‘New’ giant octopus discovered in the Pacific

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Cryptic Species, Environment, Green, New Species, Oceans, Species Discovery, Wildlife Article published by Rhett Butler The world’s largest octopus — the giant Pacific octopus — is actually represented by more than one species.New research indicates there are at least two species of octopus housed under what is traditionally called the giant Pacific octopus.The new species is called the frilled giant Pacific octopus.The giant Pacific octopus can weigh up to 70 kilograms (150 pounds). The world’s largest octopus — the giant Pacific octopus — is actually represented by more than one species, according to new research led by an undergraduate student at Alaska Pacific University.The study, published in American Malacological Bulletin, describes a second species of the giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) based on DNA samples and visual observations of octopuses collected in shrimp pots laid by fishermen in Alaska’s Prince William Sound. The newly distinguished species is called the frilled giant Pacific octopus for the distinctive “frill” that runs the length of its body. A formal description of the species is forthcoming.The newly documented frilled giant Pacific octopus has two distinctive white marks on its head. Photo courtesy of David ScheelThe giant Pacific octopus (Enteroctopus dofleini) has only one white mark on its head. Photo courtesy of David ScheelThe visual confirmation of the new species was completed by Nate Hollenbeck, who undertook the research as his senior thesis at at Alaska Pacific University. Hollenbeck’s co-author is his advisor David Scheel.The findings aren’t a huge surprise, according to a story in Earther, which notes that “Scientists have suspected for decades that giant Pacific octopus might be an ‘umbrella name’ covering more than one species.”The newly documented frilled giant Pacific octopus. Photo courtesy of David ScheelThe results suggest that further research may yield more cryptic species currently classified under the giant Pacific octopus, whose range rings the Pacific from California to Japan.CITATION:Hollenbeck, N. and D. Scheel. 2017. Body patterns of the frilled giant Pacific octopus, a new species of octopus from Prince William Sound, AK. American Malacological Bulletin 35(2): 134-144.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Cambodia’s banteng-eating leopards edge closer to extinction, new study finds

first_imgIn just five years, the population density of Indochinese leopards within a protected area in eastern Cambodia has fallen from about 3 leopards per 100 square kilometers in 2009 to 1 leopard per 100 square kilometers in 2014, a new study has found.This is one of the lowest densities of leopards reported in Asia, researchers say.This statistic is worrying because the eastern Cambodian population is the last remaining breeding leopard population within a huge region spanning southeastern China, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam.Eastern Cambodia’s leopards are also part of the only leopard population in the world to prey predominantly on an animal weighing more than 500 kilograms — the banteng. For Cambodia’s last remaining Indochinese leopards (Panthera pardus delacouri), extinction could be just around the corner, a new study has found.The only breeding population of this leopard subspecies in Cambodia is believed to occur within a large protected area complex in a part of the country called the Eastern Plains Landscape (EPL). But in just five years, leopard density within one protected area in the EPL has fallen from about three leopards per 100 square kilometers (39 square miles) in 2009 to one leopard per 100 square kilometers in 2014, a team of scientists found.This is one of the lowest densities of leopards reported in Asia, researchers write in the recent study published in the Royal Society Open Science journal.“The low density means that this population of Indochinese leopard has a high risk of extirpation in the near future, unless effective conservation action is taken immediately,” said lead author Susana Rostro-García, a postdoctoral researcher at the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) at the University of Oxford, U.K.This decline is especially worrying because the Indochinese leopard has already been wiped out from 94 percent of its former range.“This population in eastern Cambodia is the last remaining breeding population within a huge region spanning southeastern China, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam,” said co-author Jan F. Kamler, Southeast Asia leopard program coordinator for Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization. “So it’s critically important to try and save this unique population before it goes extinct.”An Indochinese leopard passes a camera trap in the study site. Camera trap image courtesy of Panthera/WildCRU/WWF Cambodia/FA.The loss of Cambodia’s Indochinese leopards would deprive the world of a unique member of the leopard family.When the team analyzed leopard droppings collected from the study area, they found that the male leopard’s main prey was the massive, 500-kilogram-plus (1,100-pound-plus) rare wild cattle species called the banteng (Bos javanicus). This finding was unexpected, the researchers say.Although previous research has recorded instances of African leopards preying on large-sized prey like giraffe or eland, these animals comprise a very small proportion of the leopard’s diet, the authors write. Instead, leopards, which typically weigh less than 90 kilograms (198 pounds) prefer to prey on smaller animals weighing about 10 to 40 kilograms (22 to 88 pounds).By contrast, male Indochinese leopards in the eastern Cambodian study site appear to prey predominantly on an animal more than five times its mass, making this the only known leopard population in the world to do so.The leopards there could be targeting banteng because the large herbivore represents about 70 percent of the available ungulate biomass within the study site, Rostro-García said. Moreover, tigers, whose main prey was the banteng, went locally extinct in the landscape a decade ago, allowing leopards to take over as the apex predator.“Tigers kill and displace leopards, and previous research showed that when tigers are present, leopards consume smaller prey to avoid encounters with tigers,” Rostro-García said. “Thus, the leopards in eastern Cambodia likely changed their predatory behavior to include the banteng, the largest herbivore, which may have been previously off limits to them when tigers were present.”The Indochinese leopard’s main prey in the study area was banteng, a rare species of wild cattle. Camera trap image courtesy of Panthera/WildCRU/WWF Cambodia/FA.But only the male leopards seem to be consuming banteng, the team found. The female leopards preferred muntjac (genus Muntiacus), a small deer. This difference is likely because male leopards can grow up to 50 percent larger than females, the researchers say, suggesting that the banteng might be “too large and dangerous” for female leopards to prey upon, but not for the larger male leopards.Despite the availability of prey of all sizes, Cambodia’s leopards are on the verge of extinction. And poaching is to blame, the researchers say.“Our conclusion was based on evidence we collected during the study: The presence of considerably higher numbers of snares in the core zone compared to previous years, and the documentation of several snared animals, including leopard, in the core zone in recent years,” Rostro-García said. “Other possible explanations, such as prey declines and differences in methods across years, were not likely given that prey densities remained stable across years, and we used the same camera-trap methodologies as in the previous study.”Poachers pass by a camera trap. Camera trap image courtesy of Panthera/WildCRU/WWF Cambodia/FA.In fact, a study published last year reported that Southeast Asia was in the middle of a “snaring crisis.” Between 2010 and 2015, patrol teams removed more than 118,000 snares from just three protected areas in Cambodia, the researchers found.Hunters use these snares to meet the rising demands for bushmeat in Southeast Asia. However, snares kill indiscriminately, trapping not just smaller rodents and mammals, but also larger leopards and baby elephants.“Many areas are covered with thousands of snares set to catch wild pig and deer to supply bushmeat markets,” Kamler said. “Leopards and other wildlife are often caught in these snares as bycatch, and the valuable parts sold to traders.”To protect the last remaining Indochinese leopards in Cambodia, Panthera is focusing on increasing its monitoring efforts and expanding its survey areas. “We are also working with our collaborators, WWF Cambodia, WildCRU, and the Ministry of Environment, to help strengthen environmental laws in eastern Cambodia to develop strictly protected core zones and increase fines from poaching,” Kamler wrote in a blogpost.An Indochinese leopard passes a camera trap in the study site. Camera trap image courtesy of Panthera/WildCRU/WWF Cambodia/FA.Citation:Rostro-García, S., et al. (2018) An adaptable but threatened big cat: density, diet and prey selection of the Indochinese leopard (Panthera pardus delacouri) in eastern Cambodia. R. Soc. open sci. 2018 5 171187; DOI: 10.1098/rsos.171187 Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Leopards, Mammals, Poaching, Protected Areas, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

Two dozen Latin American countries sign agreement to protect environmental defenders

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Principle 10 treaty deals mainly with the defense of environmentalists, promoting transparency in public access to environmental information, and shoring up environmental democracy and justice.The principles were approved on March 4 in the so-called Escazú Agreement in Costa Rica, by 24 countries from around Latin America and the Caribbean. It must now be ratified by the member countries.Environmental activists have hailed it as a massive step forward in the protection of environmental defenders, in a region where such advocates face the greatest threats to their lives. A photograph of Berta Cáceres, a Honduran national who was murdered two years ago for fighting against a controversial hydroelectric project, stood out at the negotiating table in Escazú, Costa Rica. And it was there where a regional agreement on access to information, public participation and access to environmental justice, known as Principle 10, was approved.The presence of Cáceres’s image was a poignant reminder of a key aspect of this international treaty: special measures that governments should take to protect environmental defenders. Regionally, Latin America saw the most environmentalists killed anywhere in the world in 2017, according to Global Witness.The so-called Principle 10 brought together 24 representatives from Latin American and Caribbean countries in Costa Rica. Photo: DARThe Escazú Agreement (formally called the Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters in Latin America and the Caribbean) was approved on March 4. A total of 24 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have signed on, and it remains open for others to join.The commitments related to the protection of environmental defenders are set forth in Article 9 of the Escazú Agreement. The article, titled “Human Rights Defenders on Environmental Issues,” specifies that each country “guarantee a safe and propitious environment in which individuals, groups and organizations that promote and defend human rights in environmental matters can act without threats, restrictions and insecurity.”It also indicates that adequate and effective measures will be taken to recognize, protect and promote all the rights of human rights defenders in environmental matters. It commits to appropriate, effective and timely measures to prevent, investigate and punish attacks, threats or intimidation.A long road“This is a historic moment for Latin America and the Caribbean,” said Carole Excell, director of the Office of Environmental Democracy at the World Resources Institute (WRI). “The countries of the region have the opportunity to approve a legally binding environmental rights agreement that will not only help prevent and punish attacks against environmental defenders, but will also make it easier for millions of people to access environmental information and participate in the making decisions that affect their lives.”The process to reach the agreement began six years ago, Excell told Mongabay in an interview.“We have reached the end of an important negotiation because this treaty is the first time developing countries [have signed an] agreement that deals specifically with environmental rights, citizen participation and the right to justice,” she added.Andrea Sanhueza Echeverría, a representative of the public for Principle 10, said she believed the agreement would have real impact. Representatives of governments and civil society participate in the negotiations, the latter being called representatives of the public.“This agreement will change the rules of the game on how decisions are made in environmental matters in Latin America and the Caribbean,” Sanhueza said. “Once the [public] comes into force, it can be part of the decisions on projects and policies that will affect them.”Representatives of governments and civil society met to negotiate an agreement for environmental democracy. Photo: DARSanhueza said it was a binding agreement that governments must comply with legally once signed and ratified in each of their countries.“The region had already made considerable progress in terms of access to public information, but in terms of citizen participation, our countries still have very poor mechanisms,” she said.She also noted that the groundwork for the agreement began in 2012, when 10 countries committed to the process of environmental democracy. The negotiations that culminated in the new agreement began in 2016.As it stands, the agreement to protect environmental defenders is historic. “It will be the first international treaty in the world that recognizes the situation these people are living and offers guarantees for their better protection,” Sanhueza said.The negotiations of Principle 10 began in 2016 and culminated on March 4, 2018. Photo: Natalia Gómez.Nations commitFor the treaty to enter into force, 11 of the 24 governments of the nations that approved the agreement must ratify it in their respective countries. The committed countries are expected to sign it by September 2020. In some countries, including Costa Rica, Chile and Colombia, which are scheduled to hold elections this year, ratification of the agreement will depend on the new government that comes into power.Danielle Andrade, a lawyer from Jamaica with who represents clients in domestic civil society cases, said she was optimistic about the agreement’s impact in her country. “This treaty will be able to strengthen its laws, especially those that allow the public to participate in the decisions that affect the environment,” Andrade said.Patricia Gualinga, Kichwa Sarayaku leader from Ecuador, threatened for denouncing the violation of the rights of the Amazonian peoples. Photo: Courtesy Patricia Gualinga.A spokesperson for the Peruvian Ministry of Environment told Mongabay that throughout the negotiation process, Peru favored a legally binding agreement. The agreement still has to be presented to Peru’s congress for ratification.Peru also joined Costa Rica and Paraguay in supporting the proposal to recognize the term “human rights defenders in environmental matters.”Peru’s approval of the Escazú Agreement comes shortly after it signed off on its National Human Rights Plan 2017-2021, on Jan. 31. The latter includes the design and execution of policies in favor of special protection groups, such as human rights defenders. Peru says it is committed to generating a registry of risk situations for human rights defenders and implementing a mechanism for their protection.The Deputy Minister of Strategic Development of Natural Resources of Peru, Fernando León Morales, participated in the negotiations in Costa Rica. Photo: DAR.Isabel Calle, director of the Environmental Policy and Governance Program of the Peruvian Society of Environmental Law, describes the Escazú Agreement as an international instrument that regulates standards for access to information and environmental justice in Latin America and the Caribbean.Discrepancies in treaty approvalNatalia Gómez, from the Colombian NGO Asociación Ambiente y Sociedad and a participant at the negotiations, said her country had “been regressive” in the negotiations, even though it signed the base document in 2013.Gómez, who is an expert on environmental democracy, said Colombia backed down on two issues during the talks in Costa Rica. One dealt with a monitoring committee that proposed that any citizen could monitor and communicate to this committee in compliance with the treaty in their country. Colombia requested that that article be deleted.“Mexico also adopted this position, but after negotiations a consensus was reached, but the paragraph that you can receive communications about compliance with the agreement was excluded,” Gómez said.Guadalupe Campanur, from the indigenous community of Cherán, in Mexico, was murdered on January 17, 2018. Source: Facebook.Another issue flagged by the Colombian government was related to the request to include an article that allows governments to have so-called “reservations.” This allows each government the possibility to sign the agreement but choose which articles of the treaty it accepts and which to not adopt. Thus, each country can pick and choose how the agreement is applied in its jurisdiction, Gómez said.Colombia and Mexico are among the countries with the highest number of murders and threats to environmentalists, according to a 2017 Global Witness report. So the bid to allow countries not to ratify some articles worried the other governments and environmentalists at the negotiations.In the end, the push to include such an article faltered, and the Escazú Agreement was approved excluding any reservations.“Colombia has regressed on these issues because, although our constitution has many mechanisms for citizen participation in environmental matters, it is currently going through a crisis as more and more communities carry out prior consultation processes for mining in their territory,” Gómez said. “I think the government is worried about this situation.”Although she questioned whether everything that civil society participants had hoped for was achieved, Gómez said she considered the Escazú Agreement was a hopeful advance.The countries that approved the Agreement of Principle 10 must now ratify the treaty in their respective nations. Photo: DAR.Included among the specific actions for governments to take are the recognition of environmentalists’ work, the non-criminalization of their actions, and the guarantee of access to information. In many cases, socio-environmental conflicts are caused by a lack of information on the projects within a community.Vanessa Cueto, coordinator for governance and environmental management at the Peruvian NGO Law, Environment and Natural Resources, said the clause referring to environmental defenders was not considered at the beginning of the negotiations and it was civil society that encouraged its adoption. Cueto said transparency in information was often not taken into account, despite the fact that timely access is important to help prevent rights violations.“It is a subject that is violated every day, not only in the prior consultation processes, but in the environmental impact study processes for megaprojects,” she said. “It is important that local populations have timely information from the promulgation of the investment project and we hope that one of the effects is the reduction of environmental conflicts.”Now it is up to the governments to ratify the agreement so that the document signed in Costa Rica is translated into concrete actions in the defense of environmental rights.Banner image: The countries that approved the Agreement of Principle 10 must now ratify the treaty in their respective nations. Photo: DAR.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on March 8, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Rainforest, Environmental Activism, Environmental Heroes, Forest People, Forests, Governance, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Frogs may be ‘fighting back’ against deadly pandemic

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Amphibians, Animals, Chytridiomycosis, Environment, Extinction, Featured, Frogs, Fungi, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Herps, Mass Extinction, Research, Trade, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade Chytridiomycosis is caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a type of chytrid fungus.Scientists believe Bd originated in Africa, and has spread around the world where it has contributed to the declines and extinctions of at least 200 amphibian species globally.But a new study finds populations of several Panamanian frog species exposed to Bd appear to have gained resistance to the pathogen. Previous research indicates U.S. frogs may also have developed resistance after exposure.The authors of the study say their findings offer hope for the survival of amphibians around the world. But they caution that detecting the remnant populations that survive infection and helping them persist and proliferate will require extensive monitoring efforts. A deadly disease that has ripped through frog populations around the world, contributing to huge declines in many species and the outright extinction of several others, has shown little sign of slowing its onslaught since scientists first detected it in the 1990s. But recent research indicates some frogs are showing increased resistance to the pathogen, giving biologists and conservationists hope that infected populations may be able to recover.Chytridiomycosis is caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), a species from a group of fungi called chytrids. Members of this group are usually found on underwater decaying plant or animal matter, but Bd is different – it feeds on the skin of living amphibians, primarily frogs. Infection interferes with a frog’s ability to take in water and air through its skin, often leading to death.Scientists believe Bd originated in Africa and first spread around the world due to the trade in African clawed frogs (Xenopus laevis), which are commonly used as laboratory research animals. American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus), which show low susceptibility to the disease and have become an invasive species in many parts of the world, have also been implicated as carriers. In addition, scientists detected Bd on bird feathers, opening up another wide route of transmission. Today, Bd is found on every continent where amphibians live.The African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) is an aquatic frog species widely used in research. Photo by H. Krisp via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY SA 3.0)“This pathogen infects many different amphibian species — sometimes without causing disease — and can survive in the environment outside of its host, so it’s not going away anytime soon,” said Allison Byrne, a doctoral student at the University of California, Berkeley who is studying chytridiomycosis.Infection can be devastating to frog populations, killing some off completely. In Australia alone, scientists believe the fungus was directly responsible for the extinction of four species. Worldwide, Bd has been implicated in the decline or extinction of at least 200 amphibian species, and some biologists peg it as the driving force behind the largest disease-caused loss of biodiversity ever recorded.But there may be hope for frogs faced with Bd. A new study released yesterday in the journal Science finds populations of several frog species in Panama appear to be gaining resistance to the pathogen. The study was conducted by scientists at research institutions in the U.S. and Panama.“In this study, we made the exciting discovery that a handful of amphibian species – some of which were thought to have been completely wiped out – are persisting, and may even be recovering, after lethal disease outbreaks,” study lead author Jamie Voyles, a disease ecologist at the University of Nevada, Reno, said in a statement. “We wanted to understand how it was happening. Was it a change in the pathogen, the frogs, or both?”Voyles, Byrne and their colleagues looked at pathogen and frog host samples collected in Panama before, during and after infection by Bd. They found that while the fungus is still as deadly as it was before the outbreak, frogs now appear to be more likely to survive after infection.“The evidence suggests that the pathogen has not changed. It’s possible that the hosts have evolved better defenses over a relatively short period of time” she said. “We found that nearly a decade after the outbreak, the fungal pathogen is still equally deadly, but the frogs in Panama are surviving and may have better defenses against it. This suggests that some of Panama’s frogs may be fighting back.”Panama’s Atelopus varius has been affected by the Bd fungus, and is listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN. But researchers have detected resistance to the fungus in wild A. varius frogs that survived exposure. Photo by Brian Gratwicke, SCBIAtelopus varius was given its “varius” moniker because the species exhibits a wide range of colors and patterns. Photo by Brian Gratwicke, SCBIAtelopus varius has several common names, including variable harlequin frog, clown frog, golden frog, painted frog and Veragoa stubfoot toad. Photo by Brian Gratwicke, SCBIChytridiomycosis is the main driver of Atelopus varius decline. But the species is also threatened by habitat loss from deforestation and predation by invasive trout. Photo by Brian Gratwicke, SCBIAmphibian skin secretions are full of antimicrobial substances that help ward off disease. When Voyles and her team looked at the skin secretions of wild frogs that survived a Bd epidemic, they found that they slowed the growth of the fungus much more effectively than secretions from captive frogs that had not yet encountered the pathogen. They say this indicates frogs may gain resistance only after being exposed to Bd.This, say conservationists, may have important implications for gauging the impacts of Bd, as well as relocation and reintroduction programs for species in affected areas. One of these is the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project run by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), which collected healthy frogs before the outbreak in the hopes of releasing them back into the wild.“We learned to breed them in captivity and are now releasing Atelopus varius in areas where the epidemic has passed, so it is extremely important for us to realize that the defenses of these frogs may be weaker than the defenses of frogs that survived the epidemic in the wild,” said Roberto Ibáñez, study coauthor, STRI staff scientist and in-country director of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project. “Captive breeding programs must consider breeding and releasing frogs with stronger defenses, and testing their skin secretions against the fungus is one useful tool to see which frogs are more resistant.”STRI staff scientist and in-country director of the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project Roberto Ibañez collects frogs for captive breeding. Photo by Sean Mattson, STRIInside the Panama Amphibian Conservation and Rescue Center in Gamboa, Panama, program manager, Jorge Guerrel, feeds frogs that have been taken into captivity to protect them from the chytrid fungal disease sweeping the country. Photo by Brian Gratwicke, SCBIOn Jan. 17, 2018, Smithsonian researchers released approximately 500 frogs at First Quantum Minerals’s concession site in Panama’s Colon province as a first step toward full-scale reintroduction of this species. This individual is carrying a radio transmitter so that it can be tracked by researchers after the release. Photo by Brian Gratwicke, SCBIThis study isn’t the first to detect the emergence of Bd resistance in frogs. In 2016, scientists discovered that a population of endangered Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frogs in the U.S. appeared to have developed resistance to Bd after infection by the fungus (together with an influx of nonnative trout) nearly wiped them out.The authors of the Panama study say their findings offer hope for the survival of amphibians around the world. But they caution that even if this resistance trend holds for most species, detecting the remnants that survive infection and helping them persist and proliferate will require extensive monitoring efforts.“Clarifying how disease outbreaks subside will help us predict, and respond to, other emerging pathogens in plants, wildlife – and in humans,” Voyles said. “These are increasingly important goals in a time when rapid globalization has increased the rate of introduction of pathogens to new host populations.” Citation:Voyles, J., Woodhams, D.C., Saenz, V et al. 2018. Shifts in disease dynamics in a tropical amphibian assemblage are not due to pathogen attenuation. Science. 10.1126/science.aao4806Banner image of Atelopus varius by Brian GratwickeFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

At least 4 dead in Mahaicony accident

first_imgAt least four persons have been confirmed dead in the accident at Fairfield, Mahaicony, East Coast Demerara, Region Five.Guyana Times understands that a Route 50 minibus collided with a beverage distribution truck.Both vehicles were said to be speeding at the time of the accident.The four individuals died on the spot. Other persons were rushed to the hospital.last_img

DONEGAL STONE COMPANY BLOOMS AT CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW

first_imgPhoto Caption : Daniel Mc Monagle, Dan McMonagle and Michael McMonagle, McMonagle Stone.A Donegal company has become one of the largest manufacturers and suppliers of natural stone products in Ireland and are now the preferred stone and paving supplier to international award winning garden designers and landscape architects.Based in Mountcharles, McMonagle Stone products were an integral part of award winning designs at Bloom 2015, with their Donegal sandstone and Quartzite stone central to garden design that won Gold in a number of categories and Best in Show.This year, the famous garden designer, Paul Martin will be exhibiting at the Chelsea Flower Show using McMonagle Stone products as part of his garden design. Established in the 1970’s, McMonagle Stone is family business which has grown from solely producing and supplying stone locally for domestic builds to a company that sees demand for its products from international markets.Daniel Mc Monagle, Company Director, said, “We invested in state of the art machinery and are now supply paving stone for commercial, restoration and landscaping projects to countries all over the world. In recent years our focus has been on developing new products from our leftover materials, which we now package and export as part of the sand and gravel side of our business. The support we have received from Údarás na Gaeltachta has been invaluable and has helped us to refocus our business towards exporting.”“Our Donegal Quartzite products, along with our sandstone and granite range are prestigious and sought after. The quartzite that we produce from our quarry based near Gleann Cholm Cille is unique to anything found anywhere in the world. Its unique technical properties, the colour and solidity of the material, have made it a very popular product which is high in demand. As soon as the lorries leave the quarries, the materials are brought to our finishing factory at Mountcharles, where they are all carefully cleaned, cut to customer requirements, packaged and dispatched. All our staff pride themselves on their work and every one of them has their own individual roles, which makes our running operation very efficient,” said Daniel McMonagle.The company currently employs 83 people, between its quarry operations, finishing factory and showrooms in Mountcharles, Dublin and London. “Working with high profile and award winning garden designers and architects has opened up new markets internationally for us, especially within the U.K.”“These garden designers work on large-scale urban design and landscaping, state commissions and show gardens for international clients. We also work with them on commercial landscaping for hotels and resorts, rural country estates and private residential gardens, and our on demand supply and distribution makes it easier for them to have us as their partner.” says Michael McMonagle.“We have also been very fortunate to have working with us a number of highly skilled local craftsmen who have been involved in stone masonry for generations. I don’t think that there is anywhere else in the world that you will find skills like we have here in Donegal. To boast that we, a company from South West Donegal, are the preferred stone supplier for award winning and famous landscaping designers and architects all over the world, is an achievement that we are all proud of,” he said.DONEGAL STONE COMPANY BLOOMS AT CHELSEA FLOWER SHOW was last modified: April 25th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Chelsea Flower ShowdonegalMcMonagle StoneMOUNTCHARLESlast_img read more