Environmental defenders increasingly targeted, data shows

first_imgAround the world, 197 people were killed in 2017 for defending or protecting land.A partnership between The Guardian and international NGO Global Witness has been tracking and compiling data on the deaths of land defenders since 2002.Land defenders are often private individuals and activists protecting nature reserves, natural wealth, and stand up against those who harm the environment. Land defenders around the world are increasingly being targeted for murder, according to an annual data analysis by The Guardian and Global Witness. According to the 2017 data, released in February, 197 land defenders around the world were killed last year. They are described by the Guardian people who were “standing up to the governments and companies that steal their land and harm the environment, calling out the corrupt and unjust practices that enable it.”The data collection project started in 2002, and since then the number of land defenders killed every year has increased four-fold. “The situation remains critical,”  said Ben Leather, senior campaigner for Global Witness in a statement. “Until communities are genuinely included in decisions around the use of their land and natural resources, those who speak out will continue to face harassment, imprisonment and the threat of murder.”The most dangerous region for land and environment defenders is Latin America, a position it has long occupied. According to Global Witness, agribusiness interests are now most commonly linked to murders. In the past, the mining industry has been the worst offender. Agribusiness and mining alone are connected to over 60 percent of known cases with links to a source.National parks remained extremely deadly in 2017. There were 21 recorded deaths linked to poaching in national parks. Park rangers often clash with poachers in small-scale, but deadly conflicts inside national parks.  Brazil remains the deadliest place in the world for land defenders with 46 deaths, spurred on in part by conflicting interests in the Amazon. Colombia is a close second, though, with 32 deaths, with conflicts related to the power vacuum caused with the FARC peace deal. In Peru, a group of six farmers were murdered by a criminal group that wanted cheap land for palm oil-related profit.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Endangered Environmentalists, Environmental Activism, Environmental Crime, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

The ozone layer is still getting thinner, new study finds

first_imgChemicals, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Extinction, Conservation, Environment, Extinction, Forests, Industry, Mass Extinction, Ozone Layer, Plants, Research, Trees A team of scientists measured the total amount of ozone in the atmosphere and found that the overall concentration is about the same as it’s been, despite a measured boost in the upper layer.That discovery led the team to surmise that the lower level of the ozone layer is still getting thinner.It could be that climate change is forcing ozone in the atmosphere to spread out more quickly toward the poles.Another hypothesis is that some of the compounds that have replaced CFCs in the past three decades may similarly be stripping the atmosphere of ozone, just as CFCs did. The specter of an environmental problem once thought to have been solved has risen again. A new study published Feb. 6 in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics reports that the ozone layer might still be thinning, despite efforts to halt the use of the human-made chemicals thought to be responsible.That’s not to say that the Montreal Protocol hasn’t been effective. The 1989 agreement banned the use of chemicals such as chlorine-containing chlorofluorocarbons and similar compounds used to cool air in refrigerators and air conditioners, and soon after, there was evidence that the ozone layer was on the mend.“Thanks to the Montreal Protocol, ozone in the upper stratosphere” — above 30 kilometers (19 miles — “has increased significantly since 1998, and the stratosphere is also recovering above the polar regions,” William Ball, an atmospheric researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich) and the study’s lead author, said in a statement.Detail of naturally aborted ovulate cone at end of growth season from control (non-irradiated) healthy pine. Another recent study has found that radiation, allowed into the atmosphere by a thinning ozone layer, may sterilize trees. Photo and caption by Jeff Benca/University of California, Berkeley.Most scientists figured that the ozone layer would return to its proper form by 2050 or so. But when Ball and his colleagues measured the total amount of ozone in the atmosphere, they found that the overall concentration was about the same as it’s been, despite that measured boost in the upper layer. That discovery led the team to surmise that the lower level of the ozone layer, which lies between 15 and 24 kilometers (9 and 15 miles) above the Earth’s surface, is still getting thinner. The authors note that this part of the layer usually has the highest density of ozone, which shields the planet from ultraviolet rays and other types of radiation.The researchers acknowledge that several questions remain unanswered. For example, they weren’t able to show definitively that the ozone layer is in fact thinning in those parts of the atmosphere below 15 kilometers.It could be that the warming climate is forcing ozone to spread out toward Earth’s poles more quickly than before. Or a new class of compounds that are taking the place of CFCs, known as very short-lived substances, could be having a similar effect. They, too, contain chlorine and bromine, and while some of them form naturally in the atmosphere, a few others are used in industrial applications.“These short-lived substances could be an insufficiently considered factor in the models,” Ball said.A malformed pollen grain of irradiated pine. Photo and caption by Jeff Benca/University of California, Berkeley.And Ball and his colleagues aren’t sure what the knock-on effects will be or exactly what’s causing it. A related study, published in the journal Science Advances on Feb. 7, puts forth evidence that higher levels of UV radiation could render trees infertile. What’s more, a thinner ozone layer may have played a part in a mass extinction a few hundred million years ago.What is clear is that the steps the global community took nearly 30 years ago in Montreal are working to some degree, said Thomas Peter, an atmospheric chemist at ETH Zurich and one of the study’s authors.“The decline now observed is far less pronounced than before the Montreal Protocol,” Peter said in the statement. “The impact of the Protocol is undisputed, as evidenced by the trend reversal in the upper stratosphere and at the poles.”Still, this study makes it clear that it hasn’t solved the whole problem.“[We] have to keep an eye on the ozone layer and its function as a UV filter in the heavily populated mid-latitudes and tropics,” he added.Banner image of the Cygnus Loop Nebula, a picture that can’t be taken from Earth because the ozone layer would block the UV light, by NASA/JPL-Caltech [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.CITATIONSBall, W. T., Alsing, J., Mortlock, D. J., Staehelin, J., Haigh, J. D., Peter, T., … & Bourassa, A. (2018). Evidence for a continuous decline in lower stratospheric ozone offsetting ozone layer recovery. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 18(2), 1379-1394.Benca, J. P., Duijnstee, I. A. P., & Looy, C. V. (2018). UV-B–induced forest sterility: Implications of ozone shield failure in Earth’s largest extinction. Science Advances, 4(2).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Sarawak makes 80% forest preservation commitment, but some have doubts

first_imgAgriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Illegal Logging, Industrial Agriculture, Logging, Monkeys, Montane Forests, Oil Palm, Orangutans, Palm Oil, Plantations, Primary Forests, Primates, Rainforests, Secondary Forests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Banner photo of cleared forest in Sarawak by John Cannon.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. The Malaysian state of Sarawak is committing to the preservation of 80 percent of its land area as primary and secondary forest, according to an announcement by Sarawak Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Johari Tun Openg.According to data, concession boundaries for oil palm and other kinds of tree plantations covered 32.7 percent of Sarawak’s land area as of 2010/11, suggesting that if Sarawak is to fulfill its commitment to preserve 80 percent of its land as primary and secondary forest, then it may need to cancel some of these concessions.The director of environmental and human rights watchdog organization Earthsight expressed doubts that Sarawak will follow through on the commitment, and recommends the state increase transparency and crack down on illegal logging. The Malaysian state of Sarawak is committing to the preservation of 80 percent of its land area as primary and secondary forest, according to an announcement by Sarawak Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Johari Tun Openg made February 26 in the city of Kuching. But some in the conservation community are expressing doubt that these promises will come to fruition.Occupying the northern coast of Borneo, Sarawak’s rainforests are home to unique, disappearing species like endangered proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) and critically endangered Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus). But plantation agriculture, timber harvesting and other development pressures have supplanted many areas of Sarawak forest, with data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) finding natural forest covered just under 65 percent of the state in 2010. Other research indicates the amount of 2010 forest coverage may be closer to 57 percent – much of that heavily degraded by logging, according a 2013 assessment.Sarawak’s remaining forests are home to threatened species like proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus).Research indicates much of Sarawak’s rainforest has been degraded by logging and other human activities. Photo by John Cannon.But in a speech presented to attendees of a business networking event called The Sarawak Dialogue, Chief Minister Abang Johari indicated the state will be working to preserve and restore the state’s rainforests.“Sarawak is a small state but it has its obligation in its role to preserve the environment,” Abang Johari said, as reported by regional media outlets. “We make sure that 80 percent of our land mass must be covered by primary and secondary forests.”According to news reports of the event, Abang Johari went on to say that Sarawak’s forests provide important environmental services for the world, like generating oxygen.“We do not even claim the credit for this,” Abang Johari reportedly said. “The rest of the world is enjoying when we are providing free of charge.”But some aren’t buying it. Sam Lawson, director of the UK-based environmental and human rights watchdog organization Earthsight, told Mongabay that he is “really suspicious” of Sarawak’s new commitment, and that he has “no reason to believe anything.”“I welcome any serious commitment by the Sarawak government to protect what forest remains,” Lawson said, “but given that the administration has a long history of broken promises and disinformation in this regard, I would treat any such promises with a great deal of skepticism.”Lawson says the state needs to increase transparency and crack down on illegal logging if its conservation commitments are to be believed.“If Sarawak wants its promises to be taken seriously, the first thing it needs to do is release information about all of the areas of forest licensed for conversion to palm oil and timber plantations,” he said. “It also needs to immediately halt the destructive and commonly illegal commercial logging still taking place in some of the last vestiges of intact forest in the state.”According to data from Earthsight and other organization analyzed by Global Forest Watch, concession boundaries for oil palm and other kinds of tree plantations covered 32.7 percent of Sarawak’s land area as of 2010/11. Lawson said he doesn’t believe those boundaries have changed significantly since then, suggesting that if Sarawak is to fulfill its commitment to preserve 80 percent of its land as primary and secondary forest, then it may need to cancel some of these concessions.According to analysis by Global Forest Watch, plantation concessions cover nearly 33 percent of Sarawak’s land area. Data sources: SADIA, Aidenvironment, Global Witness and Earthsight InvestigationsA truck transports recently harvested oil palm fruit, which will be pressed to make palm oil. Photo by John Cannon.A truck transports logged timber. Photo by John Cannon.Mongabay reached out to the office of Sarawak’s Chief Minister, but received no response by presstime.Chief Minister Abang Johari is relatively new to the position, having succeeded Adenan Satem following his death in January 2017. Lawson said that if Abang Johari is really the environmental proponent that he’s claiming to be, “then they need to open the books.”According to reports of Abang Johari’s announcement, he stated Sarawak is doing its best to preserve the environment.“We want to share our resources with the world,” Abang Johari reportedly said. “We hope that Sarawak can become a bridge to the world so as to lead to a new beginning.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Wildlife trade detective Samuel Wasser receives prestigious Albert Schweitzer Medal

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Samuel K. Wasser, a conservation biologist at the University of Washington, U.S., has pioneered ways of using DNA from animal feces to track wildlife poachers.In recognition of his achievements, the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI) has honored Wasser with the Albert Schweitzer Medal, an award that “recognizes outstanding achievement in the advancement of animal welfare.”In a brief Q&A, Wasser told Mongabay that it was “heartening” to win the Albert Schweitzer Medal, and that he is proud to see his work make a difference in the world. From dogs to poop, Samuel K. Wasser has used it all to monitor wildlife and track down poachers.A conservation biologist at the University of Washington, U.S., Wasser has pioneered methods that use DNA from elephant dung to identify poaching hotspots and pinpoint where seized ivory originates from — work that’s been instrumental in prosecuting some of Africa’s biggest ivory poachers. He has also spearheaded the use of detection dogs to sniff out the feces of wild animals over large landscapes. This innovative strategy has helped researchers monitor the health of threatened species without needing to actually spot any individuals in the wild.In recognition of his achievements, the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI) has awarded Wasser with the Albert Schweitzer Medal. The medal, instituted in 1951 in honor of the philosopher and theologian Albert Schweitzer who would go on to win the Nobel Peace Prize a year later, “recognizes outstanding achievement in the advancement of animal welfare.” Past recipients of the medal include British primatologist Jane Goodall and American biologist Rachel Carson.U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell of Washington presented the award to Wasser in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., on April 10.“Dr. Wasser’s groundbreaking work has paved the way for remarkable strides in the fight against wildlife trafficking, especially ivory trade,” Cathy Liss, the AWI president, said in a statement. “The Animal Welfare Institute feels privileged to have this opportunity to acknowledge his accomplishments with the Albert Schweitzer Medal.”Samuel Wasser examining seized ivory. Photo by Kate Brooks.Mongabay caught up with Wasser, who said it was “heartening to win the Albert Schweitzer Medal.”A brief Q&A with Wasser follows.Mongabay: Can you give us a bit of background on how you first became interested in studying wildlife?Samuel K. Wasser: I loved animals all my life. I started working in Africa at 19 years of age, studying how migratory ungulate herds impact lion social structure and hunting patterns in the Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem. Then, I was hooked.What inspired you to develop non-invasive methods to monitor the distribution and physiological health of wild animals?During my doctoral dissertation on baboons in southern Tanzania, I became interested in how the environment impacts the timing of reproduction in baboons. I pioneered methods to measure stress and reproductive hormones in baboons to do that. That led to tools to measure nutrition hormones, DNA and even toxins in feces.How did you come up with the idea of training dogs to sniff out animal feces? What kinds of species can the detection dogs identify from scat?Realizing how much biological information was available in scat and how accessible scat is in the wilderness, I was searching for a method that could increase access to these samples across large wilderness areas in an unbiased manner. Detection dogs were the answer. They have an extraordinary ability to detect samples from their scent. Since detection is incentivized by the reward of a couple minutes of play with their ball, the dogs are actually searching for ways to get their ball. The means to that end is locating the target samples associated with that reward. That makes detection dog sampling virtually unbiased because the dogs get their ball regardless of the sex of the target species or the degree to which the sample is hidden, features that typically bias other forms of sampling (for example, trapping, hair songs, camera traps).Our dogs have been used to detect dozens of species. Examples include: grizzly bears, killer whales, right whales, pocket mice, northern spotted owls, Jemez [Mountains] salamanders, wolves, caribou, moose, coyote, cougar, bobcat, lynx, fisher, pangolins, jaguar, maned wolves, tapir, tigers, lions, cheetah, invasive plants, and even chemical in the environment like PCBs [polychlorinated biphenyls].Wasser’s detection dogs can track several species, including killer whales. Photo by Jane Cogan.What prompted you to develop techniques to determine when and where an elephant was killed by poachers?My baboons work was in the most heavily poached part of Africa, the Mikumi-Selous Ecosystem in southern Tanzania. My work there began in 1979, the same year that poaching began to skyrocket and continued for another 20 years. Throughout that time, we frequently ran across poached elephants, or had to leave the field because we heard gun shots nearby. I wanted to do something about it. When my lab pioneered methods to get DNA from feces, I realized that was the answer. I could collect elephant scat across Africa and use the DNA in the scat to map elephant genetics across the continent. If I could then get DNA from ivory, I could match the ivory genotypes to the DNA reference map to determine where seized ivory was poached.Do you feel disheartened to see the current levels of poaching in Africa? How do you stay motivated?It is horrible to watch and it just doesn’t stop. What keeps me going is that my work is making a difference and I am very proud of that.Is there anything else that you would like to add?I could not have done this work without great partners: Bill Clark was my mentor and paved the way for me to apply these methods to actual ivory seizures. My incredible staff at the Center for Conservation Biology work tirelessly to genotype these samples. Governments like Kenya, Uganda, Mozambique, South Sudan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Taiwan, and others who gave me access to their ivory seizures, INTERPOL who supported many of these sampling efforts, many donors like U.S. State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics [and] Law Enforcement Affairs, World Bank, Vulcan, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime, Woodtiger Fund, the Bosack Charitable Foundation and others for continuous support, and my most recent collaborators, U.S. Homeland Security Investigations.Samuel Wasser with elephant tusks. Photo courtesy of Samuel K. Wasser/Animal Welfare Institute.Samuel K. Wasser receiving the award from Senator Cantwell and AWI president Cathy Liss. Photo by Kristina Sherk. Animals, Conservation, Deforestation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Illegal Trade, Interviews, Mammals, Poachers, Poaching, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

NFL picks, Week 12: 49ers top Packers, Jets upset Raiders

first_imgLong story short, we’re putting this week’s NFL picks out as an appetizer for next week’s Thanksgiving feast:Jets 20, Raiders 19: Derek Carr lost his 2014 rookie debut at the Jets, and, 88 games later, he surprisingly falls in his return visit. Line: Line: Jets +349ers 33, Packers 20: Neither Aaron Rodgers nor Aaron Jones can stop the 49ers defense from grading out A+. Line: 49ers -3Texans 33, Colts 24: Houston has yet to lose back-to-back games, and this is a welcome homecoming after …last_img

Debut cookbook for South Africa’s Sibalicious chef

first_img28 January 2016South African chef Sibahle Mtongana’s love for cooking has catapulted her on to the international stage with cooking shows, appearances, and various honours. Now Mtongana – who is best known simply as Siba – has whipped up another feat: her debut cookbook entitled My Table.Make no mistake, this is no ordinary cookbook merely containing recipes and pictures. Using technology, specifically Quick Response (QR) codes, readers are able to watch videos on their mobile devices of Mtongana cooking some of her recipes featured in the book. All the reader has to do is scan the code with their smartphone or tablet.According to her website, it’s a “first of its kind for cookbooks”, giving a more interactive touch to traditional recipe books.Watch how it works:Who’s started using QRcodes in my book to watch videos of me making the recipes? #MyTable #SibasCookbook #WithVids pic.twitter.com/qWOFFZvIFT— Sibahle Mtongana (@SibaMtongana) January 3, 2016Launched in December, Mtongana told the online publication, Media Update, that she was excited about her book, on which she had been working for months. “It’s one of those things I’ve always wanted to do but I wanted to do it right. Now everything has fallen perfectly into place.”She held a book signing on 26 January in Cape Town, to which Brand South Africa was invited. It was an intimate gathering, where Mtongana’s plans for 2016 were highlighted. The chef aims to launch the book internationally by March.According to her website, almost everyone, from busy professionals to couples, single parents and younger people will find something to cook in My Table. She is described as the “queen of convenience” and it shows readers “how to make dinner in no time; and provide the kind of tips that’ll make something you whipped up in under an hour look like you’ve been slaving over the stove all day”.“Her recipes reflect her local roots, international food trends and some of the exotic flavours and ideas she’s picked up on her travels around the world.”The section called “Local is Lekker” is Mtongana’s take on a variety of uniquely South African dishes.About MtonganaMtongana has been the food editor of Drum magazine, and her cooking show, Cooking with Siba, was a hit on DStv’s Mzansi Magic channel.Her most recent show, Siba’s Table, on the Food network has broken into the US market. Filmed in Cape Town, it has gained a viewership of 60 million. She is the first South African chef with a series in the US. It is also aired throughout Africa, Europe, the Middle East and the UK.Last year, she represented South Africa at the annual Taste of Abu Dhabi and was invited to the Taste of Moscow in Russia. Mtongana has also won three Galliova awards for food journalism and involvement in the South African food arena.Reaction from readersHer fans have been vocal on social media, and have praised My Table.@SibaMtongana @brianmtongana Your book is world class.Thank you!The quality is amazing!!@WOOLWORTHS_SA @ProudlySA pic.twitter.com/Kynz31cxo5— Lungelo (@LungeloM_) December 16, 2015Can’t stop pouring over your book @SibaMtongana. Thanks for sharing your gift with the world. Proud of you and your work. Slay! Bless.— Thato (@Miss_Thato) December 23, 2015You’re an Incredible inspiration @SibaMtongana ♥ Thank you for modelling pure Greatness for every South African woman to aspire to #SibaLove— Sindiswa Siyothula (@SindiswaCo2la) December 29, 2015Source: SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

SA, Botswana look to streamline trade

first_img22 November 2013 South African President Jacob Zuma and Botswana President Ian Khama, during their meeting in Pretoria on Thursday, stressed the importance of speeding up infrastructure projects to facilitate the movement of goods and people between the two countries. Zuma met with his Botswana counterpart ahead of the inaugural meeting of the South Africa-Botswana Bi-National Commission, which the two presidents co-hosted. Speaking to journalists after the commission meeting, Zuma said discussions were under way to look at how resources could be streamlined to boost trade between the two countries. “It is a question of how … we streamline trade. In this regard, we have taken a decision that our ministers will meet twice a year to evaluate how far the agreements we have signed have been implemented.” Since the establishment of official relations nearly 20 years ago, South African and Botswana have signed a total of 34 agreements covering various areas such as immigration, defence and security, energy, trade, transport and environmental affairs. Zuma said the bi-national commission would play a key role in broadening and streamlining cooperation between the two countries. The establishment of the commission was “a very important development because our relations with Botswana are historical and for us to take them forward is very important. We were able to get a clear report from the ministers of what we need to do going forward.” Strong economic ties already exist between the two countries, and South Africa remains Botswana’s major trading partner. South African companies have a huge presence in Botswana and are involved in various sectors, including mining, housing, food and beverages, construction, retail, hotels and leisure, banking and medical services. Zuma said his meeting with Khama had not only focused on the mutual needs and priorities of both countries, but also brought into sharp focus the importance of regional integration. The two presidents discussed developments in the region and on the continent, including the situation in Madagascar, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Mozambique. According to a joint communique issued after the talks, the two leaders commended Madagascar for holding peaceful and credible presidential elections last month, urging the people of Madagascar to maintain the same commitment to democratic processes in the second round of elections scheduled for 20 December. Khama and Zuma expressed concern over the unfolding security situation in Mozambique, and hoped that the situation would soon be resolved. In recent weeks, there have been sporadic clashes between former rebel movement Renamo and the Frelimo government, with the former accusing the latter of not honouring the Rome peace agreement they signed in 1992. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Corbett Tiger Reserve Director removed after his shoot-at-sight order

first_img Last week, Mr. Dhakate had issued shoot-at-sight order and pressed two drones into service after movement of poachers was reported along the southern fringes of the park.150 forest officials were deployed and a total of 388 camera traps installed at sensitive points within the territory of the park.Villagers in the area were also informed of the same and were advised to avoid taking animals for grazing to the core areas.The order, however, raised eyebrows following which Mr. Dhakate has been removed from his post. The Director of Corbett Tiger Reserve has been removed from his post following a controversy over shoot-at-sight order issued by him in the national park to check the activities of poachers.Uttrakhand’s Chief Secretary S. Ramaswamy said that Parag Madhukar Dhakate has been replaced by Dheeraj Pandey as Director.D.V.S Khati, the Chief Wildlife Warden, said that Mr. Dhakate was not authorised to issue any such order.Also Read Corbett Tiger Reserve workers get the nod to kill armed poachers last_img read more

AllStar Cast For Alzheimers Play

first_imgUS against ALZHEIMER’S is announcing an all-star cast for the ensemble reading of the acclaimed play, “Surviving Grace”, written by Trish Vradenburg (“Designing Women”, “Family Ties” and “Kate & Allie”) on Wednesday, June 19th at a fundraising benefit at Warner Bros Studio.The play, which was successfully performed at The Union Square Theatre in New York and The Kennedy Centre, Washington, DC is inspired by Vradenburg’s Mother’s battle with the disease, and the first act will be read on stage by a stellar cast, to be announced shortly, at the Los Angeles fundraiser to fight the battle against this deadly disease. Award winning director James Burrows will supervise the reading of this black comedy.The events host committee include Ann-Margret, Seth Rogen, Diahann Carroll, Joan Collins, Peter Gallagher, Molly Sims, Elizabeth Banks, George Hamilton, Linda Gray, Michael Feinstein, Loni Anderson, Sherry Lansing, Maura Tierney, Morgan Fairchild, Stefanie Powers and Marilu Henner.This will be the first of a four city tour with fundraisers headed to San Diego, Dallas and Florida. For more information about US against ALZHEIMER’S visit the website www.SurvivingGrace.org.DATE:Wednesday, June 19thEVENT:US against ALZHEIMER’SWHERE:Stephen J Ross Theatre @ Warner Bros Studio, BurbankTIME:6.00pm— red carpet arrivals7.00pm— play reading followed by receptionSource:PR Newswirelast_img read more

ETALK KICKS OFF SEASON 18 WITH CANADAS MOSTWATCHED COVERAGE OF TIFF BEGINNING

first_img Facebook Advertisement Advertisement ETALK airs weeknights at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CTV, CTV.ca, and the CTV app and 7:30 p.m. ET on CTV2, CTV.ca, and the CTV app (visit CTV.ca for local listings). Full festival coverage is available at etalk.ca. Advertisement Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: TORONTO – As film’s biggest, brightest, and most-talented make their way to the 44th annual Toronto International Film Festival® (Sept. 5-15), ETALK is on the ground covering the top world premieres, landing exclusive interviews, breaking festival news, sharing red carpet highlights, and more. ETALK (@etalkCTV) launches its new season with unparalleled exclusive access to all things TIFF, beginning Thursday, Sept. 5 at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CTV, CTV.ca, and the CTV app. Click here for a look at ETALK‘s TIFF promo.Season 18 of ETALK officially kicks off Sept. 3 with a week of exclusives, including one-on-one interviews with Lenny Kravitz about his new design project – all leading up to the extensive TIFF coverage that begins later that week.This year, ETALK brings audiences even closer to the stars with more real-time coverage than ever before. ETALK‘s Twitter followers can access ETALK‘s red carpet interviews at the most buzzed-about premieres as they happen. Plus, ETALK‘s always candid, always fresh social series The Drop (weekdays on Instagram and Facebook Stories), broadcasts from the heart of the action on opening weekend. ETALK hosts share their hot takes on the movies everyone’s talking about on Instagram in a new daily confessional series, while Etalk.ca delivers comprehensive festival coverage, including extended interviews, daily fashion roundups, breaking news, and more.last_img read more