Why intact forests are important

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Animals, Biodiversity, boreal forests, Degraded Lands, Environment, Forest Fragmentation, Forests, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Logging, logging roads, Old Growth Forests, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Roads, Temperate Forests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Citation:James E. M. Watson, Tom Evans, Oscar Venter, Brooke Williams, Ayesha Tulloch, Claire Stewart, Ian Thompson, Justina C. Ray, Kris Murray, Alvaro Salazar, Clive McAlpine, Peter Potapov, Joe Walston, John G. Robinson, Michael Painter, David Wilkie, Christopher Filardi, William F. Laurance, Richard A. Houghton, Sean Maxwell, Hedley Grantham, Cristián Samper, Stephanie Wang, Lars Laestadius, Rebecca K. Runting, Gustavo A. Silva-Chávez, Jamison Ervin, David Lindenmayer. The exceptional value of intact forest ecosystems. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 2018; DOI: 10.1038/s41559-018-0490-xFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Overall, the world lost more than 7 percent of its intact forest landscapes in just over a decade, a trend that appears to be accelerating.A new study discusses how intact forests are critically important for mitigating climate change, maintaining water supplies, safeguarding biodiversity and even protecting human health.However, it warns that global policies aimed at reducing deforestation are not putting enough emphasis on the preservation of the world’s dwindling intact forests, instead relying on a one-size-fits-all approach that may end up doing more harm than good.The researchers urge more inclusion and prioritization of intact forests in global commitments and policies aimed at curbing deforestation. When it comes to habitat quality and ecosystem services, research has shown that natural landscapes do it best. A new study, published today in Nature, adds fodder to this argument, describing how intact forests are critically important for mitigating climate change, maintaining water supplies, safeguarding biodiversity and even protecting human health. However, it warns that global policies aimed at reducing deforestation are not putting enough emphasis on the preservation of the world’s dwindling intact forests, instead relying on a one-size-fits-all approach that may end up doing more harm than good.Intact forests are large areas of connected habitat free from human-caused disturbance. From the Amazon rainforest in South America to the taiga that rings the Arctic, the Earth’s intact forests provide a diverse array of unbroken habitats for many – if not most – of the planet’s terrestrial wildlife.But intact forests are disappearing. An analysis released last year found that, overall, the world lost more than 7 percent of its intact forest landscapes in just over a decade, a trend that appears to be accelerating. Zooming in, the analysis reveals bigger losses for specific regions: 10.1 percent in Africa, 13.9 percent in Southeast Asia, nearly 22 percent in Australia. At the country level, Paraguay came out particularly bad, losing almost 80 percent of its intact forest landscapes between 2000 and 2013.Satellite data show only a few tracts of intact forest remain in Paraguay.The driving force behind these losses varies depending on location, but agriculture, logging and road building are global heavy-hitters. And the disturbance doesn’t need to be big in size to have a big impact; research has shown even small logging roads can open up a “Pandora’s box” of destructive repercussions that can threaten the integrity of a once-untouched forest. Such seemingly small, localized deforestation activities have resulted in a situation where the world’s forests have essentially been cut up into an estimated 50 million fragments – which scientists think is closing in on a tipping point at which forest fragmentation may dramatically accelerate.In response to intact forest losses, researchers at institutions around the world teamed up to synthesize hundreds of previous studies and figure out just how important these forests are and how best to protect them on a global scale.They found that despite their reduction, intact forests currently absorb around 25 percent of the world’s human-generated carbon emissions and are thus playing a big role in offsetting global warming. According to their study, intact forests sequester more carbon than logged, degraded or even planted forests. In addition to the direct removal of trees, human encroachment also opens up forests to hunters; the researchers write that as hunters remove animals from a forest, the trees that depend on these animals to spread their seeds may not be able to reproduce, which could in turn affect how much carbon a forest is able to store.In addition to affecting the global climate, intact forests may also help regulate local and regional climates. Research indicates that when intact forest is cleared or degraded, cloud cover is reduced and droughts are more likely to happen. Studies also show that non-degraded forests are better at holding water in the soil, as well as stabilizing slopes and preventing erosion. This, the researchers write, may help ensure water security for local and Indigenous communities.Intact forests are also better at providing habitat than those that have been degraded. Studies have shown intact forests host more wildlife, and their loss correlates with the retreat or even the extinction of forest-dependent species. Along with reducing a forest’s biodiversity, research indicates degradation can also affect the overall functioning of its ecosystems.Species with big ranges, like jaguars, need huge swaths of connected habitat in order to survive.The authors of the new Nature study write that despite the wealth of research on the benefits of intact forests and the consequences of their degradation, international policies aimed at reducing deforestation do not sufficiently prioritize their conservation. They write that efforts like the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, which seek to sustainably manage forests, fight desertification and halt land degradation and biodiversity loss, stand to fall short of their targets if they don’t do more to address the importance of preserving intact forests.Specifically, the authors write that many of these global initiatives focus too much on forest extent and not enough on its condition, effectively lumping all forest cover into one conservation category.“As vital carbon sinks and habitats for millions of people and imperilled wildlife, it is well known that forest protection is essential for any environmental solution–yet not all forests are equal,” James Watson of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the University of Queensland said in a statement. “Forest conservation must be prioritized based on their relative values–and Earth’s remaining intact forests are the crown jewels, ones that global climate and biodiversity policies must now emphasize.”A logging road pierces rainforest in Sabah, Malaysia.Watson and his colleagues warn that if international policies and agreements don’t make more of an effort to prioritize intact forests, then they stand to disappear – and with them, important reservoirs of biodiversity and one of the world’s biggest carbon sinks.“Even if all global targets to halt deforestation were met, humanity might be left with only degraded, damaged forests, in need of costly and sometimes unfeasible restoration, open to a cascade of further threats and perhaps lacking the resilience needed to weather the stresses of climate change,“ said Tom Evans, WCS Director of Forest Conservation and Climate and joint lead author of the study.“This is a huge gamble to take, for conservation, for climate change, and for some of the most vulnerable human communities on the planet,” Evans said.Mongabay reached out to the offices overseeing the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, UN Sustainable Development Goals and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, but received no response by press time.In their study, Evans, Watson and their colleagues put forth several recommendations to fill what they see as a gap in international policy. First, they urge the creation and standardization of metrics to measure forest intactness, which would help prioritize action to areas that are the most intact. They write that the intact forest concept should also be embedded in reports produced by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This, they say, will help ensure that the international commitments supporting the Paris Agreement will include and prioritize the conservation of intact forests.The researchers also urge support for efforts on both the global and local scale that seek to limit road expansion, regulate hunting and extractive activities like mining and logging, invest in protected areas, and help attain land rights for Indigenous communities. They write that degraded forests should be restored and made more productive rather than opening up intact forests to human activity.“Our research shows that a remedy is indeed possible, but we need to act whilst there are still intact forests to save,” Evans said.last_img read more

Detecting disasters on community lands in the Amazon: film highlights indigenous struggle

first_imgcameras, Drones, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Mapping, Monitoring, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Sensors, Technology, Wildtech For decades, indigenous communities across the western Amazon have protested the contamination of their water, soil and other natural resources by oil companies.A short film, “Detecting Disasters,” explores the use by the Kukama Kukamiria and other indigenous groups of small drones to strengthen their case to officials and reduce future damage to their health and that of their forest resources.The successful, consistent use of drones and other new technologies by remote communities requires overcoming several basic challenges, including adequate electricity, training time, and availability of parts to make repairs. Tens of thousands of indigenous people in the Peruvian Amazon have been fighting decades of contamination of their natural resources by foreign and domestic oil companies.Oil spills, leaky pipelines, and dumping of toxic production waters have polluted soils, gardens, rivers and lakes, as well as the fish and other animals living there, for more than 40 years. Health problems resulting from drinking and washing with waters contaminated by billions of barrels of toxic waste include epidemics, diarrhea, and skin diseases. These problems continue, though the government frequently blocks or ignores the people’s protests, or it sides with industry’s efforts to hide its trail of impact.Clean-up crew at an oil-contaminated stream in Loreto, northern Peru after a 2016 spill, one of several that year from the PetroPeru pipeline. Image credit: Al Jazeera, YouTubeThe short film “Detecting Disasters” explores one action the Kukama Kukamiria and other indigenous groups are taking to strengthen their case and reduce future damage to their resources—using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, a.k.a. drones) to monitor their lands.The Kukama Kukamiria people’s territory in northern Peru includes the exceptionally biologically diverse Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve, which has also been invaded and drilled by oil industry teams.Contamination from oil and gas spills in 2014 in the Kukama Kukamiria people’s water still imperils the community. They and other groups teamed up with the Interethnic Association for the Development of the Peruvian Rainforest  (AIDESEP),  an organization representing indigenous peoples of the Peruvian Amazon, and U.S. non-profits to learn to fly small UAVs.“It’s a way of monitoring territory more efficiently and more quickly,” Apu Alfonso López Tejada, President of the indigenous Kukama Kukamiria organization ACODECOSPAT, explained in the film, below. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Sue Palminteri The Kukama training produced high-quality filming and mapping results, and AIDESEP has helped train indigenous groups to monitor their territories using drones since 2015.“We can check very distant areas and also see the potential threats, such as illegal mining and illegal logging, among other activities, which are incompatible with the objective of creating this protected natural area [Pacaya-Samiria],” said participant Edwin Yunga Yauta M., from the Amarakaeri Communal Reserve. “In this way, we can mitigate the impacts currently being caused by hydrocarbons, mining, and also encroachment.”The Amarakaeri people in southeastern Peru also began using UAVs in 2015 to monitor land cover change, specifically from invasions of their territory by illegal loggers and miners.The idea is to train trainers who can build capacity regionally. “We are trying to train an environmental monitor in each of the communities of our organization,” López Tejada said.Nevertheless, introducing UAVs or any new technology to remote societies is not without its difficulties, as highlighted in a 2017 review of the use of UAVs in indigenous territory monitoring.Despite the high enthusiasm of the Kukama training participants, the single workshop’s short duration and a single practice drone, which was then kept by AIDESEP for future use, limited practice time. The lack of practice time, both during and after the 12-day workshop, prevented the group from learning to fly the UAV independently. Similarly, they lack easy access to parts to fix the drone when it crashes and access to the internet to allow the UAV pilots to view the ground below the UAV as it flies.The upper row shows the fixed-wing drone used and some of the workshop participants. The lower row shows drone imagery acquired that found an oil spill within the Kukama territory not yet cleaned after a year. The spill was located some 11 km inside a swampy forest area; reaching the site on foot was unsafe and very challenging. Photo credits: Paneque-Gálvez et. al (2017).Decades of careless management of Amazon hydrocarbon and mining infrastructure continues to take its toll on some of the world’s highest biological and linguistic diversity, including areas far from the drilling and pipeline sites.The 64 Amazonian indigenous peoples include over 1,800 communities that are home to more than 650,000 people in 19 linguistic families. AIDESEP works to defend their rights and lands, highlight their problems, and present alternative proposals for development. The organization conducts periodic trainings, some in conjunction with NGOs and universities.‘If Not Us Then Who?’ is a US non-profit that produced this and other participatory films, photos, and content to highlight the role indigenous and local peoples play in protecting the planet.Banner image shows the lush vegetation in the rainforest canopy of southeastern Peru. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriReferencePaneque-Gálvez, J., Vargas-Ramírez, N., Napoletano, B. M., & Cummings, A. (2017). Grassroots Innovation Using Drones for Indigenous Mapping and Monitoring. Land, 6(4), 86.last_img read more

At least 4 dead in Mahaicony accident

first_imgAt least four persons have been confirmed dead in the accident at Fairfield, Mahaicony, East Coast Demerara, Region Five.Guyana Times understands that a Route 50 minibus collided with a beverage distribution truck.Both vehicles were said to be speeding at the time of the accident.The four individuals died on the spot. Other persons were rushed to the hospital.last_img

Crunch time for five HDN squads

first_imgIt’s do or die time for five local teams today as the North Coast Section playoffs get under way in baseball and softball.And that means there is little room for error and a little more at stake in every pitch and every swing of the bat.Three of those five teams will get to host a game, including Eureka, which is seeded No. 7 in the Division-III baseball bracket.The Loggers have been impressive this spring, winning 21 games, many of them against some big schools out of the area in a …last_img

Travel ban hits business travel hard

first_imgUS President Donald Trump. Trump’s executive order prohibits travel from seven predominately Muslim countries to the U.S. Citizens of Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen are covered.Today the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in California ruled against the Trump Administration’s efforts to impose the ban.The appellate courts’ move may pave the way for the ultimate issue to be decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. Bottom line: for now, at least, the ban is stayed. It’s been at least temporarily lifted.Nonetheless, travel executives remain cautious. Shortly after it was imposed late last week GBTA Executive Director and COO Michael W. McCormick said, “With 30 percent of companies expected to reduce travel, the economy will certainly take a hit.” The GBTA chief says there could be short, mid- and long term consequences. In a prepared release, GBTA concludes, “Thirty-one percent of travel professionals expect the ban to cause a reduction in their company’s business travel in the immediate ensuing three months.Similarly, nearly three in ten also expect the ban to impact to impact their company’s business in travel in both the short-term (29 percent), over the next three to six months and the long-term (28 percent) over the next six to twelve months and beyond.”By the numbers, here are the specifics behind travel professionals’ worries: –    Sixty-three percent say they’re concerned as to just how other countries will respond to the ban, perhaps making it more difficult for U.S. citizens to travel abroad;–    Fifty-six percent say they’re concerned about complications in travel to the U.S.;–    Fifty-four percent take the long view and express worries about the lasting impact of the travel ban.That’s how a select slice of pros believe travel will be hit. But what do they think about the ban itself? The answers reflect the growing political gaps between ideologies in today’s USA. GBTA says its survey found “Half of the travel professionals surveyed strongly or somewhat strongly oppose [Trump’s] action, while nearly four in ten (38 percent) strongly or somewhat support it.”Ironically, based on United States Department of Commerce data, the U.S. Travel Association says international travel to the U.S. has just now returned to pre-9/11 levels. The U.S. lost a significant amount of ground in the international marketplace in the years after 9/11.” USTA President and CEO Roger Drew labels that period “the Lost Decade.”A final note: USTA says the U.S. is the single largest destination for global long-haul travel and the second-largest destination for overall global travel.How long it remains so might well lie in the hands of the courts.last_img read more

J&K policeman caught on camera snatching money from beggar, held

first_imgThe Jammu & Kashmir Police have arrested one of their own after he was allegedly caught on camera “snatching” money from a roadside beggar in Ramban district.A video clip purportedly showing head constable “snatching” money from the beggar a few days back went viral on social media, triggering shock and uproar.‘Bad habit’“Head constable Munawar Hussain has been suspended and arrested by the police after the incident,” Ramban Senior Superintendent of Police (SSP) Mohan Lal said.He said an FIR has also been registered against the policeman, who was attached with Ramban police line after being transferred from “Kishtwar due to his bad habit of chronic drinking”. Mr. Lal said Mr. Hussain came out of the police line and allegedly snatched money from the beggar. The officer said Hussain was caught by the policemen deployed there.More casesMr. Lal said three more cases are registered against Mr. Hussain in Kishtwar. “He was kept in the police line in Ramban after being transferred from Kishtwar due to his bad habit of chronic drinking. His ATM cards and others such items were given to his wife to operate in view of the his bad habits,” he said.last_img read more

Hiding details evokes criticism in J&K

first_imgThe authorities have decided not to publicise the details of candidates contesting in elections to urban local bodies in volatile pockets in the Kashmir valley “due to security reasons,” evoking sharp reactions from political parties.“Lack of transparency will only bring disrepute to the institution of democracy. It seems former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee’s legacy is being reversed. Mr. Vaypayee, as prime minister, ensured fair elections in J&K and allowed peoples’ representatives to come up. This saw a new hope emerging among people, who started looking up to elections as a credible exercise. In the process, mainstream political parties, too, gained an important space despite Kashmir’s complex situation,” senior Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) leader Nayeem Akhtar told The Hindu. He described the situation in J&K as “worse than the 1990s.” “It’s getting worse than 1990s, with non-locals being fielded as candidates in many wards. They may have visited the area for the first time on the day of the nominations. The way the elections are held goes against tenets of democracy,” said Mr. Akhtar.All major regional parties, including the PDP and the National Conference, have decided to boycott polls, leaving the Jammu & Kashmir People’s Conference (J&KPC), the Congress and the BJP (Bharatiya Janata Party) as major players in the fray. “The credibility of the poll process has been badly affected. No candidate has filed a nomination in 177 wards. In 215 wards, candidates have been declared [elected] unopposed. It speaks volumes about the power-thirsty BJP imposing [on the] elections. What will be the credibility of these polls, when even finding a candidate to contest has become difficult?” asked Congress vice president and MLC G.N. Monga .Details concealed Contrary to J&K Chief Electoral Officer Shaleen Kabra’s directive to returning officers “to paste details of contesting candidates on notice boards”, scores of wards in south and north Kashmir have decided against it. “Candidates have pleaded with us that their lives will be in danger in case their details are made public. In many wards, we decided against publicising it,” a south Kashmir-based official told The Hindu. In the wake of militant threats, several independent candidates on Thursday held a press conference in Srinagar. They claimed they were “not getting any response from the government over security. The property of two candidates have been attacked by unknown men in the past 24 hours in the Valley with petrol bombs.”However, Additional Director General Police-Law and Order (ADGP) Muneer Ahmad Khan said many contestants have been put up in hired hotels, guarded by heavy contingents of police and paramilitary forces. About 3,000 candidates are in the fray across J&K for elections to 1,145 wards across 79 municipal bodies, starting October 8.last_img read more

PH volleybelles bow to Vietnam, draw Thailand in semis

first_imgSEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Arellano pulls rug from under St. Benilde, ends four-game skid Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games View comments MOST READ UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension The Philippines was hoping for a win that would have given the team a lighter semifinal opponent but will now have to deal with Thailand, which experts have tagged as the gold favorite in this event.But the Filipinos continue to hold on to hope.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“We can never tell, the ball is round,” said PH coach Francis Vicente. “We tend to play better when we are up against the wall.”Vietnam overcame the Philippines’ tough stand in the first and third sets to score the victory and set up a semifinal duel with Indonesia. Read Next Vietnam, the 2015 SEA Games silver winner, relied on Tran Thi Thanh Thuy, who had 14 points and team captain Nguyen Thi Ngoc Hoa, who made 11.Alyssa Valdez topscored with 11 points, while Jaja Santiago added 10. Jovelyn Gonzaga had seven, and Aby Marano five. The Vietnamese will face Indonesia in the other group that Thailand swept. Semis is on Saturday.“Everybody played well. We fought well except in the second set,” said Vicente.Down by two sets, the star-studded Philippines stormed to a 16-12 lead in the third but soon encountered problems in service receives and failed to close out the frame.“We should be happy with the result, they did their best but in the second set I don’t know what happened,” bared the mentor.“We lost by a big margin and I was surprised because we used the same combinations,” he said. “In the third set we changed, it clicked but we couldn’t sustain it.”ADVERTISEMENT WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Alyssa Valdez of the Philippines attacks the defense of Vietnam during their women’s volleyball match in the 29th Southeast Asian Games. The Vietnamese prevailed, 26-24, 25-12, 25-23. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/SEA GAMES POOLKUALA LUMPUR—The Philippine women’s volleyball team must now take the road it had hoped to avoid in the semifinals.The Nationals are now headed to a semifinal showdown against world-class Thailand after absorbing a stinging 26-24, 25-12, 25-23 defeat to Vietnam Friday at MITEC Hall 11.ADVERTISEMENT Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesseslast_img read more

ESPN Accidentally Airs Audio Of Dari Nowkhah Making Fun Of Media After Nick Saban Segment

first_imgalabama head coach nick saban at the sec championship gameATLANTA, GA – DECEMBER 01: Head coach Nick Saban of the Alabama Crimson Tide reacts after defeating the Georgia Bulldogs 35-28 in the 2018 SEC Championship Game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on December 1, 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)SEC Media Days continued Wednesday morning, with Alabama’s Nick Saban taking the podium first. The Crimson Tide head coach didn’t face very many tough questions, however, and the ESPN broadcast team apparently noticed.After Saban’s presser ended, ESPN forgot to cut the audio on a few of its analysts’ microphones. Host Dari Nowkhah was heard making chicken noises, implying that the media was scared to ask Saban tough questions. He also said that Saban “owns” the media. He later owned up to the mistake on-air.ESPN broadcasters (not realizing mic was live) made chicken sounds and said Saban “owns the media” because nobody asked about Cam Robinson— Bill Landis (@BillLandis25) July 13, 2016@SECNetwork cuts to commercial and you hear @ESPNDari ask the question “You think he (Saban) owns the media?” #SECMD16— Justin Nails (@justinnails) July 13, 2016When @SECNetwork doesn’t realize their still live & says “Nick Saban Owns The Media” #Whoops #SECMD16 @finebaum @johnP_hayes— #Tribe17 (@NoleNationFSU) July 13, 2016And @ESPNDari owns up to it. Kudos to him. Great segment all around on reaction to Saban’s presser— Eric Bowman (@E_ROCK12) July 13, 2016It was expected that someone in the media would ask Saban about the status of star offensive lineman Cam Robinson, who was arrested on multiple charges this past May. That didn’t happen though.Saban likely won’t make it through the day without being asked about Robinson, but it was a bit surprising that it wasn’t one of the first questions on the docket.last_img read more

Jamaica’s Economic Performance Remains Strong – IMF

first_img The Fund contended that creating the space for such spending will require going beyond temporary remedies like wage freezes and adjustments to non-wage benefits. Story Highlights The multilateral agency noted further that the unemployment rate is at a 10-year low, inflation and the current account are modest, international reserves are at a comfortable level, and external borrowing costs are at historical lows. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has given high marks for Jamaica’s performance under the Stand-By Arrangement (SBA), saying programme implementation remains strong, with public debt firmly on a downward trajectory.In its recently released Executive Board Review, the Fund highlighted that strong programme implementation continues to anchor macroeconomic stability.“All quantitative performance criteria and structural benchmarks for end-December 2017 were met. Fiscal consolidation is ongoing; primary surplus is expected to be at least seven per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) in financial year (FY) 17/18 and a similar target is set in the FY18/19 Budget. Public debt is projected to be under 100 per cent of GDP by end-March 2019,” the report said.The multilateral agency noted further that the unemployment rate is at a 10-year low, inflation and the current account are modest, international reserves are at a comfortable level, and external borrowing costs are at historical lows.The Executive Board Review said that inflation remains anchored. It said that higher food prices resulting from flooding have begun to unwind, and Consumer Price Index (CPI) inflation has remained low (2.7 per cent in February 2018), in part due to weak domestic demand.In addition, the current account deficit remains relatively low (at 2.8 per cent of GDP in FY17/18) and it is expected to shrink over the medium-term as oil prices remain contained and tourism earnings improve.The Executive Board, in its review, pointed to the need to boost growth, which was estimated at 0.5 per cent in 2017, with the growth forecast revised down to 0.9 per cent in fiscal year 2017/2018.It was noted that weakness in agriculture, slow recovery in mining, and a deceleration in manufacturing had offset growth in tourism and construction.The Fund stated that formalising the current inflation targeting regime will help entrench macroeconomic stability and promote growth.“With inflation likely to remain in the lower part of the Central Bank’s target range, a looser monetary stance remains appropriate. Upcoming revisions to the BOJ Act – including a clear mandate for price stability, a reformed governance structure, and a strong Central Bank balance sheet – will help institutionalise the inflation targeting framework,” the IMF said.The Fund further noted that structurally reducing the wage bill is critical for the Government to reprioritise spending towards growth-enhancing projects.It said that more expenditure is needed for infrastructure, citizen security, building agricultural resilience, health, education, and the social safety net.The Fund contended that creating the space for such spending will require going beyond temporary remedies like wage freezes and adjustments to non-wage benefits.The entity noted, further, that building the resilience of agriculture to weather-related events, and investing in school attendance and youth training programmes will improve growth and social outcomes.It added that continued reform implementation will not only safeguard hard-won gains but also deliver stronger growth and job creation. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has given high marks for Jamaica’s performance under the Stand-By Arrangement (SBA), saying programme implementation remains strong, with public debt firmly on a downward trajectory.last_img read more