Nadal: “My priority is not to recover number one”

first_imgReferring to the debut duel in Acapulco, the place he received in 2005 and 2013, Rafa accepted that after just a few weeks with out competing, the primary spherical is uncomfortable, however he is glad with the victory as a result of now he may have the chance to transfer on.“I strive to enhance every single day, each time I’m going out on the observe I strive to be the perfect, not significantly on this event, however the place I compete; generally I get higher, generally worse. I’ll strive to do my greatest tomorrow. “This Wednesday Rafa Nadal will face the 20-year-old Serbian Miomir Kecmanovic within the closing match of the central court docket, whom the Spanish described as a sophisticated rival.“He is a robust participant of nice proper and with numerous power; will probably be a tough recreation. The video games towards younger persons are difficult as a result of they’ve a particular power and he has it; I hope to play at a superb degree, “he concluded.To beat Kecmanovic within the spherical of 16, the Spaniard will play within the quarterfinals towards the perfect amongst Serbian Dusan Lajovic, eighth preclassified, and the Korean Soonwo Kwon. The Spanish Rafael Nadal, winner of 19 ‘Grand Slams’ tournaments, mentioned Tuesday that at this level in his profession Ranquin’s number one is not a priority, though if it reaches it it enjoys it.“My aim can’t be number one, if the chance presents itself to me as final 12 months, incredible, however I’m a time when my priority is to be aggressive so long as attainable and prolong my profession as a lot as attainable, “mentioned Manacor.Nadal beat his compatriot Pablo Andújar on Tuesday 6-Three and 6-2 of their debut on the Mexican Tennis Open, event 500 of the ATP, that of profitable the Spanish will return the number one of many world checklist.The primary favourite of the Mexican event acknowledged that at 33 he has a conservative calendar in accordance to the wants of your physique and your private life and your happiness.“I strive to play the place it makes me glad and I’ve higher choices to get pleasure from and play effectively,” I observe.last_img read more

Despite population growth and management challenges, hope for forests in Ethiopia

first_imgcharcoal, Deforestation, Forests, Monocultures, Montane Forests The country’s capital city of Addis Ababa, already home to about 3.4 million people, is expanding outward and impacting forestland in its periphery.A legacy of poor forest management has long plagued Ethiopia’s efforts to protect and manage indigenous tree species and the habitat in which they grow.Poverty is driving the exploitation of woodland resources such as eucalyptus, as the need for charcoal and firewood increases along with population growth. ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia – In Ethiopia’s ever-expanding capital of Addis Ababa, the massive afromontane forest coverage on the city’s outskirts could be under threat from the increasing urban population, which is more than 3.4 million and growing. At an elevation of 3,200 meters (10,500 feet), the Mount Entoto region at the northern limit of Addis Ababa has long been a haven for hikers, tourists, and forest researchers who flock to the area from around the world.At the turn of the 20th century, natural resources in the Entoto region were quickly used up, and the devastated natural forest was replanted with eucalyptus. Today, the Entoto region is a state-owned eucalyptus plantation and a popular place for locals to gather firewood for home use and sale.Things in the Entoto region and throughout Ethiopia are changing, though. According to the UN, Ethiopia is expected to become “significantly more urbanized” by 2050. That means more space and materials for homes, roads, and infrastructure. What used to be densely wooded forestland covered with eucalyptus and fig is now rapidly disappearing as the city continues to experience massive population growth – including new construction that relies heavily on wood products. The growth seems to be mushrooming in every corner of the city.That growth, much of which is organic or unsanctioned, presents additional challenges to effective forest management. The third most populous African nation, Ethiopia remains a difficult place to get reliable data on the condition of forests. Indeed, estimates of how much of Ethiopia’s vegetation cover is natural forest varies significantly.REDDdesk.org, an online resource project by the UK-based tropical forest think tank Global Canopy Programme, also notes the difficulty of obtaining sound estimates on forest cover and forest cover change in Ethiopia. The website states that conflicting data sources are partially attributable to varied definitions of forests in the country. Through a combination of a number of studies, the site says the average deforestation rate can be estimated at somewhere between 1.0-1.5 percent annually.For example, the Woody Biomass Inventory and Strategic Planning Project estimates that around 3.3 million hectares (8.1 million acres) of Ethiopia is covered by “high forest”, which amounts to about 3 percent of the of the total land area. The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that total forest cover is about 12.29 million hectares (30.37 million acres), which amounts to 11 percent of the total land area.Addis Ababa’s expansion is only part of the challenge. Ethiopia’s population is fast approaching 100 million, according to World Bank figures. The population increase is only the start of the challenges, though.“The main drivers of deforestation in Ethiopia are basically two,” said Mulugeta Limenih, regional head of natural resources management and forestry with Farm Africa. “The main cause is the expansion of Ethiopia’s small-scale agriculture that necessitated the clearing of forests to make way for agricultural lands. Biomass fuel is the other factor, as the dominant energy source for rural households in the country is firewood and charcoal. This subsequently has led to the unsustainable harvesting of forests for the production of this biomass fuel.” Biomass is loosely defined as renewable organic materials, such as wood, that can be burned as fuel.Ethiopia has had major ups and downs in the past two centuries regarding its forests. In the mid-19th century the Entoto region was home to a wide variety of rare and precious tree species, which were nearly decimated by the early 20th century. The first modern-day afforestation and re-afforestation programs began during the military Derge regime that ruled from 1974 and fell in 1991. The work done in that period is often credited for the presence of most of today’s forests in and around the capital.A map detail of Africa, with Ethiopia in red. Map by TUBS via Wikimedia CommonsAccording to FAO, for two decades preceding the Derge regime between 1955 and 1979, Ethiopia lost a devastating 77 percent of its forested area.In an Ababa University study published in 2013, Amogne Asfaw Eshetu notes that during the Derge period there was a drive to promote community-based forestry through plantations.“The plantation scheme was undertaken in response to critical shortage of fuel wood,” wrote Eshetu. “Rather than showing the ecological impact of forest destruction, more emphasis was given to its economic benefit [as fuel].” He also noted that murky tenure and ownership rights led to a significant lack of community participation. Most of the plantations were removed during the fall of Derge’s regime. Some national parks and big game reserves in the south were also damaged through arson.“Peasants and others demolished bunds (embankments) and terraces, set fire on forests and national parks,” he states in the report. They also ripped out young, recently planted saplings and stole trees from government plantations. Eshetu describes the damage at that time as widespread: About 60 percent of Ethiopia’s conservation assets created under Derge were destroyed in just two years.Hopeful progressNot all is lost, though. Recent successful forest preservation projects in Ethiopia notably includes a Participatory Forest Management (PFM) scheme pioneered by Farm Africa close to 20 years ago.PFM projects involve processes and mechanisms that enable people who have a direct stake in forest resources to be part of decision making in all aspects of forest management, from resources to formulating and implementing institutional frameworks. More specifically, community forestry refers to a component of participatory forestry that focuses on local communities as key stakeholders for sustainability.Launched in collaboration with local and international partners, PFMs have led to the preservation of close to 1 million hectares of natural forest in Ethiopia. The scheme benefits the livelihoods of communities who rely on the forests and at the same time protects the forests. The approach has led to the reversal of deforestation in some areas.PFM projects, like Farm Africa’s in Benishangul Gumuz Regional State, include activities such as training. The Benishangul project teaches community members to produce frankincense from the forest – something that the government and private forest concessions used to do.There have also been more attempts to integrate PFM with REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation in developing countries), an international effort dedicated to slowing greenhouse gas emissions through financial rewards to developing countries for projects that protect and restore forests. In Ethiopia, REDD+ efforts have been woven into the country’s larger green economic growth strategy, including carbon trading.The first REDD+ initiative in Ethiopia was the Bale Mountains Eco-Region project in the Oromia regional state, a continuation of an earlier project in the area. Oromia is the largest regional state in Ethiopia. It encompasses Addis Ababa and much of the south, and is home to 70 percent of Ethiopia’s remaining high forest cover in the country. A major block of Oromia’s high forest is in the Bale Mountains eco-region.The 20-year Bale Mountains project started in 2012 under REDD+ project and it is projected to reduce deforestation by over 68 percent in the Bale eco-region. It has already managed to reduce emissions from the forest by 5.5 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, according to Farm Africa’s Limenih. It also aims to establish about 60 PFMs in Oromia.ExpansionToday, PFMs are formally recognized in forest proclamations of Ethiopia’s federal government and several regional states. Despite the program’s encouraging success in Oromia, many other locations in Ethiopia still continue to experience deforestation at an alarming rate, especially in the north, northeastern and northwestern parts of the country.Farm Africa’s Limenih says that overgrazing from free-roaming cattle is also becoming a big factor as Ethiopia has the largest cattle population in Africa.“This overgrazing problem has led to forest grazing,” Limenih said. He added it is also affecting the regeneration of trunk leaves and other issues are having an impact on the country’s forests. “Ethiopia has experienced a number of forest fires in the past though it has relatively been rare recently. Illegal timber harvesting was also an issue but it has significantly been limited in recent years.”Eucalyptus trees in Ethiopia. Photo by Junior Peres Junior via PixabayIn April 2015, Ethiopian officials announced to local media that the country’s forest coverage had increased 15 percent, with a 4 percent increase over just a decade. The Ministry of Environment and Forest stated at the time that the increased coverage was the result of the extensive natural resource conservation campaigns. Natural conservation activities were undertaken on more than 13 million hectares of land in the course of four years. “The national reforestation program and green economy strategy contributed for this success,” said Kebede Yimam Dawd, Ethiopia’s state minister for environment and forest, in a statement published by Fana Broadcasting Corporation.Some experts cast doubt on the 15 percent figure, though, stating that it is difficult to judge whether the forest coverage in Ethiopia is increasing or decreasing. Accurate forest data in Ethiopia has long been problematic, due in part to conflicting data sources and differing classifications between natural forests and plantations.According to Limenih, forest enclaves increase and decrease and some plantations in enclosures can be difficult to categorize as forests. There are also contradictory figures regarding natural forests.“There is a huge increase in eucalyptus planting by smallholders that is estimated to be 1 million hectares wide,” Limenih said. “However, in terms of a formal industrial plantation, there is a very small annual planting by regional institutions.”Green economyRegardless of the deforestation rate and data questions, Ethiopia remains a prime example of a burgeoning green economy. The Ethiopian government’s pursuit of that has included infrastructure projects that use electricity instead of oil, like the newly built nationwide railway system. In 2011, Ethiopia launched its Climate Resilient Green Economy economic strategy plan to achieve green economy growth in the next two decades. It is estimated it will cost $150 billion. The country as a whole also aims to be net carbon neutral by 2025 as part of its green economy strategy.Ethiopia’s current forest policy and strategy aim is to meet public demand in forest and forest products and to enhance the socio-economic and environmental contribution of forests.According to the latest available data from Global Forest Watch, the forestry sector in Ethiopia contributed over $893 million to the economy in 2011, which is approximately 3.2 percent of the GDP. The share of forests to the country’s rapidly growing economy is expected to rise as more forest products are needed in the years to come, if well managed.Banner image: A woman and donkey carry firewood and tree material from the Entoto forest. Photo by Ji-Elle via Wikimedia Commons.Elias Meseret is a freelance journalist based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. You can find him on Twitter at @EliasMesert.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.CITATIONS:Asefi-Najafabady, S., & Saatchi, S. (2013). Response of African humid tropical forests to recent rainfall anomalies. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 368(1625).Pennington, E. (2009). Balancing the Social and Ecological Concerns on the Outskirts of Ethiopia’s Capital.World Urbanization Prospects, UN Dept of Economic and Social Affairs.Participatory Forest Management in Ethiopia, Practices and Experiences – SFE Technical Paper for UN FAO.Bekele, M.; Tesfaye, Y.; Mohammed, Z.; Zewdie, S.; Tebikew, Y.; Brockhaus, M.; Kassa, H. (2015) The context of REDD+ in Ethiopia: Drivers, agents and institutions, Center for International Forestry Research.Eshetu, A. (November 2013).  Forest resource management systems in Ethiopia: Historical Perspective. College of Development Studies, Ababa University, Ethiopia.Making forest conservation benefit local communities: participatory forest management in Ethiopia. (July 2015). Farm Africa Report.Bale Mountains Eco-region Reduction of Emission from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) Project. Project summary by Oromia Forest and Wildlife Enterprise, Farm Africa, SOS Sahel EthiopiaForestry for a low-carbon future: Integrating forests and wood products in climate change strategies, UN FAO report. (2016).Ethiopia’s Climate-Resilient Green Economy, UN Development Program. (2011).Environment and Society in Ethiopia, Girma Kebbede. (2016).Routledge Studies in Political Ecology.World Bank, Ethiopia ProfileThe REDD Desk, Ethiopia Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Why the Suy’uk are fact-checking their Dayak origin myth

first_imgEnvironment, Forestry, Forests, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Mapping, Protected Areas, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Forests FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on May 31, 2016. The Suy’uk are one of Indonesia’s hundreds of indigenous groups. They live in western Borneo.Like many communities, the Suy’uk are mapping their lands in the wake of a landmark decision by Indonesia’s highest court that took indigenous peoples’ forests out of state control.The government has dragged its feet in implementing the ruling, but mapping is seen as a prerequisite before indigenous groups can claim their rights. KAPUAS HULU, Indonesia — Mateus Liung headed to the Tanjung village hall just as dusk started to gather. A walking stick in his right hand supported his now-fragile legs. A torch in his left lit the path.“I am old,” he said. “But tonight’s village discussion concerns history. I must attend and help.”Since an Indonesian Constitutional Court decision in 2013 stating that indigenous people have rights to their land, NGOs have encouraged adat groups, as they are known in this Southeast Asian country, to map their traditional territories. For decades, the state has failed to recognize their rights, instead allowing loggers, miners and plantation firms into their territory, with or without the local community’s consent.The hope now is that national and regional governments will incorporate the outlined area into official maps and consider the areas in planning and other governance decisions. Under the current administration of President Joko Widodo, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry even agreed to process 6.8 million hectares of indigenous maps so that they could be included in the country’s one map.The meeting Liung was headed to was among the first steps the Suy’uk community of Tanjung, West Kalimantan, took toward mapping its indigenous territories. Inside the Tanjung village hall this April evening, the sense of kinship was thick. Young joked with old. And representatives from the Indonesian branch of the World Wildlife Fund, an NGO, sat in to help facilitate Tanjung with its 20-year development plan. The first step toward this goal was to find traces of the Suy’uk people.As the 70-year-old Liung turned his thoughts to times past, the hall turned silent. It is as if everyone was hypnotized, spellbound with the anticipation. “Originally, we were members of the Suy’uk Busang tribe of Sungai Langau of East Kalimantan. Our ancestors travelled a long way to get to the Bawan River in Kapuas Hulu,” Liung said. And his oral history continued. The first Suy’uk tribal member to settle in Sungai Bawan was named Tongkah. He had seven wives and they were blessed with 30 kids. This led to five major lineages that fought between themselves before the tribesmen dispersed to the rivers Mentebah, Kalis, Embaloh, Mandai and Bunut. Tongkah’s descendants moved to 11 other places, eventually settling in Tanjung, Biang and Gurung Langkung. Traces of the Suy’uk migration exist today. There is the Teeh pillar. There is also the Mpatung Mensia wooden sculpture of a man and the Mpatung Mmaung figurine of a tiger.The Mpatung Mmaung is battered but still stands in the territory of the Suy’uk. Photo by Andi Fachrizal for Mongabay.Searching for the old sitesThe night after Mateus Liung’s stories, some worthies of Tanjung village prepared to explore the Suy’uk River. With the meeting’s oral history as their guide, they headed into the field to find indicators of their past.The head of village development, P Sabang, took the commanding shaft to lead the trip. He was joined by Dulah, Samad and Thomas, village heads of Gurung Langkung, Roban and Biang respectively. “Is everyone ready,” he asked and after receiving nods, headed down the path to the Muller Mountains. Walking out of Roban hamlet, the eight-man exploration team passed through thick, multispecie tree groves. The Suy’uk River ran clear alongside, adding to the beauty of the panorama.After two hours of climbing hills, fording the river and honest trudging, the team reached Nanga Baeng, a site hailed as a onetime residence of the Suy’uk people. “Let us rest, take a look up here,” Thomas said pointing at an old but sturdy-looking pillar.The pillar was made from ulin wood. At the top of the pillar was a replica of a hornbill bird, a symbol of strength among the Suy’uk. The team defied the thick weeds surrounding the pillar to get a closer look. After hacking a new path in, Thomas lay down his machete and smiled. “ This is Teeh,” he said. According to the village elders, there is no site that stands alone. Look around and you will find traces of heritage. And sure enough, not far from the first finding, the team came upon Ngkaran.Its shape was like the Teeh pillar. Dug into the earth, the Ngkaran stood 5 meters tall, but midway up the stump was an earthern jar adorned with birds and snakeheads. This was a Dayak motif. The Ngkaran is considered a symbol of authority among the Suy’uk.Not far from the Ngkaran, the team found a few other spots: a pillar from the ruins of a longhouse. Near the river, they sighted the Nanga Biang. At another spot, they came across wooden statues of men; symbols of the bravery and military prowess of the Suy’uk.“These are signs that our ancestors have used this land,” Thomas declared. “They created a community in this spot not far from a water source. They farmed and hunted here for subsistence.” For the Suy’uk, these sites are evidence that they have managed the forests surrounding the Muller Mountains for centuries, preserving and protecting the area and developing a sustainable society. This is a revelation that may come in handy if the Suy’uk, like countless other indigenous groups, find themselves facing down a well-connected company that wants to develop their land, with or without their consent.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by mongabayauthorlast_img read more

Ever wondered how much your pet’s diet impacts the environment?

first_imgAnimals, Climate Change, Climate Change And Food, Environment, Erosion, Food, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Meat, Pesticides, Pets, Waste Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored There are approximately 163 million dogs and cats kept as pets in the US, and it’s safe to assume even most vegetarians feed their pets some kind of non-vegetarian food product, given that dogs and cats are both carnivorous species.That got University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) geography professor Gregory Okin wondering: Just how bad is the production of pet food for the environment?Meat production has well-documented impacts on the environment, as Okin notes in a study he published this month in the journal PloS ONE: “Compared to a plant-based diet, a meat-based diet requires more energy, land, and water and has greater environmental consequences in terms of erosion, pesticides, and waste.” Based on a poll conducted last year by the Baltimore, Maryland-based Vegetarian Resource Group, an estimated eight million adults in the United States identify as vegetarian. That’s 3.3 percent of the adult population in the US who abstain from eating any meat, seafood, or poultry (that number includes adults who identify as vegan, meaning they do not eat eggs or dairy, either).Many people who have chosen to become vegetarian cite the harmful impacts of meat production on the environment as one of their reasons for doing so. Meanwhile, there are approximately 163 million dogs and cats kept as pets in the US, and it’s safe to assume even most vegetarians feed their pets some kind of non-vegetarian food product, given that dogs and cats are both carnivorous species. That got University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) geography professor Gregory Okin wondering: Just how bad is the production of pet food for the environment?As a professor of geography and member of the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability at UCLA, Okin’s research is usually focused on things like desert landscape dynamics and how they impact local ecosystems and the global climate. He first became interested in looking at the environmental impacts of pet food while considering the growing number of Americans raising chickens in their backyards.“I was thinking about how cool it is that chickens are vegetarian and make protein for us to eat, whereas many other pets eat a lot of protein from meat,” he said in a statement. “And that got me thinking — how much meat do our pets eat?”Meat production has well-documented impacts on the environment, as Okin notes in a study he published this month in the journal PloS ONE: “Compared to a plant-based diet, a meat-based diet requires more energy, land, and water and has greater environmental consequences in terms of erosion, pesticides, and waste.”He adds that, with an estimated 77.8 million dogs and 85.6 million cats as of 2015, the US has the most pet cats and dogs of any country on Earth — and the meat-based diets of those pets have considerable consequences. “In addition to requiring greater land compared to plant crops to produce equivalent protein energy, and contributing to soil erosion, animal production has considerably greater impacts on water use, fossil fuel use, greenhouse gas emission, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Despite the fact that more than 60% of US households have pets, these consumers of agricultural products are rarely included in calculations of the environmental impact of dietary choices.”Using publicly available information from sources like the American Pet Products Association, the American Kennel Club, and the US Department of Agriculture, Okin was able to calculate that Americans’ dogs and cats consume about as many calories as the entire population of France every year, or about 19 percent as many calories as Americans themselves. But because dog and cat food typically contains more meat than the average human diet, our canine and feline companions actually consume about 25 percent of the total calories derived from animals in the US.In fact, according to Okin, if the 163 million cats and dogs in the US were to somehow found their own country, that country would rank fifth in global meat consumption, behind only Brazil, China, Russia, and the US.As a result, Americans’ pet cats and dogs produce about 30 percent as much feces, by mass, as the humans in the US, and their diet is responsible for 25 to 30 percent of the environmental impacts of producing food derived from animals. Dog and cat food is also responsible for the release of so much methane and nitrous oxide, both potent greenhouse gases, that it’s equivalent to driving 13.6 million cars for a year or releasing 64 million tons of CO2 into the atmosphere.Okin writes in PloS ONE that the point of his study was not to argue for decreased pet ownership, as our furry friends “provide a host of real and perceived benefits to people including companionship, increased physical activity, improved mental health and social capital, benefits for child development, and social status.” Many dogs are also service animals, as well, while cats have long provided services such as pest control to humans, and Okin does not discount these positive impacts of pet ownership, either.Rather, he wants people to be aware of the fact that dog and cat ownership is not “an unalloyed good,” and suggests that vegetarian pets like hamsters and birds might confer some of the same benefits as cats and dogs while having a much smaller impact on the environment.It’s not just what Americans feed their pets that needs to be addressed, however. How much American feed their pets is another issue, as it makes the animals overweight and unhealthy while also making a major contribution to the unsustainability of pet food production. The pet food industry is already aware of these issues, he notes, and is working to reduce overfeeding and waste while looking for alternative sources of protein.“I like dogs and cats, and I’m definitely not recommending that people get rid of their pets or put them on a vegetarian diet, which would be unhealthy,” Okin said. “But I do think we should consider all the impacts that pets have so we can have an honest conversation about them. Pets have many benefits, but also a huge environmental impact.”Photo by Georgie Pauwels, licensed under CC BY 2.0.CITATIONOkin, G. S. (2017). Environmental impacts of food consumption by dogs and cats. PloS one, 12(8), e0181301. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0181301center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Javan rhinos face human incursions into their last remaining habitat

first_imgThis story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published on our Indonesian site on Sept. 3, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Only around 60 Javan rhinoceroses are believed to remain, all of them in Indonesia’s Ujung Kulon National Park.Authorities have caught dozens of people hunting, gathering forest products and planting crops in the park, including the recent arrest of 13 people in core rhino habitat.Despite the challenges, the population is believed to be stable and calves continue to be born. With an estimated population of around 60 individuals, the Javan rhino (Rhinoceros sondaicus) is among the world’s most Critically Endangered species. Once spread across much of southern Asia — from northeastern India to Vietnam, and south to Sumatra and Java in Indonesia — the species is now known to survive in just one habitat: Ujung Kulon National Park at the westernmost tip of Java.Set aside as a protected area since the Dutch colonial era, Ujung Kulon has long been a safe haven and stronghold for Javan rhinos. But conservationists say this last habitat faces a number of threats, including incursions by humans.Dozens of people have been caught conducting illegal activities in the park’s core zone and jungles, Ujung Kulon National Park Head Mamat Rahmat told Mongabay’s Indonesian sister site.These activities include hunting birds and lesser mouse-deer (Tragulus kanchil); gathering honey, wood and jernang (a red palm resin used for making dye); and even planting rice and other crops.Two Javan rhinos deep in the forests of Ujung Kulon National Park, the species’ sole remaining habitat. Image courtesy of Sugeng Hendratno/WWF.Evidence seized by authorities demonstrates that 13 people were gathering jernang in known Javan rhino habitat earlier this year, Rahmat said. “This kind of activity is indeed prone to recurring. The park authorities took repressive measures to create a deterrent effect.”The case has been sent to the Pandeglang Regency Prosecutor’s office, based on an incident report written July 8, 2017. Authorities also allege there are indications that people have entered rhino habitat with the intention of hunting, including at least one person Rahmat said was suspected of being a “financier.”Muhammad Waladi Isnan, Java area protection manager for the Indonesian Rhino Foundation (YABI) said human incursions into wildlife areas disturb animals living there and can be detrimental to conservation efforts, regardless of whether hunting occurs. Experts fear such illegal activities could hamper activities aimed at increasing the number of Javan rhinos.The park’s research station has been working on surveying the population by camera trap since 2011. During nine months of monitoring in 2011, the project obtained 427 video clips of Javan rhinos in their natural habitat. Based on their specific physical features, researchers identified 35 individuals in these clips – 22 males and 13 females. A more expansive survey carried out in 2013, which obtained 1,660 video clips of rhinos, allowed researchers to establish a minimum population of 58 individuals — 35 males and 23 females.That population included at least eight calves, indicating that Ujung Kulon’s rhinos are breeding. However, the numbers fall short of a target, set in 2007, of raising the population to 70-80 individuals by 2015. Some conservationists believe the park may not be able to support a larger population.One of Ujung Kulon’s rhinos. The species enjoys spending time in wet, muddy areas. Image courtesy of Sugeng Hendratno/WWF.The long-term fortunes of the park’s rhinos — and by extension, the species as a whole — are also threatened by the prospect of disease or natural disaster. A study published in April 2017 found that a tsunami the size of the 2006 Java tsunami would put most, if not all, of the park’s rhinos in danger of drowning. Given Ujung Kulon’s position in the shadow of an active volcano, as well as the area’s history of seismic activity, such disasters are an ever-present possibility.Plans to establish a second site for Javan rhinos have long been discussed, and efforts are also underway to expand suitable habitat within Ujung Kulon.In the meantime, park authorities are working to ensure the current rhino range remains as secure as possible. Four Rhino Protection Units, conducted by park authorities in cooperation with conservation NGOs, regularly patrol the area. In addition, community members participate in joint patrols four times a year.YABI’s Isnan also points to the importance of ensuring that people living near the park are living in sustainable social and economic conditions. “So, in the process of conservation, people can be involved and engaged,” he said. Article published by Isabel Esterman Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Javan Rhinos, Mammals, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforests, Rhinos, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

The lure of wild orchids persists in Colombia

first_imgAmazon Rainforest, Featured, Flowers, Forests, Orchids, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Colombia is the top location for orchids in the world, but about 50 percent of the country’s native orchids are threatened. Estimates put the total amount of annual wild orchid trafficking at about $6 billion minimum.The disappearance of the orchid threatens the stability of countless aspects of the forest, including the loss of specific types of wasps and bees attracted to a specific orchid.Colombia’s conservation efforts have been harshly criticized by one expert who points out that even Bogota’s botanical garden doesn’t have a permanent orchid exhibition. BOGOTA, Colombia – In March 2000, two Englishmen in their early twenties, Tom Hart Dyke and his friend Paul Winder, decided to trek through the Darién Gap in the war-torn jungles of Colombia’s northwestern frontier wilderness bordering Panama. This was at the zenith of Colombia’s bloody US-backed counter-insurgency campaign against Marxist FARC rebels, making the Darién one of the most dangerous places in the world at that time.Undeterred, or ignorant of the danger, the two hired a local guide to lead them on their mission: to find rare and undiscovered wild orchids. Within days, they were kidnapped by FARC rebels and accused of being spies or international drug runners.The rebels held the men for nine months until deciding one day that obtaining a ransom for them was futile, so they let them go. They were also sick of them, by Paul’s own account, after months of hearing him talk incessantly about orchids. They were freed, unscathed, with all of their original belongings. But without a guide the orchid hunters quickly got lost in the maze-like swamps of the Darién, and turned back to the rebel camp where they had been held captive. Incensed at seeing the hated Englishmen return, the rebels gave them a map and told them to leave and never come back or they would be killed: finally, the pair found their way back to safety.What motivated the young pair of Englishmen to venture off to dangerous foreign lands in search of flowers is perplexing to most people – but not to the orchid-obsessed.“The orchid is a seducer, like a mermaid,” explains Ildefonso Velasquez, an orchid expert and seller based in the Colombian capital of Bogota. “It’s mysterious and beckoning – it’s even seductive in its adaptation: it tricks other insects into pollinating it.”For true believers, a wild orchid is like a femme fatale: mysterious, beguiling, and utterly worth pursuing to the end.There is no denying the sexual element to orchids, not least because of their role in nature as “seducers.” The Cattleya labiata, also known as the Ruby-lipped Cattleya from northeastern Brazil is perhaps one the closest things in nature resembling human female genitalia, and does not leave much to the imagination: colored an electric pink, its long petals fold over a deep lilac capsule designed to attract the pollination of bees.Paphiopedilum villosum, a South Asian “slipper” orchid at the Paloquemao Market in Bogota. Photo by Maximo Anderson for Mongabay.Cattleyas have long been the most-sold variety of orchid on the market, prized for their perfume and thought of as the epitome of floral beauty.But sex aside, there is also lots of money in the game: gram for gram, rare orchids are worth more than gold worldwide. It is estimated that orchid trafficking globally is worth at least $6 billion. One widely circulated anecdote notes that a rare Kovachii picked from the Amazonian wilderness of Peru has fetched above $25,000.Just coming too close to the orchid can be dangerous.Without a permit, trading orchids across borders is illegal, as is trading those picked from the wild. In the US, orchid smuggling can land you in jail and cost tens of thousands of dollars in fines. The world renowned Kew Gardens Orchid Festival in London, England, where some of the most coveted orchid collections exist, has a security protocol that is not unlike that of a besieged embassy, with 24-hour police on duty and CCTV surveillance. The most precious are not even on display to the public, but instead, locked away in the basement of the Kew Herbarium.Valesquez says that this obsession for rare orchids has endangered many native species in Colombia and even landed some collectors in jail. A sample of orchids taken by the environmental ministry in 2012 looked at threats to the country’s flora and fauna and found that 50 percent of the species were threatened.This threatens not only the wildflower but the forests and marshlands in which they grow. Since some flowers have adapted to specifically attract one type of wasp or bee, for instance, their extinction can produce a negative spiral effect on the surrounding habitat. And if too many are removed from their habitat, it opens the way for other plants to colonize their place.“[Despite this threat] there is zero conservation effort in Colombia,” says Velasquez. He adds, a bit ruefully perhaps, that there isn’t a permanent orchid collection at Bogota’s Botanical Gardens.Loot and empireThe hunt for orchids in Colombia has a long legacy that leads back to 19th century Britain, when Victorian elites would send their servants off to the new world in search of rare and exotic flora to broaden their botanical collections.It was the age of loot and empire, and orchids held a special place in Europe, both as powerful symbols of social status and new specimens for scientific study. Some scholars have suggested that these exotic collections acted as a kind of private pornographic stash for the famously prudish Victorians. At the height of this “Orchidelirium,” as the craze became known, poachers were known to murder competitors and even burn down entire forests to stop others finding new species.The orchid is the most abundant flowering plant in the world, and is as varied as it is numerous: some can weigh up to a ton, stretch 100 feet in length; others are as small as a coin. They are used in everything from medicine to meditation rituals to food.Colombia is the world capital of orchids, with over 4,000 species, according to the state environmental ministry. Southeast Asia has the second highest number of wild orchids, with around 1,500 species spread between Burma, Thailand and Laos.Thanks in part to the Internet, Southeast Asia is going through an illegal boom of wild orchids, which is also threatening them with extinction.Colombia is the world’s second largest exporter of cut flowers, behind the Netherlands. Its flower industry, worth $1 billion per year, boomed in the early 1990s after the US dropped import tariffs from Colombia in order to choke off coca cultivation, making it the number one supplier of cut flowers to the US.Ironically, the flower industry became the perfect conduit for Colombia’s drug cartels to smuggle narcotics into the US, using flower shipments to conceal cocaine. It continues to be so.Domestic tradeColombia’s native orchid market, on the other hand, is almost completely illegal, catering to collectors in South America, Europe and the US.According to a decade-long investigation carried out by Colombia’s environmental ministry on the prevention and control of Colombia’s flora and fauna, the most endangered orchids are tulip orchids (Anguloa), Cattleya and swan orchid (Cycnoches).Though it estimated that only 10 percent of its native orchids have been discovered, experts believe that they are equally under threat. Colombia’s national police intercepted 305 illegal shipments of orchids between 2005-2010, when the government began taking stock of numbers. It is considered to be a fraction of the actual numbers.As of July this year, Colombia’s national police intercepted a total of 2,137 trafficked orchid species. The national police did not respond to further questioning about the type of orchids are smuggled, or their financial worth.Cattleya trianae, also known as the “Christmas orchid” which is at danger of extinction at the Paloquemao Market in Bogota. Photo by Maximo Anderson for Mongabay.Within Colombia, collectors have materos –  “orchid poachers” – who are on call to go and pick a collector’s desired plant on commission. Like small-scale drug dealers, materos often change their phone numbers to evade the authorities.While much more knowledgeable of the local dynamics and politics within Colombia than the English orchidophiles who wandered into the Darién, materos also run high risks of their own.“Four of my colleagues were lost in the jungle,” confided one matero* recently. “It was during the [civil] war and the guerrillas and paramilitaries – though they weren’t involved in the orchid trade – they were in control of the countryside.” He believed his colleagues were most likely murdered, either for not following protocols at checkpoints or simply for being suspect. “[Now that the war is officially over] that is no longer a problem, but we still have to know our way around, you can’t just turn up [to a place and collect orchids], people have to know you.”The absence of any serious oversight by the government is most evident in Bogota’s downtown market of Paloquemao, where endangered Catleya’s are sold next to endangered Bromelia’s for as a little as $3 to $10. Ironically, it’s the more expensive Asian hybrids that everyone wants, explains Velasquez, because they are considered “perfect.”But to the orchid-obsessed, it is the native wildflower that possesses the quality best captured by what the Japanese term wabi sabi: something that is sublime expressly because of its incompleteness, impermanence and imperfection.Rich historyOrchids have captivated people since the Ming Dynasty in ancient China, during which time the flowers were believed to cure almost any ailment, as well as healing sick elephants. While Charles Darwin was formulating his theory of evolution, he became so obsessed with orchids that he wrote an entire book on the relationship between the flower and its pollination.But the obsession has also had a more lurid application – many cultures considered them potent aphrodisiacs; Zulu warriors were known to stuff orchids into their armpits during courtship, and in modern times the flower is used to make aphrodisiac ice cream in Turkey.According to Interpol, international orchid trafficking is like other wildlife crime in that it does not function by itself. It is often mixed up with other criminal networks such as arms and drugs trafficking that use the same trade route to smuggle items across borders. Its the same approach as when the Colombian flower market was hijacked to smuggle cocaine into the US in the 1990s.There exists an international legal framework in (CITES), protecting endangered flora and fauna on the global level – policed by Interpol – but its critics say it works better on paper than in practice. The UN states environmental crime is the fourth largest criminal activity in the world, worth $258 billion, which is growing 5 per cent each year.Paloquemao Market, Bogota. Photo by Maximo Anderson for Mongabay.Carolina Castellanos, a biologist at the Bogota-based Humboldt Institute, says that part of the problem with policing orchid trafficking is in identifying endangered species.“It is hampered by technical issues because there is no standard taxonomy for flowers worldwide and most authorities responsible for intercepting trafficked flowers aren’t botanical experts,” Castellanos said. She added that the porous nature of Colombia’s jungle borders makes policing difficult, too.Castellanos has been working on a government-backed initiative to document and analyze Colombia’s vast fauna in order to come up with a national strategy for its conservation as well as its sustainable commercialization. The results were published in August this year.Colombia’s environmental ministry found that the greatest threat to the country’s flora and fauna overall is the expansion of cattle-ranching and wildcat logging. Since the end of the war with the FARC, which came after a November 2016 peace treaty was signed, there has been a sharp uptick in deforestation and close to half of Colombia’s current carbon emissions are a result of deforestation related to agriculture and cattle ranching, according to a report by Mapping the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP).Meanwhile, massive invasion of the country’s national parks is also a pressing issue, with 37 of its 59 parks currently affected.All of this places orchids and their habitats at greater risk than ever before. Velasquez believes the state is not doing enough to protect it’s most precious species of wildflower.“At the current rate there will be no native orchids left in 100 years,” he said.*Name has been changed on request due to safety concerns.Banner image: An orchid. Photo by Džoko Stach/Pixabay.Maximo Anderson is a freelance journalist and photographer currently based in Colombia. You can find him on Twitter at @MaximoLamar.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Scientists give humanity ‘second notice’ to shape up or suffer the consequences

first_imgAnimals, carbon, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Deforestation, Environment, Extinction, Forests, Fossil Fuels, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Oceans, Research, Trees Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In a paper published this week in Bioscience, scientists issue a second warning to humanity to adopt more sustainable practices and check in on how the world has fared since the first warning was published in 1992.They found most environmental problems have gotten far worse during the past 25 years.The paper puts forth ways in which humanity could improve its relationship with the natural world. If we don’t, the scientists warn we are “jeopardizing our future.”More than 15,000 scientists from 180 countries have signed the paper in support. Scientists have issued a second warning of impending doom for the natural world if humanity does not make significant changes in how we treat the planet. The warning is presented in a paper published this week in Bioscience, and serves as a follow-up on a similar declaration by scientists in 1992.The first “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity” was authored in 1992 by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) and signed by 1,700 scientists, including most living Nobel laureates in the sciences. It called out the “collision course” between humans and the natural world, pointing to evidence of “critical stress” to the planet’s various systems, from the ocean and atmosphere to forests and soil. It describes how this stress manifested in depletion of ozone, water, fish stocks, soil productivity and biodiversity.They urged fundamental changes to be taken in order avoid catastrophe. Among them: moving away from fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy, halting deforestation and the loss of species, more efficiently managing resources, stabilizing the human population, eliminating poverty and ensuring gender equity.“A great change in our stewardship of the earth and the way of life on it is required, if vast human misery is to be avoided and our global home on this planet is not to be irretrievably mutilated,” the 1992 declaration stated.The Kihansi spray toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis) is considered extinct in the wild.In “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice,” Bill Ripple, director of the Trophic Cascades Program at Oregon State University, and his colleagues looked at how humanity has progressed toward the targets put forth over the past 25 years. With one exception – stabilization of the ozone layer through strict regulation of ozone-depleting chemicals – they found that not enough progress has been made to avert the massive environmental problems apparent in the late 20th century.In fact, they found most of these problems have gotten far worse.Two big trends were “especially troubling” to the researchers. One is the significant uptick in greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels, deforestation and agricultural practices. The other is extinction.The release of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide is driving global warming. Forests are big carbon sinks and deforestation has been widely acknowledged to be a major source of atmospheric carbon. Yet, while international conservation programs like REDD+ are seeking to curb deforestation and, with it, climate change, forests are still being lost at an ever-increasing pace. A recent analysis of satellite data showed global tree cover loss rose more than 50 percent from 2015 to 2016.Since 1992, the world has also marched headlong into a mass extinction — the sixth such event in 540 million years. Researchers estimate species are being lost at a rate at least 100 times faster than historical levels, with habitat loss, over-hunting and climate change just a few of the many human-caused drivers behind the event.The scientists warn that these consequences won’t just be felt by the natural world – they will also affect us.“Humanity is now being given a second notice, as illustrated by these alarming trends,” write Ripple and his colleagues in their declaration. “We are jeopardizing our future by not reining in our intense but geographically and demographically uneven material consumption and by not perceiving continued rapid population growth as a primary driver behind many ecological and even societal threats.”The scientists again implore humanity to alter its behavior before it’s too late. As in the first “Warning,” Ripple and his co-authors suggest more than a dozen concrete goals. These include the establishment of effective protected areas that would encompass a significant proportion of terrestrial, aquatic and aerial habitats, halting the degradation of forests and other native land cover and restoring those that have already been degraded; shifting diets to plant-based foods; reducing fertility rates by ensuring access to family planning services; and developing new green technologies.The paper has been widely endorsed internationally, with more than 15,000 scientists from 180 countries signing their support for it.“Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory, and time is running out,” Ripple and his colleagues write. “We must recognize, in our day-to-day lives and in our governing institutions, that Earth with all its life is our only home.”Citations:Ripple, W. J., Wolf, C., Galetti, M., Newsome, T. M., Alamgir, M., Crist, E., … & Laurance, W. F. World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice.Banner photo: Micronesian kingfisher (Todirhamphus cinnamominus), which is extinct in the wild.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Another blow to troubled Madagascar rare earth mine

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored December 8, 2015: Tantalus Rare Earth (TRE AG), a German company that had owned TREM since 2009, agrees to sell TREM to a private Singapore-registered company now known as REO Magnetic in a two-part deal. ISR Capital does not yet have anything to do with TREM.May 9, 2016: David Rigoll, a U.K.-based mining investor, enters into an agreement to buy more than a quarter of the shares of ISR Capital and a few days later joins the company as a director. Rigoll had until recently been an executive and leading shareholder of TRE AG.May 12, 2016: The Singapore stock exchange, observing an unusual increase in the trading of ISR Capital stock that could be a sign of insider trading or stock manipulation, asks the company if any information — about, for example, possible impending acquisitions — needs to be made public. ISR Capital replies “no.”May 19, 2016: ISR Capital’s share price has now increased by more than 700 percent in the ten-day period since Rigoll signed on.May 20, 2016: ISR Capital announces a deal to purchase an as-yet undefined stake in TREM from REO Magnetic. After further negotiations, the agreement entails ISR purchasing a 60 percent stake in TREM for about $30 million, roughly seven times the price that REO had paid to TRE AG for the same stake a few months earlier. The Singapore stock exchange later questions ISR’s methodology in making the purchase at this price. (If both this deal and the two-part deal between TRE AG and REO were to go through, ISR would ultimately own 60 percent of TREM and REO would own the remaining 40 percent.)July 16, 2016: In a filing, ISR Capital writes that TREM is applying for a pilot production permit. Madagascar’s National Environmental Office (NEO) gave TREM permission to conduct an environmental impact study, which the company must submit for approval before the NEO will issue a pilot production permit. No study has been turned in at press time, more than a year later, according to the NEO.August 14, 2016: ISR Capital acknowledges that Timothy Morrison, an executive at the advisory firm that ISR had hired for help with the TREM acquisition, was also a director of REO Magnetic, the company selling TREM. ISR had failed to disclose this information until regulators asked specifically about Morrison. This was a potential conflict of interest that may have allowed Morrison to sit on both sides of the table during the ISR/REO negotiations. ISR explains that when it conducted its records search on REO, Morrison was not yet a director there.In the same communication, the stock exchange asked ISR Capital about a potential conflict of interest linked to David Rigoll’s involvement with both TRE-AG and ISR Capital. In response, ISR writes that Rigoll’s investments in the two companies did not overlap.September 2016: TRE AG hands over management of TREM to REO Magnetic, now the majority owner of TREM, according to Markus Kivimäki, TRE AG’s CEO.September 29, 2016: With its stock price soaring, ISR Capital announces that it will loan TREM about $4.5 million. ISR is investing in the Ampasindava project even though its deal to acquire the 60 percent stake in TREM from REO Magnetic has not yet been finalized.November 2016: ISR Capital’s share price has now increased by more than 4,000 percent since April.November 8, 2016: In response to a regulator’s inquiry, ISR Capital explains that it has loaned TREM money so that it can obtain environmental permits, which are critical to the project’s success. TREM needs $7.1 million to get environmental permits, ISR explains.ISR states: “…there are no significant risks to the Permits not being approved as [TREM] has addressed all 147 items highlighted by the National Environment Office in the scope of work submitted earlier this year. [TREM] expects to obtain the Permits in Q1 of 2017.”When showed this ISR filing, the National Environment Office’s environmental evaluation director wrote to Mongabay that he was “unaware of this.” At press time TREM has not received the pilot production permits. In fact, TREM no longer has even an active exploration permit. ISR does not appear to have revealed the lack of permits to investors or regulators.November 21, 2016: The Singapore stock exchange questions ISR Capital’s two valuations of the “Madagascar Asset” in Ampasindava. Both consultants valued the concession at over $1 billion. However, the Singapore stock exchange rejected both valuations for failing to meet the exchange’s standards: the first was done by an unqualified sole proprietor, while the second copied some data from the first, without making a site visit to Ampasindava.The first valuation, by Geologica Pty Ltd, which was quickly promoted by ISR upon its completion in July 2016, discounted local opposition and environmental risk. “The potential land tenure risk, including Native Title risk is considered low, as is the sovereign risk associated with the concession,” the appraiser wrote. After a perfunctory look at potential environmental impacts, he added, “Geologica concludes that there is a low environmental risk associated with the concession.”November 24 and 25, 2016: Jon Soh Chee Wen, alleged mastermind of the penny-stock crash of 2013, is arrested and charged for his role in what Singapore authorities call “the largest market manipulation case in Singapore’s history.” ISR Capital is a penny stock — a high-risk stock investment that can be purchased cheaply — with connections to the 2013 scandal, and its price begins to plummet, losing more than half of its value in a day. Three days later, the Singapore stock exchange suspends trading of ISR stock.December 7, 2016: To investigate a potential violation of Singapore’s Securities and Futures Act, authorities demand copies of all of ISR Capital’s recent emails, meeting minutes, and merger deals.December 20, 2016: Singapore prosecutors confirm connections between ISR Capital and Jon Soh Chee Wen. They also announce that they are investigating ISR Capital. Eventually they will claim in a court document that Soh “was intimately involved in, and exercised influence over, the management and corporate affairs of ISR.” (Contacted by Mongabay in August, the Monetary Authority of Singapore declined to comment on the status or nature of the investigation.)March 6, 2017: After more than three months of suspension, the Singapore stock exchange relists ISR Capital after issuing a “trade with caution” warning. The stock plummets once more, and David Rigoll sells a significant portion of his shares. Rigoll also resigns as an executive director, criticizing management and becoming at least the fourth high-level ISR executive to resign in as many months.March 2017: TRE AG retakes operational control of TREM, on a temporary basis, due to what Kivimäki referred to as “certain challenges at the buyer.”April 28, 2017: ISR Capital confirms that it will move forward with the TREM acquisition.August 1, 2017: ISR Capital and REO Magnetic agree to new terms. Instead of paying $30 million for the 60 percent stake in TREM, ISR will now pay about $3.3 million. ISR is still awaiting a third appraisal of the Ampasindava concession.August 6, 2017: ISR Capital admits that the Ampasindava concession has a much lower value than the two earlier appraisals suggested. In the same document, ISR explains that “there have been limited exploration activities by the Operating Company [TREM] in the past months.” ISR again fails to mention that TREM has had no exploration permit since January. TREM staff in Ambanja told Mongabay there had been no exploration this year.September 21, 2017: TRE AG announces that the second part of its deal with REO, for the remaining 40 percent of TREM, has been canceled.September 22, 2017: Behre Dolbear Australia releases a new appraisal, commissioned by ISR Capital, that gives the Ampasindava concession a most likely value of $48 million, less than 5 percent of the previous estimates.November 16, 2017: David Rigoll, who until this week still owned about 17 percent of ISR Capital, sold most of his remaining shares. He now owns about 3 percent of the company.An unknown species of chameleon that resides on the Ampasindava peninsula. Photo by Leslie Wilmet. Banner image: An endangered Sambirano mouse lemur (Microcebus sambiranensis), which is found only in two or three small populations in northwest Madagascar, including one on the Ampasindava peninsula. Photo by Leslie Wilmet. CitationsYang, X.J., & Lin, A., Li, X-L., Wu, Y., Zhou, W., Chen, Z. (2013). China’s ion-adsorption rare earth resources, mining consequences and preservation. Environmental Development 8 131(6).An entrance to the TREM concession on the Ampasindava peninsula. Photo by Edward Carver for Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Rebecca Kesslercenter_img Biodiversity, Conservation, Corporate Responsibility, Endangered Species, Environment, Featured, Forests, Governance, Government, Green, Human Rights, Land Rights, Mining, Protected Areas, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Wildlife German and Singaporean business interests have been attempting to start a rare earth mine on northwestern Madagascar’s Ampasindava peninsula.According to some scientists, going forward with the project would pose grave long-term threats to local people and the surrounding rainforest, including a protected area home to endangered lemurs and other unique wildlife.The project has been beset by ownership uncertainty, an ongoing investigation into one of its owners for financial misconduct, and permit delays.Now its concession, previously valued at over $1 billion, has been reappraised at just $48 million. A rare earth mining project in Madagascar that has been in turmoil for the last two years took another blow in September, when its concession, previously valued at over $1 billion, was reappraised at just $48 million. Tantalum Rare Earth Malagasy (TREM), a company owned by firms in Germany and Singapore, holds the rights to the 92-square mile (238-square kilometer) concession, located on the Ampasindava peninsula in northwest Madagascar, just across the water from Nosy Be, the country’s main tourist destination.Demand for rare earth elements, sometimes called “technology metals,” has risen in recent decades because they are used in the production of smartphones and other modern devices. China dominates the market for rare earths, having produced more than 85 percent of world supply for the last few decades. But the environmental and health impacts of rare earth mining have caused Chinese authorities to restructure the industry and close, or attempt to close, many of the mines. Now investors are looking elsewhere.TREM’s project would be the first rare earth mine in Madagascar. For now, the project has stalled due to a lack of permits and unstable ownership. According to some scientists, going forward with the project would pose grave long-term threats to local people, who oppose the project, and to the surrounding rainforest, including a protected area home to endangered lemurs and other unique wildlife.“It will be a nightmare for anything living there — humans, animals, or plants,” a geologist familiar with ionic clay rare earth mining told Mongabay. “It will be a huge disaster. It will destroy the whole peninsula,” added the geologist, who asked not to be named due to the sensitive nature of the situation.Maps show Madagascar’s Ampasindava Peninsula, with its marine protected area (blue writing), terrestrial protected area (green writing), and TREM rare earth mining concession (red writing). Background map courtesy of Google Maps; Ampasindava Peninsula map by Association Famelona.A farmer inspects vanilla plants near his home on the Ampasindava peninsula. Cash crops are the main livelihood for families in the area. Photo by Edward Carver for Mongabay.Potential impactThe rare earth deposit in Ampasindava is of an uncommon type known as ionic or ion-adsorption clay. Most similar deposits are near Ganzhou in southeast China, although they make up less than 3 percent of China’s total rare earth reserves. Unlike other rare earth deposits, ionic clay does not contain high levels of the radioactive elements uranium and thorium. However, mining ionic clay still causes extreme environmental and health consequences.TREM has not yet decided which mining method it would use in Ampasindava. It is considering three techniques: heap leaching, vat leaching, and in-situ leaching. The first two would involve open-pit mining of the ground’s surface. When these techniques have been used on ionic clay mines in China, the results have been dire for local ecosystems. For every ton of rare earth oxide extracted, 300 square meters of vegetation and topsoil are removed, 2,000 tons of tailings are disposed in nearby valleys or streams, and 1,000 tons of highly polluted wastewater is created, according to a 2013 paper by Chinese researchers.“[S]urface/mountaintop mining for ion-adsorption rare earth ores has become the dominant driver of land-use change and degradation in southern China, causing permanent loss of ecosystem, severe soil erosion, air pollution, biodiversity loss and human health problems,” the authors write.There are hundreds of millions of tons of tailings from ionic clay mines in the Ganzhou area, and the environmental costs, measured strictly by how much it costs to restore the land, exceed the revenues produced by the rare earths, the Chinese state press has acknowledged.In fact, if the project goes forward, TREM may not have any choice but to use an open-pit mining technique on most of the concession, according to the geologist familiar with ionic clay mining. The alternative, ostensibly safer in-situ method requires ground that is flat and porous, which is uncommon in ionic clay deposits.Even if the in-situ leaching method is used, it may not prove much better for the environment. In-situ leaching does not involve highly disruptive surface mining, but it does require huge amounts of ammonium sulfate solution to be pumped into the ground with great force. Rare earth oxides then trickle through the ground to a collection trench — thus the need for porous earth. This method, if not applied with care, can lead to water contamination, mine collapses, and landslides.Water contamination could spell trouble not just for public health but for the local economy. The streams in TREM’s mining concession serve as the water source for cash crops such as cacao, pepper, coffee, and vanilla. Thus far, no environmental impact study of the project has been completed, so it is difficult to know how severe the effects, both onsite and downstream, could be.Some scientists working on the peninsula have expressed concern about the project. If it goes forward, the mine is likely to reduce the habitat of the Endangered Mittermeier sportive lemur (Lepilemur mittermeieri), which lives only on the peninsula, Leslie Wilmet, a doctoral student in conservation biology at the University of Liège and Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech in Belgium who studies the lemurs, told Mongabay in August. “The problem with the TREM project will be that lots of forests will disappear,” she said at the time. “We don’t know if the species will survive or not if the project goes on.”The Mittermeier sportive lemur (Lepilemur mittermeieri) is found only on the Ampasindava peninsula. Researchers warn that its population could be harmed if TREM moves ahead. Photo by Leslie Wilmet.A view of the Ampasindava protected area, taken from Andranomatavy Mountain. Photo by Rêve d’Ailes photographie.Shaky underpinningsDelays in the TREM project are due not so much to environmental concerns as to management setbacks. ISR Capital, a Singapore-listed firm trying to take a majority stake in TREM, is under investigation for financial misconduct. The company has been linked to John Soh Chee Wen, who currently faces charges for some of the worst financial crimes in Singapore’s history. David Rigoll, a high-flying UK-based investor and ISR’s largest shareholder used to be a leading shareholder and executive at Tantalus Rare Earth AG (TRE AG), the German firm that has owned TREM since 2009. (Rigoll himself has previously been caught up in a stock scandal.)TRE AG poured over $30 million into the Madagascar project, its sole holding, but ran out of funds and filed for bankruptcy in 2015. In a two-part deal, it sold TREM to REO Magnetic, a private company in Singapore. In September of this year, the second part of the deal, for the remaining 40 percent of TREM, was canceled. TRE AG now retains that 40-percent ownership of TREM; a recent filing indicates that it might still try to sell the stake.On paper, the other 60 percent is owned by REO Magnetic, but ISR Capital made a deal to buy this stake from REO over a year ago. The Singapore stock exchange has not yet approved the deal; last year, the exchange refused to accept two appraisals commissioned by ISR, each of which valued the “Madagascar asset” at over $1 billion. Behre Dolbear Australia (BDA), the North Sydney-based consultancy ISR commissioned for the latest appraisal, referred to the two previous appraisals as of “limited credibility,” and to their methodologies as “quite inappropriate” and in “direct contradiction” of industry standards.Although the new appraisal indicates that TREM is worth less than 5 percent of previous estimates, in making it BDA relied on assumptions that Mongabay’s previous reporting suggests may not bear out. The valuation assumes that new permits for exploration and pilot testing are forthcoming. Yet TREM currently has no permit of any kind; the company’s exploration permit expired in January and although it applied for a permit renewal last December, the government has yet to issue one nearly a year later. Also, BDA acknowledges in the report that it did not review any environmental studies and did not conduct an independent social assessment. That is, BDA apparently did not speak to people in Ampasindava. The report cites only TREM’s opinion of what those people think, casting them as supportive of the project; in reality, many locals strongly oppose it.And while BDA is qualified and respected in the field, it’s unclear if it has any experience with ionic clay rare earth mines — few people outside of China do. (Queried by Mongabay about its experience in this specific field, BDA declined to comment.)In addition to the concession’s devaluation, ISR Capital faces other challenges in moving the project forward. This week, ISR’s stock price dropped to an all-time low, which could make fundraising for the project difficult, especially since ionic clay mining is a specialized field in which ISR has no experience. In fact, as a company, ISR has no track record whatsoever in the mining industry, as the BDA report acknowledges.ISR, REO, TRE AG, TREM, and the prime minister’s office in Madagascar did not respond to requests for comment.Timeline: Singapore’s investigation of ISR Capital[EXPAND] The ownership of Tantalum Rare Earth Malagasy (TREM), the company exploring for rare earth elements in northwest Madagascar, has been in flux since late 2015. ISR Capital, a Singapore-listed company, is in the process of taking a majority stake in TREM. In 2016, just before the announcement of its TREM acquisition, ISR’s stock price began a dramatic rise that lasted several months. When it later crashed, the Singapore stock exchange suspended trading of ISR stock. Singapore authorities connected ISR to an alleged mastermind of stock manipulation, and opened an investigation into the company.last_img read more

Indonesia hints rhino sperm transfer to Malaysia may finally happen this year

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Mammals, Megafauna, Rhinos, Saving Species From Extinction, Sumatran Rhino, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Indonesia has signaled it may send a much-needed sample of Sumatran rhino sperm to Malaysia for use in a captive-breeding program seen as the last means of saving the critically endangered species.If it goes to plan, the program would boost the genetic diversity of the species, of which only 30 to 100 individuals are believed to remain in the wild.The Sumatran rhino population has been decimated by poaching and habitat loss, but the biggest threat facing the species today is the small and fragmented nature of their populations, with an increased risk of inbreeding. JAKARTA — Indonesia has signaled it may finally send a sample of Sumatran rhino semen to a breeding program in Malaysia, amid a growing urgency to keep the species alive.Conservationists in Sabah, in Malaysian Borneo, where only two Sumatran rhinos (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis) remain, have since 2015 sought a frozen sample of sperm taken from a rhino in Indonesia’s own captive-breeding program in Sumatra to kick-start an artificial insemination attempt — but to no avail, as the Indonesian government repeatedly ignored its requests.Now, though, a senior official says the sperm being stored at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary (SRS) may be sent to Malaysia sometime this year.“We have discussed all of the aspects of the request, and submitted our analysis to the [environment] minister,” Wiratno, the head of conservation at Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry, told reporters in Jakarta last week.“It will be a valuable lesson for both countries, as we are also dealing with rhinos which are losing their habitats,” he added.Andalas, right, and Bina meet at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary. Photo by Dedi Candra.If approved, the plan would be to combine the sperm from Andalas, a captive-bred rhino at the SRS, with viable eggs from Iman, the last remaining female Sumatran rhino in Malaysia, to produce an embryo that could then be implanted into one of the females back at the Indonesian sanctuary.The fertilization would preferably happen in Malaysia because frozen semen travels better than eggs. Malaysia has agreed to let Indonesia keep any resultant offspring.If everything goes as planned, the program would boost the genetic diversity of the species, given that Iman comes from a population on Borneo that has been disconnected from the populations on Sumatra for thousands of years.John Payne, the head of the Borneo Rhino Alliance (BORA), which is deeply involved in the plan on the Malaysian side, welcomed Wiratno’s statement.“I cannot speak on behalf of the government of Malaysia, but I am sure that this is the news that we have all been waiting for,” he said. “It is heartening that the director general of conservation has expressed his commitment to seeing through the necessary procedures to expedite approval to release frozen semen of Sumatran rhino to Malaysia.”He said 2018 was the “make-or-break year” for collaborative efforts between Indonesia and Malaysia to conserve the species, which began in 1985.“We need to recognize that speed is of the essence,” Payne said. “Whether or not Indonesia decides to work with Malaysia, the species is very close to extinction. The need to immediately boost Sumatran rhino births far outweighs the need to prevent rhino deaths.”Sumatran rhinos are solitary animals and the females give birth to one calf at a time every 3-4 years. Photo by Tiffany Roufs/Mongabay.There is an increased urgency to step up the captive-breeding program for the critically endangered species, compelled by the death in June last year of Puntung, Malaysia’s only other female Sumatran rhino at the time; and, in December, a serious deterioration in the health of Iman. Iman has since made a slow recovery, with Payne and his team hoping she can once again produce fertile eggs for fertilization attempts.Experts believe that no more than 100 Sumatran rhinos, and perhaps as few as 30, are left in the wild, scattered in tiny populations across Sumatra, Borneo and perhaps peninsular Malaysia. With such a small population to draw from, the risk of genetic defects being passed on through captive breeding are high — which makes the need for the Indonesia-Malaysia collaboration all the more important.There could also be a diplomatic payoff for the two governments, who have often been at loggerheads on issues such as cultural appropriation and territorial claims.“The relationship between the two countries will also improve because wildlife issues transcend national borders, and this is an important global need that’s based on science,” Wiratno said.Banner image: Sumatran rhino Ratu with her firstborn, Andatu, four days after his birth in June 2012. Photo courtesy of the International Rhino Foundation.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

Belize creates one of Central America’s largest biological corridors

first_imgOn Feb. 13, the government of Belize approved the 110-square-kilometer Belize northeastern biological corridor.The corridor aims to provide safe passage for wild animals like jaguars, pumas and Baird’s tapir to move freely between the Shipstern Nature Reserve and Freshwater Creek Forest Reserve in northern Belize.Private landowners have agreed to place their corridor-designated lands into a trust in perpetuity, with the lands to be managed as part of the protected area system for conservation purposes. Belize is set to establish one of the biggest biological corridors in Central America, connecting two nature reserves that are home to jaguars and pumas, among other wildlife.The Belize northeastern biological corridor, approved by the government on Feb. 13, will span some 110 square kilometers (42 square miles) of forest, according to a press release from the Corozal Sustainable Future Initiative (CSFI), a conservation NGO in Belize. It aims to provide safe passage for species such as jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor) and Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii) to move freely between the coastal dry forests of the Shipstern Nature Reserve and the tropical forests of the Freshwater Creek Forest Reserve.“This corridor is highly important,” Heron Moreno, executive director of the CSFI, told Mongabay. “It will not only guarantee the long term survival of wildlife within the area but it will also contribute to the strengthening of the Belize Protected Areas System. Most importantly, it will serve to highlight the importance of Government, NGO and private partnership in conservation initiatives. This hereby paves the way and serves as a model for other similar initiatives to follow in Belize.”A Baird’s tapir in the Shipstern Nature Reserve in Belize. Photo courtesy of Corozal Sustainable Future InitiativeThe push for corridors in Belize began about two decades ago through the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor Project, a Global Environment Facility-funded effort to interlink patches of forests from Mexico through Central America to Colombia. Belize’s northeastern biological corridor was one of the potentially important links that the project highlighted.In 2015, the CSFI, together with other conservation NGOs, the government and private landowners reinitiated this dormant project, according to Caspar Bijleveld, secretary of the board of the CSFI and project coordinator for the group’s international partner, the International Tropical Conservation Fund (ITCF).To decide the route of the corridor, the NGOs and the government used the general layout that the Mesoamerican corridor project had already proposed. “The route was originally one of the possibilities designated as such by the GEF project, back when the whole north-eastern part of Belize was forested,” Bijleveld said.However, expanding agricultural lands and other infrastructure development drove rampant deforestation around this route. So the teams cross-referenced the original proposed corridor with the actual forest cover on the ground to determine the final route of the corridor.The next step was to convince the private landowners to give up their land for the corridor. That was challenging, Moreno said, because “the concept of corridors is still very vague and not quite proven to function as such.”“To be able to engage the partners, it had to be tackled more from [an] economic and regulatory perspective,” he said, adding that the process did not involve any financial transactions.Map of the Belize northeastern biological corridor by CSFI.Balam Jungle Estates, which owns the largest land parcel in the corridor, was convinced by tax incentives offered by the government. The Rheinländer Mennonite community, which owns another land parcel with the corridor, was convinced by a regulatory clause. “When they purchased the land, the Department of the Environment had imposed a clause of non-deforestation on the parcel that was recognized as a potential part of the corridor,” Bijleveld said.Both landowners have agreed to place their corridor-designated land into a trust in perpetuity. The land, which will continue to be owned by the private landowners, will be managed as part of the protected area system for conservation purposes. “This protected area can then de facto only be managed as such, according to rules defined by the Trust itself,” Bijleveld said. “The rules themselves will be based on national legislation on protected areas.”For its part, the government will halt the collection of taxes on those lands for the duration of the trust arrangement, Moreno said.Two pumas caught on camera trap in Shipstern Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of Corozal Sustainable Future Initiative.Two steps are still pending. The private landowners have yet to officially put their land into trust. “This is still much in process. Trust agreements have already been drafted but official signatures are still pending,” Moreno said.In addition, the government still needs to acquire some 40 square kilometers (15 square miles) of land within the corridor, at an estimated cost of about $1 million.“ITCF is engaging with international NGOs active in the acquisition of lands for corridors and other critical habitats, asking them for their help,” Bijleveld said. “Although at this stage I am not in a position to cite names, things are looking promising.“Personally, I have always been a firm believer that conservation success is a matter of long, if not very long-term involvement in a project,” he added. “That success sometimes comes through waiting for the right window of opportunity and having (lots of) patience. I have been involved in forest conservation in Belize for 30 years, and [it’s] successes like these that will keep me going for another 30.”A jaguar captured by a camera trap in Shipstern Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of the Corozal Sustainable Future Initiative. Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Protected Areas, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Corridors center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more