Camera traps confirm existence of ‘world’s ugliest pig’ in the wild, warts and all

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Javan warty pig is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List due to a drastic population decline, “estimated to be more than 50% over the last three generations (approximately 18 years),” driven primarily by destruction of its preferred habitat in stands of teak forest and similar forest or plantation areas. The pigs are also hunted for sport and frequently killed in retaliation for raiding local communities’ crops at night.“There are no estimates of overall population size, but the species has shown a rapid population decline in recent decades,” the IUCN reports. “Compared to a survey conducted in 1982, 17 of the 32 (53%) populations are extinct or have dropped to low encounter rate levels.”There were originally three subspecies of Sus verrucosus, but one of them, S. v. olivieri, found on the island of Madura, is now believed to be extinct. Researchers proposed upgrading another, S. v. blouchi, found on Bawean Island, to full species status in 2011, but it is still treated as a subspecies pending further study of its genetics. S. verrucosus is the subspecies endemic to the island of Java.Compounding the threats to S. verrucosus, it’s believed that the pig’s continued existence might also be jeopardized by hybridization with European wild pigs, which can also be found on Java.Johanna Rode-Margono, South East Asia Field Programme Coordinator for the Chester Zoo, led the study that used camera traps, nocturnal forest surveys, and interviews with locals to locate the last Javan warty pigs.“Javan warty pigs are of a similar body size to European wild boar but are a bit more slender and have longer heads. Males have three pairs of enormous warts on their faces. It is these characteristics that have led to them being affectionately labelled as ‘the world’s ugliest pig’ but, certainly to us and our researchers, they are rather beautiful and impressive,” Rode-Margono said in a statement.“Indeed the Javan warty pig is a special animal. They are unique and can only be found in Java. Little is known about them and that very fact means we need to preserve them. We just don’t know what havoc it could wreak for other wildlife if they go extinct.”Shafia Zahra, a Program Manager at the Chester Zoo who is leading the field surveys in Java, noted that there are currently no protections for the Javan warty pig under Indonesian law.Between June 2016 and May 2017, Zahra led surveys of seven locations across Java that were previously identified by local communities as still potentially harboring Javan warty pigs. The species was found in just four of those locations, meaning that it is likely extinct in the other three, according to Zahra and team.“Sadly the pigs are freely hunted — not just for crop protection but often as a hobby and a sport,” Zahra said. “Yes, they may be ‘ugly’ but no animal deserves to become extinct because of human activity.”The Chester Zoo researchers are conducting a second study to estimate the exact size of the Javan warty pig population, assess the impact that hunting is having on the species, and examine the threat posed by hybridization with non-native wild boars. They hope that their findings will help inform conservation efforts to protect what’s left of the Javan warty pig population.Wild Javan warty pigs caught on camera for the very first time. Photo courtesy of Chester Zoo.CITATION• Semiadi, G., Rademaker, M. & Meijaard, E. (2016). Sus verrucosus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T21174A44139369. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-1.RLTS.T21174A44139369.en. Downloaded on 18 January 2018. Researchers have used camera traps on the island of Java, Indonesia to capture what they say is the first-ever footage of the Javan warty pig in the wild.Sometimes referred to as “the world’s ugliest pig” because of the eponymous warts that grow on its face, the Javan warty pig (Sus verrucosus) has seen its numbers decline precipitously over the past few decades, leading to fears that it might be locally extinct in a number of locations and perhaps even on the brink of extinction as a species.The Javan warty pig is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List due to a drastic population decline, “estimated to be more than 50% over the last three generations (approximately 18 years).” Researchers have used camera traps on the island of Java, Indonesia to capture what they say is the first-ever footage of the Javan warty pig in the wild.Sometimes referred to as “the world’s ugliest pig” because of the eponymous warts that grow on its face, the Javan warty pig (Sus verrucosus) has seen its numbers decline precipitously over the past few decades, leading to fears that it might be locally extinct in a number of locations and perhaps even on the brink of extinction as a species.But researchers with the Chester Zoo in the UK have now recorded a total of 17 videos that clearly show Javan warty pigs at two different sites on Java. You can see some of that footage here: Article published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Endangered Species, Environment, Mammals, Saving Species From Extinction, Wildlife last_img read more

Agroforestry bolsters biodiversity and villages in Sri Lanka

first_imgResidents of the rural Sri Lankan village of Pitekele relied on the nearby rainforest as a source of food, fuel, fiber and medicine for generations, until it was made into a park.The forest’s new conservation status and rules for accessing traditional products caused traditional “home garden” agroforestry plots to replace the forest’s role in villagers’ incomes and food procurement strategies.These unusually diverse agroforestry systems have reduced the pressure on native primary rainforest and serve to provide habitat, forest cover, biodiversity and food security within the buffer zone, where land is otherwise increasingly being used for tea cultivation.Sri Lanka is a biodiversity hotspot, and its home gardens are very diverse too: Pitekele’s home gardens support a richness of 219 species in 181 genera and 73 families. PITEKELE, Sri Lanka — Visitors to the Sinharaja Man and Biosphere Reserve, Sri Lanka’s largest remaining primary rainforest, could easily miss the fact that adjoining the forest’s entrance is the old and thriving community of Pitekele. Yet on foot, it takes just a quick turn and a climb over a boulder or two to exit the UNESCO World Heritage Site and enter into this bucolic village landscape of fallow rice paddies, sprawling tea gardens, and homes surrounded by some of the most diverse, and biodiverse, gardens in the whole region.Pitekele, Sinhalese for “the village outside the forest,” is located within the 3-kilometer-wide (1.9-mile) buffer zone on the northwestern side of Sinharaja, the last remaining example of a once extensive mature wet-zone rainforest containing species endemic to Sri Lanka, and is itself a prime example of applied agroforestry.View of a Pitekele home garden surrounding dense plantings of tea. Photo by Chandni Navalkha for MongabayVillagers have a complex relationship with the protected area; while they fully support the conservation of the forest for its contribution to the local climate and clean water, conservation rules implemented after the reserve’s establishment in 1986 have curtailed their ability to use forest resources upon which they have depended for generations.These restrictions have made the villagers’ “home gardens” — multi-story combinations of trees, shrubs, herbs and lianas planted around houses — increasingly important for their livelihoods and food security.Shifting away from forest resourcesForest resources were once a central part of villagers’ livelihoods. Three decades ago, men and children in Pitekele would often go to the forest to gather valuable products for use at home and to sell.Villagers tell of the many different plant species they would gather at different seasons. A favorite was wild cardamom (Elletaria ensal), known locally as enasal, used to flavor curries and sweets. A yellow vine called weniwelgetha (Coscinium fenestratum), which has recognized anti-tetanus properties and is now critically endangered, was prized as medicine for ailments as common as fevers and as rare as snakebites. On their way to tap fishtail palms (Caryota urens), known as kitul, whose sweet sap is used to make hard sugar and syrup, men would gather up nuts and resins from native dipterocarps (Shorea sp.) to eat and to sell.Since the creation of the reserve, these activities are forbidden. Now, to tap palms within the forest, villagers are required to purchase permits. As a result, people rarely enter the forest; even village elders told Mongabay that they go maybe once a year.“Before, we used to go to the forest to gather food, spices, medicine, to tap fishtail palms,” says Guneratne W.* “We used to sell resins and fruits we collected, and now we don’t, we sell areca nut, coconuts, or bananas that we have on our land when we need extra income. Now, we must grow what we want to eat or sell in our home gardens.”Nam nam is a fruit tree common in Sri Lankan home gardens, this one has a fruit that’s almost ready to be picked. Photo by Chandni Navalkha for MongabayAn extraordinarily diverse agroforestry systemScholars believe home gardens in Sri Lanka are an ancient agroforestry system that has been practiced for more than 2,500 years. The age of tropical home gardens is less well understood, but Vijaykumara W.* knows his family has maintained a home garden in Pitekele for at least 200 years. “I am the fifth generation here,” he says, “this is my ancestral village.”According to village elders like Vijaykumara, most of the home gardens in Pitekele were planted between 30 and 50 years ago, established by children when setting up their own households. Some home gardens, those of the older households, are more than 100 years old.These home gardens also feature a high level of diversity compared to other regions of Sri Lanka. A forthcoming study on Pitekele by Klaus Geiger et al. in association with Yale University finds that the tropical home gardens found here demonstrate a much higher species richness than those found in other studies of Sri Lankan home gardens. Through their survey of 10 home gardens in the village, the authors found a total species richness of 219 species in 181 genera and 73 families. Similarly, their mean species richness per home garden of 64 species is much higher compared to other estimates of Sri Lankan home gardens, which range from 42 to 46 in a 2009 study by K. Kumari et al.People here say that their home gardens have existed as far back as they can remember, even if the species mix has changed over time. Jayawira*, a tea planter and kitul tapper in Pitekele, remembers walking 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) from Weddagala, the closest town, carrying construction materials for his house on his back.“In the past, there was no road … we would walk,” he recalls. “We had to grow everything we wanted because we couldn’t buy it, including medicine because we were far from the doctors and hospital. Now we have less than we used to in the home gardens because we don’t need to grow medicines anymore, we have the road and can go to the hospital.”While no single home garden in the village is the same — each reflects the individual preferences of a family — all contain a mix of edible, medicinal and ornamental trees and plants. The most common trees in home gardens are the native kitul palms and two species which are ancient introductions: coconut palms (Cocos nucifera), including the famous king coconut (Cocos nucifera v. aurantiaca), and areca palms (Areca catechu), the nuts of which are sold for cash throughout the year.In addition to these native palms, jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus) and mango (Mangifera indica) trees dominate the canopy of home gardens and provide an important source of both fruit and timber. Exotic fruit species from Latin America and the Asia Pacific, like breadfruit (Artocarpus altilis), ambarella (Spondias dulcis), water apple (Syzygium malaccense), and rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum), as well as spice trees like clove (Syzygium aromaticum), compose the mid-canopy.“Here, we don’t buy fruits,” Niyentara G.* says as she hands me a 2-kilo (4.4-pound) bag of ambarella from her garden to make curry for dinner. “We eat from the garden as things come into season. But the animals eat the manioc and bananas, and we still need to buy things like vegetables in town.”Edible and medicinal herbs cover the ground in Pitekele’s home gardens. Photo by Chandni Navalkha for MongabayLower-canopy trees consist of exotic citruses such as lemon (Citrus aurantifolia), orange (Citrus sinensis), and mandarin (Citrus reticulata), plus guava (Psidium guajava) varieties, nam nam (Cynometra cauliflora), the native cinnamon tree (Cinnamomum verum) and medicinal trees such as nika (Vitex negundo) and pawata (Pavetta indica). Black pepper (Piper nigrum) and betel (Piper betel) vines often adorn the trunks of these trees.Ground-story herbs and shrubs supplement edible fruits with edible leaves like koppa (Polyscias scutellaria), niramulia (Hygrophila schulli), gotukola (Centella asiatica) and bowitiya (Osbeckia aspera), used to make the sambal sauces that traditionally accompany meals of rice and curry. Spices like curry (Murraya koenigii) and pandan (Pandanus amaryllifolius) leaf are also found in this layer of the home garden, as are popular medicinals like polpala (Aerva lanata) and iraweriya (Plectranthus zatarhendi var. tomentosa), which are used for stomach ailments.Changing livelihoodsThe road is a symbol of the villagers’ changing livelihoods. Two or three decades ago, sheets of freshly tapped and rolled rubber would be drying outdoors on clotheslines; people grew coffee and cinnamon as cash crops, sold forest products, tapped kitul and planted their own rice.Around the same time as the establishment of Sinharaja, however, villagers began replacing their rubber and cinnamon plantations with tea plants and stopped growing rice altogether.According to villagers, this shift began when the price of low-grown tea rose above rubber prices. Infrastructure, like the road and a daily truck sent to pick up villagers’ tea harvest, encouraged people to switch from rubber and cinnamon to tea. “We became busy with growing tea and picking the tea leaves,” Lakshi R.* explains, “We didn’t have time to grow rice, and with our income from tea, we can buy rice instead.”Even as higher incomes enable families to purchase rice from the market, villagers say that as food prices increase home gardens are vital in supplying their households with food staples like peppers, coconuts, spices, and fruits and vegetables. Ashoka W.*, who started his tea plantation in Pitekele about 10 years ago, told Mongabay, “Our lives depend on the price of tea. If it goes down, so does our quality of life.”Useful trees visible in this typical home garden include coconut, jackfruit, areca palm, banana, mango, breadfruit, and citrus varieties. Photo by Chandni Navalkha for MongabayGrowing their own food in home gardens ensures that even if the price of tea decreases, villagers in Pitekele are food secure. The same study by Geiger et al. found that an equal amount of Pitekele’s land area is in tea cultivation as in home gardens.Recognizing this, the Sri Lankan government has encouraged the establishment of home gardens through its rural development and agricultural policies. In 2011, the Sri Lankan Department of Livelihoods (Divi Neguma, later consolidated into the poverty alleviation program known as Samurdhi) launched an initiative to foster the establishment of more than 1 million home gardens. Annual targets continue to extend this number; in 2016, the Ministry of Agriculture aimed to create 500,000 additional home gardens throughout Sri Lanka.Maintaining tree cover and combating climate changeIn a country where deforestation has decreased its original forest area by half since 1956, home gardens like those in Pitekele are crucial to maintaining forest cover and ecosystem services. A report by the Food and Agriculture Organization in 2009 found home gardens compose nearly 15 percent of Sri Lanka’s land area and 33 percent of its total forest area.Like other agroforestry systems globally, home gardens in Sri Lanka play an important role in combating climate change. Annually, agroforestry sequesters 0.73 gigatons of carbon around the world. While quantitative studies of carbon storage in home gardens is lacking, experts agree that Sri Lanka’s tropical home gardens have a high degree of existing and potential carbon storage“These are tree-based systems that store large amounts of carbon in both above-ground biomass and in soils,” says James Roshetko, an expert on agroforestry in Southeast Asia at the World Agroforestry Centre. Along with carbon storage, home gardens boost resilience to climate change: “The diversity of home gardens helps farmers eliminate the risk associated with changing climate conditions.”Mangala De Zoysa, a professor of agricultural economics at the University of Ruhuna in Sri Lanka, notes that even as home gardens themselves sequester carbon, they reduce the risk of deforestation and degradation of carbon-sequestering forests like Sinharaja.Sixty percent of Sri Lanka’s timber is supplied by home gardens, he says. “People get their fuelwood and firewood from their gardens, which helps to protect natural forests.”Home gardens capture carbon and provide dense cover for creatures to hide, forage, and nest in, as with this gourd tree. Photo by Chandni Navalkha for MongabaySupporting biodiversity, from monkeys to monitor lizardsAlong with reducing pressure on forest resources, contributing to villagers’ food security and livelihoods, and maintaining forest cover in the buffer zone of Sinharaja, the tropical home gardens of Pitekele support biodiversity conservation in the region by providing a habitat for important fauna, many of which are endemic species.“Home gardens provide excellent habitat for pollinators like insects and birds,” Roshetko says. “And at the same time their diversity helps farmers to keep out pests and disease.”Talking with villagers about the birds and animals they witness commonly within their gardens, they mention just a few of the many species they see.One family often spies the endemic Sri Lankan gray hornbill (Ocyceros gingalensis) eating papaya from a tree in their garden. Villagers put out rice to feed the birds, and the Sri Lankan jungle fowl (Gallus lafayetii) can be seen in many home gardens as a result. Other commonly seen and heard birds are the pied cuckoo (Clamator jacobinus), the brown-headed barbet (Megalaima zeylanica), the Sri Lanka blue magpie (Urocissa ornata), and the rarer Ceylon frogmouth (Batrachostomus moniliger). Yellow-billed Babbler in a Pitekele garden. Photo by Le Do Ly Lan 1234 read more

Small farmers not ready as Indonesia looks to impose its palm oil sustainability standard on all

first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Certification, Environment, Farming, Forests, Indonesia, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Rspo, Sustainability Banner image: A Lubuk Beringin villager, Rahimah, 70, harvests palm nuts for palm oil on her agroforestry farm at Lubuk Beringin village in Jambi province, Indonesia. Photo by: Tri Saputro/CIFOR/Flickr The Indonesian government plans to make its sustainable palm oil certification scheme, the ISPO, mandatory for small farmers by 2020. These farmers account for 40 percent of the total oil palm plantation area nationwide, but were exempted from the initial ISPO rollout.A recent study shows that these smallholders are not ready to adopt the standard. They face a variety of challenges, largely stemming from the tenuous nature of their land ownership claims.The Ministry of Agriculture fears that under the existing ISPO compliance regulation, many farmers will end up in prison for failing to comply by the deadline. The government is now drafting an updated ISPO regulation. JAKARTA — The Indonesian government aims to impose its homegrown sustainability standard for palm oil on all operators, but concerns persist over the readiness of the previously exempt small-scale farmers who manage two-fifths of total plantation area nationwide.Mandatory participation in the Indonesian Sustainable Palm Oil scheme, or ISPO, was initially aimed at farmers and companies managing plantations of more than 25 hectares (62 acres) in size. This, however, exempts from certification the vast number of smaller plantations that, combined, account for 40 percent of oil palm plantations in the country.To date, less than 1 percent of independent smallholder farms are certified as sustainable under the ISPO and the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), the world’s largest association for ethical production of palm oil.The industry has long been associated with social and environmental problems such as forced labor and massive deforestation. The government, aware that any meaningful reform of the industry would have to include small-scale farmers, plans to make ISPO certification mandatory for these smallholders by 2020.The need to do so will only grow more urgent as the number of such operators continues to increase, expanding their share of Indonesia’s oil palm plantation area to 60 percent by 2030.“Independent smallholders are thus critical players for bringing sustainable, conflict-free palm oil into reality,” the World Resources Institute (WRI) said in a recent blog post.However, there are concerns that smallholders, long overlooked by both industry and government for assistance in adopting agricultural best practices, are not ready for ISPO certification.A truck transports recently harvested oil palm fruit, which will be pressed to make palm oil. Photo by John Cannon.Obstacles to certificationThe independent smallholders in question here differ from so-called plasma farmers, who also manage smallholdings but have agreements in place with larger companies that cover support and logistics, and ultimately guarantee that the companies will buy their palm fruit.Independent smallholders, by contrast, typically learn how to manage plantations with no training, no supervision, and limited support from the government. The result, says Arya Hadi Dharmawan, a researcher at the Bogor Institute of Agriculture (IPB), is “a sad tale” of a large group of farmers for whom obtaining ISPO certification will be difficult.A recent IPB study of small farmers in the three provinces of Jambi, Riau and Central Kalimantan highlighted just how ill-prepared they were to meet the standard. For a start, Arya said, most of these farmers lacked land certificates.Under 2013 government guidelines for plantation licensing, small farmers are required to apply for a plantation registration certificate known as an STD-B, while large-scale producers (those cultivating more than 25 hectares) have to obtain a plantation business license called an IUP-B.The former is a simple land certificate with no requirement to carry out an environmental impact assessment (EIA), while the latter involves more complex procedures and regulatory requirements, including an EIA. In practice, however, STD-B certificates are rarely issued, Arya found during the study of small farmers in Jambi.“We thought it’d be easy [for these farmers to obtain ISPO certificates] because they’re located in [designated plantation] areas, but it’s not,” he said. They don’t have any papers, he added, and manage their land without formal borders, relying instead on mutual understanding with their neighbors.“As a result, only 1 percent of them have STD-B certificates,” he said.A second obstacle to certification is the farmers’ lack of access to ISPO-compliant fertilizers and seeds. The study found 89 percent of small farmers used lower-cost seedlings that provided smaller yields. Another challenge is the difficulty small farmers face in forming groups in order to have a firmer legal basis from which to operate.These problems all mean no small farmers are truly ready, Arya said, even in regions like Jambi, where they face fewer legal woes because they manage plantations in non-forest areas. In Jambi, he said, small farmers are only about “55 percent ready” to comply with the ISPO.Farmers in other regions are even less prepared, the study suggested. In Riau, Arya found that many farmers were managing plantations inside forest areas — a situation that would make it even harder for them to get the requisite paperwork for the land.“If that’s the case, then it’ll be difficult for these farmers to obtain ISPO certificates,” he said. “The ISPO will surely claim victims in the form of farmers whose plantations are in forest areas.”Elephant, orangutan, and tiger habitat cleared in the Leuser ecosystem for oil palm. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerPlantation to prisonThe government has acknowledged the uphill task it faces ensuring all oil palm growers are certified by 2020.“If we make certification mandatory for all 450,000 households [working as oil palm planters], then maybe our prisons will be full,” said Dedi Junaedi, plantation product director at the Ministry of Agriculture, which is managing the ISPO compliance program.Under the regulation mandating ISPO certification for all farmers, failure to comply is punishable by between three and 10 years in prison, and fines of up to 10 billion rupiah ($700,000).“That’s why we have to be careful,” Dedi said. “Just look at [the study] — the readiness [of small farmers] is still 50 percent.”An Orangutan (Pongo abelii). Orangutans in Indonesia and Malaysia have been highly impacted by oil palm production, bringing a strong organized response from international conservation NGOs and local wildlife activists. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerAcceptability and productivityThe ISPO was introduced by the government in 2011 as a mandatory certification scheme for all oil palm growers in the country, after several big buyers, including Unilever, Nestlé and Burger King, stopped buying palm oil from Indonesia over deforestation concerns.Compared against other certification schemes, primarily the RSPO, the ISPO is largely considered the weakest, as it adheres only to Indonesian laws and regulations, which in some cases are not specific enough and fall short of providing detailed guidance for best practices.A recent report commissioned by Friends of the Earth Europe detailed some of the ISPO’s weaknesses, such as lack of traceability, lack of protection for the rights of workers — it doesn’t clearly prohibit the use of force or of child labor — and failure to recognize key instruments on community rights, making it a poor tool for safeguarding the rights of indigenous communities.The government, led by the Coordinating Ministry for the Economy, is drafting a presidential regulation to undergird the new ISPO scheme, with new provisions, such as traceability, to address the highlighted weaknesses.Part of these efforts to improve the ISPO is to make it mandatory for smallholders by 2020, so that large corporate consumers that previously claimed ignorance about their suppliers can no longer fall back on that excuse.Ultimately, the idea behind the ISPO is to make Indonesian palm oil and its associated products acceptable on the global market. It also aims to boost the productivity of smallholders, currently a third of that of big growers, by providing small farmers with certification-compliant fertilizers and seeds.“It’s such a shame our farmers lose such a huge potential,” said Musdhalifah Machmud, the coordinating economic minister’s deputy for food and agriculture.The revision of ISPO also dovetails with the government’s replanting program, in which small growers will receive financial aid and technical assistance to shift from less-productive crops to with newer variants with better-quality seeds and fertilizers. The government aims to replant 1,850 square kilometers (714 square miles) of smallholder plantations this year.“If we don’t do that now, our farmers will lose their potential of high productivity in the next 10 years,” Musdhalifah said.The government is concerned that if smallholder productivity remains low, the farmers will expand their plantations to boost output, raising the risk of forest clearing to make way for new land.“Currently, our farmers feel their productivity is low, so they think they need to increase the size of their plantations,” Musdhalifah said.The government expects to finish the revision of the ISPO this year, said Wilistra Danny, Musdalifah’s assistant for plantations.“Starting from a few weeks ago, we’ve started discussing the legal draft,” he said. “We’re hoping that the presidential regulation [on the new ISPO] can be issued this year at the latest. But the process is still long. We still have to discuss it with the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights, and there’s going to be a harmonization process as well. All these will take quite a long time.”last_img read more

CORRIGAN BROTHERS CHANGE NAME IN HONOUR OF LETTERMACAWARD MAN MCHUGH

first_imgIrish band the Corrigan Brothers  have become the “Carl McHugh Brothers” to honour the Donegal man and Bradford City hero for the Capital One Cup Final in Wembley. The Brothers enjoyed a huge hit with “There’s No One As Irish As Barack Obama” which notched up ten million hits on You Tube.Now the brothers, whose Bradford song “There’s no Team as Wembley as Bradford City” has captured the imagination of many Bradford fans, are delighted to wear the masks that will raise much needed funds fo the Bradford Burns Research Unit.The masks have been produced by Bradford fan John Barker and his wife Frances who run a print company in Bradford.Lead singer Ger Corrigan said “We spoke with Frances last week and she sent us on some of the Carl McHugh masks, we are very proud of Carl here in Ireland as are all the people in Donegal. “The masks are really high quality and we are thrilled to become the Carl McHugh Brothers for the week. I think the Swansea goalkeeper will be spooked by the masks if the game goes to penalties”.The Brothers are delighted with the reaction to their Bradford song.Ger continued “We have made some great friends and have had some great fun, Bradford’s name is on this cup and it is a great honour to have an association with this Final, now let’s get masked up and show Wembley how much Bradford can add to the occasion”if anyone would like to purchase direct they can either email at this address or rodleyb@aol.com we will despatch same day. The face masks cost £1.50 each or a pack of all 5 players, (Carl McHugh, James Hanson, Matt Duke, Nakhi Wells, Gary Jones) for £5.There is also a mask for Mark Lawn (Joint Chairman of BCFC). CORRIGAN BROTHERS CHANGE NAME IN HONOUR OF LETTERMACAWARD MAN MCHUGH was last modified: February 18th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Carl McHughCorrigan BrothersdonegalLettermacawardWEMBLEYlast_img read more

BROLLY – “TIME FOR KERRY TO GET OFF THAT HIGH HORSE”

first_imgJoe Brolly has said that if Tyrone introduced puke football then Kerry are the little girl from “The Exorcist”.Joe Brolly’s war of words with Kerry doesn’t look like ending anytime soon, and he has launched another stinging attack on them in his column with Gaelic Life. Brolly was on the receiving end of some stick from Kieran Donaghy at the end of last week’s All-Ireland final, because of an article he wrote a few months previous saying the production line was dead in Kerry.However, what seems to be irking Brolly is the belief from Kerry supporters or former players such as Pat Spillane that suggest Kerry won last week’s decider against Donegal by sticking to their traditional core principles. However, it was clear they engaged in a blanket defence strategy, which ultimately led to a very poor All-Ireland final with scores at a premium.Brolly has said that if Tyrone introduced puke football then Kerry were the little girl in “The Exorcist” whose head revolves as machine guns the walls with a torrent of vomit.Brolly wrote,  “Gaelic football is now a race to the bottom. The debate about system v more skilful individuals has been emphatically settled.“Jimmy’s monster is already sweeping through club football. “Now that it has the endorsement of the Kingdom, that process will accelerate.“They will celebrate in Kerry, but for the first time ever, no one else will.But no one outside of the county wants any part of Sunday’s joyless, ugly travesty. So, well done Kerry, but you can get off your high horse now.“Maybe it’s only puke football if someone else is playing it.BROLLY – “TIME FOR KERRY TO GET OFF THAT HIGH HORSE” was last modified: September 29th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Defencedonegalgaelic lifeJOE BROLLYKerrynewsSportSystemslast_img read more

supermodel 16 inch LIGHT BLONDE – i really like them but only 4 stars because ive only worn

first_imgPretty very good company and quick to offer with. . Shown colors are not actual, so i had to mail back again for a substitution which they did rapidly and competently.Rapidly delivery, outstanding thick hair which does not grow to be dry or brittle like some i have ordered, been making use of hair extensions for 5 decades and these are by considerably the most effective i have purchased and good price for dollars, would defo reccomend.Pretty very good company and quick to offer with. . Shown colors are not actual, so i had to mail back again for a substitution which they did rapidly and competently.I truly like them but only four stars since ive only worn. Ordered with categorical and acquired them three days following buying, bought the 16inch they are smooth and thick and blend very very well with my hair, my hair is a bit much more yellowy so just after i tone my genuine hair a bit more it will match beautifully. I definitely like them but only 4 stars since ive only worn them two times so am not confident if theyll previous long or get rid of xxxx.But they are lovely and comfortable and a authentic good colour match so fingers crossed. This is the to start with time i have purchased clip in extensions so i have nothing at all to evaluate them to, but they are wonderful and soft and a authentic very good color match so fingers crossed.I experienced to dye them since my hair is lilac, color took so perfectly, and they are however really comfortable. Delivery was tremendous swift as effectively. Way further than happy and unquestionably would recommend.I truly like them but only four stars since ive only worn. Ordered with categorical and acquired them three days following buying, bought the 16inch they are smooth and thick and blend very very well with my hair, my hair is a bit much more yellowy so just after i tone my genuine hair a bit more it will match beautifully. I definitely like them but only 4 stars since ive only worn them two times so am not confident if theyll previous long or get rid of xxxx.I favored them at very first swift shipping and delivery but just after 2 weeks theyre tatty and i cant use them unfortunately i wont be purchasing them all over again.I experienced to dye them since my hair is lilac, color took so perfectly, and they are however really comfortable. Delivery was tremendous swift as effectively. Way further than happy and unquestionably would recommend.Rapidly delivery, outstanding thick hair which does not grow to be dry or brittle like some i have ordered, been making use of hair extensions for 5 decades and these are by considerably the most effective i have purchased and good price for dollars, would defo reccomend.But they are lovely and comfortable and a authentic good colour match so fingers crossed. This is the to start with time i have purchased clip in extensions so i have nothing at all to evaluate them to, but they are wonderful and soft and a authentic very good color match so fingers crossed.At 1st they were attractive, i experienced to dye them to make them the exact colour as my hair and they dyed fantastic, nevertheless following sporting them a couple of moments they have gotten dry and knot up very easily generating them search and come to feel pretend. A good deal improved than some other folks i have experienced, but also not the very best i have had, i assume following time i will invest in some much more highly-priced and superior quality types which will very last for a longer time.Will reorder this correct product up coming time i will need some more hair. Really awesome quality hair, pretty and extended and thick to the ends. Experienced it for just about 3 months now, dyed it and styled it each individual working day and it is nonetheless going potent 🙂 also remarkable price, can shell out up to three times as substantially on the high road. At 1st they were attractive, i experienced to dye them to make them the exact colour as my hair and they dyed fantastic, nevertheless following sporting them a couple of moments they have gotten dry and knot up very easily generating them search and come to feel pretend. A good deal improved than some other folks i have experienced, but also not the very best i have had, i assume following time i will invest in some much more highly-priced and superior quality types which will very last for a longer time.These hair extensions are amazing. You get so considerably far more then you spend for. Not as smooth as the additional expensive models but most definitely thicker.100g is a lot enough for a full head.Will reorder this correct product up coming time i will need some more hair. Really awesome quality hair, pretty and extended and thick to the ends. Experienced it for just about 3 months now, dyed it and styled it each individual working day and it is nonetheless going potent 🙂 also remarkable price, can shell out up to three times as substantially on the high road.I favored them at very first swift shipping and delivery but just after 2 weeks theyre tatty and i cant use them unfortunately i wont be purchasing them all over again.These hair extensions are amazing. You get so considerably far more then you spend for. Not as smooth as the additional expensive models but most definitely thicker.100g is a lot enough for a full head.Reviews from purchasers :i really like them but only 4 stars because ive only worn Will reorder this exact product next time I need some more hairbut they are lovely and soft and a real good colour match so fingers crossedlast_img read more

Two Maoists killed in Sukma

first_imgThe security forces gunned down two alleged members of the outlawed Communist Party of India (Maoist) in Sukma district of south Chhattisgarh on Saturday.The encounter took place in Burkapal area of Sukma when the District Reserve Guard (Chhattisgarh police’s special anti-Maoist unit) and the Special Task Force were conducting an anti-Maoist operation in the area.The security forces also recovered 11 country-made weapons from the spot of the encounter suggesting some more Maoists may have been injured or killed.In a separate development, Maharashtra police found one more body of a Maoist in Gadchiroli district.“A decomposed body was found in the forest near Indravati river in Tadgoan forest area of Gadchiroli where an encounter had taken place on last Sunday. One AK-47 rifle was also recovered during a search operation in the area today. Today’s recovery has taken the total number Maoists killed in Kasansur encounter to 34,” Gadchiroli police said in a statement.Mr.Abhinav Deshmukh, the district Superintendent of Police, Gadchiroli, informed that 19 bodies have been identified so far and 14 bodies have been handed over to the relatives of the deceased.last_img read more