U.S. zoos learn how to keep captive pangolins alive, helping wild ones

first_imgThe Pangolin Consortium, a partnership between six U.S. zoos and Pangolin Conservation, an NGO, launched a project in 2014 which today houses fifty White-bellied tree pangolins (Phataginus tricuspis).Common knowledge says that pangolins are almost impossible to keep alive in captivity, but the consortium has done basic research to boost survival rates, traveling to Africa and working with a company, EnviroFlight, to develop a natural nutritious insect-derived diet for pangolins in captivity.While some conservationists are critical of the project, actions by the Pangolin Consortium have resulted in high captive survival rates, and even in the successful breeding of pangolins in captivity.The Pangolin Consortium is able to conduct basic research under controlled conditions at zoos on pangolin behavior and health – research that can’t be done in the wild. Zoos can also present pangolins to the public, educating about their endangered status, improving conservation funding. Captive pangolins can teach researchers much about species behavior and breeding, information that could be valuable to protecting the animals in the wild. Photo by Jim Schulz courtesy of the Chicago Zoological Society“When we first started talking about pangolins, people thought we were saying ‘penguin,’” says Amy Roberts, Curator of Mammals at Chicago’s Brookfield Zoo. That remains a problem, even today, with the majority of Americans still not knowing what pangolins look like, much less how much deep trouble they’re in.This is just one issue addressed by the Pangolin Consortium – a partnership of six U.S. zoos, along with the Florida-based NGO, Pangolin Conservation. This alliance, begun in 2014, now holds around fifty African White-bellied tree pangolins (Phataginus tricuspis) including a few born in captivity.Which is remarkable, considering that the common wisdom is that captive pangolins almost always quickly waste away and die.There are eight species of wild Asian and African pangolins in the world today, all under extreme pressure from illegal trafficking – especially due to hunting for bushmeat and use of their scales in traditional medicine.Often called the world’s most trafficked mammal, all eight species are considered by the IUCN to be threatened with extinction. Numbers of the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) have declined by 90 percent, and recent research showed that 2.71 million pangolins of the African species are killed every year in Central Africa, an increase of 145 percent since 2000.Some conservationists argue that pangolins ­– with such rapidly plummeting wild populations, and perceived high rates of mortality in zoos – should not be held at all in captivity. But the Pangolin Consortium argues just the opposite: to conserve remaining wild populations, scientists need to know far more about these unusual animals, data that can only be gleaned under controlled conditions like those seen in zoos.The Pangolin Consortium is working diligently to gain that knowledge, and has already made significant breakthroughs. And the more they learn about captive pangolins, say these experts, the more hope there may be for wild ones.Though protected by law, White-bellied tree pangolins (Phataginus tricuspis) were recently offered as smoked bushmeat in the Kantamanto Market in Accra, Ghana. Photo by Alex WilesDespite international and national pangolin protections, these pangolin scales were offered for sale in a rural village in Togo. The scales are falsely believed to have healing properties and used in traditional medicine in parts of Africa and Asia. The scales are made of keratin, the same material as human nails and hair. Photo by Justin MillerThe captive pangolin dietDiet was widely supposed to be the biggest problem with keeping pangolins healthy and alive in captivity, so that was the first problem that Justin Miller, founder of Pangolin Conservation, set out to solve.In the wild pangolins eat insects, using a long, sticky tongue similar to that of an anteater. This diet can be challenging to replicate for a number of reasons. “For a long time, zoos fed them everything from mince meat to dog food, milk, eggs – nothing insect-based –just readily available food that the pangolin would accept,” Miller says.He had become familiar with research done in Taipei, Taiwan where zoos achieved success at keeping and breeding the local pangolin species, data that clarified some key dietary factors. However, just adopting the Taipei diet wasn’t an option, as it included ingredients not readily available in the United States, such as bee larvae and silkworm pupae.So Miller initiated his own research in 2013. First he needed to figure out exactly what wild White-bellied tree pangolins eat. He went to Africa to observe pangolin eating habits and to collect insects, sending them back to the U.S. for nutritional analysis. Miller recalls that he needed a lot of bugs, so he hired locals to gather them, despite the fact that this wasn’t the most appealing business opportunity.Termites were collected in West Africa during reproductive swarms for nutritional analysis and to determine pangolins’ natural diet. Photo by Justin Miller“It was hard to convince people to catch ants,” he says. “When I tried to show them how, it was just entertainment to watch me be bitten en masse during a few failures. I had to start an impressive system of supply and demand with ant prices changing daily, and even hourly, to get the amounts needed.”Next Miller had to convert that nutritional analysis into a food product using ingredients readily available in the United States. Sourcing those ingredients involved networking and creativity. One important consultant was John Gramieri, the Austin, Texas Zoo’s general curator, and former director of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Taxon Advisory Group in charge of xeanrthrans (anteaters, armadillos and sloths), aardvarks and pangolins.Gramieri had helped develop a similar insect-derived diet for captive armadillos, shifting the animals away from the meat diet generally served them in zoos. “I bemoaned the fact that there was very little opportunity in this country to buy insect matter in a manner that was cost effective,” Gramieri says. “If you wanted to feed an armadillo nothing but mealworms, that was incredibly expensive.”The prepared diet developed for pangolins consists of farmed insects and other ingredients nutritious to pangolins and offered in a moist crumble. Photo by Justin MillerThen, one day, someone showed him a United Nations report on insects for human consumption, and it mentioned a company called EnviroFlight. The firm was raising black soldier flies and producing rose fertilizer from their castings and fish food from their larvae. He sent EnviroFlight an email, wondering if there was some chance he could get the raw insects minus the processing.“They called me and said, ‘We’ve got two tons of this stuff in the freezer, what do you want to do with it?’” he says.This led to a couple years research developing an ideal insect-based armadillo diet, which put Gramieri in the perfect position to advise Miller and connect the pangolin researcher with suppliers. Again, Enviroflight turned out to be an excellent collaborator and supplier, but then the delivered insect larvae caused practical problems.“First we got [the larvae] in whole, and they broke a bunch of machines because they gummed them up,” says Jennifer Watts, director of nutrition at the Brookfield Zoo.A specially prepared diet composed of dried insects and other nutritious ingredients is offered to pangolins in “slow feeders” to encourage natural behaviors like clawing. Photo by Justin Miller“The only way we could effectively grind them up, because of the [high] fat content, was to put dry ice with them, freeze them, then grind them,” Miller relates. “But then EnviroFlight said, ‘we can use a cold press, and we can press out the fat and give you what’s left over.’” The company was also able to modify the amount of protein and nutrients in the larvae based on what they were fed.Once Miller designed a nutritionally complete pangolin diet, he acclimated the animals to it while they were still in Africa. “I started them off on their wild diet of ants and termites, and then slowly switched them over to the prepared diet,” he says. This way, when the animals arrived in the U.S., they didn’t need to be persuaded to eat strange food while also acclimating to new surroundings. Lessening stress, the researchers were learning, meant happier, healthier pangolins.Pangolins transported in custom-built crates designed to provide security and reduce stress. Photo by Justin MillerPreparing for the big moveAnother reason pangolins have done poorly in captivity historically is that often captive animals in the past were rescues from trafficking confiscations, so they started out in poor health, which only got worse.Confiscated pangolins “have been in stressful conditions, either obtained from bushmeat markets or hunters,” explains Miller. “They can go through capture myopathy – a buildup of stress that ends up damaging their heart muscles.” When that happens, animals may appear to be doing well, but there is [cardiac] damage, “and then any sort of stressful event can lead to heart failure.”This and other health deficits due to illegal wildlife trafficking puts the animals at a high risk of dying in transit, or shortly thereafter.In contrast, the Pangolin Consortium did everything possible to assure that the animals brought to the U.S. beginning in 2015 started out in good health. While still in their native countries, the pangolins were treated for parasites and infections, with Miller assessing each individual. “Any specimens that showed signs of stress, or any other factors that made them poor candidates, were released into safe areas near their original collection sites [in the wild].” That turned out to be about thirty percent. The remaining captive pangolins were adapted slowly to the presence of people and unusual noises, “primarily consisting of NPR [National Public Radio] and [electric] fans,” Miller says.Miller also minimized the stress and risk of travel, replacing the shocks on transport vehicles to give a smoother ride. “All vans had air conditioning, and I had a spare van follow us in case of vehicle problems. We only traveled during the night so the otherwise busy roads would be clear and allow for shorter transit time and cooler weather in case of air conditioner problems,” he relates. “I never let any specimens out of my sight until they were loaded onto the plane. Even then, I stayed at the cargo warehouse until the plane was in the sky.”An adult male White-bellied tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis), photographed at Pangolin Conservation in St Augustine, Florida. Photo by Dev LeeSettling inOnce in the United States, the first priority was to ensure the wellbeing of the pangolins. Only one was put on public exhibit, at Brookfield, while the rest remained in seclusion.“What everyone has committed to is making sure these animals are well established behind the scenes,” says Gramieri. “We want to do a full and detailed analysis of their behavior, their hormone values, their food consumption. We want to be able to assess that in a private, non-trafficked space, so if we do put them on display, we’ll be able to see if their behavior changes at all.”At Brookfield, the researchers will be analyzing stress hormones, determining the estrous cycle, and monitoring pregnancies – natural processes never scientifically observed in this, or pretty much in any African pangolin species.“We are collecting fecals on everyone, every day, for the first year,” Roberts says. The animals are kept in slightly different environments, to see if minor variations affect their behaviors and health. For example, two settings utilize true reverse lighting to simulate nocturnal conditions, while another allows some daylight in. “There are differences in keeper activity, humidity, noise. We’re tracking [all of that] so we can correlate down the road with the fecal hormone results.”The founder of Pangolin Conservation, Justin Miller, offers water to a rescued female White-bellied tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis). This animal, captured in the wild by a poacher, was discovered in a plastic bag carried by a motorcyclist who was bringing it to a restaurant in Lomé, Togo’s capital city. Another plastic bag was also confiscated at the time; it contained a weak newborn pangolin pup which had been born to the captive female the night before. Many pangolins die in the hands of smuggling networks, without ever reaching market. Photo by Alex WilesMeanwhile, Miller’s facility is starting a study, analyzing stress hormones in any pangolins utilized in public outreach presentations to make sure those individuals are not being negatively impacted.It’s hoped that all of this advance planning, attention to detail and careful research is likely to increase the chance of success with Phataginus tricuspis, as is the coordination and communication within the consortium.“We’ve never been in a better position within the zoological community to quickly exchange information between facilities and rapidly analyze data like nutritional requirements,” Miller reports. “For example, say our animals have their blood analyzed and it shows a nutritional deficiency. We can then rapidly alter the diet, send it off for analysis, and follow up with new blood work weeks later.”In addition, Grameiri’s research has now led him to question the conventional wisdom that pangolins do poorly in captivity. In fact, he says, their lifespans at zoos were improving even before the Pangolin Consortium project began. He has analyzed longevity records and found survival trend statistics that are much better than the figures often cited, which he says incorrectly interpreted data from currently living animals. By analyzing records of 296 pangolins held in zoos since the animals first appear in records in 1954, he found that the captive lifespan has steadily increased. The 45 animals in zoos at the time of his analysis had been in human care for an average 7 years 8 months, which included many that had been in captivity more than ten years so far.Justin Miller, collecting weaver ants in West Africa for nutritional analysis. The development of a natural food specifically designed to meet the dietary needs of captive pangolins was a major breakthrough for researchers seeking to improve the survival rate of pangolins in zoos. Photo by Steven TillisBreeding pangolinsHelping pangolins survive better in captivity is one thing, breeding pangolins in captivity is quite another matter. Miller says that captive breeding was never a realistic possibility before in Western zoos, because most facilities had so few animals to work with, and because many had been confiscation rescues in poor health.But there was evidence it could be possible – the Taipei Zoo bred Formosan pangolins to the third generation. And indeed, the Pangolin Consortium project has already seen successful zoo births. Most offspring, like two recently weaned at Brookfield, had mothers already pregnant when they arrived at the zoo. However, in November, Miller’s facility saw a successful birth from an animal bred since arriving.Maintaining genetic diversity is important for captive populations, and advance planning is underway to assure it. “We’re doing genetic work on each and every individual of all the founder animals to figure out which to breed together for the maximum amount of diversity,” says Miller. “For a lot of species we don’t have that [baseline data] for the founder stock.”While there are no current plans to release captive animals to the wild – where the situation for pangolins is still dire – this attention to genetic health of a captive population will be important for any future reintroductions.A White-bellied tree pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis). Photo by Jim Schulz courtesy of the Chicago Zoological SocietyAmbassadors and moreSome conservationists have objected to the strategy of bringing pangolins into captivity.Along with the concerns about maintaining them in good health in captivity – an issue that the Pangolin Constortium’s work seems to be addressing successfully – another concern that has been expressed is that the collecting of pangolins for zoos places additional pressure on wild populations. Gramieri thinks it’s worth looking at the statistics: according to conservative estimates “there’s more than a pangolin an hour being poached.” Compared to poaching figures in the millions, the number of animals that have been taken into zoos is miniscule.Pangolin Consortium participants argue that the contribution their efforts make to preserving pangolins in the wild far outweigh the capture of small numbers of individuals, and they have taken significant steps toward that goal. For example, every U.S. zoo that received pangolins was required to pledge its support to in situ conservation. “All the facilities signed off on a strict set of agreements to ensure that this collaborative consortium facilitated research and conservation goals,” says Miller. This includes a mandatory yearly donation that will be pooled and distributed to selected grant applicants who are conducting in situ and ex situ conservation projects.The consortium is also assisting conservation in the wild in other ways. Knowledge gained about the behaviors and breeding of captive pangolins will almost certainly provide useful information that will help their wild relatives.“We’re doing research that would be very difficult in the wild,” says Miller. For example, existing pangolin “reproduction data was grossly inaccurate ­– such as gestation and age of maturity, basic modeling of the population and what is sustainable – none of this is [currently] known, and all can be based off data [gathered] from our captive population.”The careful veterinary attention given to captive pangolins, and veterinary knowledge gained, also has the potential to aid wild populations, especially animals seized from traffickers and in need of immediate medical care and rehabilitation in preparation for return to the wild.The Pangolin Consortium today houses fifty White-bellied tree pangolins (Phataginus tricuspis). Photo by Jim Schulz courtesy of the Chicago Zoological SocietyMiller says it’s unclear how effective current rehabilitation practices are, but notes that the baseline health data gathered at the zoos could be critical to contributing to the health of confiscated and wild populations. He points out that this is information that cannot be easily gathered or analyzed in rehab facilities.Rehab centers “may never have seen a healthy pangolin heart,” he says. “They could be releasing specimens that won’t fare well because they have damaged hearts.” Data from a healthy captive population will make it possible to more accurately assess the health of rehabbed animals before release, upping their chances for survival back in the wild.There is one last argument in support of the Pangolin Consortium’s captive pangolin program, which brings us back to where this story began: nobody is likely to care about conserving pangolins if they’ve never heard of them, and can’t even keep pangolins straight from penguins.When it comes to conservation, public education, recognition and awareness matters. That’s clearly why the Eastern mountain gorilla is receiving significant amounts of conservation funding today, while the Bornean white-bearded gibbon is not.Gramieri points out that while only one pangolin is on exhibit right now, when it becomes possible to display more, the combined consortium zoos could potentially expose more than seven million visitors per year to this amazing keritan-armored animal.“We think this is a very important way of getting the American people involved in the plight of the pangolin,” Gramieri says.Put that potential for education together with the financial and research support for in situ conservation, and the Pangolin Consortium can be seen as a bold innovator: offering a proactive conservation model by which zoos support in situ species survival. Says Gramieri, “This is exactly what zoos are supposed to do.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Note: A number of Mongabay readers have asked for a complete list of the Pangolin Consortium partners. They are the Brookfield Zoo, Gladys Porter Zoo, Columbus Zoo, Pittsburgh Zoo, Turtle Back Zoo, Memphis Zoo, and Pangolin Conservation.Response to Mongabay Pangolin Article (Posted Feb 9, 2018)By Lisa Hywood, CEO & Founder of Tikki Hywood Foundation, Zimbabwe and Thai Van Nguyen, Executive Director, Save Vietnam’s Wildlife, VietnamWe are writing in response to the Jan. 5 article in Mongabay entitled “U.S. Zoos Learn How to Keep Captive Pangolins Alive, Helping Wild Ones.”The article, which excluded insights from any pangolin conservation groups, asserts that the “Pangolin Consortium” – a partnership between six U.S. zoos and a non-profit organization – is saving pangolins by taking them from the wild in Togo and keeping them in U.S. zoos.One of the main problems with this rationale – that we can save pangolins by transitioning them to captive environments – is that pangolins have a very high mortality rate during capture and in captivity. As such, displaying them in zoos might require a constant flow of wild pangolins into captivity. This is something we can’t risk given pangolins are threatened with extinction and are the most trafficked mammal on earth, with over one million poached for their scales (used in traditional Asian medicine) and meat over the past decade. Indeed, pangolins are in such grave danger that the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Pangolin Specialist Group – the world’s foremost experts on pangolins – expressed serious concern with the Consortium’s actions in a recent letter to the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA).Fortunately, at a recent meeting between organizations working on pangolin conservation and the Consortium, the zoos committed to stop importing pangolins from the wild. In other words, even if those they have die; they will not be replaced with wild-caught pangolins. While we remain concerned about the way in which the Consortium acquired its original 45 pangolins, this is an extremely positive step.We are hopeful that the Consortium will now adhere to global conservation action plans developed for pangolins by the IUCN Pangolin Specialist Group, which outline the top priorities for saving such species, such as reducing consumer demand and stopping illegal trafficking. Indeed, zoos can and should be involved in saving these species – as they have other threatened animals – through actions like supporting rescue, rehabilitation and release facilities in countries that make up the pangolins’ habitat like Zimbabwe’s Tikki Hywood Foundation and Save Vietnam’s Wildlife; launching initiatives in consumer nations to help reduce the demand for pangolins; and developing digital media and awareness raising campaigns to raise the profile of pangolins globally.Pangolin populations have undergone such massive declines that we need all hands on deck to prevent the extinction of these unique animals. This means working together to carry out the conservation plans developed by pangolin experts, which prioritize protecting wild populations and their habitat and cracking down on trade—not removing pangolins from their habitat.The general public currently knows little about pangolins and their plight. Zoos can help educate people to the dangers pangolins face from wildlife trafficking. Photo by Jim Schulz courtesy of the Chicago Zoological Society Article published by Glenn Scherer Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Bushmeat, Captive Breeding, Conservation, Ecology, Ecosystems, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Featured, Green, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Hunting, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Over-hunting, Overconsumption, Pangolins, Restoration, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking, Zoos center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon dropped 13 percent in 2017

first_imgA new analysis of satellite imagery and data finds 143,425 hectares of forest were lost in the Peruvian Amazon in 2017, down 13 percent from 2016.The analysis identified newly deforestation hotspots in the San Martín and Amazonas regions.The main causes of the loss of forest in the Amazon appear to be cultivation of crops, small- and medium-scale ranching, large oil palm plantations and gold mining. A recent analysis of satellite images gives a glimpse into Peru’s widespread deforestation in 2017. The analysis, which was produced by the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), found 143,425 hectares of forest were lost across the Peruvian Amazon during 2017 — the equivalent of 200,000 soccer fields.Deforestation was down 13 percent from 2016, but the analysis reveals new forest loss hotspots and conservationists remain concerned for the future of Peru’s forests. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This story was initially published in Spanish on Mongabay Latam on Feb. 8, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Satellite images of an area in southern Peru’s Madre de Dios region show the advancement of deforestation from 2016 to 2018. Images courtesy of MAAPMAAP’s report indicates the five most-deforested areas in Peru are spread throughout the country’s Amazonian regions, from Madre de Dios in the south to Ucayali and Huánuco and San Martín in the central part of the country to the Santa María de Nieva area in northern Peru’s Amazonas region.According to the analysis, the main causes of deforestation in these areas are small- and medium-scale ranching, large-scale oil palm cultivation and gold mining.Matt Finer, MAAP’s principal investigator, told Mongabay Latam that advancements in early deforestation alert systems have allowed them to quickly produce a complete panorama of what happened last year.“Historically, we had to wait months and years to know the levels of deforestation that had been reached every year,” he said. A recently deforested area in the Amazonas Region. Images courtesy of MAAPOverall, MAAP found there was 13 percent less deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon in 2017 than in 2016. But experts still worry about the future of the country’s forests. Claudio Schneider, Technical Director of Conservation International Peru, considers the amount of deforestation in Peru to be too high.“Although efforts have been made to improve monitoring — because now we have more reliable data about deforestation — there still isn’t enough being done to stop the loss of forests,” Schneider said.He said that it is a complex issue, and that the Peruvian Amazon continues to be a neglected area with weak governance.“As long as people don’t work in a territorial way, in the titling of the land and in coordination with Indigenous communities and other sectors of the population, the Amazon will continue to be, a little bit, no one’s land,” Schneider said. He added that this disorganization is an open door for illegal activities such as mining or indiscriminate logging.Schneider says that to advance the fight against deforestation, the Peruvian government should launch a stronger land titling campaign for communities that reside in the country’s forests. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Gold Mining, Habitat Loss, Mining, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests Satellite imagery shows a new deforestation hotspot in the San Martín Region caused by the cultivation of oil palm. Images courtesy of MAAPIn the area around the Interoceanic Highway, deforestation totals 11,115 hectares and appears to be caused primarily by gold mining and agricultural activity, particularly in areas north of the highway. In Iberia, 3,220 hectares of forest were lost in 2017. In this area, the main drivers are the cultivation of corn, papaya and cacao, according to local sources.A large-scale agricultural project in northeastern San Martín resulted in the deforestation of 740 hectares during the last few months of 2017. According to MAAP, Peru’s National Forest Conservation Program, administered by the Department of the Environment, confirmed that there is a new oil palm plantation on the border between the regions of San Martín and Loreto.Another new deforestation hotspot is also located in the Amazonas Region, in Nieva District along the Bagua-Saramiriza Highway. In this area, 1,135 hectares of frest were lost in 2017. Deforestation in this area was due to crop cultivation and ranching, according to the report. The amount of deforested land has increased to 3,220 hectares in Iberia in Peru’s Madre de Dios region. Images courtesy of MAAPHe added that the satellite analysis has allowed them to learn that the same patterns and drivers of deforestation are repeated throughout many different areas of the country.In the Ucayali and Huánuco regions, MAAP estimates that deforestation affected 23,240 hectares in 2017. “In this area, the main drivers would be ranching and palm oil,” the report states.Madre de Dios, one of Peru’s most-deforested regions, once held a large area of forest that has been lost to the Interoceanic Highway, as well as a deforested area along its border with Brazil.last_img read more

In Jakarta, wildlife monitors find a hotspot for the illegal tortoise trade

first_imgIndonesia’s capital has seen an increase in the sale of non-native species of tortoises and freshwater turtles that are prohibited for international commercial trade, according to a report by the wildlife-monitoring group TRAFFIC.Growing demand for these species, coupled with Indonesia’s lax enforcement of customs regulation at international ports of entry and an outdated conservation act, have allowed the illicit international animal trade to grow, TRAFFIC said.The group has called on the Indonesian government to improve the country’s conservation laws and regulations, and urged more stringent monitoring of the markets, pet stores and expos in Jakarta and across the country to document and assess the extent of any illegal trade. JAKARTA — The sale of some of the most threatened tortoise and turtle species from around the world continues to flourish at stores and exhibitions across Jakarta, highlighting longstanding concerns about the illegal animal trade in the Indonesian capital.A four-month survey by the wildlife-monitoring group TRAFFIC in 2015 found that 4,985 individuals from 65 different tortoise and freshwater turtle species were on display for sale at pet stores, animal markets, tropical fish markets and reptile expos in Jakarta.Fifteen of the 65 species observed during the survey were native to Indonesia, only three of which were included in the country’s list of protected animals, according to the report published on March 26.Radiated tortoises (Astrochelys radiata) and African spurred tortoises (Centrochelys sulcata) for sale at an expo in a shopping center in North Jakarta. Photo courtesy of TRAFFIC.The rest of the surveyed species were identified as endemic to countries from Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, South America and Madagascar, the report said.It added that nine species observed, only one of which was endemic to Indonesia, were currently listed in Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), for which commercial international trade is prohibited.“[This means] at least eight of these species were likely to have been illegally imported,” John Morgan, from TRAFFIC Southeast Asia and lead author of the report, wrote.Two of these non-native species are the ploughshare tortoise (Astrochelys yniphora) and the radiated tortoise (Astrochelys radiata), both native to Madagascar and listed by the IUCN as critically endangered, or a step away from being extinct in the wild.The study also identified an increase in the sale of non-native species of tortoise and freshwater turtles from previous surveys, in 2004 and 2010, which documented 26 and 35 non-native species, respectively.Growing demand for these species, coupled with Indonesia’s lax enforcement of customs regulations at international ports of entry and an outdated conservation act, have allowed the illicit international animal trade to grow, TRAFFIC said.The report also showed that non-native species were significantly more expensive overall than native species. Some of the non-native species were being offered at $1,535 a head, and the native species at $83 a head.An alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii) from North America on sale at a reptile expo in Jakarta in 2015. A higher number of North American species were found on sale in 2015 compared to previous two surveys. Photo courtesy of TRAFFIC.In 2008, Indonesia began to require import permits for all CITES-listed freshwater turtles and tortoises entering the country. Countries of origin must also notify Indonesian authorities before issuing an export permit.However, existing national regulations — the 1990 Conservation Act and a 1999 government regulation on flora and fauna management — fail to prescribe any protections for non-native species. While Indonesia is a signatory to CITES, it has not ratified the convention by legislating it into law.“This legal loophole hampers any law enforcement to counter illegal trade in these non-native species,” Morgan wrote. “Furthermore, existing laws covering native protected species are seldom enforced effectively, and traders are rarely prosecuted to the full extent possible under the law: thus illegal trade continues largely uninhibited given the lack of regulation and deterrence.”Indonesia’s parliament and government are currently working on a revision to the existing national laws and regulations on conservation and animal protection.Morgan suggested the revision of the conservation law should include legal protections for non-native CITES-listed species, as well as for threatened native species that are not listed as protected by the government. Examples of the latter include the Sulawesi forest turtle (Leucocephalon yuwonoi), listed as critically endangered by the IUCN.The wildlife group also called for more stringent monitoring of the markets, pet stores and expos in Jakarta and across the country by the government, NGOs and researchers, in order to document and assess the extent of any illegal trade.“If this trade and the open markets that sell species illegally are not made a priority for law enforcement action, many of the currently threatened species will be pushed closer to extinction,” said Kanitha Krishnasamy, acting regional director for TRAFFIC in Southeast Asia.Radiated tortoises (Astrochelys radiata) and Indian star tortoises (Geochelone elegans) on sale at an expo in North Jakarta. Signs prohibiting the taking of photos are visible. Photo courtesy of TRAFFIC.According to a 2008 report by TRAFFIC, the supply and demand of freshwater turtles and tortoises appears to be increasing throughout Southeast Asia.“Indonesian authorities should increase communication and co-operation with countries known to be source locations or transit points for smuggled animals entering the Indonesian market, such as Madagascar, the USA, Thailand, Malaysia and China to disrupt international trade chains and focus law enforcement efforts on key traders and species of concern,” Elizabeth John, senior communications officer at TRAFFIC, told Mongabay in an email.More than 50 percent of the world’s 356 known species of tortoises and turtles are currently threatened with extinction, or are nearly extinct, a new report warns. Loss and degradation of habitat; hunting for meat and eggs, or for traditional medicines; and the pet trade, both legal and illegal, are largely driving the decline of these reptiles.“There are many species at risk from trade, but tortoise and freshwater turtles are one group of species that do not receive the same attention as other more high-profile or iconic species,” John said. “Jakarta has been regularly shown to be a hotspot for trade in these species over the last decade.”Radiated tortoises (Astrochelys radiata) and Indian star tortoises (Geochelone elegans) with prices painted on their shells, at an exhibition in 2015 in Jakarta. Photo courtesy of TRAFFIC.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkon Animal Cruelty, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Freshwater Animals, freshwater turtles, Illegal Trade, Pet Trade, Trade, Turtles, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Four-time Meghalaya Chief Minister D.D. Lapang quits Congress

first_imgIn a major blow to the Congress in Meghalaya, four-time Chief Minister Donwa Dethwelson Lapang resigned from the party.In his resignation letter to Congress chief Rahul Gandhi on Thursday night, Mr. Lapang said he was resigning “reluctantly and with a heavy heart”.The former Meghalaya Pradesh Congress Committee (MPCC) chief accused the All India Congress Committee (AICC) of embarking upon a policy of phasing out senior and elderly people.“In my opinion it means that service and contribution of senior and elderly people is no longer useful to the party,” he said in the letter, copies of which were made available to the media.Mr. Lapang said, “This restriction made me frustrated and compelled me to be no longer comfortable in the party.”Mr. Lapang first became Chief Minister in 1992. He was again sworn in as Chief Minister in 2003, 2007 and 2009.AICC general secretary in charge of Meghalaya Luizinho Faleirio said he had not met Mr. Lapang in the last three years. Mr. Faleirio said he did not meet Mr. Lapang during his recent visit to Shillong for revamping the activities of the party.Mr. Lapang, after demitting the office of party chief last year, continued to hold the position of an adviser to the party.MPCC president Celestine Lyngdoh expressed surprise over Mr. Lapang’s decision to quit the party. “We’ll try and find out and, if possible, sort out things at the earliest,” he said.last_img read more

17 days agoWijnaldum insists Liverpool not getting carried away

first_imgWijnaldum insists Liverpool not getting carried awayby Paul Vegas17 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool midfielder Georginio Wijnaldum insists they’re not getting carried away by title talk.The season is only eight games old but already Jurgen Klopp’s men hold a significant eight-point lead over last season’s champions Manchester City.”We don’t want to think we are already champions. That would be a really wrong thing to do,” Wijnaldum told Sky Sports.”I’m sure the manager will keep us grounded and say that we just have to think about ourselves, and try to play good and try to give 100 per cent every week.”We just have to do what we did before and look at ourselves and not look too much to other teams because we don’t have influence on other teams – we can’t control the performance of other teams.”We just have to make sure we are ready for the games that are to come and to make sure we are ready and try to have good results because we know that it can change quickly.”Then at the end of the season we will see where we stand.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Gallery Mens Hockey vs Minnesota

Senior goalkeeper Sean Romeo looks down the ice during the second period of Ohio State’s hockey game vs. Minnesota on Feb. 15. Ohio State lost 4-3. Credit: Nick Hudak | For The Lantern The Ohio State Men’s Ice Hockey team took on Minnesota on Feb. 15 and Ohio State lost 4-3 Photos by Nick Hudak

Stamoulis teams up with Grollo

first_imgDeveloper Harry Stamoulis has joined forces with Daniel Grollo’s Grocon development group, on plans to build a $600 million office tower at 555 Collins Street.An earlier proposal by the Stamoulis Property Group – to build a 404 metre tower on the Western side of Collins Street – was deemed too tall. There were also concerns it would cast a shadow over the Yarra River.Grocon and Stamoulis are working on a proposal for an office tower to feature around 60,000 square metres of prime space and are already seeking out potential anchor tenants. There is currently a 24 storey building on the site built in 1975 and owned by the Stamoulis Property Group. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img

Elvis Costello Reveals Cancer Diagnosis Cancels European Tour Dates

first_img Email Elvis Costello Cancels European Tour Dates elvis-costello-reveals-cancer-diagnosis-cancels-european-tour-dates News Facebook Elvis Costello Reveals Cancer Diagnosis, Cancels European Tour Dates https://twitter.com/ElvisCostello/status/1015145826941743104center_img Read more The iconic singer/songwriter will forgo the final six dates of his summer tour to recover from surgeryNate HertweckGRAMMYs Jul 6, 2018 – 4:39 pm GRAMMY-winning singer/songwriter Elvis Costello has been forced to cancel the remaining six shows of his ongoing European tour after revealing he was recently diagnosed with cancer.The 63-year-old underwent surgery in May to remove a “small but aggressive cancerous malignancy” before beginning his summer tour. His doctors have urged him to sit out the upcoming dates to recover.“Six weeks ago my specialist called me and said, ‘You should start playing the Lotto,’” Costello said in a statement. “He had rarely, if ever, seen such a small but very aggressive cancerous malignancy that could be defeated by a single surgery. I was elated and relieved that our European summer tour could go ahead.”Despite this initial optimism, Costello admitted he had to accept his recovery will take longer than he would have wished and apologized to ticketholders for the cancellations.”Post-surgical guidelines for such surgery, recommend three weeks to four weeks recovery, depending on whether you are returning to a desk job or an occupation that involves physical work or travel,” Costello continued. “It was impossible to judge how this advisory would line up with the demands on a traveling musician, playing 90-minute to two-hour-plus performances on a nightly basis, but by the time we reached the Edinburgh Playhouse, I was almost fooled into thinking that normal service had been resumed.” In the statement, Costello also reminded fans he and his band The Imposter have a “magnificent new record of which we are truly proud” on the way this October. Just last month, he announced the album and a fall North American tour to support it.A full list of scheduled tour dates can be found on Costello’s website, as fans of the songwriting icon from all over the world wish him a full and speedy recovery.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs” Twitter last_img read more

Honda Activa 125 Price Revealed Launch on 28 April

first_imgHonda ‘s much awaited scooter Activa 125 is all set to hit Indian roads on 28 April.Activa 125, the latest offering of Honda in the Activa line up has been the talk of the town since its first appearance at the Delhi Auto Expo 2014.The two wheeler enthusiasts in the country have waited enough to hear about the launch of the Activa 125 in the domestic market and now the latest report suggests that the scooter will finally reach showrooms on 28 April.A report by Motoroids claims that the Honda has started sending invite for the Activa 125 launch and the event will also mark the inauguration of the sales of the scooter. Earlier in this week, Honda revealed the prices of its upcoming Activa 125.Activa 125 will be made available in two variants – Standard (with drum brakes) and Deluxe (Disc brakes & alloys). While the Standard version is priced at 52,447, the Deluxe comes at a price point of 58,156 (ex-showroom, Delhi).The latest Activa pack a 125cc, single cylinder, four-stroke engine under the hood ,which  can churn out a power of 8.6bhp at 6500 rpm and a peak torque of 10.12 Nm at 5500 rpm .The scooter, a strong rival of Piaggio’s Vespa, Suzuki’s Access and Swish and Mahindra’s Duro and Rodeo in India comes mated to a V-Matic CVT transmission and comes with telescopic fork suspension at the front and hydraulic type at the rear.It measures 1,814 mm in length, 704 mm in width, 1,151 mm in height and has a wheelbase of 1,260 mm. Promising a fuel efficiency of 60-65 kmpl, the Activa 125 is the first Honda scooter in the 125cc segment to come with Honda Efficiency Technology (HET). The scooter will be offered in four colour variants in the sub-continent market- midnight blue, black, pearl white and sword silver – and comes with features like optional disc brake, tubeless tires, digital meter and metal body.Technical Specifications of Honda Activa 125Engine Type: 4 Stroke, Air Cooled, SI EngineDisplacement: 124.9ccMax Power: 6.38 Kw (8.6 Bhp)@6500 rpmMax Torque: 10.12 Nm@5500 rpmDimension: 1814mmX704mmX1151mmWheel Base: 1260mmSeat Height: 765mm[ED:VS]last_img read more

Baba Ramdevs Patanjali to expand business manufacture solar power equipment

first_imgTOUGH TIMES: Yoga guru Baba Ramdev and Managing Director of Patanjali Ayurved Acharya Balkrishna performing yoga. REUTERS/Amit DaveAfter gaining a considerable market share in the FMCG market space, self-styled Yoga guru Baba Ramdev’s Patanjali Ayurved is planning to diversify its business, this time into the solar power equipment manufacturing.”Getting into solar is in line with the swadeshi movement. With solar, each household in India can have power supply, and we are here to make that happen,” Acharya Balkrishna, managing director of Patanjali Ayurved told Mint in an interview.Since its inception, Patanjali is cashing in on the “natural” or ayurvedic and ‘swadeshi’ label to scale up its business. The company was set up in 2006, has been a success story now, as it has grown at a dramatic pace, with revenue touching Rs 10,561 crore as of March 31, 2017, from Rs 2,006 crore in 2014-15.Patanjali’s decision to foray into solar power equipment manufacturing space comes when the central government is considering a 30 percent capital subsidy as part of a new solar manufacturing policy, reported the business daily.”The government has been working on the solar industry, and even offering sops. We will manufacture solar panels in India without compromising the quality. But we are not going to get into the price war with the Chinese solar panels,” Balkrishna explained.The government has also proposed a scheme—”rent a roof”, with an aim to support its ambitious plan of generating 40 gigawatts (GW) of solar power by 2022.Earlier this year, the firm acquired a navigation aid equipment manufacturing company, Advance Navigation and Solar Technologies. Baba Ramdev backed Patanjali plans to invest around Rs100 crore in solar equipment manufacturing.For manufacturing solar equipment, the firm has already chosen a factory unit in Greater Noida, it is expected to be functional in next three to four months, reported the business daily.”This started with our plan to use solar as a source of power at all our factories. That time we understood (that) most of the solar modules come from China. And there was no quality consistency even in India-made ones. We started with making solar modules for our captive use initially and then decided to utilize existing capacity to manufacture solar modules and sell in the market. This unit is at a nascent stage at the moment,” Balkrishna said.last_img read more