New ‘ghost’ scorpion among several species recorded for the first time in Malaysian rainforest

first_imgFor the first time ever, scientists have surveyed the rainforest of Penang Hill comprehensively. The 130-million-year old forest is believed to have never been cut before and has remained largely unexplored.Among the exciting discoveries is a potentially new species of “ghost” scorpion, and numerous first records for Penang Hill.With a more complete understanding of the forests of Penang Hill, the scientists hope to nominate Penang’s forest as a UNESCO biosphere reserve. In a first-of-its-kind expedition, a team of more than 100 scientists and students have surveyed the largely unexplored Penang Hill in the Malaysian state of Penang. The landscape of rolling hills is covered by a large expanse of old-growth tropical hardwood trees and lies just 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) from George Town, the state capital. Yet remarkably the 130-million-year-old rainforest is believed to have never been cut before.Over a span of two weeks last October, a 117-member team climbed tall trees, searched the forest floor and scoured the dark, mysterious depths of caves to discover a treasure trove of animals and plants. They recorded more than 1,400 species, including four likely new to science — a scorpion, a fly, a bacterium and a water bear — and at least 25 species of plants and animals that were recorded in Penang Hill for the very first time. For the expedition, researchers from the California Academy of Sciences (CAS) partnered with The Habitat, an ecotourism facility on Penang, as well as scientists from the University of Science Malaysia (Universiti Sains Malaysia or USM) and local students.The expedition produced an “extraordinary number of firsts,” Margaret D. Lowman, CAS’s Lindsay Chair of Botany and expedition leader, told Mongabay in an email. “This was an unprecedented whole-forest, and all-taxa BioBlitz by scientists, the majority of which were female.”What was also surprising, Lowman added, was that “a rainforest so close to 1.5 million people was so pristine!”Biologist Siti Azizah Mohd Nor of USM agreed. “It was certainly gratifying to obtain such good biodiversity records from an area of forest which is very close to human settlement and activity areas.”Researcher Wendy Baxter surveying the treetops in Penang Hill. Photo copyright 2017 Anthony Ambrose.Among the exciting discoveries is a potentially new species of “ghost” scorpion that arachnologists Lauren Esposito and Stephanie Loria of CAS chanced upon during the very first collecting day of the trip.“We had spent the morning out on a short trail near the base camp, and had just made it out to one of the longer trails leading into the primary rainforest,” Esposito told Mongabay. “It was about 3 p.m., and we had just found each other again after meandering off on our own. About 100 yards down the trail, Stephanie paused to break apart a log dangling across the steep, muddy path. We were just casually standing around talking when Stephanie yelled out, ‘A chaerilid [scorpion]!’”The scorpion belongs to one of the oldest lineages on Earth, known as the ghost scorpions, a group that is native to Southeast Asia. Most scorpions glow a bright cyan-green under ultraviolet light, but the ghost scorpions’ glow is very faint. “It’s almost eerie,” Esposito explained, “resembling the ghost of the scorpion.”The local partners had seen the scorpion before, but they did not know that it was something new, she added. “We had a hunch this new species was out there, but it was really a matter of odds. For every hundred logs or so we turn over, we find a scorpion. We got lucky.”A new-to-science scorpion discovered on Penang Hill. Photo copyright 2017 Phil Torres/bioGraphic. This photo originally appeared in bioGraphic, an online magazine about nature and sustainability powered by the California Academy of Sciences.The researchers identified numerous species that had never been recorded on Penang Hill before. These include the red-rumped swallow, the stripe-throated bulbul, the spotted-wing fruit bat, a species of orchid, eight species of mammals (including the peculiar lesser mouse deer), two species of frogs, and several species of flies, ants and spiders. The team also managed to record the cryptic Sunda colugo (Galeopterus variegatus), also called the Sunda or Malayan flying lemur.“The most interesting finding from this expedition involves insights into the biology and behavior of the elusive Sunda colugo,” primatologist Nadine Ruppert of USM told Mongabay. “We will reveal details of this in a forthcoming scientific publication soon. So please stay tuned.”A Sunda colugo, or flying lemur, was recorded for the first time on Penang Hill. Photo copyright 2017 Phil Torres/bioGraphic. This photo originally appeared in bioGraphic, an online magazine about nature and sustainability powered by the California Academy of Sciences.The surveys involved not just scientists but also students from local schools, giving them the opportunity to become citizen scientists.“Many of the students that were involved … hail from schools in the immediate vicinity of the lower station at the foothills of Penang Hill,” Justine Vaz, the general manager of the Habitat Foundation, told Mongabay. “We expect to continue to engage actively with these students so that they will become good stewards and ambassadors for the Penang forest within their communities.”The survey teams are currently analyzing their collections from the expedition. “We are confident of a few more discoveries in the coming weeks,” Siti Azizah said.With a more complete understanding of the biodiversity within Penang Hill, the scientists hope to nominate the area as a UNESCO biosphere reserve. The size of the proposed Penang Hill Biosphere Reserve is currently in the final stages of being finalized by the state government.“Penang is fortunate to have almost one quarter of the island still relatively pristine,” Lowman said. “So this UNESCO site would ensure long-term forest conservation.”Nur Faeza Abu Kassim of USM and her student Nur Zulaikha Zainal Abidin investigate a mosquito trap. Photo by Wendy Baxter/2017. Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Invertebrates, Mammals, New Species, Plants, Rainforest Conservation, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon dropped 13 percent in 2017

first_imgA new analysis of satellite imagery and data finds 143,425 hectares of forest were lost in the Peruvian Amazon in 2017, down 13 percent from 2016.The analysis identified newly deforestation hotspots in the San Martín and Amazonas regions.The main causes of the loss of forest in the Amazon appear to be cultivation of crops, small- and medium-scale ranching, large oil palm plantations and gold mining. A recent analysis of satellite images gives a glimpse into Peru’s widespread deforestation in 2017. The analysis, which was produced by the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), found 143,425 hectares of forest were lost across the Peruvian Amazon during 2017 — the equivalent of 200,000 soccer fields.Deforestation was down 13 percent from 2016, but the analysis reveals new forest loss hotspots and conservationists remain concerned for the future of Peru’s forests. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This story was initially published in Spanish on Mongabay Latam on Feb. 8, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Satellite images of an area in southern Peru’s Madre de Dios region show the advancement of deforestation from 2016 to 2018. Images courtesy of MAAPMAAP’s report indicates the five most-deforested areas in Peru are spread throughout the country’s Amazonian regions, from Madre de Dios in the south to Ucayali and Huánuco and San Martín in the central part of the country to the Santa María de Nieva area in northern Peru’s Amazonas region.According to the analysis, the main causes of deforestation in these areas are small- and medium-scale ranching, large-scale oil palm cultivation and gold mining.Matt Finer, MAAP’s principal investigator, told Mongabay Latam that advancements in early deforestation alert systems have allowed them to quickly produce a complete panorama of what happened last year.“Historically, we had to wait months and years to know the levels of deforestation that had been reached every year,” he said. A recently deforested area in the Amazonas Region. Images courtesy of MAAPOverall, MAAP found there was 13 percent less deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon in 2017 than in 2016. But experts still worry about the future of the country’s forests. Claudio Schneider, Technical Director of Conservation International Peru, considers the amount of deforestation in Peru to be too high.“Although efforts have been made to improve monitoring — because now we have more reliable data about deforestation — there still isn’t enough being done to stop the loss of forests,” Schneider said.He said that it is a complex issue, and that the Peruvian Amazon continues to be a neglected area with weak governance.“As long as people don’t work in a territorial way, in the titling of the land and in coordination with Indigenous communities and other sectors of the population, the Amazon will continue to be, a little bit, no one’s land,” Schneider said. He added that this disorganization is an open door for illegal activities such as mining or indiscriminate logging.Schneider says that to advance the fight against deforestation, the Peruvian government should launch a stronger land titling campaign for communities that reside in the country’s forests. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Gold Mining, Habitat Loss, Mining, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests Satellite imagery shows a new deforestation hotspot in the San Martín Region caused by the cultivation of oil palm. Images courtesy of MAAPIn the area around the Interoceanic Highway, deforestation totals 11,115 hectares and appears to be caused primarily by gold mining and agricultural activity, particularly in areas north of the highway. In Iberia, 3,220 hectares of forest were lost in 2017. In this area, the main drivers are the cultivation of corn, papaya and cacao, according to local sources.A large-scale agricultural project in northeastern San Martín resulted in the deforestation of 740 hectares during the last few months of 2017. According to MAAP, Peru’s National Forest Conservation Program, administered by the Department of the Environment, confirmed that there is a new oil palm plantation on the border between the regions of San Martín and Loreto.Another new deforestation hotspot is also located in the Amazonas Region, in Nieva District along the Bagua-Saramiriza Highway. In this area, 1,135 hectares of frest were lost in 2017. Deforestation in this area was due to crop cultivation and ranching, according to the report. The amount of deforested land has increased to 3,220 hectares in Iberia in Peru’s Madre de Dios region. Images courtesy of MAAPHe added that the satellite analysis has allowed them to learn that the same patterns and drivers of deforestation are repeated throughout many different areas of the country.In the Ucayali and Huánuco regions, MAAP estimates that deforestation affected 23,240 hectares in 2017. “In this area, the main drivers would be ranching and palm oil,” the report states.Madre de Dios, one of Peru’s most-deforested regions, once held a large area of forest that has been lost to the Interoceanic Highway, as well as a deforested area along its border with Brazil.last_img read more

Climate change imperils tiny animal in the world’s most extreme continent

first_imgSoil researchers have found that a microscopic nematode is vanishing from Antarctica’s Dry Valleys — and they believe it’s because of climate change.Scottnema lindsayae thrives in super-arid landscapes where little else can make it, but melting ice makes for a wetter environment that’s unsuitable for this soil dweller and allows its competitors to flourish.Researchers are also concerned that as Antarctica warms, it will become increasingly vulnerable to invasive species. Every Antarctic summer between December and January, a group of biologists heads out into the vast wilderness. They do not look for the giant whales or the emperor penguins that are typically associated with the region. They show no interest in the ice that covers almost the entire continent. Instead, they head to the largest ice-free region of Antarctica and poke around the soil. While the rest of the world waits for the latest news about melting glaciers, researchers from the McMurdo Dry Valleys Long-Term Ecological Research (MCM LTER) project have been studying tiny animals that live in the Antarctic soil.But isn’t Antarctica all ice? “Let’s not forget Antarctica is a whole continent,” says Walter Andriuzzi, a soil scientist and a post-doctoral researcher at Colorado State University.While ice dominates the continent, it does melt sometimes, creating small pools of water or a few patches of land that house minuscule but hardy life-forms such as microbes, moss and lichen. Indeed, some parts of the Antarctic Peninsula are so free of ice in the summer that two species of flowering plants grow there.But it is the McMurdo Dry Valleys that draw Andriuzzi and his colleagues. Located across McMurdo Sound from Mount Erebus, the Dry Valleys feature a chain of mountains that are frozen at the peaks, but whose valleys form about 4,800 square kilometers (1,850 square miles) of land that’s ice-free all year round. Here, water is restricted to some of the most saline frozen lakes in the world and ephemeral streams from melting ice during the two months of summer; the higher elevations are so hostile that scientists have compared them to the surface of Mars. The rest is really just a very, very cold desert. The McMurdo Dry Valleys as seen on the map are the largest ice free zone in the Antarctic. Photo by USGS via Wikimedia Commons (public domain).Yet tiny microscopic animals, each interesting in its own way, have managed to adapt to this extreme environment. These include rotifers, tardigrades (or water bears) and Andriuzzi’s speciality, nematodes, or roundworms. But change is coming: a new study by Andriuzzi and colleagues finds that increasing warming due to climate change may be overturning Antarctica’s nematode populations.Some parts of the Dry Valleys have been compared to Mars, but even this extreme desert life persists. Photo by David Saul, via Wikimedia Commons (public domain).Humans are most familiar with the parasitic kinds of nematodes such as hookworms, but nematodes are actually one of the most diverse animal groups in the world, with over 40,000 species described so far. They are found on land and water, and can eat a range of things including algae, microbes and fecal matter. Whatever the diet, most species play an important role in adding and removing nutrients from the soil and sea floor. Most are a few millimeters long, but some, like those in Antarctica, can only be viewed under a microscope.Adult male of the nematode Scottnema lindsayae seen under a microscope. Photo by the McMurdo LTER “Soils” team.The soils and surrounding waters of the Dry Valleys are home to three known species of nematodes. Eudorylaimus antarcticus is found in streams and occasionally in the soils close to water. This species is possibly the only predatory nematode in the landscape. Plectus murrayi is found exclusively in water and feeds on microbes. And finally, Scottnema lindsayae, also a microbe feeder, is Andriuzzi’s favorite nematode.All of these species survive the 10 months of extreme cold before the short summer thaws the streams thanks to anhydrobiosis — a process Andriuzzi calls a metabolic marvel. When all liquid water freezes in the Antarctic, these animals enter a state of dehydration and remain like that until water becomes available again.But S. lindsayae is able to survive in even less water than the other species, because it can remain dehydrated for longer and will very quickly come alive if even a little water is available. This allows the nematode to survive in soils further away from the lakes and streambeds, in the driest parts of the Dry Valleys. Scottnema lindsayae which can thrive in the extremely arid soils of the Dry Valleys is one of the most common nematodes on Antarctica currently. Photo by the McMurdo LTER “Soils” team.“This ability to quickly exploit transient favorable conditions gives it an important advantage over other species,” Andriuzzi says.But this advantage may not last if the continent keeps warming. Andriuzzi and his team of soil scientists, who jokingly refer to themselves as worm herders, have been monitoring soil animals from three of the Dry Valleys for years (Taylor, Miers and Garwood valleys) and collecting information on temperature cycles and soil moisture in the region, coinciding with a period of warming in the Dry Valleys since 2001.Soil scientists from the MCM LTER project, examining equipment before setting out into the Dry Valleys in Antarctica. Photo by Byron Adams.Cycles of cooling and warming are common to the Antarctic, but with climate change Andriuzzi believes that warming events are potentially becoming more frequent and lasting longer. These warming events appeared to be causing a population decline of the mighty S. lindsayae. Frequent or extended warming can lead to ice thawing faster and more water becoming available. This is great for the rotifers, tardigrades and other nematodes in the landscape, but not for S. lindsayae. For a nematode perfectly suited to survive in this arid habit, too much moisture is kryptonite.With water now creeping into the dry soils, Andriuzzi says several things might be going wrong for these roundworms. For one, the salts in the soil could dissolve in the water and come in contact with the animals, drawing out any fluids through their cell walls, leading to what is called osmotic shock.Where water levels have increased, the water-dwelling P. murrayi might also have moved in to compete with S. lindsayae for their shared prey, microbes.An additional threat could come from the predatory nematode E. antarcticus, which the researchers speculate may be feeding on juvenile S. lindsayae.“The superior ability of Scottnema lindsayae to go in anhydrobiosis probably comes at some cost, and in fact we know that it has an unusually slow life cycle for a nematode,” Andriuzzi says. Essentially, the nematode might not be able to recover if its population takes a hit.A separate study by a graduate student from the same lab, Ashley Shaw, found that E. antarcticus was very likely to occupy the top spot in the Dry Valleys’ soil food chain. The only thing protecting S. lindsayae from this voracious predator is the very dry soil, but the melting ice could change that.With changing climate and increased soil moisture, the predatory Eudorylaimus antarcticus could prove to be a threat to the microbe feeding Scottnema lindsayae. Photo by the McMurdo LTER “Soils” team.Overall, the spread of moisture in the landscape could mean that creatures now restricted to the streams and lakebeds could gain more ground, leading to greater diversity in the soils of the Dry Valleys. This sounds like a good thing, but Andriuzzi says the newcomers are not increasing in abundance nearly as fast as S. lindsayae is declining.“It’s as if a garden that used to have only daisies is starting to have a few daffodils and dandelions, but also many bare patches,” he says.Antarctica has been of interest to terrestrial biologists for a long time, particularly in the context of climate change.“There are very good scientific reasons for studying change in Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems,” says Peter Convey, a terrestrial biologist with the British Antarctic Society, who is not connected with the nematode study.Convey says the terrestrial ecosystems of the Antarctic have the same components, but in a simpler form, as the temperate or tropical ones that people are more familiar with. That makes it easier to understand how they respond to changes in temperature and precipitation.“If we can understand where in their structure polar terrestrial ecosystems are sensitive, we can hope to transfer this knowledge and see if it applies in the same way in more complex systems,” he says.But in a world with rising extinction rates, could one tiny soil dweller losing ground be so bad?Diana Wall, a professor at Colorado State University and head of this research project in the Dry Valleys, emphasizes the importance of the soil animals. She says creatures like nematodes are a main part of the soil food web. Andriuzzi says previous studies have shown that in low-diversity soil ecosystems, a decline in the dominant soil animals can lead to changes in the carbon cycling.And then there is the possibility of other outcomes, such as the arrival of invasive species, already a concern in some other parts of the Antarctic. Invasive animals or plants could arrive “attached to footwear, clothing, equipment, rucksacks, camera bags, cargo, vehicles,” Convey says.A warmer, wetter Antarctica will also make invasive species’ survival more likely.“Remember that we’re talking of communities with only a handful of species of animals,” Andriuzzi says, “so even the arrival of a single new one — or the disappearance of a resident one — could have big implications.”CITATIONSAndriuzzi, W. S., Adams, B. J., Barrett, J. E., Virginia, R. A., & Wall, D. H. (2018). Observed trends of soil fauna in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: early signs of shifts predicted under climate change. Ecology. Shaw, E. A., Adams, B. J., Barrett, J. E., Lyons, W. B., Virginia, R. A., & Wall, D. H. (2018). Stable C and N isotope ratios reveal soil food web structure and identify the nematode Eudorylaimus antarcticus as an omnivore–predator in Taylor Valley, Antarctica. Polar Biology, 1-6. Treonis, A. M., & Wall, D. H. (2005). Soil nematodes and desiccation survival in the extreme arid environment of the Antarctic Dry Valleys. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 45(5), 741-750. Virginia, R. A., & Wall, D. H. (1999). How soils structure communities in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. BioScience, 49(12), 973-983. Climate Change, Global Warming, Interns, Research Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Sarawak makes 80% forest preservation commitment, but some have doubts

first_imgAgriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Illegal Logging, Industrial Agriculture, Logging, Monkeys, Montane Forests, Oil Palm, Orangutans, Palm Oil, Plantations, Primary Forests, Primates, Rainforests, Secondary Forests, Timber, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Banner photo of cleared forest in Sarawak by John Cannon.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. The Malaysian state of Sarawak is committing to the preservation of 80 percent of its land area as primary and secondary forest, according to an announcement by Sarawak Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Johari Tun Openg.According to data, concession boundaries for oil palm and other kinds of tree plantations covered 32.7 percent of Sarawak’s land area as of 2010/11, suggesting that if Sarawak is to fulfill its commitment to preserve 80 percent of its land as primary and secondary forest, then it may need to cancel some of these concessions.The director of environmental and human rights watchdog organization Earthsight expressed doubts that Sarawak will follow through on the commitment, and recommends the state increase transparency and crack down on illegal logging. The Malaysian state of Sarawak is committing to the preservation of 80 percent of its land area as primary and secondary forest, according to an announcement by Sarawak Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Johari Tun Openg made February 26 in the city of Kuching. But some in the conservation community are expressing doubt that these promises will come to fruition.Occupying the northern coast of Borneo, Sarawak’s rainforests are home to unique, disappearing species like endangered proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus) and critically endangered Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus). But plantation agriculture, timber harvesting and other development pressures have supplanted many areas of Sarawak forest, with data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO) finding natural forest covered just under 65 percent of the state in 2010. Other research indicates the amount of 2010 forest coverage may be closer to 57 percent – much of that heavily degraded by logging, according a 2013 assessment.Sarawak’s remaining forests are home to threatened species like proboscis monkeys (Nasalis larvatus).Research indicates much of Sarawak’s rainforest has been degraded by logging and other human activities. Photo by John Cannon.But in a speech presented to attendees of a business networking event called The Sarawak Dialogue, Chief Minister Abang Johari indicated the state will be working to preserve and restore the state’s rainforests.“Sarawak is a small state but it has its obligation in its role to preserve the environment,” Abang Johari said, as reported by regional media outlets. “We make sure that 80 percent of our land mass must be covered by primary and secondary forests.”According to news reports of the event, Abang Johari went on to say that Sarawak’s forests provide important environmental services for the world, like generating oxygen.“We do not even claim the credit for this,” Abang Johari reportedly said. “The rest of the world is enjoying when we are providing free of charge.”But some aren’t buying it. Sam Lawson, director of the UK-based environmental and human rights watchdog organization Earthsight, told Mongabay that he is “really suspicious” of Sarawak’s new commitment, and that he has “no reason to believe anything.”“I welcome any serious commitment by the Sarawak government to protect what forest remains,” Lawson said, “but given that the administration has a long history of broken promises and disinformation in this regard, I would treat any such promises with a great deal of skepticism.”Lawson says the state needs to increase transparency and crack down on illegal logging if its conservation commitments are to be believed.“If Sarawak wants its promises to be taken seriously, the first thing it needs to do is release information about all of the areas of forest licensed for conversion to palm oil and timber plantations,” he said. “It also needs to immediately halt the destructive and commonly illegal commercial logging still taking place in some of the last vestiges of intact forest in the state.”According to data from Earthsight and other organization analyzed by Global Forest Watch, concession boundaries for oil palm and other kinds of tree plantations covered 32.7 percent of Sarawak’s land area as of 2010/11. Lawson said he doesn’t believe those boundaries have changed significantly since then, suggesting that if Sarawak is to fulfill its commitment to preserve 80 percent of its land as primary and secondary forest, then it may need to cancel some of these concessions.According to analysis by Global Forest Watch, plantation concessions cover nearly 33 percent of Sarawak’s land area. Data sources: SADIA, Aidenvironment, Global Witness and Earthsight InvestigationsA truck transports recently harvested oil palm fruit, which will be pressed to make palm oil. Photo by John Cannon.A truck transports logged timber. Photo by John Cannon.Mongabay reached out to the office of Sarawak’s Chief Minister, but received no response by presstime.Chief Minister Abang Johari is relatively new to the position, having succeeded Adenan Satem following his death in January 2017. Lawson said that if Abang Johari is really the environmental proponent that he’s claiming to be, “then they need to open the books.”According to reports of Abang Johari’s announcement, he stated Sarawak is doing its best to preserve the environment.“We want to share our resources with the world,” Abang Johari reportedly said. “We hope that Sarawak can become a bridge to the world so as to lead to a new beginning.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

‘Mate, you look like a hotdog’ – QPR star’s diabolical outfit draws hilarious responses

first_imgQPR fans on Twitter quickly called the fashion police after striker Sebastian ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ Polter posted a picture of himself ahead of a trip to Barcelona.Polter jetted off for a well deserved break after helping Rangers win at Fulham in a dramatic west London derby.Massive three points today. 🙌🏼 Now off to Barcelona for a short holiday! 😎👍🏼 #COYRS #SeeYouSoon pic.twitter.com/X9CV7Jj00g— Sebastian Polter (@polti1991) October 1, 2016@polti1991 well done bud but wtf are you wearing??!! 😎😂— Stuart Stamp (@stuart_stamp) October 1, 2016@polti1991 buy some new clothes whilst in Barca PLEASE— Neil Southey (@kblockpoole) October 1, 2016@polti1991 that’s the sort of outfit only a professional footballer or a pimp would get away with wearing 🙈— sean flood (@floody_s) October 1, 2016@polti1991 you ain’t pulling much in that outfit sunshine ⚪️🔵⚪️🔵— Wayne Reese (@reesie75) October 1, 2016@polti1991 Well deserved Polti – but don’t let the bulls see you in that!— Grant Foster (@Beanofire) October 1, 2016@polti1991 if anyone asks what you do, please don’t say you play for #QPR it’s enough of a circus without you dressing like a clown— PhilG67 (@W12Squirrel) October 1, 2016@polti1991 have a great time Seb but what the bloody hell are you wearing 😂— steve allen (@steveallen82) October 1, 2016@polti1991 he wears wot he wants, he wears wot he wants! We’re Queen’s Park rangers he wears wot he wants #QPR #FULQPR— TonyC (@TCQPR2012) October 1, 2016@polti1991 mate,ONLY you can get away with that outfit !👍🔵⚪️— Tony Salvatore (@WI2TPS) October 1, 2016@polti1991 if you hear sirens; it’s the fashion police— Loftboy (@ianpyke1) October 2, 2016@polti1991 look like a big salami— Loftus Roads (@4EverQPR) October 1, 2016@polti1991 Nice one Seb. But seriously, that outfit is proper rascal!— Simon Hunter (@realsimonhunter) October 1, 2016@polti1991 camouflage clobber will blend in nicely…German Ninja stylee— Skorpio (@Skorpio1) October 1, 2016@polti1991 mate you look like a hot dog— jake claremont (@hoopsmanjake) October 1, 2016@polti1991 mate, that outfit’s funnier than a last-minute Fulham penalty! Enjoy Barca!— Kieran Robinson ⚽ (@Son_of_Robin) October 1, 2016@polti1991 WTF Seb is that outfit?You going fancy dress or going to be one of the guys on La Ramblas taking pictures with the tourists?😂— neil flynn (@neilflynn61) October 1, 2016 Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

DeMarcus Cousins’ debut with Warriors: Cousins’ doctor, medical experts weigh in

first_img* * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table book* * *The man witnessed DeMarcus Cousins through a lens that gives him a distinguishable perspective on how he managed his injured left Achilles tendon.Dr. Richard Ferkel, the Director of Sports Medicine Fellowship of Southern California Orthopedic Institute, performed surgery on Cousins’ left Achilles tendon five days after he injured it with the New Orleans …last_img

BJP demands apology from Odisha CM Naveen Patnaik over BJD flag on martyr’s coffin

first_imgOpposition BJP on Friday demanded an unconditional apology from Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik soon after a photograph of martyr Ajit Kumar Sahoo’s coffin, draped in a BJD flag, went viral on social media. The photograph was taken on Thursday and it was uploaded on Friday. Ajit Kumar Sahoo, a jawan of the 44 Rashtriya Rifles (RR) hailed from Dhenkanal district in Odisha. He was critically injured in an improvised explosive device (IED) blast in Jammu & Kashmir’s Pulwama district on June 17 and later succumbed to injuries while undergoing treatment at the hospital on June 18. “Let BJD president Naveen Patnaik tender unconditional apology for hurting sentiments of the people and the martyr’s family,” BJP Ex-Servicemen Cell State President Colonel B.K. Bastia told reporters here. “It is unfortunate that the martyr’s coffin was draped with a BJD flag instead of the Tricolour,” Mr. Bastia said. BJP national vice -president and former MP Baijayant Panda also demanded an apology from the ruling Party. “Very unfortunate, politicising the death of an Indian soldier by the ruling party in Odisha draping his coffin with their party flag instead of the Tricolour. ….,” Mr. Panda tweeted. “The BJD people offered floral tribute to the martyr near Khuntuni on the way to our village in Dhenkanal district. They covered the coffin with the BJD flag. The BJD flag was removed later. My brother was not working for any political party,” the martyr’s brother, Parameswar Sahoo, said. Odisha governor Ganeshi Lal and many other persons had paid tribute to the martyr as soon the body reached the Biju Patnaik International Airport late night on Wednesday. The coffin was then taken to Dhenkanal Mini Stadium and later to his native village Badasuanla where his mortal remains was consigned to flames. BJD spokesperson Sasmit Patra has, however, described the incident as unfortunate and condemnable. “Our Party has a lot of respect for the martyrs and we condemn the incident. Stringent action will be taken against those who are involved in this episode,” he said.last_img read more

US Open, Day 2: Wozniacki out, Djokovic in second round

first_imgCaroline Wozniacki has become the first big name to crash out of the US Open after losing to world No.96 Romanian Irina-Camelia Begu, while Novak Djokovic demolished his first-round opponent in the men’s draw.Eighth seed Wozniacki crumbled in a 6-2, 6-2 defeat to Begu in which she registered just four winners all match.”I definitely felt like I couldn’t hit through her today and I couldn’t hit past her like I wanted to,” Wozniacki said, adding that she had been hampered by injury.”Hopefully it will get better quickly. It’s frustrating to have some injuries, but it happens to everyone. It’s just about moving on.”The defeat was the second time Wozniacki had lost in the first round of a Grand Slam tournament this season, after the same fate befell the Dane at Wimbledon last month.Another seed to fall was former French Open champion Francesca Schiavone, seeded 22nd, who lost 3-6, 4-6 to home favourite Sloane Stephens of the United States.Elsewhere, Serena Williams booked her place in the second round after a straight-sets victory in an all-American first-round match.The Olympic champion beat fellow Californian CoCo Vandeweghe, ranked 75th in the world, by a score of 6-1, 6-1 to set up a second-round match with Spain’s Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, the world No. 108.Both players suffered in windy conditions, Williams said.”The match was so weird, the conditions were so tough, I couldn’t really play my game. She couldn’t really play her game,” she said in comments on the U.S. Open website.German sixth seed Angelique Kerber will face Venus Williams in the second round after easing her way past Britain’s Anne Keothavong 6-2, 6-0 in the first round.French Open finalist Sara Errani, the 10th seed, was made to fight in her match with Spanish world No. 98 Garbine Muguruza, but prevailed 6-3, 6-7(6), 6-1 and will next play Russia’s Vera Dushevina.Russian No.2 Maria Kirilenko, the 14th seed, swept past Chanelle Scheepers of South Africa with ease in a 6-2, 6-1 win. Her next opponent is Hungary’s Greta Arn.In the men’s draw, Djokovic’s first-round opponent Paolo Lorenzi of Italy offered little resistance as the world No.2 beat him 6-1, 6-0, 6-1. Djokovic next plays world No.112 Rogerio Dutra Silva of Brazil.Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, seeded fifth, went past Slovakia’s Karol Beck 6-3, 6-1, 7-6(2) to book a second round match with another Slovakian, Martin Klizan.Sixth seed Tomas Berdych also progressed in straight sets, but he faced a fight from unseeded Belgian David Goffin, who knocked Roger Federer out of the French Open in June, as Berdych won 7-5, 6-3, 6-3.The Czech’s next opponent is Estonia’s Jurgen Zopp, the world No.80.Tenth seed Juan Monaco of Argentina also progressed after a five-set struggle with Guillermo Garcia-Lopez of Spain, who staged a fightback in the third set, although Monaco recovered to win 6-3, 6-1, 4-6, 6-7(6), 7-6(3).advertisementlast_img read more