Why intact forests are important

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Animals, Biodiversity, boreal forests, Degraded Lands, Environment, Forest Fragmentation, Forests, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Logging, logging roads, Old Growth Forests, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Roads, Temperate Forests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Citation:James E. M. Watson, Tom Evans, Oscar Venter, Brooke Williams, Ayesha Tulloch, Claire Stewart, Ian Thompson, Justina C. Ray, Kris Murray, Alvaro Salazar, Clive McAlpine, Peter Potapov, Joe Walston, John G. Robinson, Michael Painter, David Wilkie, Christopher Filardi, William F. Laurance, Richard A. Houghton, Sean Maxwell, Hedley Grantham, Cristián Samper, Stephanie Wang, Lars Laestadius, Rebecca K. Runting, Gustavo A. Silva-Chávez, Jamison Ervin, David Lindenmayer. The exceptional value of intact forest ecosystems. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 2018; DOI: 10.1038/s41559-018-0490-xFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Overall, the world lost more than 7 percent of its intact forest landscapes in just over a decade, a trend that appears to be accelerating.A new study discusses how intact forests are critically important for mitigating climate change, maintaining water supplies, safeguarding biodiversity and even protecting human health.However, it warns that global policies aimed at reducing deforestation are not putting enough emphasis on the preservation of the world’s dwindling intact forests, instead relying on a one-size-fits-all approach that may end up doing more harm than good.The researchers urge more inclusion and prioritization of intact forests in global commitments and policies aimed at curbing deforestation. When it comes to habitat quality and ecosystem services, research has shown that natural landscapes do it best. A new study, published today in Nature, adds fodder to this argument, describing how intact forests are critically important for mitigating climate change, maintaining water supplies, safeguarding biodiversity and even protecting human health. However, it warns that global policies aimed at reducing deforestation are not putting enough emphasis on the preservation of the world’s dwindling intact forests, instead relying on a one-size-fits-all approach that may end up doing more harm than good.Intact forests are large areas of connected habitat free from human-caused disturbance. From the Amazon rainforest in South America to the taiga that rings the Arctic, the Earth’s intact forests provide a diverse array of unbroken habitats for many – if not most – of the planet’s terrestrial wildlife.But intact forests are disappearing. An analysis released last year found that, overall, the world lost more than 7 percent of its intact forest landscapes in just over a decade, a trend that appears to be accelerating. Zooming in, the analysis reveals bigger losses for specific regions: 10.1 percent in Africa, 13.9 percent in Southeast Asia, nearly 22 percent in Australia. At the country level, Paraguay came out particularly bad, losing almost 80 percent of its intact forest landscapes between 2000 and 2013.Satellite data show only a few tracts of intact forest remain in Paraguay.The driving force behind these losses varies depending on location, but agriculture, logging and road building are global heavy-hitters. And the disturbance doesn’t need to be big in size to have a big impact; research has shown even small logging roads can open up a “Pandora’s box” of destructive repercussions that can threaten the integrity of a once-untouched forest. Such seemingly small, localized deforestation activities have resulted in a situation where the world’s forests have essentially been cut up into an estimated 50 million fragments – which scientists think is closing in on a tipping point at which forest fragmentation may dramatically accelerate.In response to intact forest losses, researchers at institutions around the world teamed up to synthesize hundreds of previous studies and figure out just how important these forests are and how best to protect them on a global scale.They found that despite their reduction, intact forests currently absorb around 25 percent of the world’s human-generated carbon emissions and are thus playing a big role in offsetting global warming. According to their study, intact forests sequester more carbon than logged, degraded or even planted forests. In addition to the direct removal of trees, human encroachment also opens up forests to hunters; the researchers write that as hunters remove animals from a forest, the trees that depend on these animals to spread their seeds may not be able to reproduce, which could in turn affect how much carbon a forest is able to store.In addition to affecting the global climate, intact forests may also help regulate local and regional climates. Research indicates that when intact forest is cleared or degraded, cloud cover is reduced and droughts are more likely to happen. Studies also show that non-degraded forests are better at holding water in the soil, as well as stabilizing slopes and preventing erosion. This, the researchers write, may help ensure water security for local and Indigenous communities.Intact forests are also better at providing habitat than those that have been degraded. Studies have shown intact forests host more wildlife, and their loss correlates with the retreat or even the extinction of forest-dependent species. Along with reducing a forest’s biodiversity, research indicates degradation can also affect the overall functioning of its ecosystems.Species with big ranges, like jaguars, need huge swaths of connected habitat in order to survive.The authors of the new Nature study write that despite the wealth of research on the benefits of intact forests and the consequences of their degradation, international policies aimed at reducing deforestation do not sufficiently prioritize their conservation. They write that efforts like the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, which seek to sustainably manage forests, fight desertification and halt land degradation and biodiversity loss, stand to fall short of their targets if they don’t do more to address the importance of preserving intact forests.Specifically, the authors write that many of these global initiatives focus too much on forest extent and not enough on its condition, effectively lumping all forest cover into one conservation category.“As vital carbon sinks and habitats for millions of people and imperilled wildlife, it is well known that forest protection is essential for any environmental solution–yet not all forests are equal,” James Watson of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the University of Queensland said in a statement. “Forest conservation must be prioritized based on their relative values–and Earth’s remaining intact forests are the crown jewels, ones that global climate and biodiversity policies must now emphasize.”A logging road pierces rainforest in Sabah, Malaysia.Watson and his colleagues warn that if international policies and agreements don’t make more of an effort to prioritize intact forests, then they stand to disappear – and with them, important reservoirs of biodiversity and one of the world’s biggest carbon sinks.“Even if all global targets to halt deforestation were met, humanity might be left with only degraded, damaged forests, in need of costly and sometimes unfeasible restoration, open to a cascade of further threats and perhaps lacking the resilience needed to weather the stresses of climate change,“ said Tom Evans, WCS Director of Forest Conservation and Climate and joint lead author of the study.“This is a huge gamble to take, for conservation, for climate change, and for some of the most vulnerable human communities on the planet,” Evans said.Mongabay reached out to the offices overseeing the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, UN Sustainable Development Goals and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, but received no response by press time.In their study, Evans, Watson and their colleagues put forth several recommendations to fill what they see as a gap in international policy. First, they urge the creation and standardization of metrics to measure forest intactness, which would help prioritize action to areas that are the most intact. They write that the intact forest concept should also be embedded in reports produced by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. This, they say, will help ensure that the international commitments supporting the Paris Agreement will include and prioritize the conservation of intact forests.The researchers also urge support for efforts on both the global and local scale that seek to limit road expansion, regulate hunting and extractive activities like mining and logging, invest in protected areas, and help attain land rights for Indigenous communities. They write that degraded forests should be restored and made more productive rather than opening up intact forests to human activity.“Our research shows that a remedy is indeed possible, but we need to act whilst there are still intact forests to save,” Evans said.last_img read more

Europe’s beetle species plummet as trees disappear

first_imgCitation:Cálix, M., Alexander, K.N.A., Nieto, A., Dodelin, B., Soldati, F., Telnov, D., Vazquez-Albalate, X., Aleksandrowicz, O., Audisio, P., Istrate, P., Jansson, N., Legakis, A., Liberto, A., Makris, C., Merkl, O., Mugerwa Pettersson, R., Schlaghamersky, J., Bologna, M.A., Brustel, H., Buse, J., Novák, V. and Purchart, L. 2018. European Red List of Saproxylic Beetles. Brussels, Belgium: IUCNFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Policy, Forests, Insects, Invertebrates, Iucn, Logging, Old Growth Forests, Research, Trees, Wildlife A new report by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) finds nearly 18 percent of saproxylic beetles are threatened with extinction in Europe. That number goes up to almost 22 percent for the EU as a whole.Of Europe’s threatened species, the 2018 report finds five are critically endangered, up from two in 2010. Of these, four are endemic, meaning they are found nowhere else in the world. In the EU overall, the IUCN lists seven species as critically endangered, up from three in 2010.Saproxylic beetles live in and eat dead and decaying wood, and play important ecological roles such as nutrient recycling, pollination and as an important food source for birds and other wildlife.The IUCN says that to stave of greater declines and help saproxylic beetles bounce back, land management should make sure each square kilometer of land contains a mix of trees of different ages, including standing and fallen dead trees. Saproxylic beetles live in and eat dead and decaying wood, and play important ecological roles in nutrient recycling and pollination, and as an important food source for birds and other wildlife. But a new report finds many of Europe’s saproxylic beetles are in trouble, with nearly a fifth threatened with extinction.The report was produced by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) finds nearly 18 percent of saproxylic beetles are threatened with extinction in Europe. That number goes up to almost 22 percent for EU countries.The number of threatened beetle species has increased significantly since the IUCN’s last evaluation in 2010, which found 11 percent were threatened in Europe and 14 percent were threatened in the EU.The IUCN’s Red List includes three threatened categories: Vulnerable, Endangered and Critically Endangered. This latter category is the last rung before regional extinction, and the 2018 report shows it had proportionally the most growth since 2010.Of Europe’s threatened species, the 2018 report finds five are critically endangered, up from two in 2010. Of these five, four are endemic, meaning they are found nowhere else in the world. In the EU, the IUCN lists seven species as critically endangered, up from three in 2010.Iphthiminus italicus adults are active at night and live under thick, dead bark, and in dead branches and hollow trunks of broadleaf trees. It has a small range and is threatened by large-scale tree plantations and an increasing frequency of wildfires. This species is listed as Endangered by the IUCN. Photo by Udo Schmidt via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0)The 2018 report also highlights that around a quarter of saproxylic beetle species could not be assessed because there is currently not enough data on them to do so. It estimates that if these species were able to be included in the assessment, then Europe’s 18 percent threatened rate could be as low as 13.5 percent – or as high as 40 percent.Why are these beetles declining? According to the IUCN, it’s because Europe’s trees are disappearing. The report names logging, wood harvesting and other types of tree loss as “by far the greatest threats to both threatened and non-threatened saproxylic beetles, affecting more than half the species, including 76 threatened species.”The report also states urbanization, tourism development and an increasing frequency in wildfires are big drivers of beetle habitat loss.Beetles aren’t the only group of insects in trouble in Europe. A 2017 study found Germany’s flying insect abundance dropped more than 75 percent over 30 years. Scientists are still trying to figure out why, but suspect agricultural intensification may be to blame.Limoniscus violaceus is dependent on old trees as its larvae develop in tree cavities containing wood mold. The species is listed as Endangered by the IUCN, with assessments showing it has become extinct in parts of its European range and is declining in many countries where it is still present. Photo by Udo Schmidt via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0)The IUCN says that to stave of greater declines and help saproxylic beetles bounce back, land management should make sure each square kilometer of land contains a mix of trees of different ages, including standing and fallen dead trees. The report states conservation priority should be given to species with small, isolated populations, and ecological corridors should be created to ensure populations of the same species are able to exchange genes.The report includes a number of policy recommendations, including IUCN assessment of data deficient species, regulations aimed at making sure European landscapes maintain enough living and dead trees, and more stringent measures for combatting illegal logging. It also urges the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy promote more effective management of wood pasture habitats that harbor old trees. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Finding That Parking Space May Soon Get Easier, Thanks To … Xerox

first_imgTags:#connected cars#Drive#parking#ParkMe#Parkopedia#Xerox bradley berman ReadWriteDrive is an ongoing series covering the future of transportation.Google might eventually disrupt the auto industry with self-driving cars, just as Tesla plots its threat with long-range electric vehicles. But the more immediately transformative influence over the driving experience will likely come from a surprisingly old school technology company: Xerox.See also: Why Google’s Driverless Car Is EvilWith its $6.4 billion acquisition of Affiliated Computer Services in 2009, Xerox obtained technology systems that for decades have managed the data back-end of “transportation services” for governments around the world. Those services include public transit, tolling, and parking. It’s part of Xerox’s shift from document management to a wide range of services technology.As we enter an era of highly connected cars, these enterprise-level transportation systems—software and hardware—could fundamentally change the thing most people like least about operating a motor vehicle: parking.Parking Rage“Parking is a painful experience from start to finish,” said David Cummins, managing director of Xerox parking solutions. “We’re all confused by parking signage, frustrated by scrounging around for coins, and studies have shown that 30 percent of urban congestion is caused by people cruising around looking for parking spaces.” Those issues, according to Cummins, will become a thing of the past, as cars develop the capability of telling you where there’s available parking, if you’re allowed to park there, and what the rate is.Right now, that intelligence is mostly served up by Xerox to city websites, as well as third-party apps like ParkMe and Parkopedia.Sam Friedman, chief executive of ParkMe, started the company about three years ago, after missing a movie because he couldn’t find a parking spot in Santa Monica, where the company is based. As of late 2013, the company—funded by a handful of VC sources, including the private venture arm headed by Bill Ford, executive chairman of Ford Motor Co.— had about 30 employees.In June 2013, Audi became the first car company to offer ParkMe in its cars, providing drivers with immediate access to info about the closest, cheapest available parking. When I met Friedman at the Los Angeles Auto Show last November, he was meeting with other major car companies, selling them on the idea to put ParkMe into the dashboards of cars.The company makes money by charging a transaction fee. “We don’t care how we get in front of consumers,” he told me. “There are now three screens. There was the desktop. Now there’s mobile.  And here comes the connected car.”Friedman described ParkMe’s business strategy as “like any other remnant marketplace model.” He said the “little secret” is that even garages in crowded places like Times Square don’t sell out.Data IntegrationParking technologies are still in their early adolescence, with many emerging apps, sensor companies, and data streams vying for acceptance. The role played by car manufacturers, which are also diversifying into mobility services, is uncertain. (BMW’s ParkNow app is available in San Francisco, Oakland and Palo Alto.) And mapping giants like Google could step in. With a 30-year legacy in transportation services, Xerox appears to have scale and thus a reasonably good position to serve as integrator of all the data.Today’s sensor technology for parking is relatively expensive—about $200 installed, plus $5 to $10 a month per sensor. Cummins believes that, in many cases, sensors are unnecessary—especially after studies by Xerox revealed that data from parking meters can provide a sufficient level of real-time accuracy.Today, feeds about open spots come mostly from parking meters and parking garage gates. Increasingly, data is coming from sensors and cameras—and eventually it could come from satellite imagery, and maybe even drones.Cummins believes that within 10 years, most cars will have their own sensors and will ping other vehicles and infrastructure as soon as they vacate a parking spot, leaving it open for the next driver.Dynamic pricing, already in use by ParkMe, will become more important as these systems mature, and we can expect the inclusion of peer-to-peer networks, allowing urban property owners to offer driveways (and other nooks and crannies) to desperate drivers seeking a parking spot. Think Lyft or Airbnb for parking.Making It EasyAccording to Cummins, cars using Siri-like voice recognition will analyze your navigation system settings and strike up a conversation with you. The car will say, “Do you want to park in a garage or on the street?” It will explain, for example, that on-street rate is a buck-fifty an hour, but you’ll save $5.00 at the garage two blocks away. Respond with your preference, and the car will automatically reserve the spot, show you the way, and handle the payment transaction.This is not a far-fetched futuristic vision. Xerox already owns much of what makes this possible. Xerox’s Vector technology manages the backend of electronic toll collection—including transponders and payment infrastructure—for systems such as EZPass on the northeast U.S. Its Merge platform similarly controls parking meters, revenue collection, and violation information from handheld devices.Xerox doesn’t write the tickets, but manages nearly all the other tasks. Until current laws change, tickets need to be set by hand on windshields. You didn’t expect technology to take all the pain out of parking, did you?Lead image by Flickr user kdingo, CC 2.0 A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Three, including infant, missing in several boat incidents in Assam

first_imgAn 18-month-old infant girl has been missing after a reportedly overcrowded boat capsized in Rakhaldubi river in western Assam’s Goalpara district on Monday evening, while two more boat incidents occurred across the State on Tuesday evening. The Rakhaldubi mishap is the third boat capsize in the State in the last one week after a mechanised country boat sank in the Brahmaputra off Guwahati killing four. Officials in Goalpara district said the unregistered row-boat had 15 people on board when it sank in the river. All other passengers were rescued by locals.Around the same time, a mechanised country boat also capsized in the Beki river near Kalgachia in Barpeta district. The boat drifted after its engine failed and hit the pillar of a bridge across the river. Around 30 people on board managed to either swim ashore or were rescued.In another incident on Tuesday, a rowboat sank in western Assam’s Goalpara district around dusk, the fourth such incident since a mechanised country boat capsized in the Brahmaputra off Guwahati on September 5. According to initial reports from the district, two people — Bilal Hussain, 26 and Amina Khatun, 7 — were missing after the boat with at least four people on board sank at Khankhowa Char near Goalpara town.These mishaps involving unregistered boats happened on non-notified routes. We have registered cases against the operators,” Bharat Bhushan Dev Choudhury, director of the State’s Inland Water Transport Department, said.On Monday, Assam Transport Minister Chandra Mohan Patowary said no mechanised country boats would be allowed to operate in the entire river system of the State. After a review meeting with IWT officials, he ordered all single-engine ferries to be converted into double-engine ones with reversible gears.“As per the safety norms, there must be one life jacket for each passenger in the vessel and it will be mandatory for each passenger to put on the life jacket while boarding the vessel. The deputy commissioners shall conduct a safety audit of the ferry vessels within their respective districts,” Mr. Patowary said.last_img read more

CTCRI notifies recruitment for 18 Skilled Support Staff posts

first_imgThe Central Tuber Crops Research Institute (CTCRI) has invited applications for various posts. The interested and eligible candidates can apply latest by August 4.Post details:Total posts: 18 Post name: Skilled Support StaffEligibility criteria:Age limit:The candidates applying for this post should age between 18 and 25 years as on August 4, 2014. In case, the candidates belong to SC/ ST category, five years relaxation in the upper age limit is applicable. And for those belonging to OBC category, three years relaxation is applicable.Educational qualification:The candidates applying for this post should have passed ITI or should have passed their matriculation exam.Pay Scale:Rs 5,200-20,200 with Grade Pay Rs 1,800 per month.Selection process:The candidates will be selected on the basis of their performances in the written test and the interview.How to apply:Candidates should send their duly-filled applications to “the Director, CTCRI, Sreekariyam, Thiruvananthapuram-695 017, Kerala”. The candidates are required to send a latest passport size photograph, DD, attested copies of certificates in proof of age, educational qualification, mark sheets, experience, caste status along.CTCRI:Established in the year 1963, it is a constituent institute under the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR).last_img read more

Ottawa continues to fail First Nations Auditor General

first_img(Auditor General Sheila Frasher. APTN/Photo)APTN National NewsOTTAWA-Canada’s auditor general called for major changes to the relationship between First Nations, Ottawa and provincial governments to break the persistent and growing gap between quality of life on reserves and the rest of the country.After 10 years issuing reports on the performance of government departments, Auditor General Sheila Fraser said the existing system dealing with First Nations was not working.“I believe that First Nations, the federal government, and in some cases the provinces, have to rethink their relationship with each other,” said Fraser. “First Nations people have waited far too long to have the quality of services Canadians receive every day and take for granted.”Fraser said she has done 29 audits that directly or indirectly dealt with First Nations people and has seen very little change in the social conditions afflicting reserves.She said reserves have fallen behind over the last 40 years and the federal government has failed to do anything about it.“The conditions on many reserves remain poor and progress is slow. Some communities are making significant progress, but they are the exception rather than the rule,” said Fraser. “Services on reserves have not kept pace with services in municipal governments…The federal government has not been identifying and funding comparable services on reserves in any systemic fashion.”Fraser said her office had uncovered government failures in education, water quality, housing and child and family services.She also highlighted that her office had found that reporting requirements for First Nations, some with fewer than 500 members, have been “excessive.” She said some of the reports were never reviewed by Indian Affairs or didn’t serve any purpose.She said another report on the government’s response to her office’s concerns around comprehensive land claims will come out in May.Akwesasne Mohawk Council Grand Chief Mike Mitchell thanked Fraser for her work and said his community is mired in required audit reports.Mitchell said his council receives $74 million for programs and services and is required to file 77 audits.“They put you through the ringer,” said Mitchell. “And all the times you (Fraser) have made recommendations and observations it blows out the window the next day.”Alluding to the swirling controversy around the Canadian Taxpayers Federation campaign over the levels of reserve politician salaries, Mitchell then said, “But when First Nations people get accused for something, it just stays in the air for a long time.”last_img read more