Audio: WildTech covers the high- and low-tech solutions making conservation more effective

first_imgAnimals, Bushmeat, Conservation, Conservation Technology, Coral Reefs, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Illegal Trade, Land Grabbing, Land Speculation, Lemurs, Podcast, Primates, Rainforests, Research, Rhinos, Technology And Conservation, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildtech Article published by Mike Gaworecki Sue shares with us some of the most interesting technologies and trends that she sees as having the biggest potential to transform the way we go about conserving Earth’s natural resources and wildlife.Also on the program, we feature a live-taped conversation with Jonathan Thompson and Clarisse Hart, two scientists with the Harvard Forest, a long-term ecological research project of Harvard University.Guest co-host and Mongabay editor Becky Kessler helps lead a conversation about Thompson and Hart’s work, including a study they released looking at multiple scenarios for the future of Massachusetts’ forests that they say changed the way they approach research altogether. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we welcome Sue Palminteri, editor of Mongabay’s WildTech site as well as a scientist and director of the biodiversity and wildlife solutions program at RESOLVE, a Washington, D.C.-based NGO.Sue fills us in on the history of the WildTech site and why it is important to highlight the high- and low-tech solutions to challenges in conservation efforts. She also shares with us some of the most interesting technologies and trends that she sees as having the biggest potential to transform the way we go about conserving Earth’s natural resources and wildlife.Also on the program, we feature a live-taped conversation with Jonathan Thompson and Clarisse Hart, two scientists with the Harvard Forest, a long-term ecological research project of Harvard University.A few Mongabay staffers were recently invited to speak at the journalism school at UMass Amherst, which happens to be fairly close to the Harvard Forest out in Western Massachusetts. While we were there, we took the opportunity to sit down with Thompson and Hart in order to discuss their work in front of a live studio audience of journalism students. Guest co-host and Mongabay editor Becky Kessler helps lead a conversation about Thompson and Hart’s work, including a study they released looking at multiple scenarios for the future of Massachusetts’ forests that they say changed the way they approach research altogether.Here’s this episode’s top news:Will Madagascar lose its most iconic primate?“Endangered species to declare?” Europe’s understudied bushmeat tradeA Czech zoo is dehorning its rhinosDamage to Raja Ampat 12 times higher than previously thoughtAmazon land speculators poised to gain control of vast public landsMongabay is a nonprofit and relies on the support of its readers, so if you value what you learn at the site and on this podcast, please visit mongabay.com/donate to help make it all possible. There are numerous ways you can support Mongabay — read about them all and decide what works for you at mongabay.org/donate.If you enjoy this podcast, please write a review of the Mongabay Newscast in the Apple Podcasts app, iTunes store, Stitcher page, or wherever you get your podcasts from! Your feedback will help us improve the show and find new listeners. Simply go to the show’s page on whichever platform you get it from and find the ‘review’ or ‘rate’ section: Stitcher, TuneIn, iTunes, Google Play, or RSS.A recent study found that population numbers of Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta), like those seen here at Berenty Reserve in Madagascar, have crashed to the point that there may be just 2,000 to 2,400 individuals left. Photo by David Dennis, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Extremely rare cobra lily rediscovered in India

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasgupta After years of looking for the plant, naturalist Tarun Chhabra chanced upon several flowering Arisaema translucens in 2009 in a patch of shola forest in the Nilgiri mountains. Specimens of the species were collected in 2016.Researchers say that A. translucens could be threatened by illegal collection and expansion of tea estates into the shola habitat of the plant.While the team has not yet assessed the species’ conservation status, the plant is most likely to be at risk of extinction. Naturalists in India have rediscovered a rare flowering plant — Arisaema translucens — after nearly 80 years.Botanist Edward Barnes first collected this plant in 1932 from the Nilgiri mountains in southern India. The plant, commonly called a cobra lily and noted for its translucent spathe (a large leaf like plant part that encloses a cluster of flowers), was then scientifically described in 1933. Since then, there have been no confirmed records of this species.Intrigued by the plant’s record, dentist and naturalist Tarun Chhabra began combing the Nilgiris for Arisaema translucens. He searched for the plant year after year, and finally in 2009, chanced upon several flowering Arisaema translucens within a small patch of shola forest — a mosaic of grassland and stunted evergreen tree species — within the Nilgiris.“It felt unbelievable to finally see this plant. It looks beautiful,” Chhabra said.Botanist and co-author K.M. Prabhukumar of the Centre for Medicinal Plants Research in Kerala, who collected specimens of these plants in 2016, added that no other Arisaema species has such translucent spathe, making this species unique.The team also collected specimens of another rare cobra lily species, Arisaema tuberculatum from the Nilgiris. Together with scientists K.M. Prabhukumar, Indira Balachandran and others, Chhabra then described the two species in a new study published in Phytotaxa. Both species are believed to be found only in southern India.Arisaema translucens has a unique translucent spathe not recorded in other Arisaema species. Photo by Tarun Chhabra.Many species of Arisaema, such as the Japanese A. heterocephalum, are prized for their beauty and threatened by illegal collection. The researchers say that A. translucens could also face a similar threat and needs immediate protection.Moreover, the small patch of shola where the species was found is surrounded by expanding tea estates that threaten to wipe out the plant’s habitat.“Big tea estates slowly whittle away these shola forests, and nobody even gets to know,” Chhabra said. “Small patches of sholas disappear every day, and these plants, too, may just disappear one day. So, we need to be cautious. We don’t want people to be hunting for these plants, and we need to protect these plants.”Chhabra hopes to work with the tea estates to help protect forest areas that harbor these rare species.While the researchers have not yet assessed the conservation status of A. translucens, the species is most likely to be at risk of extinction, the team says.“I think the plant is threatened, but in order to know if it is critically endangered or not, somebody has to study the species in greater detail,” Chhabra said. “We found the species in one patch, but it is possible that there are patches nearby that have this plant, and haven’t been explored yet. In that case the species might be safer.”Arisaema translucens was rediscovered after more than 80 years. Photo by Tarun Chhabra.Citation:Prabhukumar KM, Chhabra T, Robi AJ, Jagadeesan R, Sunil CN, Balachandran I (2017). Rediscovery of Arisaema translucens (Araceae) and notes on A. tuberculatum, two strict endemics of Nilgiris, India. Phytotaxa 306 (1): 085–090. DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.11646/phytotaxa.306.1.7center_img Biodiversity, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Flowers, Forests, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Happy-upbeat Environmental, New Species, Plants, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Indonesia is running out of places to put rescued animals

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Putra Alam Tarigan carries a critically endangered Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) he caught hours earlier. He says that now that he knows the the creature is facing extinction, he wants to help end the trade in its body parts. Photo by Ayat S. Karokaro/Mongabay-Indonesia.Tarigan, left, looks on as wildlife conservationist Rudianto Sembiring, center, and a representative of the North Sumatra BKSDA examine the pangolin, which has curled into a protective ball. Photo by Ayat S. Karokaro/Mongabay-Indonesia.President Joko Widodo has made raising awareness about Indonesia’s conservation laws a priority in a country with some of the world’s richest biodiversity. More and more citizens are learning it is illegal to keep many creatures as pets, hunt them for sport or sell them to traffickers.But conservationists point to a problem: as animal confiscations increase, the government is running out of places to put them.“As more people surrender their animals, our facilities have actually surpassed their capacity,” said Hotmauli Sianturi, head of the North Sumatran branch of the Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA).Jokowi, as he is popularly known, has tried to lead by example. In January 2016, he set free 190 birds that had been on sale at the notorious Pramuka wildlife market in Jakarta. A few months later, he launched a national movement to conserve biodiversity, marked by the release of hundreds of Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) hatchlings and other creatures on an island in the capital region. (Sea turtles are heavily trafficked in Indonesia.)The president’s actions, alongside grassroots efforts by local authorities and NGOs, appear to be having an effect. Last Nov. 5, on National Love Flora and Fauna Day, Sianturi’s office received an Asian leopard cat (Felis bengalensis), a Sunda slow loris (Nycticebus coucang) and nearly two dozen exotic birds from citizens who claimed to have previously been unaware of the law. The month before, a man handed over his pet saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus). He had kept it in an enclosed pond behind his house for 13 years.A North Sumatran man surrendered this crocodile to authorities last year. He said he didn’t know it was illegal to keep it as a pet. Photo by Ayat S. Karokaro/Mongabay-Indonesia.Authorities load the crocodile into the back of a pickup truck. “It kept growing, so I asked my friends, and they advised me to hand it over to the BKSDA,” the owner said. Photo by Ayat S. Karokaro/Mongabay-Indonesia.Like Tarigan’s pangolin, most rescued animals are immediately set free. But poor health is a top reason why some in North Sumatra are taken to the BKSDA’s main wildlife sanctuaries in the province, in Sibolangit and Barumun. Some animals are injured so badly they can never be released.Among other creatures, the Barumun facility is now taking care of a female Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) whose leg was amputated due to snare wounds. During the first half of 2017, the center received from people who turned them in six eagles and 10 siamangs (Symphalangus syndactylus). That does not include confiscations from illegal traders.During the same period, the Sibolangit shelter received from contrite citizens 21 animals of nine species, from slow loris to white-crested laughingthrush (Garrulax leucolophus) and white-bellied sea eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster). The facility is also rehabilitating five Sumatran orangtuans (Pongo abelii) transfered from West Java and Aceh provinces.“The capacity at both Sibolangit and Barumun is already full and unable to take in more animals,” Sianturi said.Dedicated facilities exist to receive some species. The nonprofit Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme (SOCP) runs a rescue center for the apes outside Medan, the provincial capital. Visitors to the Asam Kumbang Crocodile Park in Medan can pay $2 to feed the beasts a live duck.For other creatures, authorities have had to improvise. The SOCP has temporarly housed gibbons, sun bears (Helarctos malayanus) and slow lorises on occasion, although they try to focus only on orangutans and to have other species relocated elsewhere as quickly as practically possible.The overcrowding has sometimes forced Sianturi to turn to Indonesia’s zoos, which are generally known for poor management and outdated facilities. The infamous Surabaya Zoo has seen large numbers of animal deaths, for example.Sianturi recently sent a reticulated python (Malayopython reticulatus) to the Pematang Siantar Zoo. The Ministry of Environment and Forestry said in 2015 that only four of 58 registered zoos in the country were decent and appropriate, while the rest were either improper or not yet accredited.“It’s not just in North Sumatra — they have the same problems throughout the country,” said Ian Singleton, the SOCP’s director.A rescue center on Bali island is overcrowded, for example, with 89 individuals as of March. Most are unlikely to be released, according to in-house veterinarian Dyah Ayu Risdasari Tiyar Novarini. One resident, a Moluccan cockatoo named Martha, had to have her leg amputated after it became septic from being chained up by her previous owner.In May 2015, the arrest in the Javan port city of Surabaya of a man with 23 yellow-crested cockatoos (Cacatua sulphurea) stuffed in plastic water bottles prompted a deluge of reports from citizens wanting to surrender their pet cockatoos to the state.Martha, the cockatoo whose leg was amputated. Her caretakers say she can never be released. Photo by Luh de Suriyani/Mongabay-Indonesia.Minimal allocation from the provincial budget and inefficient bureaucracy in the process of releasing animals are the main causes of overloading at rescue centers, said I Gede Nyoman Bayu Wirayudha, a veterinarian and founder of the Bali-based Friends of the National Parks Foundation (FNPF).“It’s very much likely that rescue centers are no longer able to set free the animals back to the wild because of this condition,” he said.But allotting more cash to expand rescue centers doesn’t quite fix the core issue, the SOCP’s Singleton suggested.“The bigger problem is lack of law enforcement and prosecutions,” he said. “If BKSDA confiscates animals [but] does not prosecute, then there is no effect on the trade and the numbers of animals being kept. People just keep on buying them.”Perpetrators of wildlife crimes, including animal trading, are charged under the 1990 Conservation Law, which stipulates a maximum punishment five years imprisonment and a fine of up to 100 million rupiah ($7,490). But in practice, suspects almost always receive a much softer sentence, or none at all.By comparison, the maximum penalty for a wildlife offense in Vietnam was recently raised to 15 years behind bars. The change is incorporated in the 2015 Penal Code, which was finally approved by the Vietnamese National Assembly in June.The Indonesian House of Representatives is considering its own revision of the 1990 Conservation Law, with green groups calling for harsher sentences, provisons on online trading and more.In the meantime, Sianturi doesn’t let the challenges discourage her from campaigning against the illegal wildlife trade and from rescuing more animals.“All of the rescued animals in Sibolangit and Barumun are in the rehabilitation process and, hopefully, they can be released back to the wild,” she said.Banner image: A slow loris in North Sumatra. The primate can secrete venom from under its armpits in self defense. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. The head of the state conservation agency in North Sumatra says both of her rescue centers are over capacity. She is having to send animals to zoos.The glut is due to an increase of people handing over protected species to the government, in line with efforts by authorities and NGOs to raise awareness of the law.Dedicated facilities exist to receive some species, but for others, authorities have had to improvise. RUMAH KINANGKUNG — Authorities were explaining the rules governing protected animals to residents of this North Sumatran village when a man appeared, carrying a small, scaly creature by the tail.It was a live pangolin, the world’s most trafficked mammal. The man had been catching them in the forest and selling them to brokers, who smuggle them to China and Vietnam in a thriving international trade. “Now we know these animals must be protected from the threat of extinction,” Putra Alam Tarigan said. Article published by mongabayauthor Animal Rescue, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered, Environment, Forests, Pet Trade, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Rehabilitation, Wildlife Trafficking last_img read more

From tarsiers to cloud rats, scientist strives to save Philippine species

first_imgCritically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Interviews, Primates, Research, Rodents In this interview, Milada Rehakova shares how she and her husband rediscovered the bushy-tailed cloud rat, previously thought extinct, on Dinagat Island in 2012.Rehakova is currently working with local allies to establish the first protected areas on Dinagat Island to protect the cloud rat and tarsiers among other species.Rehokova is also working to save the tarsiers of Bohol from an exploitative tourist trade. In 2012, Dr. Milada Rehakova’s research brought her back to Dinagat Island, Philippines. It was her second expedition to the island in pursuit of insights on the tarsier, but she had another rare animal in her mind too: the bushy-tailed cloud rat (Crateromys australis). The species had been presumed extinct – it hadn’t been seen in decades – but Rehakova thought it might still be around. She laughs as she tells the story of how her husband, skeptical that she’d find an extinct species, was actually the first to spot the bushy-tailed cloud rat’s brown body with its unmistakable black and white tail.Before Rehakova’s rediscovery, the rodent had only revealed itself to science once before, in 1975. In the meantime, mining efforts have chipped away at the bushy-tailed cloud rat’s forest habitat.“It’s a shame that there are no protected areas on Dinagat Island on the national level,” Rehakova said. “Mining companies have divided all the land and it’s just a question of time when they will start.”Czech zoologist Milada Rehakova (second from the right) studies tarsier social behavior and vocalizations in the field. Photo by Vaclav RehakThe 2012 encounter captured photo and video evidence of the critically-endangered animal’s existence, giving conservationists a new reason to push for more forest protections. The effort brings together Philippine and Czech teams, including a team member from the Philippine Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), and Rehakova is hopeful that key areas will remain intact both for forest-dependent species and Dinagat Island locals.“This is also important for the people, and we want to teach them, to let them know that they, they, need the forest – not just the animals, not just the cloud rat and other species that they never meet in their life and never care for – but the people are the ones who need the forest,” Rehakova said.While the Czech-Philippine organizations map and plan protected sites on Dinagat, Rehakova’s other conservation endeavor, The Tarsius Project, educates visitors and locals in Bohol. Just a few years ago, laws allowed locals to catch wild tarsiers for tourist displays as long as owners only had two animals at a time. But tarsiers are sensitive, and Rehakova noticed that owners’ inadequate care resulted in tarsiers’ quick deaths forcing them to continue capturing from wild populations en masse. Rehakova brought the problem to the attention of the authorities, and today, authorities no longer allow such ownership.Instead, The Tarsius Project collaborates with Habitat Bohol and other organizations to operate a visitors’ center, which includes a spacious and appropriate home for a few tarsiers, including a breeding space that saw the rare birth of a healthy captive-bred tarsier in May 2017.The advancements on Dinagat and Bohol Islands are occuring through a whirlwind year politically for environmentalists working in the Philippines. The extensive archipelago is home to thousands of endemic species, but mining has long threatened many biodiversity hotspots in the region and the unique animals living within them. For a few months, a new DENR Secretary, Regina Lopez, inspired hope and halted mining throughout the nation in efforts to preserve the Philippines’ astounding ecological riches, including on Dinagat. But government officials voted Lopez out of office this past May, and the fate of the island remains unclear. Still, Rehakova remains optimistic that current plans for establishing protected areas will move forward in DENR offices.Researchers are still making significant discoveries on tarsiers like last year’s finding of multiple tarsier subspecies in the Philippines. Rehakova’s own field work includes building libraries of tarsier vocalizations and seeing how they compare across different islands, which may help researchers establish the existence of even more species. And though she’s been studying the animal for almost a decade, this nocturnal animal remains so elusive and their behaviors can range so wildly, that our current knowledge of the animal is only beginning, from defining tarsier social systems, to descriptions of their play behaviors, to fighting to keep Dinagat Island’s remaining forests intact.Dr. Milada Rehakova is collaborating with various organizations to map and establish the first nationally-recognized protected areas on Dinagat Island. Photo courtesy of Milada Rehakova.AN INTERVIEW WITH MILADA REHAKOVA Jacqueline Hernandez for Mongabay: What’s your background, and how did you come to work in the Philippines?Milada Rehakova: I have always been fascinated about animals and nature and wildlife since my childhood, so I went to study zoology. I finished my PhD in Charles University in Prague and for my diploma and dissertation I studied monkeys in India. It was my first time [doing field studies], and I really started to love it. I studied play behavior, which is still among my interests… it’s amazing. Then [in 2007] I went to the Philippines with my friend and colleague, a zoologist from university… I visited Bohol Island and I simply fell in love with tarsiers and started to plan research and conservation projects on Bohol on Philippine Tarsiers. That’s how it started. I worked in the Philippines and I went back there for field research in 2009.Mongabay: How did that take you to Dinagat Island specifically?Milada Rehakova: On the first visit, we traveled around several island including Bohol. And then I started to work on tarsiers; Bohol is most famous for them. But, it was already known at the time that there is a population of tarsiers on Dinagat Island that would possibly be distinct, as it was confirmed later on by an American zoologist and his colleagues. So I went to Dinagat to see the Dinagat tarsiers and search for them, and then I got to know there are cloud rats that are possibly living [there], but had not been found for several years. It just caught my interest and I started to search for the cloud rats.I went back the first time in 2009, when I succeeded on seeing the tarsiers but not the cloud rats. I was searching for the cloud rat in 2012 when I went there for a second time with my husband. We were in close touch with William Oliver who was the leading person of the cloud rat conservation program in the Philippines, and he told us there were several expeditions looking for this animal, but unsuccessfully. So we were mainly searching among locals, asking if they saw the species, if they knew it or not. That’s the usual way you can [find] the animals, to ask people who go to the forest, who live there, and who might get [you] in touch with these animals. We hadn’t gotten much information from them, but we got lucky ourselves while sitting in the forest, searching for the tarsiers and wildlife.Map via Tarsius ProjectIt was my husband who first rediscovered the cloud rat and it was quite easy to say that it really was a Dinagat cloud rat because it has a very distinct tail, black and white, so it cannot be confused with any other species.But it took us another [ten] days to get the picture and video footage to really scientifically prove that we had found this missing animal.Mongabay: That sounds exciting! Milada Rehakova: Yeah because it was my husband and he texted me, “I found it! It has a black and white tail.” I said, “Did you get a picture?” But he didn’t have a camera. [The camera] was with me and we were on opposite sides [of the forest]. Then it happened again a third time, and after 10 days we finally got it. It was really exciting.Mongabay: What’s known about the cloud rat’s life history and evolution? Milada Rehakova: They are rodents, and the [genus, Crateromys] are endemic to the Philippines. This [genus] are not found anywhere else in the world. So they live in the Philippines on several islands. There are like 13 species, 5 genera described, and just last year there were five other species described on Luzon Island, which is north of the Philippines. It’s the biggest island and has great biodiversity.Most of the species of cloud rat live in the mountain forest there, high in the trees. That’s why they’re called cloud rats…they are always touching the clouds. So, they are hardly visible to people, except the Luzon people. The people of Luzon used to hunt them. They developed hunting techniques like smoking out tree holes and training dogs to hunt them for food or as pets.But on other islands it’s not a tradition, so people just don’t know about this animal. They hardly meet them in the forest, which was the case of the Dinagat cloud rat. It was first seen and described in 1975 on a zoology expedition, and since that time no single animal, no single specimen had been seen scientifically. Scientists were starting to think it was extinct, but [then] we rediscovered it after 37 years.Mongabay: Was its habitat already endangered when it was first seen in 1975?Milada Rehakova: Yes, it was. It’s a shame that there are no protected areas on Dinagat Island on the national level. All the forests that are left there are covered by mining claims. Mining companies have divided all the land and it’s just a question of time when they will start mining. This starts with clearing all of the forest, taking out the soil and taking out the minerals. We have visited several places there where the forest still exists, usually watershed areas that are protected by the local people or the local ordinances or laws…but not on the national level.So it was a question about what to do with the cloud rat rediscovery. It’s quite risky to publish such results because it can lead to very quick extinctions when people know, “Oh, there’s a Critically Endangered species,” and immediately want to go and collect the species. We were aware of these risks so we didn’t publish the exact locations.I’m very, very pleased and very lucky that I’ve been contacted by a Philippine organization last year with a proposal that they want to map and establish protected areas on Dinagat Island. They invited me to join their team and help with that. That’s how I came to Dinagat Island for a third time last year.Mongabay: I’ve read a bit on how authorities have helped with conservation efforts in the Philippines. I’m curious to know a bit more about how they’ve helped specifically with the bushy-tailed cloud rat? Dinagat cloud rat. Illustration by William OliverMilada Rehakova: It was a local NGO [Green Mindanao] that contacted me, but they were working closely with DENR, which stands for Department of Environment and Natural Resources, a government organization. It’s good that we can work together because it’s the DENR who should really push through all the laws and change legislation. We have one team member who has joined us from the DENR. He joined us for a couple of days to get training and get to know what we are doing in the field. And now he can push our plans forward in his office. We are still in touch, so it seems they are really proceeding towards this goal and that the protected areas will be established on Dinagat Island. I’m very happy about that because, as I said, they were all covered by mining claims. They want to exclude some land as protected areas. Their hope and goal is to have the whole island mining-free. It would be great. Dinagat Island is really unique. You know, the Philippines are among the top biodiversity hotspots in the world, and Dinagat is special among the Philippine islands. It has a high rate of endemism, of species that are not found anywhere else.Mongabay: Will you speak a bit about any of the existing effects of mining on Dinagat? What does the landscape look like now, especially the cloud rat habitat?Milada Rehakova: It’s kind of sad to see what’s going on there, when you go out to the island and you expect to see pristine nature and beautiful forest and animals… and you instead see the worn land and destroyed habitat. A huge amount of the land is already taken out. They take out the trees, then the soil, even the rocks, so it’s a disaster in some places. We have visited the mining areas and there’s just nothing left.The only chance is to have really protected areas. It can’t go together; if the mining company is there they just destroy everything because they need to take the soil and the minerals, so the forest is gone. And the cloud rats need the forest. The only chance for them is to stop mining in several goal areas there, and protect the forest. This is also important for the people, and we want to teach them, to let them know that they, they, need the forest – not just the animals, not just the cloud rat and other species that they never meet in their life and never care for – but the people are the ones who need the forest. They need to protect the watersheds or there will be no water.It’s happened on several islands where they cleared all the forest and then there was no water, so then people started wondering, “Oh maybe we shouldn’t do that,” and they started planting again… but the animals are just gone, you know? Once you wipe out the species they cannot come back. That’s something that people should know; that it’s for them, as well as for all of nature.Mongabay: How did the Czech-Philippine partnership come about?Milada Rehakova: It started with my first visit of Dinagat in 2009. I met some great people there and visited some places and definitely wanted to come back…I wanted to search for the tarsiers and thought, “Okay, cloud rats are interesting; they’re almost extinct so why not try to find them?” I took my husband with me, and he’s a computer programmer. He didn’t believe me at first: “Oh, right, my wife is going to find an extinct species.” So we go, and then it was him who found it… (laughs), it’s a good story. So that’s how the Czech and Philippine partnership started. I found some great people who wanted to help me with conservation, who were already aware of the necessity of protection. We kept in touch and then I was contacted by the Green Mindanao organization who wanted to do the land protection,­ mapping, and establishing the protected areas, so we joined the expedition again together with my husband and with my colleague Lubomir Peske who works with me on Bohol, and was with me on Dinagat before. So that’s our team who goes to the Philippines through the years.Mongabay: Since the DENR secretary is no longer the same person, are protections indeed still moving forward on Dinagat?Milada Rehakova: I don’t have the very latest information. Gina Lopez was very anti-mining and she is very passionate about wildlife protection. She was really going strictly towards this goal, but apparently it was too strict for this country so she was removed. It happened when I was in the Philippines last time. I just came back in May, so I don’t know what exactly is going on now. I hope at least some of the protected areas will be established.Mongabay: Is there any kind of resistance that environmental groups get from mining companies?Milada Rehakova: I didn’t get in touch with mining companies that regularly. I just visited these areas in 2012, five years ago, but I’m not in touch with them directly.Mongabay: How do the locals in Dinagat respond to the possibility of protections on the island? Do they want mining to be there for the income?Milada Rehakova: That’s a good question. I’m very happy [that] I get news from my colleagues that the locals are really willing to participate in habitat protection. Mining brings money. That’s why it occurs there. It brings money, it employs people, it brings money for the municipalities, and this is how it occur[s]. But the people [have] started to realize that it’s not the best thing and it’s not everything just to have money. And also the money doesn’t go to all the people. It goes to just some of the politicians, basically. So there are more and more people who are aware about the need and necessity of protection of the habitat, as I said, of the watersheds, to have water for the community, to have the forest to go there and collect the firewood. Because if there is mining then they will take out all the forest and there will be no wood for the people. So they want to protect the forest, for it to be there for themselves, which is a good sign.Mongabay: Tarsiers are obviously charismatic animals, but I was curious what is it about them that you find most interesting?Milada Rehakova: When I first planned to start with the research, there was not much known about their social behavior [or their] social system. There are several species of tarsiers; one lives in the Philippines, the others live in Borneo, Sulawesi, and neighboring islands. Every species has a different social system. Some live in family groups, some are solitary, some have monogamous mating systems or [are] polygamous. This [social system] was unknown in the Philippine Tarsiers so that’s what we started to study. We used radiotelemetry because it’s very hard to follow the Philippine Tarsiers. The Sulawesi species is much easier. But it’s hard or even impossible to follow the Philippine Tarsiers without the radio-collaring. So we put small radio-collars around their necks and followed them with an antenna for several months and studied their home range size, habitat use, social system, even breeding and infant and mother behavior. As I told you, I’m interested in play behavior so I have recorded the play behavior for the first time in tarsiers.Philippine tarsier. Photo courtesy of Milada Rehakova.Mongabay: Can you tell me a bit about what play behaviors you observed?Milada Rehakova: There are several types of play behavior. Locomotor play, social play, object play, so I’ve observed all of these like three times in the tarsiers. It’s very cute because the animal is just a couple of centimeters tall. It’s jumping up and down on the trees, playing with the leaves, and playing with the mother. They jump on the mother, they started play-fighting together with their hands and mouths. It was very quick. Then it ended, and then they were jumping again through the forest.Mongabay: How did the tarsiers end up on different islands? Milada Rehakova: There are now three genera of tarsiers described. One is in the Philippines, one is in Borneo, and one is in Sulawesi. These three lineages are really the most distinct. There are several species in Sulawesi within that genus. This is how the evolution went. One lineage to Borneo, one went to Sulawesi, and one in Sulawesi. And then there is greater biodiversity within Sulawesi, with several species described. There was also a recent study in the Philippines again where they discovered four lineages that [may] be distinct subspecies, or species. It depends [on] how you look at species and subspecies because they live on different islands so they can’t breed together anyway; but there are four lineages in the Philippines, which was discovered in the last year. The animals look very similar so you cannot say the color is distinct or something; they all look very similar. The most helpful tool is genetics… In Sulawesi they just used acoustic communication. Different species talk differently; they have different languages. They live in the same area, they live next to each other, but they talk differently so you can say, “Okay they don’t breed; they are different species.” These are the two most important tools in distinguishing species in such small nocturnal mammals.Mongabay: On the website it said that vocalizations were one of the first markers of the cloud rat’s existence. Is that right?Milada Rehakova: The cloud rat is not that vocal like tarsiers are. For tarsiers, we sit in the forest and listen for the vocalizations. And that’s how we found the cloud rat. The cloud rat was vocalizing but very [quietly], but mostly you could hear it walking through the trees. It was quite noisy, shaking the branches and making quite a bit of noise for such a nocturnal animal. In terms of studying vocalizations, we studied tarsiers in Bohol so we can describe some acoustic signals, and this can be used later for comparisons on other islands.Mongabay: How did local authorities in Bohol help protect tarsiers on the main tourist road? Milada Rehakova: The tourist business mainly affects the tarsiers in Bohol. Luckily, it’s not on the other islands. On Bohol it’s a severe problem because tourists want to see the tarsiers. A huge number of tourists come every day. New places were [opening] up to show [captive] tarsiers to people, and it was just a disaster. The tarsiers are very sensitive. They cannot survive in captivity very well; they need to have specific conditions. The tarsiers just died and owners just kept removing new tarsiers from the wild, of course, legally. They had a permit to own two tarsiers, so when two tarsiers died, they just went and caught more.I thought I should do something about that. If we want to protect the species, this is maybe the biggest threat because it was really a large number of tarsiers disappearing from the forest due to this. We approached the local authorities together with the great help of our ambassador. It was good that they listened to us and really forced these places to close down and to transfer these animals to another place built specifically for them. It’s much bigger and much fewer animals inside. There are still some animals involved in this tourist business but it’s not as large a number as it was before.Mongabay: Has conservation education also helped stop the flow of tarsiers coming out of the forest?Milada Rehakova: That’s something that we are really focusing on. We have our local manager there and he’s very into education. He and his colleagues developed several interactive educational programs and visited elementary schools, high schools, universities, even did some trainings for teachers. More than 700 kids and teachers participated in this program. I hope that this will have some impact on their lives. We focus on the young generation to bring this knowledge to their parents as well and hopefully to change the future. We work in the areas where tarsiers are quite common, so kids know that it’s not something that lives somewhere else, but it’s something that lives behind their houses in the forest. We’ve been doing this educational work since 2009, when we got in touch with local schools and we’ve continued and developed more and more programs. We also educate visitors together with our partner organizations; we have developed a visitor center there and eco-touristic programs that can educate tourists who go for the program, and also the locals who guide them. They learn that it’s better to have protected forests because it attracts people.The visitors’ center on Bohol Island allows tourists to see tarsiers in a safe and comfortable environment. Photo courtesy of Milada Rehakova.Mongabay: You’ve had some recent success with breeding tarsiers in the center. Can you talk a bit about that? Milada Rehakova: With our partner organizations, we have developed a visitors’ park with a guided tour, garden, and eco-tour programs for the night safari in the forest with the visitor’s hall where people [are] educated about tarsiers. Then, there’s a separate place for research and conservation purposes. We have built thick enclosures planted with trees to be as natural as we can provide for the animals. We now have one pair of tarsiers, one male and one female. The first year we caught them, there was already successful mating. Unfortunately, the baby died, probably during birth. Two days after we found that dead body on the floor, so we couldn’t do anything about it. Since tarsier breeding is seasonal, we had to wait for another year: a half year for mating, and another half-year during pregnancy. The female gave birth about the same time, in the beginning of May, and the baby is still alive. It’s now two months old, so we’ve passed the most critical period. Now we are really keeping our fingers crossed that it’ll survive. This would be a huge success because there have been some captive-bred tarsiers who didn’t survive until adulthood and didn’t breed again. So we want to have this baby grow up and then hopefully breed again, which would be a great success. This would be the first time in the Philippines, in the local country and area of origin. That’s why we started breeding the tarsiers there; to have their local climate, food, and to eliminate stress from transfer.Mongabay: At what age do they reach maturity?Milada Rehakova: It’s not exactly known but it seems that at about two years they’re able to breed. They stay with the mother for quite a long time, almost until the next baby is born, so almost a year.Mongabay: Anything else you’d like to add?Milada Rehakova: Anyone can get directly involved in our program by adopting tarsiers. It’s symbolic, of course, but we welcome regular supporters to become members of our program this way. We also sell some tarsier products!Editor’s note 8/19/17: The story was updated to clarify the recent discoveries of tarsier species in the Philippines. Article published by Erik Hoffnercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Do catch and release-induced abortions harm shark and ray populations?

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Maria Salazar CITATIONSAdams, K.R., Fetterplace, L.C., Davis, A.R., Taylor, M.D., & Knott, N.A. (2018). Sharks, rays and abortion: The prevalence of capture-induced parturition in elasmobranchs. Biological Conservation 217: 11-27. Female sharks and rays are more susceptible to aborting their young after being captured than previously realized, according to a recent review of scientific literature.The review found that 88 species that bear live young were susceptible. Among a subset of those species for which adequate data was available, researchers estimated that an average of 24 percent of pregnant females abort their offspring when captured.The authors argue that the phenomenon may be responsible for lost generations of threatened species.However, outside researchers consulted for this story say that the killing of adult sharks poses a much bigger threat to species survival. Scientists have long raised concerns over the future of sharks and rays, of which some 100 million are caught and killed on fishing boats every year. They have paid somewhat less attention, however, to the animals that survive being hauled from the water and tossed back — and which are more susceptible to aborting their young after being captured than previously thought, according to a paper published this month in the journal Biological Conservation.“Capture-induced parturition” (CIP) was the term the researchers settled on to describe the phenomenon, which they believe may be throttling already-declining populations. They sifted through academic papers detailing encounters with elasmobranchs, a group that includes sharks, rays, skates and sawfish, which have cartilage skeletons instead of bone, and large, buoyant livers in place of swim bladders. They were surprised by the frequency of casual references to sharks and rays aborting while caught, with the first account dating to 1810, and by the absence of any research looking directly at the phenomenon.In all, they found 139 reports of CIP in 88 species that bear live young. Twenty-six of those reports contained enough data for the team to estimate the prevalence of CIP in 24 species. For those species, they found that between 2 and 85 percent of pregnant females lose their offspring through the stress of entanglement in nets or ensnarement on lines, for a cross-species average of 24 percent.Kye Adams, lead author of the paper and a doctoral student at the University of Wollongong in Australia, warns that subsequent generations of some species may continue to decline even if direct killing were to be halted. “The 88 species represent a broad range from those that are of least concern for conservation up to some that are critically endangered,” he said.The paper notes that few if any evaluations of shark and ray populations currently account for the loss of pups to CIP or the consequences this could have for populations. It assumes that most prematurely birthed sharks die.“It is possible that this generational mortality could be having an underestimated impact on discarded species with otherwise high survival after release,” Adams said. He and his fellow researchers argue that more studies should investigate the long-term effects of CIP and its prevalence in commercial fishing.Most elasmobranchs are particularly vulnerable to overfishing because they tend to mature late and invest a lot of energy in a small number of offspring. Many species have particularly long gestation periods — the spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias) carries its pups for 22 months, for example — while others give birth only once every two years. All this makes elasmobranchs among the slowest organisms to recover from population declines.The researchers think CIP is an evolved stress mechanism, either to distract potential predators or to allow pups to escape the mother’s death.A shortnose spurdog (Squalus megalops) bears a pre-term pup prematurely after being captured in a trawl net. Photo by Lachlan Fetterplace. Banner image: A type of electric ray, the Tasmanian numbfish (Narcine tasmaniensis), with one of its aborted embryos. Photo by Lachlan Fetterplace. Tasmanian numbfishes (Narcine tasmaniensis) abort their litters en-masse. The small embryo size means that many are likely lost through holes in the fishing net before it is brought on deck, making it difficult to determine exactly how many embryos are in a trawl. Photo by Lachlan Fetterplace.The team also searched social media for evidence of CIP in posts by recreational fishers.“There are lots of videos online where people have caught a shark or ray, brought it onto land and it begins premature birth or aborting its litter and it is then kept on land for a long time, often with someone forcibly pulling out pups,” said Lachlan Fetterplace, Adams’s coauthor and fellow researcher at the University of Wollongong.Many of the fishers are well-meaning and even claim to be assisting with the pups’ delivery, failing to realize the animal is undergoing CIP because of the stress of being captured, Fetterplace said. “The best thing to do is return the animal to the water as quickly as possible,” he added.Besides fishing, the paper notes that research on elasmobranchs is a source of CIP, as many experiments on sharks and rays involve capturing individuals, tagging them with a sensor to track their movements and releasing them.An endangered common guitarfish (Rhinobatos rhinobatos) with aborted pups. The yellow yolk sacs provide an energy-rich food source for developing young. Photo by Kolette Grobler.Nicholas Dulvy, a professor of marine biodiversity and conservation at Simon Fraser University in Canada, said he believes the issue of CIP is small fry compared to the slaughter of adult sharks.“Killing breeding adults is the more serious issue … from an extinction risk and fisheries sustainability perspective,” said Dulvy, who co-chairs the Shark Specialist Group of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.He added that most sharks and rays that reach full term and are born under normal circumstances die before breeding anyway. “Hence, [newborns] contribute little to population growth rate, except in the least fecund sharks and rays such as manta and devil rays,” he said.Kim Friedman, a senior fishery resources officer at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, agreed that the severest impacts to elasmobranchs from fishing arise from the death of adults and was cautious as to whether CIP could be depleting shark and ray populations.“This might not have a huge effect on population growth rate … but that of course will be species dependent,” he said, suggesting that prolific breeders such as the blue shark (Prionace glauca) may be entirely unaffected.The new paper argues that humans can alleviate stress and injury to sharks and rays caught in fishing equipment by keeping them in the water and carefully cutting the line or net around any that are entangled. Friedman agreed that enforcing best practices in terms of “release strategies that promote live release” on fishing boats could help counter both unintended deaths of adults and losses from CIP. But he noted that for now there is no way to know how well fishers adhere to these principles.“This area of rapidly changing practice — improved release of sharks and rays — has no dedicated programs of compliance measurement that are done systematically at present,” he said.Amid uncertainty over how the most vulnerable elasmobranch species are coping with human pressures, study author Adams advocates for caution and further research.“Conservation wise, the biggest chance we can give endangered species that abort when fished is to limit activity in areas that are important nursery grounds,” he said. Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Interns, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Oceans, Rays, Research, Sharks, Sharks And Rays, Wildlife last_img read more

Tree-dwelling animals can ‘climb’ away from climate change, study finds

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A new study has found that the temperature within a tropical forest varies considerably, with tree canopies experiencing wider extremes of heating and cooling compared to the ground or soil.The range of canopy temperatures in tropical forests at the bottom of mountains overlaps considerably with those at the top of the mountains, which suggests that canopy animals likely have the physiology that might allow them to move across a mountain gradient freely unhindered by the climate.This implies that tree-dwelling tropical animals might be more resilient to climate change, according to the study. Animals that live in trees in the tropics are likely to be better at crossing mountains and dealing with climate change compared to ground-dwelling animals, a new study published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment suggests.In the tropics, mountains are typically considered to be barriers for lowland animals. According to a popular hypothesis put forward by ecologist Daniel H. Janzen in 1967, this is because the tropics have a relatively steady climate, with temperatures never getting too hot or too cold. Tropical organisms there tend to be adapted to very narrow ranges of temperatures. So an animal adapted to warm temperatures living at the bottom of a mountain might not be able to tolerate the colder temperatures it encounters as it moves higher up.“Think about a layered cake,” Brett Scheffers, an assistant professor in the department of wildlife, ecology and conservation at the University of Florida, Gainesville, U.S., told Mongabay. “One band represents a range of temperatures, the next band represents another range of temperatures and so on. There’s not a lot of overlap between those bands. What this means is that animals living on the bottom of a mountain will likely never have experienced temperatures at the top of the mountain and vice versa.”This suggests that tropical animals could have a harder time “escaping” from a changing climate because of the temperature constraints that mountains impose.Trees within Mossman Gorge, a lush rainforest in Queensland, Australia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.However, temperatures within a tropical forest are not uniform. Trees, for instance, create large vertical temperature gradients — that is, it is cooler at the base of a tree, under its shade, compared to the top of the tree that’s that exposed directly to the sun.To see what this variability means for tropical animals’ ability to adapt to climate change, Scheffers and his colleagues monitored temperatures of the soil, ground and canopy of tropical forests across mountains in Madagascar, the Philippines and Australia.Overall, the team found that tree canopies experienced a wide range of temperatures compared to the soil or the ground. This implies that animals living in trees are exposed to a wider variety of temperatures than those living near the ground: During the day, canopy animals are under the hot sun, while at night, the lack of vegetation above exposes the animals to colder temperatures compared to ground-dwelling creatures.Previous studies have found that this is often the case. In the rainforests of Panama, for example, researchers have found that ants living in the canopy can tolerate heat that is 3.5 to 5 degrees Celsius (6.3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than ant species living in the constant shade near the ground.Scheffer’s study also found that the range of canopy temperatures in forests at the bottom of mountains overlapped considerably with those at the top of the mountains. By contrast, there was very little overlap in soil or ground temperatures between lowland and upland forests.“Since the climate [of the canopy] is shared across mountains, it suggests that canopy animals likely have the physiology that allows them to move across a mountain gradient freely unabated by climate,” Scheffers said. “And this movement has implications for where the animals can go, which could ultimately impact the speciation or extinction of the species.”In short, tree-dwelling tropical animals are more likely to be able to move across mountain passes and “climb” away from climate change than ground-dwelling animals, Scheffers said.“The hypothesis and data are very reasonable,” Janzen, currently at the University of Pennsylvania, told Mongabay. “My concept applies to any instance that compares things in more fluctuating environments with those in more constant environments. My old example was the case that I could spot back then. Were I to write the same paper today, I would have simply listed more of these contrasts, and understory versus canopy is certainly one of them.”However, not all tree-dwelling animals might be successful at dealing with environmental stress, Scheffers warns.“There may be exceptions to the rule,” he said. “We are putting out a perspective about what might be happening out there. And we hope that lots of people test it, challenge it.”Malabar giant squirrel. Photo by Udayan Dasgupta / Mongabay.Citation:Scheffers, B.R. and Williams, S.E. (2018). Tropical mountain passes are out of reach – but not for arboreal species. Front Ecol Environ 2018; doi: 10.1002/fee.1764.center_img Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Climate Change, Climate Science, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Green, Insects, Mammals, Rainforest Conservation, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife last_img read more

Why intact forests are important

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Animals, Biodiversity, boreal forests, Degraded Lands, Environment, Forest Fragmentation, Forests, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Logging, logging roads, Old Growth Forests, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Roads, Temperate Forests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Citation:James E. M. Watson, Tom Evans, Oscar Venter, Brooke Williams, Ayesha Tulloch, Claire Stewart, Ian Thompson, Justina C. Ray, Kris Murray, Alvaro Salazar, Clive McAlpine, Peter Potapov, Joe Walston, John G. Robinson, Michael Painter, David Wilkie, Christopher Filardi, William F. Laurance, Richard A. Houghton, Sean Maxwell, Hedley Grantham, Cristián Samper, Stephanie Wang, Lars Laestadius, Rebecca K. Runting, Gustavo A. Silva-Chávez, Jamison Ervin, David Lindenmayer. The exceptional value of intact forest ecosystems. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 2018; DOI: 10.1038/s41559-018-0490-xFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Overall, the world lost more than 7 percent of its intact forest landscapes in just over a decade, a trend that appears to be accelerating.A new study discusses how intact forests are critically important for mitigating climate change, maintaining water supplies, safeguarding biodiversity and even protecting human health.However, it warns that global policies aimed at reducing deforestation are not putting enough emphasis on the preservation of the world’s dwindling intact forests, instead relying on a one-size-fits-all approach that may end up doing more harm than good.The researchers urge more inclusion and prioritization of intact forests in global commitments and policies aimed at curbing deforestation. When it comes to habitat quality and ecosystem services, research has shown that natural landscapes do it best. A new study, published today in Nature, adds fodder to this argument, describing how intact forests are critically important for mitigating climate change, maintaining water supplies, safeguarding biodiversity and even protecting human health. However, it warns that global policies aimed at reducing deforestation are not putting enough emphasis on the preservation of the world’s dwindling intact forests, instead relying on a one-size-fits-all approach that may end up doing more harm than good.Intact forests are large areas of connected habitat free from human-caused disturbance. From the Amazon rainforest in South America to the taiga that rings the Arctic, the Earth’s intact forests provide a diverse array of unbroken habitats for many – if not most – of the planet’s terrestrial wildlife.But intact forests are disappearing. An analysis released last year found that, overall, the world lost more than 7 percent of its intact forest landscapes in just over a decade, a trend that appears to be accelerating. Zooming in, the analysis reveals bigger losses for specific regions: 10.1 percent in Africa, 13.9 percent in Southeast Asia, nearly 22 percent in Australia. At the country level, Paraguay came out particularly bad, losing almost 80 percent of its intact forest landscapes between 2000 and 2013.Satellite data show only a few tracts of intact forest remain in Paraguay.The driving force behind these losses varies depending on location, but agriculture, logging and road building are global heavy-hitters. And the disturbance doesn’t need to be big in size to have a big impact; research has shown even small logging roads can open up a “Pandora’s box” of destructive repercussions that can threaten the integrity of a once-untouched forest. Such seemingly small, localized deforestation activities have resulted in a situation where the world’s forests have essentially been cut up into an estimated 50 million fragments – which scientists think is closing in on a tipping point at which forest fragmentation may dramatically accelerate.In response to intact forest losses, researchers at institutions around the world teamed up to synthesize hundreds of previous studies and figure out just how important these forests are and how best to protect them on a global scale.They found that despite their reduction, intact forests currently absorb around 25 percent of the world’s human-generated carbon emissions and are thus playing a big role in offsetting global warming. According to their study, intact forests sequester more carbon than logged, degraded or even planted forests. In addition to the direct removal of trees, human encroachment also opens up forests to hunters; the researchers write that as hunters remove animals from a forest, the trees that depend on these animals to spread their seeds may not be able to reproduce, which could in turn affect how much carbon a forest is able to store.In addition to affecting the global climate, intact forests may also help regulate local and regional climates. Research indicates that when intact forest is cleared or degraded, cloud cover is reduced and droughts are more likely to happen. Studies also show that non-degraded forests are better at holding water in the soil, as well as stabilizing slopes and preventing erosion. This, the researchers write, may help ensure water security for local and Indigenous communities.Intact forests are also better at providing habitat than those that have been degraded. Studies have shown intact forests host more wildlife, and their loss correlates with the retreat or even the extinction of forest-dependent species. Along with reducing a forest’s biodiversity, research indicates degradation can also affect the overall functioning of its ecosystems.Species with big ranges, like jaguars, need huge swaths of connected habitat in order to survive.The authors of the new Nature study write that despite the wealth of research on the benefits of intact forests and the consequences of their degradation, international policies aimed at reducing deforestation do not sufficiently prioritize their conservation. They write that efforts like the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, which seek to sustainably manage forests, fight desertification and halt land degradation and biodiversity loss, stand to fall short of their targets if they don’t do more to address the importance of preserving intact forests.Specifically, the authors write that many of these global initiatives focus too much on forest extent and not enough on its condition, effectively lumping all forest cover into one conservation category.“As vital carbon sinks and habitats for millions of people and imperilled wildlife, it is well known that forest protection is essential for any environmental solution–yet not all forests are equal,” James Watson of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the University of Queensland said in a statement. “Forest conservation must be prioritized based on their relative values–and Earth’s remaining intact forests are the crown jewels, ones that global climate and biodiversity policies must now emphasize.”A logging road pierces rainforest in Sabah, Malaysia.Watson and his colleagues warn that if international policies and agreements don’t make more of an effort to prioritize intact forests, then they stand to disappear – and with them, important reservoirs of biodiversity and one of the world’s biggest carbon sinks.“Even if all global targets to halt deforestation were met, humanity might be left with only degraded, damaged forests, in need of costly and sometimes unfeasible restoration, open to a cascade of further threats and perhaps lacking the resilience needed to weather the stresses of climate change,“ said Tom Evans, WCS Director of Forest Conservation and Climate and joint lead author of the study.“This is a huge gamble to take, for conservation, for climate change, and for some of the most vulnerable human communities on the planet,” Evans said.Mongabay reached out to the offices overseeing the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, UN Sustainable Development Goals and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, but received no response by press time.In their study, Evans, Watson and their colleagues put forth several recommendations to fill what they see as a gap in international policy. First, they urge the creation and standardization of metrics to measure forest intactness, which would help prioritize action to areas that are the most intact. They write that the intact forest concept should also be embedded in reports produced by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This, they say, will help ensure that the international commitments supporting the Paris Agreement will include and prioritize the conservation of intact forests.The researchers also urge support for efforts on both the global and local scale that seek to limit road expansion, regulate hunting and extractive activities like mining and logging, invest in protected areas, and help attain land rights for Indigenous communities. They write that degraded forests should be restored and made more productive rather than opening up intact forests to human activity.“Our research shows that a remedy is indeed possible, but we need to act whilst there are still intact forests to save,” Evans said.last_img read more

Beyond polar bears: Arctic animals share in vulnerable climate future

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Carnivores, Climate, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extinction, Climate Change And Extreme Weather, Climate Change And Food, climate finance, Climate Science, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Extreme Weather, Forgotten Species, Global Warming, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Research, Storms, Weather, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The media has long focused on the impacts of climate change on polar bears. But with Arctic temperatures rising fast (this winter saw the warmest October to February temperatures ever recorded), a wide range of Arctic fauna appears to be at risk, though more studies are needed to determine precise causes, current effects on population, and future projections.Diminishing Arctic snow, especially in the spring, may leave wolverines without ideal places to den. Caribou and reindeer populations have been in serious decline due to natural population fluctuation, but scientists don’t know if their numbers will recover under changed climate conditions.Lemmings are also being impacted by diminishing snow, often leaving the rodents without cover in spring and autumn. Their decline could impact the predators that prey on them, including Arctic foxes, red foxes, weasels, wolverines, and snowy and short-eared owls.Snowy owls have raised concerns because the seabirds they hunt in winter, which congregate around small holes in the Arctic ice, could become more widely dispersed in broader stretches of open water and therefore be harder to prey on. Scientists say more study of Arctic wildlife is urgently needed, but funding and media attention remains sparse. Snowy owls, once thought to migrate south in the winter, have been found to largely stay in the Arctic and hunt among the sea ice, which could cause climate change problems for these predators. Photo by Brian Scott on FlickrIn a changing Arctic, perhaps no story of a species in peril is more compelling than the plight of the polar bear. This forlorn, yet charismatic, Arctic refugee has been spending more time ashore in recent years as its sea ice habitat shrinks, forcing the bear to swim greater distances between ice floes while he wastes away in the search for blubbery pinnipeds to replenish lost calories.But the polar bear, while iconic, is not alone in his struggles. The warming Arctic is impacting an array of species and not just those that share his waters. On land, climate change is redrawing the lines of species distribution, changing relationships between predator and prey, destroying den sites, and altering the timing of when plants bloom and when animals chow down. The driving mechanisms of such terrestrial transformation range from shrinking snow cover to rain-on-snow events that lock vegetation under ice; to boreal species moving northward and far more extreme weather.Plants are already having to deal with the resulting stress. Unlike in the Arctic Ocean, where sea ice dictates the life cycle of species, on land what matters most is spring snow cover. Though climate change brings more winter snow, it’s also causing earlier snowmelt due to hotter temperatures which can dry out the fragile tundra too early each spring – before plants are able to suck up precious water.In contrast, many northern animals seem to be benefiting from mellower weather, at least for the time being. But, the long-term forecast is grave. Increasingly, Arctic animals will come under pressure from boreal species moving up from the south, with earlier snowmelt clearing their path.“Here in the High Arctic ecosystem, the areas farthest north are the most endangered,” says Hans Meltofte, the chief scientist of the Arctic Council’s 2013 Arctic Biodiversity Assessment. “Those species will be squeezed in between those encroaching from the south and the shores of the Arctic Ocean. They cannot move any farther north.”And it’s those species that deserve to share in the polar bear’s spotlight.A wolverine pops its head out of its snow cave den. Photo courtesy of WCSWolverines losing their homes?Wolverines (Gulo gulo) are a wide-ranging species of mustelidae (think mink, weasels, and otters – but with a permanent snarl!). They seek out boulders and talus slopes for protection, food storage, and kit rearing in states like Washington and Oregon. But the Arctic is also host to its own population of this notorious carnivore, one of the most aggressive animals in North America. Up north, they’ve traded rock homes for snowy tundra abodes – and that makes them vulnerable.Tom Glass, working with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), is one of the few scientists studying the relationship between snow cover and wolverines in the field. Since 2016, he has been leading the first comprehensive ground-based collaring effort on Alaska’s North Slope, covering 500 square miles of tundra near the Umiat oil camp and 800 square miles around the Toolik Field Station. Wolverine distribution is strongly correlated with snow, and if the spring snow is melting sooner in the Arctic, Glass wonders how that will impact wolverines.“There is a cadre of wildlife species that use snow caves, but which ones will be affected we don’t know yet,” he says.A wolverine on a roll. These predators build their homes in the snow on Alaska’s North Slope, but earlier spring snowmelt means the species may be vulnerable to climate change. Photo by Maia C on FlickrHis colleague, Martin Robards, the director of WCS’s Arctic Beringia Program, thinks wolverines may increasingly be limited by a need to build their dens where snow lingers longest and deepest in spring. “The snow landscape is no longer one where everything is equal. Now, some areas are really important if snow drifts there linger on into June.”“I think there’s going to be a lot of ability for wolverines to adapt to this, but [we need to] think about where we can get some planning in ahead of time that will maintain the most critical habitats,” says Robards. Still, there’s lots of research needed to track global warming impacts.Caribou populations fluctuate naturally by decade, but there’s concern that global populations, currently in a decline, won’t recover under changing climate conditions. Photo by peupleloup on FlickrCaribou and Reindeer population recoveries in troubleHow will climate change affect caribou and reindeer populations (Rangifer tarandus), synonymous with, and so important to, northern Indigenous societies? The jury is still out.“It’s so complicated with these [climate] fluctuations that I don’t think anyone dare guess,” says the Arctic Council’s Meltofte.What we do know about northern ungulates is this:Caribou and reindeer herds fluctuate naturally in size, ballooning by millions, then dropping by just as much the next decade. Currently, wild reindeer and caribou have declined by about 33 percent since populations peaked in the 1990s and early 2000s – falling from 5.6 million to 3.8 million. This follows almost universal increases witnessed in the 1970s and 1980s.Before climate change began escalating rapidly in the 21st century, herds always recovered. Now, with many populations across the tundra in sharp decline, it’s unknown if these ungulates are in a natural cycle and will bounce back, or if recovery may be delayed with some herds, while others could disappear altogether.Scientists long believed that periodic icing – known as rain-on-snow events – of the winter ranges for reindeer and caribou led directly to mass starvation and could even extirpate local populations. With rain-on-snow events expected to become more frequent due to climate change, this seemed great cause for concern. But in 2016, a study by University of Tromso researcher N. J. C. Tyler found that there are few datasets that actually show ice-hardened snow was present on the ranges where populations are known to have declined or disappeared. Rather, winter warming and more snow were found to increase animal abundance.Then there’s the impact of the loss of spring snow cover, which drives many Arctic animal life cycles. In Canada, caribou used to rest on deep snow banks, which provided refuge from hungry mosquitoes. But now, the Inuit have witnessed those snow banks disappearing, and “the caribou are more bothered by mosquitoes,” says Meltofte. Caribou attacked by large swarms of mosquitoes will flee, which means they spend less time eating, which could impact the animals’ health.Changes in the reindeer and caribou food supply could also imperil these species. One concern is the encroachment from the south of the trees and shrubs, along with the disappearance of the ungulates’ preferred foods – grasses, lichens, and mosses. Another threat comes from a climate change-driven mismatch in the timing of when plants are ready to eat and the caribou’s breeding cycle, causing caribou to lose their calves. But as with wolverines, researchers need more time to suss out these relationships.A lemming emerges from its snow hole in the Norwegian Arctic. Photo by kgleditsch on FlickrAs lemmings go, so go their predatorsIf any animal can be considered the bedrock of the tundra ecosystem and food chain, it’s the lemming (Lemmus lemmus). These sleek, short-tailed, furry-footed rodents serve as an obligate snack for an enormous guild of the tundra’s predators – Arctic foxes, red foxes, weasels, wolverines, and snowy and short-eared owls. If the lemmings fall off the climate change cliff, then their predators could be at risk too.And lemmings aren’t doing so hot.For six months of the year, lemmings live in burrows deep in the insulating snow. Here, they breed and shelter from harsh winter conditions. But according to the 2013 Arctic Biodiversity Assessment, regional collapses of lemming populations are already occurring. For example, in Norway, populations usually peak every three to four years. However, the last peak was in 1994.That’s likely because snowfall patterns have changed. Each year, the snow needs to be deep enough so that lemmings can stay warm without expending too much energy – energy required to breed and avoid predators out in the open. But snow is arriving later in autumn and melting earlier in the spring, leaving the lemming exposed. In some places, more compact snow with ice crusts has made it hard for lemmings to dig out their snow holes. Or there simply isn’t enough snow to begin with, so there’s fewer places in which the rodents can make their homes and lock up their food in the ice.While the decline of the lemming is concerning in itself, scientists are worried about how its loss could jeopardize the Arctic food web; predator populations often fluctuate alongside lemming populations. Though some predator species may be able to diversify as southern rodent species move northward, others could lose out to southern predators coming up, too.Red foxes, for instance, have already gained significant ground on Arctic foxes thanks to warmer temperatures boosting ground squirrel and bird populations which the red fox preys on. Arctic foxes, meanwhile, have continued to limit their diet to lemmings. How these north-south species collisions might play out in the long-run is currently unknown.Snowy owls rely on lemmings and seabirds as food. Changing climate conditions could alter the predator-prey relationship. Photo by Bert de Tilly on FlickrSnowy owls working harder for a mealSnowy owls (Bubo scandiacus) are a migratory species, flying from the Arctic and sub-Arctic in the summer months, down to the prairies of Canada and the United States in the winter. Or so scientists thought.In the late 2000s, during research conducted for the International Polar Year, scientists tracked a number of snowy owls and found that 78 percent of breeding adults they tracked actually stayed in the north in the winter and didn’t head south. Rather, they hunted seabirds among the Arctic Ocean sea ice.“Many [snowy owls] become marine predators,” in the winter, says J. F. Therrien, a biologist at Pennsylvania’s Hawk Mountain Sanctuary who worked on the snowy owl study. In winter, the Arctic Sea is not totally covered by ice; there are open water patches created by tidal currents and wind. There, seabirds gather and the snowy owls feed.But as climate change forces the sea ice to retreat, the seabirds could disperse into wider stretches of open water, with the prey becoming scattered rather than clustered tightly together around limited ice holes. Researchers believe that would mean less opportunity and more work for the owls.If that’s the case, the snowy owl could be facing a double whammy. Not only will it have a harder time hunting seabirds, but snowy owls also feed on lemmings.In 2017, the snowy owl was upgraded to Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, though researchers are still figuring out the exact health of the global population.“They seem to be adaptable birds because they have a very flexible migration strategy,” says Therrien. “There’s not a direct link with sea ice and snowy owl population status, but there sure is going to be an impact on the environment and some of the resources they’ve been using in the winter.”A young mountain goat. This sub-Arctic species could be impacted by the timing of its molting and warmer temperatures. Photo courtesy of Oregon Department of Fish and WildlifeMountain GoatsThough the northernmost range of the mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) cuts off at the sub-Arctic, the animal is a good example of the unique, unpredictable ways climate change can impact cold-adapted species.“There’s a saying that under climate change, species have three options: adapt, move or die,” explains Kate Nowak, a freelance conservation scientist. But the outcome of those choices can be determined by a key factor: “Timing can be everything,” she says.This summer, Nowak will travel to the Yukon, the upper northern limit of mountain goat range, to study the “molting chronology” of the animals. She’ll be looking at when the goats shed their thick hair as they experience hotter temperatures.Mountain goats have two-layered coats that can be up to four-inches thick in the winter. Come spring, they shed those coats. Nowak wants to know if mountain goats are shedding earlier in response to global warming.Though a sudden unseasonable snow storm could leave molted goats vulnerable, Nowak says the greater risk is heat stress to unmolted goats. If mountain goats don’t molt early enough to cope with hotter days brought climate change, or if they don’t adjust behavior by staying in shady or windy places, they could die.Photogenic mountain goats offer a unique advantage to climate researchers. Though many species molt, including elk and moose, mountain goats are historically very well photographed by their human admirers, allowing scientists like Nowak to compare and contrast a half-century-worth of dated molting mountain goat images with current observations.Other Arctic species molt, too – muskox, for example, lose their qiviut. Understanding the molting dynamics of mountain goats may help researchers better understand the risks posed to these even more northern species.A Wildlife Conservation Society researcher approaches a wolverine snow cave den. Photo courtesy of WCSArctic animals: canaries in the global warming coal mine The greatest challenge Arctic researchers face today isn’t the region’s remoteness or inhospitability. Rather it is the lack of global interest – and money – flowing to the study of cold-acclimated wildlife.Whatever the reason for that, researchers have long lamented that the tropical charismatic megafauna – elephants, rhinos, tigers – get the lion’s share of media and public attention, with polar bears and marine mammals bathing in what little limelight shines up into the polar night of the Arctic.But as temperatures up north continue to rise at double the rate of the rest of the world, it makes sense to focus more climate change research funding in the region. Studying rapidly evolving Arctic habitat and wildlife impacts could provide a dramatic preview, and offer invaluable clues toward understanding shifting ecosystem dynamics due to global warming as they unfold around the planet.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.This Wildlife Conservation Society image illustrates some of the challenges involved in launching an expedition to study Arctic wildlife. Photo courtesy of WCSlast_img read more

Pearl Jam invests in Amazonian reforestation to offset emissions from current Brazil tour

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Amazon, Amazon Rainforest, Climate Activism, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Environment, Global Warming Mitigation, Mitigation, Rainforests, Reforestation, Restoration, Tropical Forests Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Rock band Pearl Jam has partnered with Conservation International (CI) in purchasing carbon offsets for the estimated 2,500 tons of carbon dioxide emissions that will be generated by its Brazilian tour dates taking place this month.Proceeds from the offset purchase will be used to support a tropical forest restoration project that aims to plant 73 million trees in the Brazilian Amazon by 2023, said to be the largest reforestation effort in the world.“As a band, it’s important for us to recognize the environmental impact of our tours and do what we can to mitigate that,” Pearl Jam guitarist Stone Gossard said in a statement. Rock band Pearl Jam is voluntarily offsetting the carbon emissions of its current tour in Brazil.The band has partnered with Conservation International (CI) in purchasing carbon offsets for the estimated 2,500 tons of carbon dioxide emissions that will be generated by its Brazilian tour dates taking place this month.The offsets were purchased through Amazonia Live, a partnership between Rock in Rio, CI, Brazil’s Environment Ministry, the World Bank, and others. Proceeds from the purchase of the offsets will be used to support a tropical forest restoration project that aims to plant 73 million trees in the Brazilian Amazon by 2023, said to be the largest reforestation effort in the world.“As a band, it’s important for us to recognize the environmental impact of our tours and do what we can to mitigate that,” Pearl Jam guitarist Stone Gossard said in a statement. “This Amazonia Live project is exciting because it helps to offset the CO2 we will emit with our Brazilian tour dates, while providing local employment and food security opportunities.”Pearl Jam is voluntarily offsetting the emissions from its current Brazilian tour. This is not the first time the band has sought to mitigate the climate impact of its tours. Photo courtesy of Conservation International.Rodrigo Medeiros, Vice President of CI Brazil, told Mongabay that the total cost of offsetting those 2,500 tons of carbon was $50,000, and that, more specifically, the money will go to an agroforestry project at the Uatumã Reserve in Amazonas state, Brazil.“This investment will directly benefit 27 families, employing 30 people as seed collectors, nursery workers, planters and agricultural technicians,” Medeiros said.This isn’t the first time Pearl Jam has taken steps to mitigate the climate impact of its tours. The band also teamed up with Conservation International to offset the CO2 emissions of its 2015 tour in Latin America and its 2016 U.S. tour.Pearl Jam says on its website that the carbon footprint of its tours is calculated “based on band and crew flights and hotel stays, truck mileage, bus mileage, shipping weight (miles/mode of transport), and the number of fans attending each show.” Profits from the band’s tours are then allocated to its offsetting efforts in accordance with these calculations.“We’re thrilled to partner with Pearl Jam in protecting the Amazon and spreading the message of its significance well beyond its borders. The Amazon benefits communities that depend upon it for their livelihoods as well as people across the globe. Twenty percent of the world’s freshwater supply comes from the Amazon, its forests provide thirty percent of the solution to climate change,” CI Brazil’s Medeiros said in a statement.“Having a global artist like Pearl Jam join us in this effort is exactly what we need to keep people and the planet thriving.”The Amazon rainforest. Photo courtesy of Conservation International.last_img read more

Father and daughter at odds over high jump focus

first_imgFifteen-year-old Janique Burgher won gold in the Class Three high jump on yesterday’s third day of the Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association (ISSA)/GraceKennedy Boys and Girls’ Athletic Championships to go with the bronze she won in the event in 2014 while competing in Class Four. Despite the Edwin Allen High School athlete’s exploits, her father is not totally satisfied, as his dream is for her to be on the track. “I am fairly proud, but I think she should doing something (running) on track as well, because I think she has the potential to do it,” 60-year-old Hopeton Burgher said. “I have been trying everything, but she is adamant on doing the high jump, so I just let her have her way.” Young Burgher said she finds running to be boring, hence her decision to stick to the high jump. “With the high jump I have something that I have to jump over, an obstacle,” the slim-built athlete said. However, her father, who represented Holmwood Technical High School in the 100m, 200m and 400m, is not giving up hope of her doing the sprints. “She is always saying she is going to be the next Shelly-Ann Fraser (Pryce), but I always tell her she can only be in the limelight if she does track,” he said. “Persons who are sponsoring they are looking for the hype, so they are not going to sponsor you if they don’t get the hype. “But in time to come I will take it back up with her and take her and make me and her go train. I think she needs to do some sprinting.” Janique was the only athlete in her event to clear 1.70 metres, which earned her the gold medal, with Hydel’s Shauntia Davidson taking the silver with her clearance of 1.65m, on the first attempt Three athletes, Kaliah Jones of Excelsior High, Lacovia High’s Kadian Myers and Camperdown High’s Ramona Hylton tied for the bronze, as they all cleared 1.65m on their second attempt. “I am happy to have won the gold medal, but I am a little bit disappointed, because my PR (personal record) is 1.75m. But my groin is hurting me right now and I am having a bellyache,” the champion athlete said. “I had to just focus on the event and forget about the pain.” ryon.jones@gleanerjm.comlast_img read more