Three, including infant, missing in several boat incidents in Assam

first_imgAn 18-month-old infant girl has been missing after a reportedly overcrowded boat capsized in Rakhaldubi river in western Assam’s Goalpara district on Monday evening, while two more boat incidents occurred across the State on Tuesday evening. The Rakhaldubi mishap is the third boat capsize in the State in the last one week after a mechanised country boat sank in the Brahmaputra off Guwahati killing four. Officials in Goalpara district said the unregistered row-boat had 15 people on board when it sank in the river. All other passengers were rescued by locals.Around the same time, a mechanised country boat also capsized in the Beki river near Kalgachia in Barpeta district. The boat drifted after its engine failed and hit the pillar of a bridge across the river. Around 30 people on board managed to either swim ashore or were rescued.In another incident on Tuesday, a rowboat sank in western Assam’s Goalpara district around dusk, the fourth such incident since a mechanised country boat capsized in the Brahmaputra off Guwahati on September 5. According to initial reports from the district, two people — Bilal Hussain, 26 and Amina Khatun, 7 — were missing after the boat with at least four people on board sank at Khankhowa Char near Goalpara town.These mishaps involving unregistered boats happened on non-notified routes. We have registered cases against the operators,” Bharat Bhushan Dev Choudhury, director of the State’s Inland Water Transport Department, said.On Monday, Assam Transport Minister Chandra Mohan Patowary said no mechanised country boats would be allowed to operate in the entire river system of the State. After a review meeting with IWT officials, he ordered all single-engine ferries to be converted into double-engine ones with reversible gears.“As per the safety norms, there must be one life jacket for each passenger in the vessel and it will be mandatory for each passenger to put on the life jacket while boarding the vessel. The deputy commissioners shall conduct a safety audit of the ferry vessels within their respective districts,” Mr. Patowary said.last_img read more

CTCRI notifies recruitment for 18 Skilled Support Staff posts

first_imgThe Central Tuber Crops Research Institute (CTCRI) has invited applications for various posts. The interested and eligible candidates can apply latest by August 4.Post details:Total posts: 18 Post name: Skilled Support StaffEligibility criteria:Age limit:The candidates applying for this post should age between 18 and 25 years as on August 4, 2014. In case, the candidates belong to SC/ ST category, five years relaxation in the upper age limit is applicable. And for those belonging to OBC category, three years relaxation is applicable.Educational qualification:The candidates applying for this post should have passed ITI or should have passed their matriculation exam.Pay Scale:Rs 5,200-20,200 with Grade Pay Rs 1,800 per month.Selection process:The candidates will be selected on the basis of their performances in the written test and the interview.How to apply:Candidates should send their duly-filled applications to “the Director, CTCRI, Sreekariyam, Thiruvananthapuram-695 017, Kerala”. The candidates are required to send a latest passport size photograph, DD, attested copies of certificates in proof of age, educational qualification, mark sheets, experience, caste status along.CTCRI:Established in the year 1963, it is a constituent institute under the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR).last_img read more

Ottawa continues to fail First Nations Auditor General

first_img(Auditor General Sheila Frasher. APTN/Photo)APTN National NewsOTTAWA-Canada’s auditor general called for major changes to the relationship between First Nations, Ottawa and provincial governments to break the persistent and growing gap between quality of life on reserves and the rest of the country.After 10 years issuing reports on the performance of government departments, Auditor General Sheila Fraser said the existing system dealing with First Nations was not working.“I believe that First Nations, the federal government, and in some cases the provinces, have to rethink their relationship with each other,” said Fraser. “First Nations people have waited far too long to have the quality of services Canadians receive every day and take for granted.”Fraser said she has done 29 audits that directly or indirectly dealt with First Nations people and has seen very little change in the social conditions afflicting reserves.She said reserves have fallen behind over the last 40 years and the federal government has failed to do anything about it.“The conditions on many reserves remain poor and progress is slow. Some communities are making significant progress, but they are the exception rather than the rule,” said Fraser. “Services on reserves have not kept pace with services in municipal governments…The federal government has not been identifying and funding comparable services on reserves in any systemic fashion.”Fraser said her office had uncovered government failures in education, water quality, housing and child and family services.She also highlighted that her office had found that reporting requirements for First Nations, some with fewer than 500 members, have been “excessive.” She said some of the reports were never reviewed by Indian Affairs or didn’t serve any purpose.She said another report on the government’s response to her office’s concerns around comprehensive land claims will come out in May.Akwesasne Mohawk Council Grand Chief Mike Mitchell thanked Fraser for her work and said his community is mired in required audit reports.Mitchell said his council receives $74 million for programs and services and is required to file 77 audits.“They put you through the ringer,” said Mitchell. “And all the times you (Fraser) have made recommendations and observations it blows out the window the next day.”Alluding to the swirling controversy around the Canadian Taxpayers Federation campaign over the levels of reserve politician salaries, Mitchell then said, “But when First Nations people get accused for something, it just stays in the air for a long time.”last_img read more