New app hopes to reduce wildlife deaths on India’s roads, railway lines

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Citizen Science, Conservation, Conservation Technology, data collection, Endangered Species, Forests, handheld, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Infrastructure, Roadkill, Roads, Technology And Conservation, Wildlife, Wildtech Roadkills, a newly launched Android app, lets users in India record information on deaths of animals — both domestic and wild — on roads or railway lines, and upload geotagged photos.Such roadkill data can be useful for both researchers and people planning infrastructure projects across the country, conservationists say.The app data can help identify what sections of roads and railway lines animals use the most, for instance, which could in turn help guide measures that would reduce or prevent wildlife deaths.Warning: Some photos may be disturbing or graphic. India’s growing network of roads and railway lines, often crisscrossing forests and wild lands, has turned deadly for wildlife. In December last year, for example, an 8-year-old male tiger died in a road accident on a four-lane-highway in the state of Maharashtra, while a speeding train killed five elephants in the state of Assam.Countless other animals, from frogs and snakes, to birds and jackals, frequently collide with high-speed cars or trains in India, but their deaths go unnoticed, unrecorded.A newly launched mobile-based app hopes to tackle this problem.Roadkills, an Android app currently supported by the Wildlife Conservation Trust (WCT), lets people record information on deaths of animals, both domestic and wild, on roads or railway lines, and upload geotagged photos. Such data can be useful not just for researchers, according to Milind Pariwakam, a wildlife biologist with the WCT, but for people planning infrastructure projects across the country. The app data can help identify what sections of roads and railway lines animals use the most, for instance, which could in turn help guide measures that would reduce or prevent their deaths.“Small research teams can only monitor a few roads at a time,” Pariwakam told Mongabay. “But development is going to happen everywhere, and the scale of this problem is so huge that resources are always going to be limited no matter how big an organization you are. So we thought ‘Why don’t we mobilize citizens to collect roadkill data instead?’”An 8-year-old male tiger was hit and killed by a speeding vehicle on Dec. 29, 2017, on a national highway in Maharashtra state. Photo by Sheetal Navgire/WCT.Users can see all of the app data on a map on the Roadkills website. And those wanting to analyze the data themselves, or use it for other purposes, can write to the team, a press release notes, adding that “the data will be shared free of cost under a Creative Commons license.”While the team’s long-term plan is to use the data to reduce roadkill, their immediate objective is to grow the user base and keep the users engaged. “Only then can data actually start flowing in and some action be taken,” Pariwakam said.But users should be careful while using the app, he cautioned. “People drive fast on highways, which is also the reason for roadkills. So while recording a roadkill would be nice, your own safety is of utmost importance,” he said.Stopping on some roads, such as parts of national highways that pass through some national parks, is also illegal. And people should be mindful of not breaking the law to collect data, he added.The team is currently working on an iOS version of the app, which they say will be out within the next couple of weeks.“We call upon other wildlife conservation organizations to join this initiative and make the data collection effort larger and more inclusive,” said Anish Andheria, the WCT president. “The data will be made available for better planning of roads and railway lines for a wildlife-friendly and better society.”A dead jungle cat on an Indian highway. Photo by Vishal Bansod/WCT.Indian fox roadkill on a highway. Photo by Anish Andheria/WCT.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Two dozen Latin American countries sign agreement to protect environmental defenders

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Principle 10 treaty deals mainly with the defense of environmentalists, promoting transparency in public access to environmental information, and shoring up environmental democracy and justice.The principles were approved on March 4 in the so-called Escazú Agreement in Costa Rica, by 24 countries from around Latin America and the Caribbean. It must now be ratified by the member countries.Environmental activists have hailed it as a massive step forward in the protection of environmental defenders, in a region where such advocates face the greatest threats to their lives. A photograph of Berta Cáceres, a Honduran national who was murdered two years ago for fighting against a controversial hydroelectric project, stood out at the negotiating table in Escazú, Costa Rica. And it was there where a regional agreement on access to information, public participation and access to environmental justice, known as Principle 10, was approved.The presence of Cáceres’s image was a poignant reminder of a key aspect of this international treaty: special measures that governments should take to protect environmental defenders. Regionally, Latin America saw the most environmentalists killed anywhere in the world in 2017, according to Global Witness.The so-called Principle 10 brought together 24 representatives from Latin American and Caribbean countries in Costa Rica. Photo: DARThe Escazú Agreement (formally called the Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters in Latin America and the Caribbean) was approved on March 4. A total of 24 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have signed on, and it remains open for others to join.The commitments related to the protection of environmental defenders are set forth in Article 9 of the Escazú Agreement. The article, titled “Human Rights Defenders on Environmental Issues,” specifies that each country “guarantee a safe and propitious environment in which individuals, groups and organizations that promote and defend human rights in environmental matters can act without threats, restrictions and insecurity.”It also indicates that adequate and effective measures will be taken to recognize, protect and promote all the rights of human rights defenders in environmental matters. It commits to appropriate, effective and timely measures to prevent, investigate and punish attacks, threats or intimidation.A long road“This is a historic moment for Latin America and the Caribbean,” said Carole Excell, director of the Office of Environmental Democracy at the World Resources Institute (WRI). “The countries of the region have the opportunity to approve a legally binding environmental rights agreement that will not only help prevent and punish attacks against environmental defenders, but will also make it easier for millions of people to access environmental information and participate in the making decisions that affect their lives.”The process to reach the agreement began six years ago, Excell told Mongabay in an interview.“We have reached the end of an important negotiation because this treaty is the first time developing countries [have signed an] agreement that deals specifically with environmental rights, citizen participation and the right to justice,” she added.Andrea Sanhueza Echeverría, a representative of the public for Principle 10, said she believed the agreement would have real impact. Representatives of governments and civil society participate in the negotiations, the latter being called representatives of the public.“This agreement will change the rules of the game on how decisions are made in environmental matters in Latin America and the Caribbean,” Sanhueza said. “Once the [public] comes into force, it can be part of the decisions on projects and policies that will affect them.”Representatives of governments and civil society met to negotiate an agreement for environmental democracy. Photo: DARSanhueza said it was a binding agreement that governments must comply with legally once signed and ratified in each of their countries.“The region had already made considerable progress in terms of access to public information, but in terms of citizen participation, our countries still have very poor mechanisms,” she said.She also noted that the groundwork for the agreement began in 2012, when 10 countries committed to the process of environmental democracy. The negotiations that culminated in the new agreement began in 2016.As it stands, the agreement to protect environmental defenders is historic. “It will be the first international treaty in the world that recognizes the situation these people are living and offers guarantees for their better protection,” Sanhueza said.The negotiations of Principle 10 began in 2016 and culminated on March 4, 2018. Photo: Natalia Gómez.Nations commitFor the treaty to enter into force, 11 of the 24 governments of the nations that approved the agreement must ratify it in their respective countries. The committed countries are expected to sign it by September 2020. In some countries, including Costa Rica, Chile and Colombia, which are scheduled to hold elections this year, ratification of the agreement will depend on the new government that comes into power.Danielle Andrade, a lawyer from Jamaica with who represents clients in domestic civil society cases, said she was optimistic about the agreement’s impact in her country. “This treaty will be able to strengthen its laws, especially those that allow the public to participate in the decisions that affect the environment,” Andrade said.Patricia Gualinga, Kichwa Sarayaku leader from Ecuador, threatened for denouncing the violation of the rights of the Amazonian peoples. Photo: Courtesy Patricia Gualinga.A spokesperson for the Peruvian Ministry of Environment told Mongabay that throughout the negotiation process, Peru favored a legally binding agreement. The agreement still has to be presented to Peru’s congress for ratification.Peru also joined Costa Rica and Paraguay in supporting the proposal to recognize the term “human rights defenders in environmental matters.”Peru’s approval of the Escazú Agreement comes shortly after it signed off on its National Human Rights Plan 2017-2021, on Jan. 31. The latter includes the design and execution of policies in favor of special protection groups, such as human rights defenders. Peru says it is committed to generating a registry of risk situations for human rights defenders and implementing a mechanism for their protection.The Deputy Minister of Strategic Development of Natural Resources of Peru, Fernando León Morales, participated in the negotiations in Costa Rica. Photo: DAR.Isabel Calle, director of the Environmental Policy and Governance Program of the Peruvian Society of Environmental Law, describes the Escazú Agreement as an international instrument that regulates standards for access to information and environmental justice in Latin America and the Caribbean.Discrepancies in treaty approvalNatalia Gómez, from the Colombian NGO Asociación Ambiente y Sociedad and a participant at the negotiations, said her country had “been regressive” in the negotiations, even though it signed the base document in 2013.Gómez, who is an expert on environmental democracy, said Colombia backed down on two issues during the talks in Costa Rica. One dealt with a monitoring committee that proposed that any citizen could monitor and communicate to this committee in compliance with the treaty in their country. Colombia requested that that article be deleted.“Mexico also adopted this position, but after negotiations a consensus was reached, but the paragraph that you can receive communications about compliance with the agreement was excluded,” Gómez said.Guadalupe Campanur, from the indigenous community of Cherán, in Mexico, was murdered on January 17, 2018. Source: Facebook.Another issue flagged by the Colombian government was related to the request to include an article that allows governments to have so-called “reservations.” This allows each government the possibility to sign the agreement but choose which articles of the treaty it accepts and which to not adopt. Thus, each country can pick and choose how the agreement is applied in its jurisdiction, Gómez said.Colombia and Mexico are among the countries with the highest number of murders and threats to environmentalists, according to a 2017 Global Witness report. So the bid to allow countries not to ratify some articles worried the other governments and environmentalists at the negotiations.In the end, the push to include such an article faltered, and the Escazú Agreement was approved excluding any reservations.“Colombia has regressed on these issues because, although our constitution has many mechanisms for citizen participation in environmental matters, it is currently going through a crisis as more and more communities carry out prior consultation processes for mining in their territory,” Gómez said. “I think the government is worried about this situation.”Although she questioned whether everything that civil society participants had hoped for was achieved, Gómez said she considered the Escazú Agreement was a hopeful advance.The countries that approved the Agreement of Principle 10 must now ratify the treaty in their respective nations. Photo: DAR.Included among the specific actions for governments to take are the recognition of environmentalists’ work, the non-criminalization of their actions, and the guarantee of access to information. In many cases, socio-environmental conflicts are caused by a lack of information on the projects within a community.Vanessa Cueto, coordinator for governance and environmental management at the Peruvian NGO Law, Environment and Natural Resources, said the clause referring to environmental defenders was not considered at the beginning of the negotiations and it was civil society that encouraged its adoption. Cueto said transparency in information was often not taken into account, despite the fact that timely access is important to help prevent rights violations.“It is a subject that is violated every day, not only in the prior consultation processes, but in the environmental impact study processes for megaprojects,” she said. “It is important that local populations have timely information from the promulgation of the investment project and we hope that one of the effects is the reduction of environmental conflicts.”Now it is up to the governments to ratify the agreement so that the document signed in Costa Rica is translated into concrete actions in the defense of environmental rights.Banner image: The countries that approved the Agreement of Principle 10 must now ratify the treaty in their respective nations. Photo: DAR.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on March 8, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Rainforest, Environmental Activism, Environmental Heroes, Forest People, Forests, Governance, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Special judiciary on environmental crimes established in Peru

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker The majority of crimes correspond to illegal mining and illegal logging, two activities that seriously affect the region and that so far in 2018 account for 53 complaints.One of the emblematic cases is related to the regional governor Luis Otsuka Salazar, who has two complaints about illegal mining and negligence in the performance of his duties.Aside from the court in Madre de Dios, experts hope to also see courts in other regions of Peru, including Loreto, Ucayali, Cusco, Piura, Lima and San Martin. On April 1 the first specialized court on environmental issues was launched in Madre de Dios, Peru. The region currently has the highest number of complaints of environmental crimes in the entire country, Julio César Guzmán Mendoza, the public prosecutor specialized in environmental crimes, told Mongabay.“As of February 20, 2018, we have 2,983 active environmental complaints in the judicial district of Madre de Dios,” Guzmán explained. “Of the approximately 20,000 cases in all of Peru almost 3,000 correspond to this region.” Complaints to the prosecutor’s office and related investigations include cases from 2009 through February 2018.Illegal mining is one of the most common environmental crimes in Madre de Dios. Photo by Rhett Butler/Mongabay.Most of the environmental crimes that occur in the region are related to illegal mining and logging, said Guzmán. But we must also add related crimes such as environmental pollution and deforestation.Illegal mining and damage to forestsOf the 64 cases presented so far this year, 15 complaints correspond specifically to illegal mining crimes and 38 refer to crimes against forests. The other 11 are linked to illicit trafficking of chemical inputs and use of machinery in illegal mining, environmental pollution, degradation of protected flora and fauna, and illegal trafficking of forest products.In 2017, of the 491 current cases, 97 are specifically related to illegal mining and 211 for deforestation, that is, 62 percent or 308 of the cases, correspond to these two environmental problems in the region: mining and illegal logging.Last year, in addition to the aforementioned crimes, there were reports of illegal trafficking of species, partly due to public officials granting illegal rights, among other crimes.For the prosecutor, one of the emblematic cases of Madre de Dios is linked to the regional governor Luis Otsuka Salazar, who has had a complaint about illegal mining against him since 2013. The complaint is in two courts, the transitory environmental preparatory investigation court of Cusco and the fourth preparatory investigation court specialized in environmental crimes of Madre de Dios.One of the areas affected by illegal logging is the buffer zone of the Tambopata National Reserve. Photo courtesy of Mininter.In addition, since 2016 the regional governor has also been investigated for the illegal granting of territorial rights, a process that is already in the fourth preparatory investigation court of Madre de Dios.In this case, the complaint was based on an audit report from the Office of the Comptroller General of the Republic, which revealed the negligence and non-compliance of its functions as a regional authority.As for other emblematic cases, although all are important for the prosecutor, he highlighted those related to illegal mining in the sector called La Pampa or those of the native Tres Islas community.Entrapment in environmental justicePublic prosecutor Guzmán considers that the problem of environmental injustice in Peru can be clearly observed in Madre de Dios, where there is a conflict between the excessive burden of processes and the few assignments of prosecutors and attorneys to deal with them.“Although this new environmental court is a step forward, the problem of the justice system in Peru will not be solved by appointing a new judge or opening a new court,” Guzmán said.He also explained that the problem is not judicial, instead, it is due to the high burden to which prosecutors and attorneys are subject to, which leads to deficiencies in the investigations. “When there are deficient investigations, the judges are forced to release the defendants. And why does this happen? Because of a large amount of procedural burden which prevents further investigations.”Deforestation affects forest concessions in Madre de Dios. Owners must deal with illegal logging. Photo by Jack Lo Lau/Mongabay.In this regard, he mentioned that the office of the Specialized Attorney for Environmental Crimes of the Ministry of the Environment, which he directs, has a staff of eight lawyers for the 20,000 complaints that exist throughout Peru, including the 3,000 in Madre de Dios.In an interview with Mongabay, the president of the Superior Court of Justice of Madre de Dios, Kori Paulet Silva, said that currently there are only 200 cases prosecuted in Madre de Dios and that these are in the preparatory investigation stage in charge of the magistrates who work in the region.“Most of the complaints are still under investigation in the prosecutor’s offices specialized in environmental matters and these have not yet been prosecuted, so we have a low number of cases admitted to the Judiciary,” Paulet Silva explained, reaffirming that the entrapment is presented in the investigation stage, as he says, because in many cases the perpetrators of the crime are not identified, since these occur in remote fields and forests of the region. “If they don’t find the ones responsible for the crimes, and if the investigation does not move forward, then it does not advance towards its judicialization.”Paulet Silva indicated that the criminal activity against the environment is alarming in the region and that most of the cases are related to illegal mining, the same that drags other environmental crimes. “The immense wealth of Madre de Dios, which should be the engine for its development is, unfortunately, the entrance for underdevelopment,” he said.The new environmental courtPaulet Silva said he has some doubts about the new Specialized Court on Environmental Matters, including that the rule does not specify whether a judge will be in charge of a preparatory investigation or a judge for trial. The difference is that the first one is in charge of resolving the accusation requirements of the prosecutors, that is, reviewing the files and approving them so that they can enter the trial. The second one carries the judgments that lead to sanctions.Illegal and informal mining has already deforested more than 2,500 hectares of forest in Madre de Dios and pollutes the rivers with mercury. Photo: SPDA.The resolution of the Judicial Branch published on Jan. 24 in the newspaper El Peruano, states that, “The aforesaid court will have criminal, administrative litigation and constitutional environmental jurisdiction.”Paulet Silva indicated that he has already made the corresponding consultation with the executive directorate of the judiciary and is now awaiting a response. However, he said that this case could use a magistrate dedicated to applying the sanctions since Madre de Dios already has a preparatory investigation office that looks at environmental issues.A comprehensive vision of justice in PeruAlicia Abanto, assistant director for the Environment, Public Services and Indigenous Peoples at the Ombudsman’s Office, said that the creation of the new court is an appropriate measure adopted by the judiciary, especially in the region most affected by illegal mining.MMAP satellite images show deforestation in La Pampa, in Madre de Dios. Image via MAAP/Planet.However, she reflected on the complexity and role of other institutions that should contribute so that a judge can have all the elements to properly sanction the environmental crime.“The prosecution of crime and punishment is not only a function of the judge but also a task of the public ministry, prosecutors, police and other government agencies such as the Ministry of Energy and Mining or the Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation, to mention some related to environmental issues,” Abanto said.In relation to the overburdening of the Environmental Prosecutor’s Office, Abanto said that it would be convenient for the government to strengthen it with more resources and that also other prosecutors — Energy and Mining, of Agriculture, of Health — should be involved in the defense of the environment. “The protection of the environment is not only the responsibility of the Ministry of the Environment but of multiple sectors,” she said.Jean Pierre Araujo, lawyer of the forestry program of the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (also known by its Spanish acronym SPDA), considered that the decision of the Judicial Power is in addition to the decision made by the Peruvian government in 2008, when the Specialized Attorney’s Offices for the Environment were created (also known by its acronym in Spanish, FEMA). “At that time we saw how there was an explosion of environmental complaints,” he explained.The expert of the SPDA stressed that this is a reform that follows from the Strategic Plan of the Environmental System of the Judiciary, approved in 2017 and in force until 2021. “It is a policy document that justifies these changes and allows the Judiciary, progressively, to improve the standards of knowledge and specialization in environmental matters.”However, he said that the courts for environmental crimes should also be established in other regions such as Loreto, Ucayali, Cusco, Piura, Lima and San Martin, among others. “The Strategic Plan includes nine priority regions for the establishment of environmental courts, but this year only one will be launched,” he explained.For his part, Mariano Castro Sánchez-Moreno, former vice minister of environmental management of the Ministry of Environment and ow a professor at the law school of the Catholic University of Peru, believes that the actions of the justice system in Peru have some gaps that must be overcome, such as the specialization.The former vice minister said that the treatment of environmental issues, “requires a sensitive management to what is happening.”“In addition, a knowledge of the legal matter to be treated in all its complexity,” he said. “Decisions should be taken considering the particularities that criminal environmental issues have.”He agreed with the other experts that the justice system, in general, should be strengthened. “The remediation and environmental rehabilitation are part of the system. The activity that has environmental prosecutors, the police and the Directorate General of Captaincies and Coast Guard, which is responsible for monitoring the rivers must have the right elements to perform their work in the right conditions,” concluded the expert.Banner image: La Pampa is another area destroyed by illegal mining in Madre de Dios. Photo courtesy of the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on February 23, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Amazon, Deforestation, Environmental Crime, Featured, Forests, Governance, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Visually challenged chess player’s feat goes unnoticed

first_imgThe sporting feat of a budding visually challenged chess sensation has gone completely unnoticed and unrewarded at a time when stellar performances of Odia athletes in the just-concluded Asian Games in Indonesia were widely acclaimed both by the State government and the private sector. Twenty-year-old Soundarya Kumar Pradhan won a silver medal at the 10th IBCA World Individual Junior Chess Championship for the Blind and Visually Impaired held in Poland in the third week of August. His feat assumes even greater significance considering the financial and infrastructure obstacles he faced in his journey from Boden in Odisha’s Nuapada district – one of the poorest and most backward regions of the country. “For a visually challenged, it was never easy to travel to Poland and compete with the best in the game. It hurts when nobody comes forward and pats your back when you bring laurels for the country against all odds,” rued Mr. Soundarya. He was a born with Leber congenital amaurosis, a disease genetically passed through families. It, however, did not deter him from dreaming. Initiated into chess at the age of four, Mr. Soundarya has been performing consistently in the game. He emerged as the champion at the national level on a couple of occasions and also won the bronze at the Asia Pacific Chess Championship for the Blind and Visually Impaired held in Karnataka in 2017 before clinching the silver last month.When Mr. Soundarya was finally felicitated by Lex Publicio, a Bhubaneswar-based law firm, here on Monday, he said it would be difficult to move ahead without support. Recently, Odia sprinter Dutee Chand was awarded ₹ 3 crore for her double silver in the Asian Games, while four members of the Indian women hockey team were given ₹1 crore each for coming second.last_img read more