A tranquilizer shortage is holding back rhino management plans in India

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, In-situ Conservation, India-wildlife, Mammals, One-horned Rhinos, Protected Areas, Rhinos, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Conservationists rely on a semi-synthetic opioid called Etorphine HCl to tranquilize rhinos for veterinary care, translocation and other critical interventions.Due to export regulations in South Africa, and red tape at home, Indian states face a critical shortage of the drug.The lack of Etorphine is already holding up translocation plans in several protected areas, and preventing veterinarians from caring for injured animals. “Watching a rhino get tranquilized is indeed an experience to cherish. It is hard to imagine that such a powerful animal can become so vulnerable too,” says Dharanidhar Boro, an officer on special duty at Manas National park, who has been working with greater one-horned rhinos in India’s Assam state since 1987.He describes the frenzy as more than 30 trained elephants circle a grazing rhino to try and contain it, and an official with a dart gun, riding atop one of the pachyderms, shoots a drug-laden syringe at the rhino’s rump or neck.It takes eight to 10 minutes after the needle pierces the rhino’s thick skin for the animal to go completely under; it takes off running at first, then staggers, before finally collapsing onto its chest or side. While the experience is no fun for the animal, tranquilization makes it possible to give rhinos veterinary care, affix radio collars to track them, or safely transfer them into crates for relocation.The most important element of the tranquilizing cocktail that allows conservationists to safely knock out a 2,000-plus-kilogram (4,400-pound) rhino is a semi-synthetic opioid known as Etorphine HCl.“Etorphine HCl is by far the best available choice for rhino immobilization today,” says Amit Sharma, coordinator of rhino conservation at WWF-India. “Other large herbivores, [such] as elephants can still be tranquilized safely with other options, but nothing better works for rhinos.”India’s stock of the drug, however, is alarmingly low. The states of Assam, West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh, home to the country’s rhino population, have almost run out of it. Since chemical immobilization plays a crucial role in the monitoring and conservation of the species, this shortage is already having an impact on rhino management plans, Sharma said.Greater one-horned rhinos running in Kaziranga National Park. Photo by Murali K via Flickr.Supply-chain problemsHome to more than 2,900 greater one-horned rhinos (Rhinoceros unicornis), India does not manufacture this critical narcotic derivative and needs to import it. South Africa, where the tranquilizer is manufactured, recently banned the export of compounded drugs — including the only commercially available Etorphine HCl compound — raising questions about how India will be able to secure it in the future.“We are in trouble regarding the procurement of the drug,” said Kushal Konwar Sarma, professor of surgery and radiology at the College of Veterinary Science in Assam. “With so many rhinos in hand and with no drug to restrain them, what will we do but to be just spectators?”The drug was once manufactured and sold under the trade name M99 in the United States, but is no longer commercially available, Sarma said. M99 was followed by a compound drug known as Immobilon, manufactured in the United Kingdom and which, according to Sarma, was a superior medication since it contained components that helped manage stress and prevent rhinos from overheating while being revived. Immobilon, too, is now off the market.The Etorphine currently being manufactured is registered under the trade name Captivon and available in South Africa. However, a regulation that came into force in South Africa this September says that “no medicine may be compounded by a pharmacist or licensed person …  for the purpose of export” — a rule that has, for now, put Captivon out of the reach of Indian conservationists.Sarma said he hopes it may somehow be possible to at least procure Etorphine in its simple form, even if the compounded drug isn’t available. “The picture is however not clear as yet,” he said.Even if veterinary facilities manage to find a supplier, they could still run into roadblocks within India. As a Schedule-1 narcotic derivative, Etorphine is a highly regulated drug, making its import a long, drawn-out process.“In India too, getting [an] import license for the drug is not easy,” says Subrata Pal Chowdhury, technical assistant in the West Bengal Wildlife Wing of the Forest Department. Even before applying to India’s Narcotics Control Bureau (NCB), which ultimately approves the import application, conservation groups and government agencies have to spend from six months to a year obtaining a range of other permits and certifications from government departments, says Chowdhury, an expert on the immobilization and transport of wild animals.If the NCB approves a requisition request, it then passes it on to the International Narcotics Control Board in Vienna, which clears the drug company to make the delivery. However, even before South Africa banned Captivon exports, the Indian government had gone years without passing along requisition requests, Chowdhury said. The last time Odisha State’s Nandankanan Zoo, the officially designated import licensee and the facility responsible for distributing the drug to other institutions, received a shipment was in the 2009-2010 fiscal period. According to Nandankanan director Sisir Kumar Acharya, requisition orders from states including Uttar Pradesh, Assam, West Bengal, Bihar and Chhattisgarh are still pending, due to the absence of supply from manufacturers. The Assam state government procured it via alternative channels in 2014-2015, but has not managed to renew stocks since.A greater one-horned rhino in Assam State’s Pobitora National Park. Photo by Travelling Slacker via Flickr.Effects on the groundIn the meantime, both critical rescue work and ambitious relocation plans have stalled.“Our second phase of rhino reintroduction program in Dudhwa National Park is held up in absence of this drug,” said Sunil Choudhary, Dudhwa’s field director.From seven rhinos brought to the park in 1984, Dudhwa now hosts 34 at its Sonaripur Range. While the success story is encouraging, park officials are wary of the possibility of inbreeding, which can lower the immunity of the existing population. Consequently, Choudhary said, officials plan to move two or three female rhinos and bring in a new male, in hopes of establishing a second breeding population in another part of the park.There’s just one problem: “In January 2017, when we checked our drug stock, we found they had already expired. They have a short shelf life between 12 months [and] 18 months,” Choudhary said. The state is currently attempting to obtain its own import license for the rhino tranquilizer.Assam is also keeping its fingers crossed for the availability of the drug. “Winter is the best time for rhino relocation, as the administering anesthesia releases heat from the animal’s body, and accordingly we had plans to do so in Manas and Laokhowa from Pobitora and Kaziranga respectively, by February 2018,” said Assam Veterinary College’s Sarma. “But if we can’t procure the drug our program will fail.”Assam State’s Manas Park, for example, urgently needs the drug, both to allow translocation and for veterinary care.  The park has about 10 females and 15 males, which is leading to fighting among the males, said special duty officer Boro. One rhino has already sustained a leg injury, likely due to such sparring. Without Etorphine, the caretakers are helpless. “Proper treatment would have helped the animal to recover faster, but we had no choice but to simply monitor it from a distance and leave the rest to nature,” Boro said.West Bengal, another rhino range state, still has a small stock of Etorphine left for emergency use. However, the drug has already passed its official expiration date, says Pradeep Vyas, recently retired as the state’s chief wildlife warden. The drug is known to retain its efficacy for at least a few years, he said, but officials there are working to acquire more stock.With more rhinos straying from their habitats as carrying capacities are exceeded, West Bengal has plans to relocate at least 50 rhinos to new habitats within the state. Underscoring the urgency of the relocations, the body of a juvenile male rhino was found on Nov. 7 in the Dhupjhora area of Gorumara National Park. The animal, aged 3 or 4 years old, likely died from fighting, according to divisional forest officer Nisha Goswami.A greater one-horned rhino in Kaziranga National Park. Photo by Murali K via Flickr.Bibhab Talukdar, chair of the IUCN SSC Asian Rhino Specialist Group, emphasized the necessity of putting in place a regular mechanism for procuring Etorphine. “The Environment Ministry should assess its annual requirements and take it up with [the] Home Ministry that governs the Narcotic Control Bureau,” he said. He added that India needs around 50 vials of the drug per year for rhino management.Accordingly, he said, India should place its requisition before the International Narcotics Control Board on time, so that the stock doesn’t run out and rhino management is not affected. Talukdar also called on the government to earmark an annual budget for Etorphine and entrust agencies such as the Central Zoo Authority and the Wildlife Institute of India with its procurement.South Africa must also be made aware of the gravity of the situation in fellow rhino range countries, so that it revokes the export ban in the interest of global rhino conservation, he said. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

To Counter Wildlife Trafficking, Local Enforcement, Not En-Route Interdiction, Is Key (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Anti-poaching, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Law Enforcement, Poaching, Researcher Perspective Series, Wildlife, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img The global poaching crisis has induced large segments of the conservation community to call for far tougher law enforcement. Many look to policing lessons from decades of counter-narcotics efforts for solutions.Boosting enforcement of wildlife regulations is overdue, as they have long been accorded the least priority by many enforcement authorities and corruption has further eviscerated their enforcement in many critical wildlife supply, transshipment, and demand countries.But better and tougher law enforcement is not a silver bullet. In fact, some designs of interdiction modeled on counter-narcotics efforts, including the current conservation community emphasis on greater en-route seizures of smuggled wildlife, can be outright counterproductive.The point in the smuggling chain at which enforcement and interdiction take place matters enormously. In the case of drugs — a non-depletable resource than can be produced in very large volumes indefinitely — seizing drugs close to production, such as in Colombia, Afghanistan, or Myanmar, is not very effective in terms of the cost of their replacement and knock-on effects on retail prices. Seizing drugs close to consumption and retail markets, such as in the United States or Europe, boosts prices much more, thus discouraging some users.However, for political, social, and justice reasons, interdiction in Colombia or Afghanistan that targets drug smuggling organizations and focuses on semi-processed or processed drugs, destruction of processing labs, and arrests of traffickers is still preferable to eradicating the drug crops of poor farmers. Hundreds of thousands of farmers in drug-cultivating countries depend on drug cultivation for their livelihoods. They will mobilize to oppose eradication, and may thus support militant groups, such as the Taliban, that provide them with protection. Moreover, in addition to prioritizing interdiction over eradication, in the case of drugs, it’s important that interdiction be designed to reduce smugglers’ proclivity toward violence and their capacity to corrupt institutions and penetrate political systems. It should also seek to limit the access of militant groups to drug revenues.Like drug crop eradication, preventing poor, marginalized indigenous communities from subsistence hunting or even participating in global wildlife trafficking is ethically questionable and can become politically unsustainable.But, unlike with drugs, focusing interdiction on en-route transshipment is highly problematic. All traffickers, whether in wildlife or drugs, assume they will lose a certain percentage of contraband to enforcement efforts, and therefore will simply pay for the production of larger volumes to cover their predicted losses. They even welcome eradication and seizures since enforcement boosts prices and makes stockpiles more profitable. The traffickers’ ability to increase and adjust supply to offset losses is one of the reasons why prices of drugs have not gone up high enough to reduce the capacity and motivation of consumers to purchase them. Seizures are thus highly unlikely to bankrupt traffickers of drugs or wildlife.Yet increasing the volume of animals poached in order to maintain supply despite law enforcement is a most undesirable and counterproductive side-effect of combating the illegal wildlife trade. Traffickers of rare parrots from Indonesia, whom I encountered during my research, for example, fully expected a 90 to 95 percent mortality rate as a result of their smuggling methods. To evade law-enforcement agencies, they stuffed the parrots into plastic bottles with GPS trackers and threw them into the sea so as to retrieve them on open waters outside the reach of naval interdiction. The fact that less than 10 percent of the parrots survived was not a deterrent to this appalling method, as profits on the remaining specimens were more than sufficient.In fact, prices can be boosted by scarcity so much that absorbing huge losses and driving a species close to extinction can be profitable and attractive for traffickers. The rarer the species, the greater its value. Law enforcement must avoid creating those transshipment inefficiencies that motivate smugglers to organize the poaching of many more animals so as to deliver even a few to the market.Rather than focusing on en-route interdiction, shutting down the retailers of illegal wildlife commodities is critical. Although retail may merely be driven underground, reducing the visibility, accessibility, and advertisement of retail markets helps drive demand down. Shutting down online and social media websites of illegal wildlife products is equally imperative.But the single most effective form of law enforcement in countering wildlife trafficking and poaching is enforcement within areas where the species occur to prevent animals from being killed or removed from the wild in the first place.Such in situ enforcement, however, often runs into the challenge that local populations can be willing participants in poaching for global smuggling networks. If local populations have not internalized laws and consider them an illegitimate imposition of Western values that hamper their socioeconomic survival and advancement, enforcement becomes costly both politically and morally, as well as in terms of resources.Despite claims that today’s wildlife trafficking is all about organized crime groups, in situ law enforcement must be accompanied by socioeconomic aid policies, such as ecotourism, financial transfers, or sustainable trophy hunting, in order to motivate local communities to comply with and internalize wildlife conservation.The White Rhinoceros was on the brink of extinction at the end of the 19th century, but the species has rebounded since then, with approximately 20,000 White Rhinos in Africa today. However, this conservation success story “is being undone by the high levels of rhino poaching since the mid-2000s,” according to TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network. Photo by Rhett Butler.Dr. Vanda Felbab-Brown is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and author of The Extinction Market: Wildlife Trafficking and How to Counter It (Hurst-Oxford University Press, 2017).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Better agricultural planning could prevent 88% of biodiversity loss, study finds

first_imgResults of a new study reveal that nearly 90 percent of the biodiversity that scientists expect will be lost to future agricultural expansion could be saved if more effective land-use planning directed this expansion to areas with the fewest species.It found that 10 countries possessed the lion’s share of this potential, and could by themselves reduce the expected loss of the world’s biodiversity by 33 percent.However, there are caveats. The researchers write that most of these countries are among the “20 worst-ranked” in terms of environmental impacts and have governance and political issues that would impede effective land-use planning at a national level. And they say global land-use optimization aimed at protecting the natural resources of the world’s most biodiverse countries may come “at the expense of their own production opportunities and economic development.”The researchers write that in order for the world’s most biodiverse countries to reach their full conservation potential while providing for their human communities, global land-use policy and research need to better integrate the governance, political and economic challenges present in these countries. Better planning could save a lot of wildlife, according to results from a study published recently in Global Change Biology. It found that nearly 90 percent of the biodiversity that scientists expect will be lost to future agricultural expansion could be saved if more effective land-use planning directed this expansion to areas with the fewest species.For their study, researchers at German institutions including the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) looked at distributions and habitat information for almost 20,000 vertebrate species along with projections of agricultural intensification and spatial land-use optimization scenarios.They found that if agriculture expansion was spatially optimized through global coordination to areas with low biodiversity, 88 percent of the world’s expected future biodiversity losses could be avoided. If coordinated at the national level, their study indicates that number would be 61 percent.It found that 10 countries possessed the lion’s share of this potential, and could by themselves reduce the expected loss of the world’s biodiversity by 33 percent.“A few tropical countries including India, Brazil, or Indonesia would have by far the greatest leverage for making global agricultural production more sustainable,” study co-author Carsten Meyer, of iDiv and the University of Leipzig, said in a statement.Land cleared for an oil palm plantation abuts rainforest in Gunung Leuser National Park, Indonesia.The study states that these results imply “huge efficiency gains” are possible through international cooperation — but there are big caveats.The researchers write that most of these countries are among the “20 worst-ranked” in terms of environmental impacts, and have governance and political issues that would impede effective land-use planning at a national level.“Unfortunately, these countries are also often characterized by domestic land-use conflicts as well as by relatively weak land-governing institutions, both of which currently inhibit land-use optimization,” Meyer said.There’s an additional complicating factor, according to lead author Lukas Egli of the University of Göttingen and UFZ. He said global land-use optimization aimed at protecting the natural resources of the world’s most biodiverse countries may come “at the expense of their own production opportunities and economic development.”“Unless such conflicting national interests can be somehow accommodated in international sustainability policies, global cooperation seems unlikely and might generate new socioeconomic dependencies,” Egli said.The researchers write that in order for the world’s most biodiverse countries to reach their full conservation potential while providing for their human communities, global land-use policy and research need to better integrate the governance, political and economic challenges present in these countries. They say their study’s results could be used to “guide international donors and capacity-building institutions in making strategic investments.”“Targeted efforts are needed to improve these countries’ capacities for integrated and sustainable land-use planning,” Meyer said. Citation:Egli, L., Meyer, C., Scherber, C., Kreft, H., & Tscharntke, T. (2018). Winners and losers of national and global efforts to reconcile agricultural intensification and biodiversity conservation. Global change biology.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Animals, Biodiversity, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Industrial Agriculture, Land Use Change, Plantations, Rainforests, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Rubber plantation in Cameroon edges closer to UNESCO World Heritage Site

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Apes, Deforestation, Environment, Featured, Forests, Great Apes, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, Plantations, Poaching, Primary Forests, Primates, Protected Areas, Roads, Rubber, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests, UNESCO World Heritage Site, Wildlife Satellite data indicate the rubber plantation, operated by China-owned Sud Cameroun Hévéa (Sudcam), is currently less than one kilometer away from intact primary forest habitat. Development is ongoing amidst concerns about threats to endangered species within and outside the park, as well as alleged violations of community land rights and political affiliations with the Cameroonian government.The expansion of this rubber plantation is “by far the most devastating new clearing of forest for industrial agriculture in the Congo Basin,” according to Greenpeace.Rubber expansion also stands to affect the 9,500 people who live in villages on the reserve’s periphery. According to Greenpeace Africa, Sudcam did not obtain Free and Prior Informed Consent (FPIC) from these communities before acquiring the land and residents have claimed that subsistence farmland has been taken away with little or no compensation.Members of the conservation community say that in order for rubber development to happen sustainably in Cameroon, companies need to collaborate with conservation NGOs to create robust buffers around wetlands and streams, develop wildlife corridors, establish areas to filter the runoff of toxins and sediment, and create bushmeat alternatives. They also recommend regulatory actions be taken in the U.S. and EU, which are major buyers of rubber. An industrial rubber plantation is currently developing land right on the edge of Cameroon’s Dja Faunal Reserve. And it’s getting closer, according to an analysis of satellite data released by Global Forest Watch. The data indicate the plantation, operated by China-owned Sud Cameroun Hévéa (Sudcam), is currently less than 1 kilometer (0.6 miles) away from intact primary forest habitat. Development is ongoing amid concerns about threats to endangered species within and outside the park, as well as alleged violations of community land rights and political affiliations with the Cameroonian government.Global Forest Watch analyzed satellite data collected by the University of Maryland’s Global Land Analysis and Discovery (GLAD) lab. It indicates that expansion is accelerating, with 10 square kilometers (3.9 square miles) of tree cover affected between November 2017 and January 2018 alone, according to the report. To date, Sudcam has been awarded more than 450 square kilometers (177 square miles) of land for development, of which it has cleared over 90 square kilometers (35 square miles). A 2018 Greenpeace report called this expansion “by far the most devastating new clearing of forest for industrial agriculture in the Congo Basin.”Imagery from Greenpeace shows the progression of clearing between 2011 and April 2017. Subsequent satellite data collected by the University of Maryland’s GLAD lab between May 2017 and the end of January 2018 show more deforestation. Analysis by Global Forest Watch indicates more than 10 square kilometers of rainforest were lost between November 2017 and January 2018 alone.Since Global Forest Watch’s report came out, more than 4,000 additional GLAD deforestation alerts have been recorded in the concession. One of these newly deforested areas is less than 500 meters (1,600 feet)  from Dja Faunal Reserve, which lies just across The Dja River from the concession. Satellite imagery from Planet Labs shows the extent of this clearing as of March 21.Biodiversity under threatThe Congo Basin contains one of the largest tracts of tropical rainforest in the world. The area protected within the Dja Faunal Reserve is considered one of Africa’s most undisturbed and species-rich rainforests. The reserve’s pristine condition and biodiversity have led to its designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and Important Bird Area. Dja is home to 107 known mammal species, including critically endangered western lowland forest gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), endangered chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and African forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis), and vulnerable giant pangolins (Smutsia gigantea). The reserve is also home to the indigenous Baka people, who carry out their traditional hunter-gatherer lifestyle within the forest.The development of agroindustry is currently one of the top three major threats to biodiversity in the Dja area, according to Manfred Aimé Epanda, country coordinator for Africa Wildlife Foundation (AWF). He said poaching, another key threat, would likely be exacerbated by increased human traffic and accessibility brought about by plantation development. Clearing forest for the plantation will also fragment the habitat of endangered primates and disrupt wildlife corridors used by forest elephants, Epanda said. In addition, nearby waterways are at risk from pesticide pollution and sedimentation due to agricultural runoff and erosion.“A strategic impact assessment study of the periphery of the Dja is needed in order to capture impacts on biodiversity,” Epanda told Mongabay in an email.Dja Faunal Reserve contains some of Africa’s most pristine and species-rich rainforest. Photo by C. Hance of UNESCO.Critically endangered western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) rely on the dense intact rainforest of the Dja Faunal Reserve.While the reserve contains the most untouched tracts of forest, dense areas of tropical rainforest lie within the concessions awarded to Sudcam as well. According to a 2016 paper by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), an environmental impact assessment of the land earmarked for rubber plantations found that “the project area has abundant wildlife biodiversity.” CIFOR concluded that rubber development “may have serious negative impacts on the [region’s] rich biodiversity … particularly through the destruction of plant cover, increased hunting and poaching, and wildlife disturbance.”Communities at riskRubber expansion also stands to affect the 9,500 people who live in villages on the reserve’s periphery. According to Greenpeace Africa, Sudcam did not obtain Free and Prior Informed Consent (FPIC) from these communities before acquiring the land. Under the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), FPIC is a right that allows indigenous peoples to grant or refuse consent for a project that could affect them or their land. Cameroon was one of the countries that voted in favor of the declaration at a U.N. General Assembly session in 2007. In the case of Sudcam, however, affected residents have claimed that subsistence farmland has been taken away with little or no compensation, Greenpeace Africa forest campaigner Sylvie Djacbou told Mongabay.“The Baka also stress the fact that graves and sacred sites which are very important to them spiritually were also destroyed,” Djacbou said.A young Sudcam rubber plantation near Ekok Village. Image courtesy of Greenpeace AfricaWhile the CIFOR paper stated that Sudcam intended to “build collective social and economic service facilities in the local communities,” Greenpeace says that community residents they interviewed told them that such facilities had not been made accessible. “The school and hospital supposedly built for communities are deep inside the concession, and inaccessible to members of local communities,” Djacbou said. “Since both the school and hospital are just inside Sudcam’s employee camp, we can assume that they are for its employees and not for the communities.”In addition, land tenure experts say Cameroon’s expropriation laws fail to recognize customary land rights. The CIFOR report states that “this causes particularly serious consequences to minority peoples who do not have formal legal titles to land and rely on respect of customary access rules for their subsistence.”Lack of transparencyCritics say a lack of transparency has dogged plantation development, adding to the discontent of local communities. According to CIFOR, Sudcam was awarded a temporary land concession of more than 450 square kilometers through presidential decree in 2008. However, an annual report for 2013 produced by Sudcam’s parent company GMG Global Ltd. lists Sudcam as the outright owner of the land it had originally leased. Since November 2016, GMG Global has been operating as a subsidiary of Halcyon Agri Corporation Ltd.“Greenpeace’s understanding is that Cameroonian law does not provide for freehold allotment of national lands, and Sudcam’s April 2013 land lease clearly indicates that its plantation is on national land,” Djacbou said.In addition, CIFOR’s report states that portions of the concessions now owned by Sudcam had been temporarily granted to logging companies, which were expelled to develop rubber plantations. Since, by law, national domain in Cameroon can only be granted if the land is not currently occupied or used, the report’s authors write that this suggests another breach. In its investigation, CIFOR learned that 20 percent of Sudcam’s shares were owned by an unknown “influential member of the Cameroonian political elite.” This lack of transparency in ownership, along with the suggestion of ties to the Cameroonian government, has led to rumors about possible political motivations behind granting Sudcam the land.Rubber is produced from the sap of the Pará rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis).Through interviews with 25 communities affected by plantation activities, Greenpeace Africa has learned that community members fear confronting the company and local authorities with their concerns due to a widespread belief that the president’s family is directly linked to the plantation. Further fueling this belief is the plantation’s close proximity to a mansion owned by President Paul Biya himself, according to the organization.Recent evidence suggests that Sudcam might be developing land outside its concession. In a report titled “The Coming Storm,” the non-profit environmental research organization Earthsight found that Sudcam had cleared roughly 3.3 square kilometers (1.3 square miles) of forest outside of the concession boundaries. While it is possible that additional permissions may have been given to Sudcam that Earthsight was not aware of, “it is notable that Sudcam parent company Halcyon Agri did not take the opportunity to deny this specific allegation in their response to our findings prior to publication,” Earthsight director Sam Lawson told Mongabay.Mongabay reached out to Sudcam, Halcyon Agri and the Cameroon government for comment, but received no responses as of publication time. In a response to Earthsite and Greenpeace reports released April 27, Halcyon Agri denied any connection to the government and clearance of forest outside its boundary, and disputed allegations that it violated land rights.Recommendations for moving forwardEpanda of AWF told Mongabay that there were a number of ways to mitigate the negative environmental impacts of rubber expansion. These include collaborating with conservation NGOs to create robust buffers around wetlands and streams; developing wildlife corridors between plantation blocks; setting up areas to filter the runoff of toxins and sediment; and creating bushmeat alternatives.On a national level, Greenpeace Africa “calls upon the Cameroonian government to suspend Sudcam’s lease agreements until clear preconditions and modalities are established.” Greenpeace also recommends participatory national land use planning and increased transparency. This would include obtaining the free, prior and informed consent of communities living in areas being considered for development.According to Earthsight’s Lawson, countries that are the ultimate destination for the rubber in a plantation, like the U.S. and the EU, must also take responsibility. “These governments need to take regulatory action, as they already have on timber, which forces importers to carry out due diligence to ensure their products and raw materials were legally sourced in the countries of origin,” he said.“They also need to use their influence to encourage the governments of producer countries like Cameroon to improve land governance, including being much more transparent regarding licensing.” Editor’s Note: This story was updated May 9 to include a response statement from Halcyon Agri.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

List of 100 most unique and endangered reptiles released

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler Animals, Biodiversity, Endangered Species, Environment, Herps, Reptiles, Snakes, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildlife Zoological Society of London has released a list of the 100 Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered Reptiles.Using a formula published in a PLOS ONE Study, each species receives a score that takes into account how evolutionarily unusual it is as well as its risk for extinction.ZSL hopes these rankings will provide a scientifically rigorous and standardized method to assign conservation priority to vanishing species. What do the world’s tiniest chameleon, a color-changing snake, and a turtle that breathes through its genitals have in common? Each of these reptiles sits perched on its own unique branch of life and, according to Zoological Society of London (ZSL), is headed for extinction unless urgent steps are taken for their protection.The ZSL has released a list of 100 Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered Reptiles through its EDGE of Existence program. Using a formula published in a PLOS ONE Study, each species receives a score that takes into account how evolutionarily unusual it is as well as its risk for extinction. ZSL hopes these rankings will provide a scientifically rigorous and standardized method to assign conservation priority to vanishing species.The worm-like Madagascar blind snake (Xenotyphlops grandidieri) has no use for eyes as it burrows through the forest floors of Madagascar. Photo by: Jörn Köhler courtesy of ZSL.A juvenile Minute leaf chameleon (Brookesia micra) perches on a match head. This is the smallest chameleon in the world and is found exclusively in the forests of Madagascar. Photo by: Glaw et al“When EDGE launched in 2007,” said EDGE of Existence Program Manager Nisha Owen, “our vision was to shine a light on those species that, if they were allowed to go extinct, would effectively take an entire branch of the Tree of Life with them.”EDGE has published lists for mammals, birds, amphibians, and corals in the past and has partnered with other organizations to fund work at the frontlines of conservation. Beyond increasing awareness of these high priority life forms, EDGE and partners invest in early-career conservationists and conservation research, working with species from the pangolin to the Philippine Eagle.“Reptiles often receive the short end of the stick in conservation terms, compared with the likes of birds and mammals,” said EDGE Reptiles co-ordinator Rikki Gumbs. “However, the EDGE Reptile List highlights just how unique, vulnerable and amazing these creatures really are. From the world’s largest sea turtles to a blind species of snake found only in Madagascar, the diversity of EDGE Reptiles is breath-taking.”The color changing Round Island keel-scaled boa (Casarea dussumieri) is the last remaining member of its evolutionary family. Photo by: Nick Page courtesy of ZSL.The Gharial crocodile (Gavialis gangeticus) uses its slim snout for fishing. Photo by: Josh More courtesy of ZSL.The largest turtle in the world, the Leatherback (Dermochelys coriacea) is the last of its phylogenetic family and Photo by: Hans Hillewaert courtesy of ZSL.Breath-taking indeed. This top 100 list includes the charismatic, slick, and scaly likes of turtles, tortoises, geckos, lizards, snakes, chameleons, and crocodiles which demonstrate some unusual survival strategies. The #1 EDGE ranking Madagascan big-headed turtle (Erymnochelys madagascariensis) has large, golden plates which protect its big head; the Pig-nosed turtle (Carettochelys insculpta) uses its pig-like snout as a snorkel; and the Mary River turtle (Elusor macrurus) can breathe underwater for up to three days.“Just as with tigers, rhinos and elephants, it is vital we do our utmost to save these unique and too often overlooked animals,” said Gumbs.“Many EDGE Reptiles are the sole survivors of ancient lineages, whose branches of the Tree of Life stretch back to the age of the dinosaurs. If we lose these species there will be nothing like them left on Earth,” Gumbs continued. “We also hope to bring the plight of these weird and wonderful creatures to the public’s attention before they disappear.”The Madagascan big-headed turtle (Erymnochelys madagascariensis) uses golden plates to protect its giant head. Photo by: Bill Hughes courtesy of ZSL.The Roti Island snake-necked turtle (Chelodina mccordi) is still hunted for food and is among the 15 most endangered turtles in the world. Photo by: Daniel Kane courtesy of ZSL.Able to stay underwater for up to three days, the Mary river turtle (Elusor macrurus) uses specialized breathing organs in its cloaca. Photo by: Chris Van Wyk courtesy of ZSL.EDGE’s 50 top reptilesMadagascar Big-headed Turtle (Erymnochelys madagascariensis)Central American River Turtle (Dermatemys mawii)Madagascar blind snake (Xenotyphlops grandidieri)Chinese Alligator (Alligator sinensis)Chinese Crocodile Lizard (Shinisaurus crocodilurus)Roti Island Snake-necked Turtle (Chelodina mccordi)Dahl’s Toad-headed Turtle (Mesoclemmys dahli)Hoge’s Toadhead Turtle (Mesoclemmys hogei)Western Short-necked Turtle (Pseudemydura umbrina)Flattened Musk Turtle (Sternotherus depressus)Flat-tailed Tortoise (Pyxis planicauda)Ploughshare Tortoise (Astrochelys yniphora)Radiated Tortoise (Astrochelys radiata)Spider Tortoise (Pyxis arachnoides)Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata)Gharial (Gavialis gangeticus)Magdalena River Turtle (Podocnemis lewyana)Big-headed Turtle (Platysternon megacephalum)Pig-nosed Turtle (Carettochelys insculpta)Asian Narrow-headed Softshell Turtle (Chitra chitra)Yangtze Giant Softshell Turtle (Rafetus swinhoei)Round Island Keel-scaled Boa (Casarea dussumieri)Union Island Gecko (Gonatodes daudini)Bojer’s Skink (Gongylomorphus bojerii)Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas)Marbled Gecko (Oedodera marmorata)Big-headed Amazon River Turtle (Peltocephalus dumerilianus)Pritchard’s Snake-necked Turtle (Chelodina pritchardi)Bell’s Sawshelled Turtle (Myuchelys bellii)Chaco Side-necked Turtle (Acanthochelys pallidipectoris)Mary River Turtle (Elusor macrurus)Newman’s Knob-scaled Lizard (Xenosaurus newmanorum)Williams’ Dwarf Gecko (Lygodactylus williamsi)Paroedura lohatsara (Paroedura lohatsara)Rhampholeon hattinghi (Rhampholeon hattinghi)Lygodactylus mirabilis (Lygodactylus mirabilis)Desperate Leaf Chameleon (Brookesia desperata)Zong’s Odd-scaled Snake (Achalinus jinggangensis)Colombian Dwarf Gecko (Lepidoblepharis miyatai)Gulbaru Gecko (Phyllurus gulbaru)West African Slender-snouted Crocodile (Mecistops cataphractus)Nguru Pygmy Chameleon (Rhampholeon acuminatus)‘Eua Forest Gecko (Lepidodactylus euaensis)Uroplatus guentheri (Uroplatus guentheri)Uroplatus malahelo (Uroplatus malahelo)Pronk’s day gecko (Phelsuma pronki)Black-breasted Leaf Turtle (Geoemyda spengleri)Ryukyu Leaf Turtle (Geoemyda japonica)Chapman’s Pygmy Chameleon (Rhampholeon chapmanorum)Mount Inago Pygmy Chameleon (Rhampholeon bruessoworum)CitationRikki Gumbs, Claudia L. Gray, Oliver R. Wearn, Nisha R. Owen. 2018 Tetrapods on the EDGE: Overcoming data limitations to identify phylogenetic conservation priorities. PLOS ONE.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Classy Campesino ready to lift Cliggott Trophy

first_img SLAMMING RIVALS The season’s first grade-one race, the $1.2 million Eileen Cliggott Memorial Trophy over 1300 metres, takes centre stage at Caymanas Park today with six facing the starter. The field includes, the 2015 Superstakes winner FRANFIELD, from the stables of Richard Azan, his vastly improved stable-companion JAMAI RAJA, as well as the reigning Glen Mills Caribbean Sprint Champion CAMPESINO, and the imported horse BRAWN, winner of the CTL Invitational Mile last November. All four should ensure a close contest, especially the trio of JAMAI RAJA, CAMPESINO and FRANFIELD who finished fourth, fifth and sixth respectively to SEEKING MY DREAM in the ultra-rich Diamond Mile on December 10, The then three-year-old JAMAI RAJA showed good speed that day before giving way on entering the straight and although racing for the first time since, reports in good nick on the convenient mark of 51.0kg. CAMPESINO, on the other hand, has already raced this season, slamming rivals in the St Catherine Cup feature over 1,100 metres on January 7, covering the distance in the smart time of 1:05.0. Although having to carry topweight of 57.0kg with Robert Halledeen again in the saddle, the consistent seven-year-old gelding from the stables of 14-time champion Philip Feanny is so well within himself at present that he can prove equal to the task. I take CAMPESINO to win from JAMAI RAJA and FRANFIELD. I expect him to stalk the leaders JAMAI RAJA and SIR BUDGET into the straight before taking command a furlong out. The 11-race programme should also provide the impressive three-year-old colt FEARLESS SAMURAI with his third consecutive win from four starts in the opening race over a mile for three-year-olds and up. From the stables of 16-time champion Wayne DaCosta, the Fearless Vision – Sayur offspring looked awesome when slamming LADY FAYE by 81/2 lengths over 1,500 metres on January 25 and having worked well since, should prove too good for the recent winner BIRD CATCHER in a field of seven. Champion jockey Omar Walker again has the ride. Other firm fancies on the card are FRANCIA’S PRIDE in the second race, JESSIE JAMES in the fifth, RAMBUNCTIOUS LINKS in the seventh and last season’s champion two-year-old SOTOMAYOR to win on his seasonal debut in the ninth race over 1500m for overnight allowance horses.last_img read more

DeMarcus Cousins’ debut with Warriors: Cousins’ doctor, medical experts weigh in

first_img* * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table book* * *The man witnessed DeMarcus Cousins through a lens that gives him a distinguishable perspective on how he managed his injured left Achilles tendon.Dr. Richard Ferkel, the Director of Sports Medicine Fellowship of Southern California Orthopedic Institute, performed surgery on Cousins’ left Achilles tendon five days after he injured it with the New Orleans …last_img

Dumbing Down the Science Reading Public

first_imgIn their rush to grab attention-getting headlines, are reporters doing more harm than good?  An essential part of science education is critical thinking.  Some headlines and articles state ideas that far outstrip the meager data on which they are based. Fingers do the walking:  Science Daily blindly reproduced an audacious claim from the University of Liverpool that Neanderthals were promiscuous on the basis of – what? – their finger bones.  “Neanderthals Were More Promiscuous Than Modern Humans, Fossil Finger Bones Suggest.”  The thinking was that a thick finger bone suggests larger amounts of male hormone during development, which in turn suggests that the men were more masculine, therefore aggressive, therefore promiscuous.  Not only that, the same scientists concluded that Australopithecus was monogamous, and Ardipithecus was promiscuous.Cometary omens:  Charles Q. Choi in Live Science took the occasion of Deep Impact’s flyby of Comet Hartley 2 (see JPL for photos) to tell a story: “How Earth May Owe Its Life to Comets.”  The origin of earth’s water and the origin of life are major unsolved problems for secular scientists, and comet impacts could inflict more damage than aid, but for the purposes of reporting, comets make nice objects that “suggest” benign effects on earth history, though seeing a cyanide jet coming out of Hartley 2 causes a minor problem.Axe-ing a question:  Observation: some stone tools in a South Africa cave show that the inhabitants had pretty good craftsmanship.  Conclusion: “Our ancestors had to grow bigger brains to make axes,” said Catherine de Lange at New Scientist.  She took the word of scientists at Imperial College London that “putting together more complex language requires you to have more complex structured thoughts, in the same way that making more complex tools requires more complex actions” – true enough, though she left it unclear how the need to grow a bigger brain led to the correct sequence of random mutations to bring it about.  Perhaps it was a decision by the cave council.Universal warming:  Live Science announced, “Black Holes Gave Our Baby Universe a Fever.”  PhysOrg followed up with a trendy headline, “Astronomers find evidence of cosmic climate change.”  Let’s hope they don’t blame humans for that.  The focus of the articles might have been on the quandary facing cosmologists for detecting anomalous heat in distant galaxies, and for invoking unobservable black holes to account for it.Lively Mars:  Is it even possible for a science reporter to write about Mars these days without using the L-word life?  Maggie McKee at New Scientist couldn’t break the habit.  The mere presence of hydrated silica on the sides of a Martian volcano was enough to set off the hallucinations: “Silica deposits on Mars could entomb possible life.”Missing blink:  “Missing link” is second only to “survival of the fittest” as a phrase capable of conjuring up the bearded visage of Charles Darwin.  The missing link in PhysOrg’s story, though, was not an apeman, but a chemical element: phosphorus.  It was apparently enough floss for us to be told, “Phosphorus identified as the missing link in evolution of animals.”  Just add phosphorus, and presto: animals.  According to a geochemist at the University of Alberta, who claims he divined a rise in phosphorus in the world’s oceans 750 million years ago, “That establishes our link between phosphorus and the evolution of animals.”Radical conclusions are not neutralized with wiggle words that the data “suggest” the conclusion.  The data could suggest many other conclusions – even opposite ones.    One of the few paleoanthropologists willing to chastise his colleagues for unscientific notions is Professor John Hawks at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and he does it with alacrity.  On his John Hawks Blog entry for today, he pointed out an inherent circularity in the argument that human mutation rates can determine the time when the human-chimpanzee lineages diverged.  After providing details from published literature, he exclaimed, “So much of the literature in this area is ultimately circular, I’m pulling out my sparse hair reading through it.  It’s turtles all the way down!” (see humor page).Since mainstream science reporters have proven themselves utter dupes of the Darwin Party, drunk on Darwine and acting like court jesters gulping toads in the Darwin castle, it’s up to us readers to do the critical thinking.  The ultimate irony in all this is that these very reporters and Darwin-worshipers think of themselves as heirs of the Enlightenment, rationalism, science, and free speech.  If the town drunk fancies himself the reasonable man, what are the truly reasonable to do in a town run by the drunks?(Visited 13 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

supermodel 16 inch LIGHT BLONDE – i really like them but only 4 stars because ive only worn

first_imgPretty very good company and quick to offer with. . Shown colors are not actual, so i had to mail back again for a substitution which they did rapidly and competently.Rapidly delivery, outstanding thick hair which does not grow to be dry or brittle like some i have ordered, been making use of hair extensions for 5 decades and these are by considerably the most effective i have purchased and good price for dollars, would defo reccomend.Pretty very good company and quick to offer with. . Shown colors are not actual, so i had to mail back again for a substitution which they did rapidly and competently.I truly like them but only four stars since ive only worn. Ordered with categorical and acquired them three days following buying, bought the 16inch they are smooth and thick and blend very very well with my hair, my hair is a bit much more yellowy so just after i tone my genuine hair a bit more it will match beautifully. I definitely like them but only 4 stars since ive only worn them two times so am not confident if theyll previous long or get rid of xxxx.But they are lovely and comfortable and a authentic good colour match so fingers crossed. This is the to start with time i have purchased clip in extensions so i have nothing at all to evaluate them to, but they are wonderful and soft and a authentic very good color match so fingers crossed.I experienced to dye them since my hair is lilac, color took so perfectly, and they are however really comfortable. Delivery was tremendous swift as effectively. Way further than happy and unquestionably would recommend.I truly like them but only four stars since ive only worn. Ordered with categorical and acquired them three days following buying, bought the 16inch they are smooth and thick and blend very very well with my hair, my hair is a bit much more yellowy so just after i tone my genuine hair a bit more it will match beautifully. I definitely like them but only 4 stars since ive only worn them two times so am not confident if theyll previous long or get rid of xxxx.I favored them at very first swift shipping and delivery but just after 2 weeks theyre tatty and i cant use them unfortunately i wont be purchasing them all over again.I experienced to dye them since my hair is lilac, color took so perfectly, and they are however really comfortable. Delivery was tremendous swift as effectively. Way further than happy and unquestionably would recommend.Rapidly delivery, outstanding thick hair which does not grow to be dry or brittle like some i have ordered, been making use of hair extensions for 5 decades and these are by considerably the most effective i have purchased and good price for dollars, would defo reccomend.But they are lovely and comfortable and a authentic good colour match so fingers crossed. This is the to start with time i have purchased clip in extensions so i have nothing at all to evaluate them to, but they are wonderful and soft and a authentic very good color match so fingers crossed.At 1st they were attractive, i experienced to dye them to make them the exact colour as my hair and they dyed fantastic, nevertheless following sporting them a couple of moments they have gotten dry and knot up very easily generating them search and come to feel pretend. A good deal improved than some other folks i have experienced, but also not the very best i have had, i assume following time i will invest in some much more highly-priced and superior quality types which will very last for a longer time.Will reorder this correct product up coming time i will need some more hair. Really awesome quality hair, pretty and extended and thick to the ends. Experienced it for just about 3 months now, dyed it and styled it each individual working day and it is nonetheless going potent 🙂 also remarkable price, can shell out up to three times as substantially on the high road. At 1st they were attractive, i experienced to dye them to make them the exact colour as my hair and they dyed fantastic, nevertheless following sporting them a couple of moments they have gotten dry and knot up very easily generating them search and come to feel pretend. A good deal improved than some other folks i have experienced, but also not the very best i have had, i assume following time i will invest in some much more highly-priced and superior quality types which will very last for a longer time.These hair extensions are amazing. You get so considerably far more then you spend for. Not as smooth as the additional expensive models but most definitely thicker.100g is a lot enough for a full head.Will reorder this correct product up coming time i will need some more hair. Really awesome quality hair, pretty and extended and thick to the ends. Experienced it for just about 3 months now, dyed it and styled it each individual working day and it is nonetheless going potent 🙂 also remarkable price, can shell out up to three times as substantially on the high road.I favored them at very first swift shipping and delivery but just after 2 weeks theyre tatty and i cant use them unfortunately i wont be purchasing them all over again.These hair extensions are amazing. You get so considerably far more then you spend for. Not as smooth as the additional expensive models but most definitely thicker.100g is a lot enough for a full head.Reviews from purchasers :i really like them but only 4 stars because ive only worn Will reorder this exact product next time I need some more hairbut they are lovely and soft and a real good colour match so fingers crossedlast_img read more

LJP confident of getting fairshare of seats in Bihar, U.P.

first_imgWith the Narendra Modi government fighting the perception of being anti-Dalit, leaving the BJP vulnerable, key NDA ally from Bihar Lok Jan Shakti Party (LJP), headed by Union Minister Ram Vilas Paswan, is confident of getting more seats to contest in Bihar during the 2019 Lok Sabha poll. The LJP is also lobbying for seats in Uttar Pradesh. Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar, who heads the Janata Dal(U) and Union Minister Upendra Kushwaha of the Rashtriya Lok Samta Party, have staked claim for a fair share of the 40 seats. The BJP holds 22 seats, LJP has six and JD(U) four. Mr. Kushwaha’s party has the lone seat that he himself represents. The BJP has indicated that it is not willing to fight the poll on fewer than 20 seats. The remaining 20 has to be shared among the three allies. “The government is not in a position to discount us if it wants to ensure that its pro-Dalit credentials are not questioned. We contested seven seats in the last election and lost only one, that too by a very small margin. So there is no question of us accepting fewer than seven,” a top LJP leader said.The party said that if its services are to be utilised in Uttar Pradesh, then it should be rewarded. “There is a huge population of the Passi caste in eastern Uttar Pradesh and also in Rae Bareli and Amethi. It is obvious that the BJP would want LJP leader Ram Vilas Paswan and his son Chirag to be involved in campaigning. The BJP will do well to at least give us three or four seats in the State,” the leader added.Mr. Paswan has been maintaining a studied silence. “We have had no discussions on seats. It will be done at the due time,” th Minister told The Hindu.last_img read more