Belize creates one of Central America’s largest biological corridors

first_imgOn Feb. 13, the government of Belize approved the 110-square-kilometer Belize northeastern biological corridor.The corridor aims to provide safe passage for wild animals like jaguars, pumas and Baird’s tapir to move freely between the Shipstern Nature Reserve and Freshwater Creek Forest Reserve in northern Belize.Private landowners have agreed to place their corridor-designated lands into a trust in perpetuity, with the lands to be managed as part of the protected area system for conservation purposes. Belize is set to establish one of the biggest biological corridors in Central America, connecting two nature reserves that are home to jaguars and pumas, among other wildlife.The Belize northeastern biological corridor, approved by the government on Feb. 13, will span some 110 square kilometers (42 square miles) of forest, according to a press release from the Corozal Sustainable Future Initiative (CSFI), a conservation NGO in Belize. It aims to provide safe passage for species such as jaguars (Panthera onca), pumas (Puma concolor) and Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii) to move freely between the coastal dry forests of the Shipstern Nature Reserve and the tropical forests of the Freshwater Creek Forest Reserve.“This corridor is highly important,” Heron Moreno, executive director of the CSFI, told Mongabay. “It will not only guarantee the long term survival of wildlife within the area but it will also contribute to the strengthening of the Belize Protected Areas System. Most importantly, it will serve to highlight the importance of Government, NGO and private partnership in conservation initiatives. This hereby paves the way and serves as a model for other similar initiatives to follow in Belize.”A Baird’s tapir in the Shipstern Nature Reserve in Belize. Photo courtesy of Corozal Sustainable Future InitiativeThe push for corridors in Belize began about two decades ago through the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor Project, a Global Environment Facility-funded effort to interlink patches of forests from Mexico through Central America to Colombia. Belize’s northeastern biological corridor was one of the potentially important links that the project highlighted.In 2015, the CSFI, together with other conservation NGOs, the government and private landowners reinitiated this dormant project, according to Caspar Bijleveld, secretary of the board of the CSFI and project coordinator for the group’s international partner, the International Tropical Conservation Fund (ITCF).To decide the route of the corridor, the NGOs and the government used the general layout that the Mesoamerican corridor project had already proposed. “The route was originally one of the possibilities designated as such by the GEF project, back when the whole north-eastern part of Belize was forested,” Bijleveld said.However, expanding agricultural lands and other infrastructure development drove rampant deforestation around this route. So the teams cross-referenced the original proposed corridor with the actual forest cover on the ground to determine the final route of the corridor.The next step was to convince the private landowners to give up their land for the corridor. That was challenging, Moreno said, because “the concept of corridors is still very vague and not quite proven to function as such.”“To be able to engage the partners, it had to be tackled more from [an] economic and regulatory perspective,” he said, adding that the process did not involve any financial transactions.Map of the Belize northeastern biological corridor by CSFI.Balam Jungle Estates, which owns the largest land parcel in the corridor, was convinced by tax incentives offered by the government. The Rheinländer Mennonite community, which owns another land parcel with the corridor, was convinced by a regulatory clause. “When they purchased the land, the Department of the Environment had imposed a clause of non-deforestation on the parcel that was recognized as a potential part of the corridor,” Bijleveld said.Both landowners have agreed to place their corridor-designated land into a trust in perpetuity. The land, which will continue to be owned by the private landowners, will be managed as part of the protected area system for conservation purposes. “This protected area can then de facto only be managed as such, according to rules defined by the Trust itself,” Bijleveld said. “The rules themselves will be based on national legislation on protected areas.”For its part, the government will halt the collection of taxes on those lands for the duration of the trust arrangement, Moreno said.Two pumas caught on camera trap in Shipstern Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of Corozal Sustainable Future Initiative.Two steps are still pending. The private landowners have yet to officially put their land into trust. “This is still much in process. Trust agreements have already been drafted but official signatures are still pending,” Moreno said.In addition, the government still needs to acquire some 40 square kilometers (15 square miles) of land within the corridor, at an estimated cost of about $1 million.“ITCF is engaging with international NGOs active in the acquisition of lands for corridors and other critical habitats, asking them for their help,” Bijleveld said. “Although at this stage I am not in a position to cite names, things are looking promising.“Personally, I have always been a firm believer that conservation success is a matter of long, if not very long-term involvement in a project,” he added. “That success sometimes comes through waiting for the right window of opportunity and having (lots of) patience. I have been involved in forest conservation in Belize for 30 years, and [it’s] successes like these that will keep me going for another 30.”A jaguar captured by a camera trap in Shipstern Nature Reserve. Photo courtesy of the Corozal Sustainable Future Initiative. Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Protected Areas, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Corridors center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

NGOs acquire land in Brazil to create wildlife corridor

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Atlantic Forest, Forest Fragmentation, Forests, Fragmentation, Habitat Degradation, Land Use Change, Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Rehabilitation The acquired land plot is located in a region of the Atlantic Forest, and will be connected to the Poço das Antas reserve by a bridge that will cross over a major highway.Brazilian NGO Associação Mico-Leão-Dourado (AMLD), in collaboration with US NGO SavingSpecies and Dutch charitable foundation DOB Ecology, has acquired a 237-hectare (585 acre) plot of land next to the Biological Reserve of Poço das Antas, in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Currently, a four-lane highway separates the newly acquired land from the reserve.The organizations now plan to restore the forest in the plot and build a bridge that will connect both areas over the highway. The bridge will allow animal species to circulate between the two regions, curtailing the negative impact of forest fragmentation.One of the species that will benefit from the new corridor is the golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia), an endangered primate which only occurs in this region. The tamarin has been the focus of conservation efforts in recent years. Brazil’s Atlantic Forest is one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots. However, over the last 500 years its extension has been dramatically decreasing, and today it occupies roughly 15 percent of its original area and 7 percent of its original forest cover. The remaining forest areas are severely fragmented, causing habitat loss and increasing the pressure on the remaining species.Conservationists have found that a way to alleviate the impact of fragmentation is to implement wildlife corridors that connect interspersed patches of remnant forests. On April 9, three conservation NGOs announced they had acquired land for one such corridors – also known as a land bridge. The area will be created in the vicinity of the Biological Reserve of Poço das Antas, in the state of Rio de Janeiro. The corridor will include a bridge overpass over a large highway that runs north of the reserve and will allow animals to circulate beyond the limits of the reserve.A golden lion tamarin. Photo courtesy AMLD.Among the species that will benefit from the corridor is the endangered golden lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia), endemic to the region. The golden lion tamarin’s protection has been at the core of the project.SavingSpecies is one of the three non-profits that have joined efforts to create the corridor. The other two are the Associação Mico-Leão-Dourado (AMLD), a Brazilian NGO that has been working on the conservation of the golden lion tamarin for the last 25 years, and the Netherlands-based DOB Ecology, a philanthropic organization that supports restoration and conservation programs in Africa and South America.Detail of restoration area. Image courtesy AMLD.“This fragmentation and infrastructure cut off tamarin populations from each other,” said Stuart Pimm, President of NGO SavingSpecies. “Since tamarins live their lives in trees, even high in the forest canopy, a ‘bridge in the canopy’ from one forest to another is necessary for the tamarins to connect to each other.”To create the corridor, the NGOs purchased Fazenda Igarapé, a 237-hectare (585 acres) land plot located next to the reserve, adjacent to the four-lane highway that limits the reserve on its north side. The next steps will be to reforest 100 hectares (247 acres) of the land which is currently occupied by pastures, and to install a bridge to connect the Fazenda Igarapé to the Biological Reserve of Poço das Antas. If everything goes according to plan, the works to install the bridge will begin in the next weeks. Once ready, the corridor will allow tamarins and other species from the reserve to expand their habitat northwards.A fruitful partnershipThe new corridor will be the second one for SavingSpecies and AMLD in the region. Ten years ago, they followed a similar approach, purchasing and reforesting a 140-hectare property located some 28 km (17 miles) from where the new corridor will be. That land plot abutted the Biological Reserve of União and connected the reserve to other forests uphill.“The restored land was incorporated into the reserve area and therefore under federal protection, its future secured,” Pimm said. “That improved forest connectivity greatly for the tamarins, increasing genetic diversity among previously isolated forests.”Detail of restoration area. Image courtesy AMLD.Thanks to projects such as these, the population of golden lion tamarins has been steadily increasing in recent years. According to the IUCN, the major threats that tamarins face today are “reduced numbers and limited possibilities for growth in the few fragmented and degraded forests that remain in their restricted range,” noting that “current and future conservation efforts are attacking this problem with reforestation and the establishment of corridors.”“Thirty years ago, there were only 200 tamarins left. Today that number has increased to 3,200, but the landscape continues to be seriously fragmented,” said Luis Paulo Ferraz, Executive Secretary of AMLD.Green corridorsIn the last decade, different wildlife corridors have been implemented by the Brazilian government as a way of connecting often-interspersed protected areas. Officially, the first wildlife corridor created was the Mosaic Capivaras-Confusões, that in 2006 connected two national parks in the state of Piauí, Serra da Capivara and Confusões. Located in north-east Brazil, the corridor created a 412,000 hectares (1,020,000 acres) stretch of protected ‘caatinga’, a type of desert vegetation that covers circa 10 percent of Brazil’s territory.Since then, other corridors followed in different regions, including some in the Atlantic Forest.Detail of restoration area with a habitat bridge. Image courtesy AMLD.Outside of Brazil, bridges to connect green areas that overpass roads – or land bridges – are becoming increasingly common. The Netherlands has dozens of wildlife crossings, called ‘ecoducts’ in Dutch, and in Canada the 41 Banff Wildlife Bridges allow animals in the Banff National Park to safely cross over the Trans Canada Highway. These type of bridges remain rare in Brazil.“This bridge will be the first of its kind in Brazil and it could become a model for landscape connectivity involving highways,” says Ferraz, from ALMD. “We have a great responsibility and we want to show that it is possible to do things right.”Ignacio Amigo is a freelance journalist based in São Paulo, Brazil. You can find him on Twitter at @IgnacioAmigoH.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Indigenous environmental activist killed in Myanmar

first_imgActivism, Conservation, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Forests, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Indigenous and environmental activist Saw O Moo was reportedly killed in Myanmar’s Karen State on April 5.According to the Karen Environmental and Social Action Network (KESAN), Saw O Moo, who worked with KESAN as a “local community partner,” was killed by soldiers with the Myanmar military while returning home from a community meeting to help organize humanitarian aid for villagers displaced by renewed hostilities between the military and the Karen National Liberation Army (KNLA), an armed ethnic group.Saw O Moo was one of the most active local community leaders pushing for the creation of the Salween Peace Park, a proposed 5,400-square-kilometer protected area to be led by indigenous peoples. “We will never forget his dedication in the ongoing struggle to build peace and protect ancestral lands,” KESAN said in a statement. Indigenous and environmental activist Saw O Moo was reportedly killed in Myanmar’s Karen State on April 5.According to the Karen Environmental and Social Action Network (KESAN), Saw O Moo, who worked with KESAN as a “local community partner,” had attended a community meeting that day to help organize humanitarian aid for villagers displaced by renewed hostilities between Myanmar’s military and the Karen National Liberation Army (KNLA), an armed ethnic group. Despite a nationwide ceasefire agreement signed in October 2015, recent hostilities between the two sides are said to have displaced as many as 2,300 local people.Saw O Moo was reportedly returning to his home in Ler Mu Plaw village by motorbike when he offered a ride to a soldier of the KNLA who was assigned to provide security for Karen civilians in the Ler Mu Plaw area. “At 5:20 PM, just as the two men were nearing Saw O Moo’s home in Ler Mu Plaw, they were ambushed and shot at by Burma Army soldiers at a place called Wah Klo Hta on the edge of the T’Ri Plaw plain,” KESAN reports.According to The Irrawaddy, the Myanmar military has denied any wrongdoing in the killing of Saw O Moo and claimed he was in fact a rebel fighter and that he had grenades on his person. The Irrawaddy reports that, in a statement released early Wednesday, the military says its troops “shot at two fleeing plainclothes men who were suspected of being involved in sabotage attacks and planting mines,” and that the troops had “captured one of the men dead.”The Irrawaddy also reports that Saw O Moo’s family has not been allowed to retrieve the community leader’s body, and that soldiers have fired upon anyone attempting to do so.A tribute to Saw O Moo posted by KESAN notes that:Since 2006, he worked as a local community partner with the Karen Environmental and Social Action Network. Saw O Moo will be remembered for his life-long passion and commitment to preserving Indigenous Karen cultural traditions, promoting customary land stewardship, and leading local community forest conservation activities as the Luthaw Paw Day Community Forest Coordinator.In his roles as Indigenous Wildlife Researcher and Kheshorter Community Forest Committee Advisor, Saw O Moo worked tirelessly to protect some of the last intact old-growth forest and endangered species habitat remaining in Burma. On August 9, 2017, Saw O Moo travelled to Yangon to help launch the Kheshorter Community Forest Documentary in commemoration of World Indigenous Peoples’ Day.Saw O Moo was also one of the most active local community leaders in the Salween Peace Park, a grassroots initiative to create a 5,400-sq. km Indigenous Karen reserve in Mutraw District. Saw O Moo was a member of the Salween Peace Park Committee and firmly believed in its vision for peace, biodiversity conservation, and cultural preservation.Despite the decades of conflict in the region, the Salween River Basin is “one of Asia-Pacific’s most biodiverse ecoregions,” home to species like the Asiatic black bear, sun bear, eastern hoolock gibbon, and Sunda pangolin, Demelza Stokes reported for Mongabay in 2016. Karen leaders like Saw O Moo have joined with local people and NGOs in calling for the creation of Salween Peace Park, envisioned as an indigenous-led protected area.“For us as Indigenous people, the Salween Peace Park represents our deepest desires and needs,” Saw O Moo said at a public consultation meeting in December 2017.“Saw O Moo’s death is yet another casualty of ongoing fighting that has broken out between the Burma Army and the Karen National Liberation Army,” KESAN said in a statement. “Since the fighting began on March 4th, over 2,300 villagers have been forced to flee their homes. Saw O Moo could have followed his wife and children into hiding in the forest, but he chose to remain at his home in Ler Mu Plaw to protect his people from the attacking Burma Army soldiers. For KESAN staff and all Indigenous Karen people of Mutraw, Saw O Moo’s death is an unspeakable tragedy. We will never forget his dedication in the ongoing struggle to build peace and protect ancestral lands.”Saw O Moo was killed by soldiers with the Myanmar military on April 5. Photo courtesy of KESAN.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

BITTER FEELINGS AS OATFIELD SWEET FACTORY TO BE DEMOLISHED

first_imgThe world-famous Oatfield Sweet Factory is to be flattened to the ground.An application is to be made to demolish the Letterkenny plant which closed in May last with the loss of the last remaining 17 jobs at the plant.The plant, which was the home of the famous Emerald Chocolates among other brands, once employed more than 80 people. A subsidiary of owners Donegal Creameries will make the application for the demolition to Letterkenny Town Council.There has been speculation linking German supermarket chain LIDL with the prime site at Gortlee.There is still a court case ongoing over a right to way at the site between original owners the McKinney family and Donegal Creameries.There had also ben speculation that the plant could be saved and turned into a museum dedicated to the memory of Oatfield Sweets.  BITTER FEELINGS AS OATFIELD SWEET FACTORY TO BE DEMOLISHED was last modified: January 25th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:demolitionOatfield Sweet Factorylast_img read more

The Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018: Initial review

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jonathan Coppess, Gary Schnitkey, Nick Paulson, Benjamin Gramig, Krista Swanson, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics University of Illinois and Carl Zulauf, Department of Agricultural, Environmental and Development Economics, Ohio State UniversityOn Monday Dec. 10, 2018, the House and Senate conference committee released the conference report for the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018; the final version of the 2018 Farm Bill. On Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018, the Senate moved quickly to pass the conference report with a final vote in favor of the farm bill of 87 to 13. On Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018, the House voted overwhelmingly to pass the farm by 369 to 47 (16 not voting). Given that it passed by veto-proof majorities, it is likely that the President will sign it and the Agricultural Act of 2018 will soon become law.From the beginning of the debate, the outlook for a farm bill in 2018 was clouded by concerns about relatively lower crop prices, the restricting parameters of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) baseline and the political landscape in Congress. Before the farm bill debate began, however, Congress relieved much of the baseline pressure by returning cotton to the Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC) and Price Loss Coverage (PLC) programs in Title I and improving dairy assistance in Title I and crop insurance. The House Agriculture Committee moved first but stumbled; intense partisanship, particularly over the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in Title IV, dominated the House debate.The Senate Agriculture Committee adhered to a more traditional path, moving through a largely status quo farm bill with strong bipartisan support. Resuscitated in the House but remaining a partisan exercise, the farm bill sailed through the Senate on one of the strongest votes in history but the two versions became stuck in a conference stalemate through the mid-term elections.The biggest issues for conference were the controversial provisions for reducing the SNAP program and for eliminating the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) in the House farm bill. Ultimately, the conference stalemate appears to have been broken by the results of the mid-term elections combined with the political realities for SNAP.The CBO cost estimate (score) reinforces the view that the bill is largely status quo. CBO estimates very little net change in spending: an increase of $1.8 billion through 2023, but sustained reductions in assumed outlays from 2024-2028 result in only a $70 million increase over the entire 10-year budget window. Commodities (Title I)In general, the 2018 Farm Bill continues the farm programs of the 2014 Farm Bill: Agriculture Risk Coverage (ARC); the Price Loss Coverage (PLC) program; and the Marketing Assistance Loans (MAL) with Loan Deficiency Payments (LDP). One of the key changes is to the election between ARC and PLC. In the 2014 Farm Bill it was a one-time election that could not be changed over the five-years of the bill. In the 2018 Farm Bill, however, the election is for the 2019 to 2020 crop years and beginning for the 2021 crop year, the farmer can change the ARC/PLC election each year. In all elections, PLC remains the default option.A second major change to farm programs is an option to update program yields for PLC. Owners of an FSA farm will have a one-time option to update their program yields, but the formula is somewhat complicated. It operates in two steps: (1) 90% of the average yield for the 2013 to 2017 crop years, excluding any crop year in which the yield was zero; and (2) reduced by a ratio that compares the 2013 to 2017 national average yields per planted acre to the 2008 to 2012 national average yields.Importantly, FSA is likely to use different yields based on its calculations of national average yield per acre. The effective ratio is multiplied by 90% to estimate a single yield update factor, which will be applied to the average yields on the farm for 2013 to 2017. In short, the yield update factor is the ratio indicating how much of the initial 90% of the 2013 to 2017 county average yields a farmer can claim in the update. For crops where the national average in 2008-2012 is close to the 2013 to 2017 national average, more of the maximum yield update (90% of 2013-2017 yields) can be captured.In addition to the PLC program yield update option, the bill also includes changes to the calculation of yields for the ARC-CO program. Specifically, the plug yield is 80% of the transitional yield and is used in the ARC calculations to replace yields in any year that are below it. The revisions also require the Secretary to calculate a trend-adjusted yield factor to use for the benchmark calculation. This would effectively use trend-adjusted yields used in crop insurance where applicable.For PLC, the statutory reference prices for covered commodities remain the same as in the 2014 Farm Bill, as amended to add seed cotton. The new bill, however, includes an escalator known as the effective reference price. The effective reference price is a feature from the House farm bill, which permits the statutory reference price to increase up to 115% of the statutory reference price. It is calculated as 85% of the 5-year Olympic moving average of the national marketing year average prices (5YOMA).The 2018 Farm Bill also includes modified language regarding base acres. Specifically, it prevents payments on any base acres if all the cropland on the FSA farm was planted to grass or pasture during the years 2009 through 2017. The base acres and program yields for the farms affected by this provision will remain on record with FSA, but payments will not be made on those acres and farms. This provision is likely designed to help offset the cost of the yield update.Finally, the 2018 Farm Bill increases the loan rates for the MAL and LDP programs. This is the first across-the-board increase in loan rates since the 2002 Farm Bill. Crop Insurance (Title XI)There are few changes to the crop insurance program in the 2018 Farm Bill. The most notable revisions involve treatment of cover crop practices. First, the bill defines cover crop termination as a practice that historically and under reasonable circumstances results in termination. It also provides that cover crop practices are to be considered a good farming practice if terminated according to USDA guidelines (or an agricultural expert) and that termination should not impact the insurability of the insurance crop. These changes should help alleviate some of the concerns farmers have with cover crops and may improve adoption of that practice where it makes agronomic sense. Conservation (Title II)The biggest issue for the conservation title going into conference was elimination of the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) in the House farm bill. The conference committee negotiated a compromise that eliminates it as a stand-alone, acreage-based program. The existing authorities for CSP are combined with the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). The CBO score shows a reduction in CSP of -$12.4 over 10 years and an increase for the combined CSP/EQIP of $8.5 billion. Part of this reduction appears to have been used to increase funding for the Agricultural Conservation Easement Program ($1.8 billion) and for the Regional Conservation Partnership Program ($1.7 billion).The conference bill terminates the acreage-based provisions of CSP and converts it to a specific funding level each fiscal year, similar to the way EQIP is funded. The existing acreage-based program ends but current five-year contracts will continue and those expiring before the end of 2019 will be permitted a one-year extension for transition purposes. Overall, the general authorities for CSP are reauthorized with revisions to focus assistance on soil health and conservation planning, cover crops, grazing management, as well as simplification for aspects of application.Buried within all of the changes for CSP is information requiring further analysis. As acreage-based CSP is terminated, program spending goes to zero after FY 2025 as existing contracts expire. Funding for EQIP and the new CSP increases over these years.Finally, in conservation there are changes to the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) that begin with increases in the current 24 million-acre cap on what can be enrolled. The acreage cap will increase each year, reaching to 27 million by 2023. The bill would also limit the annual rental payments to 85% of the average county rental rate for general sign-up or 90% for continuous practices. It also creates within CRP a new initiative focused on clean lakes, estuaries and rivers as a priority for the continuous enrollments, capped at 8 million of the overall acres in the program. There is also a pilot project for 30-year CRP contracts and a shorter-term CRP for soil health and income protection, using three, four or five year contracts on up to 15% of a field.It appears that the 2018 Farm Bill goes against the trends of recent farm bills where funds and authorities shifted from reserve policies to working lands policies. Under the lower price scenarios, it appears that Congress is shifting some of the funds and authorities back to reserve programs (CRP and easements) and reducing those for working lands.last_img read more

‘India, Pak. can help resolve Afghan conflict’

first_imgIndia should cooperate with Pakistan to ensure regional stability and to end the Afghan war, said the Ambassador of Russia on Monday. Speaking at a public event here, Nikolay Kudashev said that India-Pakistan collaboration will help in resolving the decades-old conflict in Afghanistan.“The problems of Afghanistan are impossible to resolve without taking on board every neighbouring country. Excessive pressure on certain states would just antagonise them and make numerous problems even more complicated… this logic also guides us to further develop ties with Pakistan and it is in the interest of regional stability to help Pakistanis as well as Indians effectively adjust themselves to the new forms of cooperation offered by SCO (Shanghai Cooperation Organisation) and enhance their anti-terrorism cooperation,” said Mr. Kudashev elaborating on Russia’s engagement of Pakistan.In a set of frank observations at an event organised by the Anant Aspen Centre, the envoy urged India to cooperate with Pakistan in the platforms that various multilateral bodies are providing.New-found bonhomieMoscow and Pakistan dealt with a difficult phase during the 1980s when Pakistan supported the Mujahideen fighters to counter Soviet occupation forces. However the cooperation took off in the last few years with joint counter-terror drills between two sides that India has observed with concern. The envoy clarified that Moscow does not prioritise bilateral disputes in South Asia while framing policies.“We don’t look at the region from the point of view of bilateral disputes that we are not in a position to interfere or take sides. There should be realistic and comprehensive approach to the issues of common interest,” said the envoy highlighting the need for peace between India and Pakistan.“No doubt that existing disagreements between India and Pakistan should be resolved politically and diplomatically according to the provisions of the Simla Agreement of 1972 and the 1999 Lahore Declaration,” Mr. Kudashev said.He said that Russia is open to a relationship with all sides for the sake of regional stability and the crisis in Afghanistan requires the “Afghan-led” solution.last_img read more

Celebrating 10 Years of Offshore Energy

first_imgzoom Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference brought together over 550 exhibitors and 12,145 visitors in halls 1, 2 & 5 of Amsterdam RAI. While the number of exhibitors slightly decreased compared to 2016, the visitor number increased. The conference attracted over 1,300 delegates who attended 20 sessions. Next year Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference takes place on (22), 23 and 24 October 2018.“This year marked our tenth anniversary and we look back on a great event,” says Annemieke den Otter, who bears overall responsibility for Offshore Energy.“Never before has the gathering of all players in offshore, from oil and gas to offshore wind and marine energy, been more apparent than this year and never before have we attracted so many international visitors.”This year’s theme was ‘Transformation through collaboration’. Topics that dominated the conversation ranged from decommissioning and future gas and wind energy production at the North Sea, to upstream investments in the Middle East, West-Africa, Latin-America and Asia.The event brought together industry leaders and (young) professionals during a high quality conference program, at the many networking opportunities and in the exhibition halls. For three days – starting on Monday with the first day of Offshore WIND Conference – Amsterdam was a meeting place for a host of international clients, OEMs, EPC companies and suppliers active in oil and gas exploration and production as well as renewable energy development.OEEC 2017 again had a spectacular kick-off with Offshore Energy Opening Gala Dinner and Awards Show on Monday 9 October. Guests were treated to dinner and drinks and musical interludes by the Junior Jazz Unlimited at the National Maritime Museum in Amsterdam. A special congratulation to the award winners: Dries Lammens (winner of the Offshore Energy Young Engineer Award), Our Oceans Challenge (winner of the Offshore Energy Public Outreach Award) and Next Ocean with the Next Ocean Wave Predictor (winner of the Best Innovation in Offshore Energy Award).ExhibitionThis year over 550 exhibitors covered halls 1, 2, 5 and Amtrium of the Amsterdam RAI. During the exhibition days it was also possible to attend matchmaking sessions headed by Europe Enterprise Network, from bagpipes to robots, there were some great sights on the exhibition floor. The latest addition to the exhibition floor was the Startup Zone where upcoming talent was able to present themselves and showcase their innovations and products.Back again was the Offshore WIND Expertise Hub where companies were interviewed on film. These videos will be published on OffshoreWIND.biz in the coming weeks. In the different pavilions, such as Iran, Scotland, Italy, Amsterdam IJmuiden Offshore Ports, North Sea Energy Gateway, Marine Energy and the Holland pavilion, people came together in an energetic environment to meet up and/or network.ConferenceThe high quality conference program at OEEC contained seven Technical Sessions on topics ranging from Asset Integrity, Global Business Opportunities and Decommissioning. The Launch of the National Platform for Re-use and Decommissioning also took place during the conference. This year’s Industry Panel addressed the transition to a low carbon energy mix. Featured speakers distinguished facts and fiction on both fossil and renewable energy sources, their deployment and what it takes for societies to switch to a new energy system.Within renewables Offshore WIND Conference (OWC) took place with speakers from Dong, Siemens, European Committee of the Regions and Ziton. Marine Energy Event took place on Wednesday 11 October and focused on the Conditions for Commercial Success of the industry with speakers from EMEC, Twin Valleys, Tidal Lagoon BV and Bureau Veritas. Last but not least, several side events took place and young professionals could attend special Master Classes with masters from OOS International and Schlumberger.Offshore Energy 2018Next year Offshore Energy Exhibition & Conference takes place on 22, 23 and 24 October 2018. Information on next year’s edition will be published online on www.offshore-energy.biz shortly.last_img read more