Cornerback Patrick Peterson has become a household

Cornerback Patrick Peterson has become a household

first_imgCornerback Patrick Peterson has become a household name in just two seasons in the NFL. In his rookie year, he turned heads with his return game, taking four punts to the house. Last season, his seven interceptions brought more attention to his defensive skills. He made the Pro Bowl both seasons. This summer, ESPN’s Herm Edwards, in an Insider piece, ranked Peterson as the top young cornerback in the league.It would seem as if the former Louisiana State standout has it all figured out in the pros. But, with the Arizona Cardinals in the midst of training camp, Peterson said he still has skills yet to be sharpened. Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Comments   Share   Top Stories “I want to kind of mix up my game a little bit and show the receivers and quarterbacks different looks,” Peterson said. “I want to be able to see the whole field now, and read the quarterback a little bit. I want to stop playing with my back to the quarterback.”Peterson said he’s also eager to return to the winning ways he had in college. Individual accomplishments aside, the Cardinals’ struggles the past two seasons made for a difficult ride, he said. He sounds more optimistic about the team based on what he’s seen in practice and training camp thus far.“I believe we’re a much better ball club, on both sides of the field,” Peterson said of this year’s squad. “If we can continue playing with relentless effort, full speed, I believe we’ll be a pretty good ball club and defense as well.” – / 25center_img Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelolast_img read more

Despite Mounting Health Concerns Over Pesticide EPA Chief Rejects Ban On Chemical

first_img The New York Times: E.P.A. Chief, Rejecting Agency’s Science, Chooses Not To Ban Insecticide The Washington Post: EPA Chief, Rejecting Agency’s Own Analysis, Declines To Ban Pesticide Despite Health Concerns Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, moved late on Wednesday to reject the scientific conclusion of the agency’s own chemical safety experts who under the Obama administration recommended that one of the nation’s most widely used insecticides be permanently banned at farms nationwide because of the harm it potentially causes children and farm workers. (Lipton, 3/29) Despite Mounting Health Concerns Over Pesticide, EPA Chief Rejects Ban On Chemical Advocates say exposure to the chemical compound puts children at an elevated risk for problems in learning, social skills, motor function, and other developmental domains. Medical research can’t be done in the dark. But should taxpayers be covering the light bills at university labs across the country? The Trump administration’s answer is no. The president has proposed a massive $7 billion budget cut for the National Institutes of Health over the next 18 months. And Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price said this week that he may find those savings in the “indirect expenses” that NIH funds, which includes everything from buying lab equipment to paying the electric bills for thousands of academic research labs from Harvard to Ohio State to Stanford. (Keshavan, 3/31) From research on stem cells and DNA sequencing to experiments with fruit flies and surveys of human behavior, projects funded by the National Institutes of Health aim to make Americans healthier. A new analysis finds that NIH-funded research also fuels the kinds of innovations that drive the U.S. economy. Between 1990 and 2012, close to 1 in 10 projects made possible by an NIH grant resulted in a patent, usually for a university or a hospital. (Healy, 3/30) The chemical compound chlorpyrifos, also known as Lorsban, has been used by farmers for more than a half-century to kill pests on crops including broccoli, strawberries and citrus. The EPA banned its spraying indoors to combat household bugs more than a decade ago. But only in recent years did the agency seek to ban its use in agriculture, after mounting scientific evidence that prenatal exposure can pose risks to fetal brain and nervous system development. (Dennis, 3/29) Stat: Should Taxpayers Cover The Light Bills At University Labs? Trump Kicks Off A Tense Debate Los Angeles Times: Drastic Cuts To NIH Budget Could Translate To Less Innovation And Fewer Patents, Study Argue In other administration news — This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more