On an island of plenty, a community tempered by waves braces for rising seas

first_imgFor generations, the indigenous Papuans on Indonesia’s Auki Island have depended on rich coastal ecosystem around them for sustenance and livelihoods.But when an earthquake and a tsunami struck the area in 1996, they realized they needed to do more to protect these resources to sustain their way of life.A decade later, they enshrined practices such as sustainable fishing in a local regulation, which to date has already shown positive results for the islanders and the environment.But the threat of another disaster — rising sea levels as a result of global warming — looms over the community. This time, they’re preparing through mitigation programs, including protecting mangroves. AUKI, Indonesia — “We ladies have eyes on our feet,” Susanti Maryen says after a morning spent collecting saltwater clams and snails at a beach in Auki, an islet off the northern coast of Papua, in Indonesia’s far east.She’s only half joking: clamming here, a way of life for generations, involves traipsing the beach and finding, just by feel, the small crustaceans hidden in the sand underfoot.While the women of Auki forage for the community’s food along the shore, the men are taught to fish from a young age. What they don’t eat, they sell; Susanti says a plate of saltwater clams can fetch 50,000 rupiah ($3.70), or double that during the off-season.In this sense, the Papuans of Auki are like the myriad other coastal communities spread out across the thousands of islands that make up Indonesia, each hewing to age-old traditions of subsistence that revolve around the bounty of the sea. The waters and coasts of Cenderawasih Bay, where Auki is located, are home to 95 species of coral, 155 fish species and seven types of mangrove.The inhabitants of Auki Island in Indonesia’s Papua province have for generations depended on the rich resources of the sea and coastal ecosystem around them. They have a regulation in place to manage these resources in a sustainable way. Photo by Ridzki R. Sigit/Mongabay-Indonesia.But foraging for clams hasn’t always been easy for the women of Auki. Susanti, now 50, remembers when a magnitude-8.2 earthquake struck the region on Feb. 17, 1996. It was followed by a tsunami that washed over parts of Auki and nearby islands.The twin disaster not only destroyed many houses there, but also laid waste to the coastlines the residents had always been able to depend on; for a period after the quake and tsunami, there were no shellfish of any kind to be found on the devastated beaches.“The earthquake and tsunami caused erosion; the coastlines changed, and even new coral islands emerged,” says Matheus Rumbraibab, the chief of the indigenous council in Auki.But the disaster also brought with it a valuable lesson for the people of Auki: that they needed to better protect the natural resources, in the sea and on the coast, that were so central to their lives.In the years since, they learned how to adapt to the new conditions wrought by the quake and tsunami. In 2006, 10 years after the disaster, they decided to formalize those practices in a regulation governing the protection of Auki’s coastal ecosystems, which today covers mangroves, seagrass and coral reefs, among others.In Auki, it is forbidden to cut mangrove trees, which the islanders realize are crucial to help mitigate the rising sea levels spurred by global warming. Photo by Ridzki R. Sigit/Mongabay-Indonesia.The regulation includes prohibitions on fishing in certain areas of the sea around Auki, to allow fish stocks to replenish; in other areas, fishing is permitted, but catches are capped. Beyond these zones, Auki’s fishermen can operate freely, but may not use destructive methods such as blast fishing or poison fishing.The system in force here is a miniature of the Indonesian government’s own policy of staking out and managing marine conservation zones, but with a key difference: here in Auki, the people get to discuss and decide on the zones.The women, for instance, are responsible for monitoring the population of marine animals along and just off the coast every six months. They submit the figures to local authorities, who use them to compile routine reports. These reports, in turn, serve to warn the fishermen of any decline in the population of a particular species.“We wanted the population of saltwater clams, snails and reef fish to recover, that’s why we decided to regulate fishing and collecting,” says Frans Wandosa, the Auki village chief.A magnitude-8.2 earthquake 22 years ago devastated the islands in Papua’s Cenderawasih Bay, including Auki. Image courtesy of the USGS.Faithfully practicing this sustainable way of life for the past two decades has borne fruit for the people of Auki, particularly over the last three years, when saltwater clams have bloomed beyond the restricted zones.Residents of nearby islands have also adopted similar regulations, Frans says. But he’s also aware that despite the success in protecting local marine resources, the people of Auki and the other islands face a threat more relentless than a one-off earthquake and tsunami: rising sea levels as a result of global warming.“I think a portion of Auki’s coast will end up underwater,” Frans says. “That’s why we’ve established a program to gradually move people’s houses to higher parts of the island.” The villagers have gone along with the program; many still remember losing their homes to the tsunami.They also have plans in place to protect the coastal vegetation to mitigate the impact from rising sea levels or tsunami waves. The 2006 regulation bans the felling of mangroves, and also requires residents to report first before cutting any other trees on the island.“We keep asking the village authorities, representatives of indigenous communities and religious leaders to remind the people not to cut down trees,” Frans says.Susanti Maryen is one of the women on Auki who depend on the natural resources from its coastal ecosystems. Photo by Ridzki R. Sigit/Mongabay-Indonesia.At her home on a January evening, Susanti cooks the saltwater clams gathered earlier that day. A small portion will be for dinner; the rest she will sell at the local market the next day.Even here, on the stovetop of her kitchen, the sea is ever-present.“The trick to getting the clams to open up,” Susanti says, “is to cook them in seawater.”This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published here, here and here on our Indonesian site on Jan. 28, Feb. 9 and Feb. 10, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Adaptation To Climate Change, Climate Change, Coastal Ecosystems, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Fisheries, Global Warming Mitigation, Indigenous Communities, Mangroves, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Mitigation, Seagrass Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

Brazilian lawmakers funded by donors guilty of environmental crimes: report

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer The Brazilian Chamber of Deputies has 513 members. Of those, 249 received a total of 58.9 million reais (US$18.3 million) in official donations during the 2014 election from companies and people who committed environmental crimes, including illegal clearing of forests, says a recent report by Repórter Brasil.Receiving these donations is not a crime, but it does provide insight into how environmental offenders are connected to, and potentially influencing, lawmakers and their decisions. Of the 249 deputies who received tainted donations, 134 are members of the Bancada Ruralista, the pro-agribusiness rural caucus that dominates the chamber.Since the 2014 general election, Brazil’s election laws have been tightened. In 2015, the Federal Supreme Court passed a decree that made it illegal for companies to donate to candidates and political parties. These new rules will be in effect for the October 2018 presidential election.Analysts still worry that money from those who have committed environmental crimes will go right on flowing to politicians — possibly illegally or utilizing newly discovered campaign finance law loopholes — risking the possibility of influence peddling. Plenary of the Chamber of Deputies during a joint session of the National Congress. Photo by Waldemir Barreto / Agência SenadoRoughly half of the high-ranking politicians serving in Brazil’s lower house of congress received campaign donations in the last general election from companies and individuals that committed environmental crimes, an investigation by Repórter Brasil has found.Of Brazil’s 513 elected members of the Chamber of Deputies, 249 received a total of 58.9 million reais (US$18.3 million) in official donations during the 2014 election from companies and people who illegally cleared and/or burned forests, or committed other environmental crimes. These donations were both direct and indirect (i.e. funneled through committees), and came from 92 companies and 40 individuals registered on a list of environmental crime perpetrators complied by IBAMA, the nation’s environmental agency.Though receiving these donations is not a crime, nor forbidden by Brazil’s Electoral Court, it does provide insight into how environmental offenders are connected to, and potentially influencing, lawmakers and their decisions. Some analysts feel strongly that the raft of anti-environmental legislation launched by the National Congress, which comprises the Chamber of Deputies and the Federal Senate, since 2014, especially under the Temer administration, may be closely linked to these recent campaign contributions.Of the 249 deputies who received tainted donations, 134 are members of the Bancada Ruralista, the pro-agribusiness rural caucus that dominates the chamber.“There are parties, congressmen and rulers who use their offices and draft laws in favor of those who finance them, or in exchange for favors and interests, even though this often means harming their own country,” said Marcio Astrini, coordinator of public policies at Greenpeace Brazil.Repórter Brasil’s data was compiled from donation declarations made by candidates to the High Electoral Court as compared to IBAMA’s list of environmental offenders as of November 2017. A number of these alignments between the acceptance of donations from environmental transgressors, and decisions made by politicians, are particularly notable.Federal Deputy Adilton Sachetti (left), with then President of the Senate, Senator Renan Calheiros (right). Photo by Jonas Pereira / Agência SenadoThe case of Adilton SachettiTake, for example, the case of Adilton Sachetti, a deputy from Mato Grosso state and an active member of the bancada ruralista. Sachetti received $300,000 from five entities that had committed environmental crimes — a quarter of all donations he amassed in the run-up to his 2014 election.In 2015, six months after taking office, Sachetti authored three bills that would have directly benefited the economic interests of these five funders. All three related to the building and utilization of industrial waterways; the first two were to permit companies to more freely utilize waterways on the Paraguia, Tapajos, Teles Pires and Juruena rivers.The third bill would have allowed the construction of industrial waterways for the transport of soy and other commodities on rivers running through the states of Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Pará and Goiás. If approved, the canals would open the way for large cargo vessels to sail from two Mato Grosso municipalities, where the businesses of the donors charged with environmental crimes are located, northeast all the way to the mouth of the Tapajós River, then down the Amazon to the Atlantic, with the commodities then exported globally. These proposed waterways have long been promoted for their time and economic savings, and for their potentially high profits to agribusiness. All three bills are yet to be voted on in congress.Federal Deputy Adilton Sachetti (right); and then Senator, now Agriculture Minister, Blairo Maggi (left), with Senator Renan Calheiros (center). Photo by Jonas Pereira / Agência SenadoThe Maggi connectionPerhaps the best known of those who donated to Sachetti was Eraí Maggi, an agribusiness producer who inherited the crown of “king of soy” from his cousin, the well-known and highly controversial agriculture minister, Blairo Maggi. Eraí, who donated $15,000 to help put Sachetti into power, is a member of the Bom Futuro Group, an agribusiness concern based just 200 kilometers (124 miles) from where the cargo vessels would leave Mato Grosso headed downriver toward the coast.IBAMA hit Erai with a $136,000 fine and seized his property when the environmental agency learned that he had deforested 1,463 hectares (3,615 acres) of land in 2016.Sachetti, in a statement responding to Repórter Brasil’s findings, said: “With our legislation, whoever works on the agricultural frontier will be unable to avoid getting into trouble with IBAMA. In Mato Grosso, which is a state on the agricultural frontier, there are many rural producers, and it is difficult to find anyone who hasn’t been fined. Yes, I received donations [from people and companies fined by IBAMA], and I have nothing to hide.” He maintains that the donations had no bearing on his policy decisions or votes.About the offending donors, he said: “They are my friends, we are all leaders in the sector. We arrived in Mato Grosso together and I have a history with these people. Eraí Maggi is from the same city that I grew up in, in the interior of Paraná.”Erai Maggi did not respond to Mongabay’s request for comment.Deputy Marco Antônio Cabral, 2015. Courtesy of wikimediaMore coincidencesExperts agree that it is hard to prove that particular campaign contributions result in specific political positions or votes. “The problem is you can’t know if donors are giving money to make a politician behave a certain way, or thanking them for how they would have behaved anyway,” said Taylor Boas, a political science professor from Boston University, who has researched the relationship between campaign donations and policy in Brazil. “But absence of evidence is not evidence of absence,” he said.Among those who have obtained donations from environmental offenders is Rio de Janeiro State Deputy Marco Antônio Cabral, who received a total of $400,000 in indirect donations from construction and energy companies on IBAMA’s list. He has consistently voted against increasing the size of national parks, and against granting rights to traditional workers.“All donations were made in a transparent manner, complying with the rules of electoral legislation,” Cabral said.Deputy Nilson Leitão. Photo by Ana Volpe / Agência SenadoNilson Leitão, one of the most ardent ruralist deputies in congress, and a staunch member of the bancada ruralista, received a total of $203,000 from construction, energy and agribusiness companies on IBAMA’s list of environmental offenders. In the years following his election he authored a number of bills that would likely have benefited the businesses in which many of his funders work. In 2014, he tried to halt a bill that would prohibit the collection and commercialization of plant species under threat of extinction. He also called for the annulment of the demarcation of two indigenous territories in Mato Grosso and Pará states, where major sugarcane companies are based (though this effort was ultimately unsuccessful). And in 2016, he crafted a bill that would allow rural workers to be paid for their work with food and shelter. None of these bills have been voted on yet.Ceará deputy Antonio Balhmann received a direct donation of $6,000 from melon producer Agricola Famosa Ltda, which has been fined by IBAMA in 2011 for producing its fruit without the required licenses. The following year Balhmann authored a bill, yet to be voted on, that would allow pesticides to be used in non-traditional farming.Luis Carlos Heinze, Federal Deputy of Rio Grande do Sul. Photo by Antonio AraújoLuiz Carlos Heinze, a deputy from Rio Grande do Sul, received around $170,000 in 2014 campaign donations from a wide range of Brazilian corporations on IBAMA’s list, including producers of sugarcane and other crops, and from cleaning products companies located in his state. In the same year, he called for the suspension of legal recognition of a Quilombola, a community of descendants of runaway slaves, in the state. The move was unsuccessful. In 2015, he authored a bill, still in the legislative queue for consideration, to get the letter “T” removed from the packaging of products containing transgenics, a move that seemed aimed at pleasing conventional farmers.Deputies Leitão, Balhmann and Heinze did not respond to Mongabay’s request for comment on the influence of campaign donations on the bills they authored and voted on.The large proportion of funder-offenders giving to ruralist politicians is noteworthy in the context of recent legislative actions that have rolled back environmental regulations and broadened the confines within which companies can legally operate. Among these decisions is a provisional measure that legalizes and facilitates companies invading, acquiring and deforesting public land. Astrini, from Greenpeace, noted that “what this law did was to open the doors to the grabbing of public lands by criminals and mafias, thereby making legal what was before a crime.” Heinze voted in favor of the provisional measure, which has now been made into law; three of his donors had been fined by IBAMA for deforestation.“As a rule of thumb, it can be said that any legal proposal in Brazil that would harm the environment, has behind it the concrete parochial interests of companies or organizations that want to see environmental legislation weakened or overturned,” said Carlos Rittl, executive secretary of the NGO Observatorio da Clima.Brasília: President Michel Temer receives the bancada ruralista, the rural caucus, the Parliamentary Front of Agriculture (FPA). Photo by Antonio Cruz / Agência BrasilToughened campaign finance lawsSince the 2014 general election, Brazil’s election laws have been tightened. In 2015, the Federal Supreme Court passed a decree that made it illegal for companies to donate to candidates and political parties.“As corporate election funding was still legal in the last parliamentary election, many deputies didn’t bother to hide their ties to their funders’ interests,” said Wagner Pralon Mancuso, an academic from the University of São Paulo. “On the contrary, there are deputies who explicitly spell out these links, even as a kind of accountability to those who supported them, and in the expectation that [funder] support will be repeated in the next campaign.”There were five arguments for banning corporate election funding in 2015: combatting the influence of economic power in elections; promoting political equality; catalyzing political competition; defending the public interest; and reducing the influence of donations on elected representatives’ behavior. The new election rules will be in effect for this year’s presidential election.Though hailed by some analysts as a significant democratic advance, others fear the rich and well-connected will still have significant influence over Brazil’s upcoming general elections this October. President Michel Temer helped maintain the link between funders and politicians by fighting to ensure that individual entrepreneurs will still be able to donate up to 10 percent of their gross annual income to candidates. Indeed, in city elections since 2015, Brazil has witnessed the major influence of millionaires.“What is yet to be seen, now that corporate gifts have been made illegal, is whether that organic tie between parliamentarians and business sectors will diminish, or whether it will find new ways to manifest itself,” Mancuso said.One potential concern, cautioned Boas, is that corporations will simply move from making legal donations to making illegal ones, passing money under the table. “They always have done so in the past and there’s no reason to think they won’t in the future,” he said. In recent years, the Lava Jato (Car Wash) corruption scandal rocked the nation as investigators unveiled mass political corruption in Brazilian politics.A Brazilian congressional meeting. Photo by Jonas Pereira / Agencia SenadoInternational comparisonsThe link between campaign contributions and politicians isn’t particularly Brazilian. A comparison between Brazil’s campaign finance regulation framework and those of other nations is enlightening, and shows that election regulations are both stronger and weaker elsewhere.Brazil, for example, with its 2015 rule tightening, now has much stricter regulations than the United Kingdom, according to the International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance. Brazil presently bans donations by companies to candidates and political parties; Britain allows both. Likewise, Brazil forbids contributions going from trade unions to political parties, as does the United States; such contributions are permitted in the U.K.However, there are no rules in Brazil or the U.K. against receiving donations from individuals who have behaved illegally by breaking environmental laws. As a representative from the Electoral Commission in the U.K. said: “So long as they’re a registered person, their money is valid.”Clearly, lax campaign finance laws can open the door to political influence by wrongdoers. Similarly, in the U.S., a cloak of secrecy enshrouds political action committees (PACs) and other shadowy election finance groups, leading at least to a lack of transparency, and at worst, to influence peddling.That being the case, many academics and environmental activists agree that the Brazilian government needs to crack down even harder to prevent “dirty” money from influencing policy. “I think there should be stricter donor control systems, especially for those who have behaved illegally,” said Greenpeace’s Astrini.If politicians can be barred from running based on a corruption conviction, as may happen with former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, “then it seems logical and fair that convicted individuals could be banned from making campaign donations,” Boas said.There are currently no bills in Brazil’s National Congress that would prevent anyone convicted of crimes from making campaign contributions.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Controversial, Corruption, Dams, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Grabbing, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation last_img read more

Take Back the Night march in Fort St. John

first_imgMarchers hope that their actions will help bring light to the issue and allow women in the community to feel safe in Fort St. John during night hours and promote a theme of non-violence. “Take Back the Night” march to promote non-violence towards women-Matthew Lago- Advertisement -Men and women in Fort St. John attempted to “Take Back the Night” and marched to try to bring awareness to the issue of violence towards women.Starting in Philadelphia in 1975 “Take back the Night” is an international event that hopes to promote safety of women, especially at night where many women find it difficult to walk alone and feel safe. Event organizer Emily Goodman hopes this event will promote a theme of non-violence.[asset|aid=3190|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=a8bbf7631585f574cee4f91f3d8b51d2-Emily Goodman 1_2_Pub.mp3] The event was well attended by both men and women as they walked with candles accompanied by members of the police in hopes of allowing women to feel safe walking at night in the community. Goodman notes that this issue is one that is especially important in Fort St. John.[asset|aid=3191|format=mp3player|formatter=asset_bonus|title=a8bbf7631585f574cee4f91f3d8b51d2-Emily Goodman 2_1_Pub.mp3] Advertisementlast_img read more

Four-time Meghalaya Chief Minister D.D. Lapang quits Congress

first_imgIn a major blow to the Congress in Meghalaya, four-time Chief Minister Donwa Dethwelson Lapang resigned from the party.In his resignation letter to Congress chief Rahul Gandhi on Thursday night, Mr. Lapang said he was resigning “reluctantly and with a heavy heart”.The former Meghalaya Pradesh Congress Committee (MPCC) chief accused the All India Congress Committee (AICC) of embarking upon a policy of phasing out senior and elderly people.“In my opinion it means that service and contribution of senior and elderly people is no longer useful to the party,” he said in the letter, copies of which were made available to the media.Mr. Lapang said, “This restriction made me frustrated and compelled me to be no longer comfortable in the party.”Mr. Lapang first became Chief Minister in 1992. He was again sworn in as Chief Minister in 2003, 2007 and 2009.AICC general secretary in charge of Meghalaya Luizinho Faleirio said he had not met Mr. Lapang in the last three years. Mr. Faleirio said he did not meet Mr. Lapang during his recent visit to Shillong for revamping the activities of the party.Mr. Lapang, after demitting the office of party chief last year, continued to hold the position of an adviser to the party.MPCC president Celestine Lyngdoh expressed surprise over Mr. Lapang’s decision to quit the party. “We’ll try and find out and, if possible, sort out things at the earliest,” he said.last_img read more

Ottawa continues to fail First Nations Auditor General

first_img(Auditor General Sheila Frasher. APTN/Photo)APTN National NewsOTTAWA-Canada’s auditor general called for major changes to the relationship between First Nations, Ottawa and provincial governments to break the persistent and growing gap between quality of life on reserves and the rest of the country.After 10 years issuing reports on the performance of government departments, Auditor General Sheila Fraser said the existing system dealing with First Nations was not working.“I believe that First Nations, the federal government, and in some cases the provinces, have to rethink their relationship with each other,” said Fraser. “First Nations people have waited far too long to have the quality of services Canadians receive every day and take for granted.”Fraser said she has done 29 audits that directly or indirectly dealt with First Nations people and has seen very little change in the social conditions afflicting reserves.She said reserves have fallen behind over the last 40 years and the federal government has failed to do anything about it.“The conditions on many reserves remain poor and progress is slow. Some communities are making significant progress, but they are the exception rather than the rule,” said Fraser. “Services on reserves have not kept pace with services in municipal governments…The federal government has not been identifying and funding comparable services on reserves in any systemic fashion.”Fraser said her office had uncovered government failures in education, water quality, housing and child and family services.She also highlighted that her office had found that reporting requirements for First Nations, some with fewer than 500 members, have been “excessive.” She said some of the reports were never reviewed by Indian Affairs or didn’t serve any purpose.She said another report on the government’s response to her office’s concerns around comprehensive land claims will come out in May.Akwesasne Mohawk Council Grand Chief Mike Mitchell thanked Fraser for her work and said his community is mired in required audit reports.Mitchell said his council receives $74 million for programs and services and is required to file 77 audits.“They put you through the ringer,” said Mitchell. “And all the times you (Fraser) have made recommendations and observations it blows out the window the next day.”Alluding to the swirling controversy around the Canadian Taxpayers Federation campaign over the levels of reserve politician salaries, Mitchell then said, “But when First Nations people get accused for something, it just stays in the air for a long time.”last_img read more

Hundreds gather for Aboriginal veterans day in Vancouver

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt’s still not a widely recognized day on the calendar.But Indigenous veterans know all about Nov. 8.The day marks Aboriginal veterans day.APTN’s Tina House reports on the ceremony in Vancouver.thouse@aptn.calast_img

Holyfield Faces Huge Child Support Debt – Or Jail

The financial issues Evander Holyfield have faced in recent years continues. This time, the former heavyweight champion, who made more than $250 million in his career, is $372,000 in arrears in child support — and could end up in jail if it is not resolved soon.Holyfield, who filed bankruptcy in Fayette County, Georgia, in 2008, has been alerted that the Georgia Department of Human Services has gone to court on behalf of Holyfield’s 18-year-old daughter. It alleged he owes $372,097.40 in child support that has gone unpaid since April 2010, according to TMZ.The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported in 2009 that Holyfield, whose 54,000-square foot house was up for foreclosure in 2008 and 2009, has child support payments of more than $500,000 a month. He has at lead 11 children.Holyfield, 49, once earned $34 million for a rematch with Mike Tyson in 1997, the so-called “Bite Fight,” in which Tyson bit off the tip of one of Holyfield’s ears. Holyfield has yet to announce his retirement, but hasn’t fought since stopping Brian Nielsen on May 7, 2011, in Copenhagen, DenmarkMany of Holyfield’s children live or have lived with him on his massive estate that on 104 acres, has 109 rooms, including 17 bathrooms, three kitchens and a bowling alley. read more

Sandals Foundation Spreads Christmas Cheer to Hundreds of kids with Annual Toy

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#TurksandCaicos, December 21, 2017 – Providenciales – The donations were sponsored through the Sandals Foundation- the philanthropic arm of Sandals Resorts International- which supports community, environment and educational causes within the Caribbean region.Public Relations Manager of Beaches Turks & Caicos, Elanor Krzanowski, commented on the successful toy drive.   “It’s always a pleasure to spread holiday cheer,” She continued, “With all that has happened this year, we wanted to make the little ones feel extra special.  We’re happy to partner with the schools and the various organizations in making the holidays brighter for children of the Turks and Caicos Islands.”Toys were donated to the entire student body of the Enid Capron Primary School – the hotel’s sponsored school-where students were treated to toys and treats during a Christmas party hosted by the hotel’s staff and Sandals Foundation volunteers. “On behalf of Enid Capron Primary School, staff, students and parents, we are eternally gratefully to Beaches Turks and Caicos for their kind donation in the form of the annual toy drive,” said Sophia Garland, Principal at Enid Capron.Garland continued; “We do appreciate the fact that our students matter to this resort as a corporate citizen.   Our parents and students are appreciative of the happiness that giving and receiving brings.   We continue to thank Beaches Resort for their continued support to our institution.”For a consecutive year, the hotel also brought cheer to the Living Word Center Ministries through donation of toys.Bishop Alvin Harvey expressed; “We really appreciate the help from Beaches which helps to make our Christmas Party happen every year.   It was very good, we used the toys at our annual Christmas ceremony and the donations helped us to reach our goals.”The hotel also makes a donation to the National Cancer Society.  “Beaches have always been one of our corporate sponsors,” commented Rosemary Jolly, President of the National Cancer Society of the TCI.   “Beaches is always very supportive. Today we are very grateful for the offer of toys to the children through the National Cancer Society.   Elanor (Beaches PR Manager) offered these toys without even asking here.   Knowing that we decided to give toys this year from proceeds of In the Pink to the children, this will go a long way and we are very appreciative to Beaches for its constant support of our initiatives.”Meanwhile the hosted a holiday party for the children of staff members who took part in face painting, games, dancing, and bouncing castles.Press Release: Sandals Resortlast_img read more

Wilmington OBITUARIES Week of July 21 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are the obituaries published on Wilmington Apple during the week of July 21, 2019:Lived In Wilmington At Time Of Passing:Susan A. (McNeil) Roy, 49John A. Townsend, 55Previously Lived In Wilmington: Janice Kay (Humbarger) DeLap, 74Linda J. Gallagher, 71Beverly (Gaudreau) Silva, 89Worked In/Volunteered In/Connected To Wilmington:NoneLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington OBITUARIES (Week of July 14, 2019)In “Obituaries”Wilmington OBITUARIES (Week of August 18, 2019)In “Obituaries”Wilmington OBITUARIES (Week of July 28, 2019)In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Honda Activa 125 Price Revealed Launch on 28 April

first_imgHonda ‘s much awaited scooter Activa 125 is all set to hit Indian roads on 28 April.Activa 125, the latest offering of Honda in the Activa line up has been the talk of the town since its first appearance at the Delhi Auto Expo 2014.The two wheeler enthusiasts in the country have waited enough to hear about the launch of the Activa 125 in the domestic market and now the latest report suggests that the scooter will finally reach showrooms on 28 April.A report by Motoroids claims that the Honda has started sending invite for the Activa 125 launch and the event will also mark the inauguration of the sales of the scooter. Earlier in this week, Honda revealed the prices of its upcoming Activa 125.Activa 125 will be made available in two variants – Standard (with drum brakes) and Deluxe (Disc brakes & alloys). While the Standard version is priced at 52,447, the Deluxe comes at a price point of 58,156 (ex-showroom, Delhi).The latest Activa pack a 125cc, single cylinder, four-stroke engine under the hood ,which  can churn out a power of 8.6bhp at 6500 rpm and a peak torque of 10.12 Nm at 5500 rpm .The scooter, a strong rival of Piaggio’s Vespa, Suzuki’s Access and Swish and Mahindra’s Duro and Rodeo in India comes mated to a V-Matic CVT transmission and comes with telescopic fork suspension at the front and hydraulic type at the rear.It measures 1,814 mm in length, 704 mm in width, 1,151 mm in height and has a wheelbase of 1,260 mm. Promising a fuel efficiency of 60-65 kmpl, the Activa 125 is the first Honda scooter in the 125cc segment to come with Honda Efficiency Technology (HET). The scooter will be offered in four colour variants in the sub-continent market- midnight blue, black, pearl white and sword silver – and comes with features like optional disc brake, tubeless tires, digital meter and metal body.Technical Specifications of Honda Activa 125Engine Type: 4 Stroke, Air Cooled, SI EngineDisplacement: 124.9ccMax Power: 6.38 Kw (8.6 Bhp)@6500 rpmMax Torque: 10.12 Nm@5500 rpmDimension: 1814mmX704mmX1151mmWheel Base: 1260mmSeat Height: 765mm[ED:VS]last_img read more