as “murder” or “rape”, their brain blocked access to their mother tongue – without their knowledge.Reason and emotionOn the other hand, we know a lot about reasoning. We can describe how we come to rational decisions, write rules and turn these rules into process and code. Yet emotions are a mysterious evolutionary legacy. Their source is the source of everything, and not simply an attribute of the mind that can be implemented by design. To program something, you not only need to know how it works, you need to know what the objective is. Reason has objectives, emotions don’t.In an experiment conducted in 2015, we were able to put this to the test. We asked native speakers of Mandarin Chinese studying at Bangor University to play a game of chance for money. In each round, they had to take or leave a proposed bet shown on the screen – for example, a 50% chance of winning 20 points, and a 50% chance of losing 100 points. We hypothesised that giving them feedback in their mother tongue would be more emotional to them and so lead them to behave differently, compared to when they received feedback in their second language, English. Indeed, when they received positive feedback in native Chinese, they were 10% more likely to take a bet in the next round, irrespective of risk. This shows that emotions influence reasoning. Provided by The Conversation read more

Researcher using computer vision machine learning to ensure the integrity of integrated

first_img Explore further Provided by Indiana University David Crandall is an associate professor in the School of Informatics, Computing and Engineering at Indiana University Bloomington. He, Sara Skrabalak and Martin Swany are the first IU researchers whose work is being advanced through the Indiana Innovation Institute, or IN3. Citation: Researcher using computer vision, machine learning to ensure the integrity of integrated circuits (2019, January 21) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-01-vision-machine-circuits.html Fail-safe, reconfigurable chips Credit: CC0 Public Domain IN3, a statewide applied research institute, is composed of top leaders from academia, government and industry. It seeks to solve real-world problems that impact industry and the U.S. Department of Defense in a faster, more efficient and cost-effective way. Currently, it is engaged in projects focused on trusted microelectronics, hypersonics, electro-optics and target machine learning.Crandall was kind enough to answer questions about his work with computer vision and machine learning and about the benefits of connecting with IN3.Q: Tell us about your work on trusted microelectronics.David Crandall: Our role in this project is to use computer vision and machine learning techniques to help ensure the integrity of the supply chain around microelectronics. One way is to use computer vision to inspect integrated circuits to see whether there is something suspicious that might suggest they are damaged or counterfeit.The goal of computer vision is for computers to be able to understand the visual world the way people do. Computers have been able to take and store pictures for decades, but they haven’t been able to know what is in a photo—what objects and people are in it, what is going on, and what is about to happen. People do this automatically, almost instantly, and we think nothing of it. It’s really hard for a computer. But computer vision is changing that, and the field has made huge progress in the last few years.The challenge of the computer vision work we’re doing with IN3—and with a lot of real-world problems—is that it requires very fine-grain analysis. We’re not trying to distinguish cats from dogs or cars from pedestrians; we’re trying to find very subtle differences in integrated circuits that might signal a problem. That’s really the challenge: to bring techniques that have been successful in the last few years in consumer photography to this new field that has unique challenges. Q: Why is it important to monitor integrated circuits?DC: Integrated circuits form the foundation of all devices we use on a daily basis, from cellphones to critical national infrastructure. It’s really important that the circuits in these devices are reliable, that they do what they say and that they’re built to the specifications that we need them to be built to.Electronic devices and integrated circuits are manufactured in plants throughout the world. They traverse a complicated supply chain to get between where they’re manufactured and where they’re placed into devices. A lot can go wrong in that process. Integrated circuits can be swapped or replaced for various reasons—people wanting to make a bit of a profit by substituting a cheaper device for one that’s more expensive, or for more nefarious reasons like hacking. We want to ensure the integrity of the integrated circuits so that the devices built out of them do what they are supposed to do.The problem is really important. Modern society depends on the safe, secure, reliable operation of digital devices. If they can’t be trusted, that rips apart a lot of what our society is based on. We—researchers in the state of Indiana—are in a unique position to attack this problem because of Purdue’s expertise in microelectronics; Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane’s capabilities; and IU’s expertise with chemistry, machine learning and engineering. We’re in the right place at the right time to have a real impact on this problem.Q: How do you monitor integrated circuits? What challenges are there?DC: My understanding is that current approaches to detecting counterfeit devices are either limited in their accuracy or must be done by hand, which is expensive and time-consuming. If we can create new automated techniques that could complement or improve these approaches, we can potentially ensure that more devices are inspected.There are many possible approaches. One is to use computer vision to inspect the surface of a package of an integrated circuit, checking the part number and looking for suspicious visual features that might indicate it has been modified. Another approach uses Sara Skrabalak’s work in adding uncloneable fingerprints to integrated circuit packages and using computer vision techniques to verify that they are authentic. We can also inspect the internal circuitry of the integrated circuit using various imaging techniques.Q: How have your connections with IN3 benefited your work?DC: An exciting vision of IN3 is to bring together groups of people working in different areas, who might not otherwise have thought to collaborate with one another, in order to jointly solve big problems that none of us could address individually. It’s not only bringing together groups at IU, but also creating stronger connections between IU and Purdue, Notre Dame and NSWC Crane.I work in computer vision and artificial intelligence. We’re looking for ways to apply these techniques to new, important, exciting problems. As we apply them, we discover new technical challenges, which leads us to go back to the drawing board to create new, better algorithms. I don’t have deep expertise in microelectronics, so I wouldn’t be able to impact this field alone. Collaborating with experts via IN3 will be the way we impact their field and bring back important, interesting problems for us to work on as well.Q: What might some end results be when the tech is widely adopted?DC: The end goal is to help transform microelectronics security so we can have more faith in the devices that we depend on, from voting machines to cellphones to laptop computers to critical infrastructure across the country. There was a recent story in Bloomberg about critical hardware that perhaps had been hacked. Whether or not that story was true, the motivation behind our project is to make sure something like that doesn’t happen in the future. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Arun Jaitley hints at raising cash support to farmers in futureArun Jaitley

first_imgPublished on SHARE February 03, 2019 Slams Congress President for ridiculing the scheme Union Minister Arun Jaitley on Sunday hinted that the Rs 500 a month cash dole to small farmers may be increased in the future as the government’s resources grow and said states can top up this amount with their own income support schemes.He also slammed Congress President Rahul Gandhi for ridiculing the scheme announced in the Interim Budget for 2019-20 by equating it to Rs 17 a day dole, saying the opposition leader must “grow up” and realise that he is contesting a national election and not a college union poll.The plan to give Rs 6,000 cash to 12 crore small and marginal farmers every year together with government schemes for giving them a house, subsidised food, free healthcare and hospitalisation, free sanitation, electricity, roads, gas connections, twice the amount of credit at very cheap rate are all aimed at addressing farm distress, Jaitley told PTI in an interview here.“This is the first year where it (farmer income support scheme) has begun. I am sure as the government resources improve, this can be increased,” he said.On nearly 15 crore landless farmers being left out of the scheme, he said they have rural employment guarantee scheme MNREGA plus other benefits for the rural population.Takes a dig at Congress’ farm loan waiver“What is the biggest thing that the Congress claims that they ever did? (UPA regime Finance Minister) P Chidambaram announced a Rs 70,000 crore farm loan waiver… (but) actual distributed was only Rs 52,000 crore. (Also), CAG said a large part of that money went to traders and businessmen and converted itself into a fraud,” he said.The present government, he said, is “starting off over and above the lakhs of crores we are putting into rural areas.” “We are starting off with Rs 75,000 crore a year and I foresee this amount increasing in the years to come. And if the states top it up, some states have already started with the scheme, I think the others must emulate them, it will increase,” he added.State’s income support schemeJaitley, who is here for medical treatment, said the state governments too have a responsibility to address farm distress by bringing their own income support schemes.“Some state governments have started it,” he said. “So my advise to what I call the ‘Nawabs of Negativity’ is ask your own state governments to top it off with their own income support schemes. Ideally, like the GST, this is a case where all political parties must defy party lines and in the spirit of cooperative federalism, have a Centre plus state scheme.” He said most of the central schemes are divided into 60:40 ratio, so “let us enhance this to 60:40 in the spirit of cooperative federalism” and instead of “giving criticism, let the states give 40 (per cent).” “In addition to the fertiliser subsidy – another big amount, the healthcare, cheap ration, over a dozen other things you are spending on. This is just an add-on, this (income support) is not something being thrown in the air. The Congress doesn’t understand it because it did nothing,” he said.On Gandhi’s criticism of the Budget proposal, he said, “I think he needs to grow up. He must realise that he is contesting a national election not a college union one.” On opposition criticismOn his predecessor P Chidambaram’s criticism that the interim budget was an “account for vote” and not a ‘Vote on Account’, he said, “I have no problem with monies being spent on either of these two accounts. But I have a serious problem when monies go into personal accounts.” Taking on the Congress, he said the comments by the leaders of the principal opposition party and “some other compulsive contrarians” indicate that they have a complete lack of understanding of the subject.“Others have been in power much longer than we have been and did nothing. There is a real problem in India, both with regard to the urban-rural divide, which is reflective of the quality of life available in rural areas, and the state of agriculture. You have to look at both these issues compositely,” he said.Jaitley, who had to give up charge of the finance ministry to undergo medical treatment just weeks before the budget was presented, said the Congress gave just slogans like ‘Garibi Hatao’ (remove poverty) but delivered very little.Dwelling on the steps taken by the BJP-led NDA government since coming to power in 2014 to address farm sector distress, he said the Centre adopted a two-pronged approach of raising rural infrastructure spend and raising farm incomes. SHARE SHARE EMAIL Union Budget COMMENT agriculture COMMENTSlast_img read more