Biofuel boost threatens even greater deforestation in Indonesia, Malaysia: Study

first_imgA new report projects the global demand for palm oil-based biofuel by 2030 will be six times higher than today if existing and proposed policies in Indonesia, China and the aviation industry hold.That surge in demand could result in the clearing of 45,000 square kilometers (17,374 square miles) of forest in Indonesia and Malaysia, the world’s biggest palm oil producers, and the release of an additional 7 billion tons of CO2 emissions a year — higher than current annual emissions by the U.S.That impact could be tempered to some degree by the European Union, which plans to phase out all use of palm oil in its biofuel over the next three years, citing environmental concerns. JAKARTA — Global demand for biofuels containing palm oil looks set to grow sixfold by 2030, potentially driving the destruction of Southeast Asian rainforests the size of the Netherlands, a new report warns.Biofuel policies in place or proposed by Indonesia and China, as well as the aviation industry, could push their consumption alone to 45.6 million tons by 2030, according to the report commissioned by Rainforest Foundation Norway.“As we approach 2020, many biofuel policies are being reassessed and renegotiated,” report author Chris Malins, a biofuels policy expert, said in an email. “So this seemed the right time to look at what the best and worst scenarios were for the impact of biofuel policy on deforestation in Southeast Asia for the next decade.”A filling station selling biodiesel. Photo by Robert Couse-Baker/flickr.Biofuel policiesIndonesia, the world’s biggest producer of palm oil, is currently pushing for increased domestic consumption of biodiesel that contains the vegetable oil. The policy calls for a minimum bio, or palm oil, content of 30 percent in all diesel sold in the country by 2020, up from the current requirement of 20 percent.This target is one of the most ambitious biodiesel-blending targets in the world. If achieved, Indonesia’s annual biodiesel consumption would rise to 18.6 million tons.China, meanwhile, has begun discussions with Indonesia and Malaysia, the world’s second-biggest palm oil producer, to boost its own blending target to a minimum of 5 percent palm oil in biodiesel. That would increase China’s palm-based biodiesel consumption to 9 million tons a year.Another key driver of the demand for palm-based biofuels will come from the aviation industry. The UN’s International Civil Aviation Authority (ICAO) has proposed increasing the use of biofuels for passenger planes, aiming for half of jet fuel to come from biofuels by 2050. This scenario could potentially require 18 million tons of palm-based aviation fuel by 2030.“The report shows that the aviation sector and Indonesia may become the largest consumers of palm oil-based biofuels in 2030,” Nils Hermann Ranum, the campaign and policy chief at Rainforest Foundation Norway, told Mongabay.An oil palm plantation adjacent to tropical forest in Borneo, where a “triple hotspot for biodiversity, carbon and threat, [means] there is a compelling global case for prioritzing their conservation,” the scientists write. Photo by Rhett A. Butler7 billion tons of emissionsAssuming that Indonesia, China and the aviation industry meet stick with and achieve their stated biofuel policies, demand for palm oil for use in biofuels by 2030 could be more than six times higher than today — amounting to 67 million tons.This would account for half of global demand for palm oil, and would exceed the current global production of the commodity, at around 65 million tons annually.Production has remained largely flat over the last 20 years, which means the surge in demand presaged by the policies in Indonesia, China and the aviation sector will call for a massive expansion of existing palm plantations. In Indonesia and Malaysia, which produce 85 percent of the world’s palm oil, this would translate into a sharp escalation of already alarming levels of deforestation. (In Indonesia alone, 40 percent of the deforestation that occurred between 1998 and 2008 can be attributed to palm oil production, according to a 2013 technical study funded by the European Commission.)Barring a massive increase in the average palm oil yields, meeting the global demand would result in the loss of 45,000 square kilometers (17,374 square miles) of forests, an area the size of the Netherlands, by 2030.A loss of forests that size would result in 7 billion tons of carbon dioxide emissions over the next two decades — more than the total annual emissions of the United States.“It’s well understood that the palm oil industry in Southeast Asia is endemically linked to deforestation and peat drainage, but biofuel mandates adopted in the name of climate change mitigation continue to drive palm oil demand higher and higher,” Malins said.Deforestation for oil palm in Malaysia’s Sabah State. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.EU scaling backWhile the environmental prospects look bleak, the impact could be tempered by the European Union’s policy to go in the opposite direction and phase out palm oil in biofuels.The EU is currently the world’s second-biggest importer of palm oil, behind only India, and is in the process of adopting a revised Renewable Energy Directive to take effect from 2020-2030.“The purpose of the EU’s renewable energy policy is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and allowing palm oil-based fuels would be a direct contradiction to that goal,” Ranum said.To that end, the European Parliament last week voted in favor of targets to cap crop-based biofuels, following the parliament’s overwhelming decision last year to ban the use of vegetable oils in biofuels. The amendments will now go to the European Commission and member states before they become law.The amendments call for a reduction to zero of “the contribution from biofuels and bioliquids produced from palm oil” by 2021.Ranum and Malins welcomed the move, saying that it would have a significant impact on global demand. Their report found that without strong measures to avoid palm oil use in biofuels, EU biofuel consumption in 2030 could reach 7.3 million tons, up from the current 3 million tons.An immediate reform of EU biofuel policy could reduce global palm oil demand by 3 million tons, Malins said.“That would take a great deal of pressure off the global market, and could allow 3,000 square kilometers [1,158 square miles] of deforestation to be avoided,” he said.Ranum noted, however, that the amendments still needed to be ratified.“It’s important to bear in mind that while the European Parliament has suggested to exclude palm oil-based biofuels from its renewable energy policy, the EU member states, through the EU Council, have come to an opposite position,” he said. “If the EU decides to avoid palm oil biodiesel, that would be proof that the EU takes the climate effect of its policies seriously.”Last week’s vote triggered a backlash from Indonesia and Malaysia, who called it unfair and misguided. Officials from both countries trotted out the industry-sanctioned argument that other types of vegetable oils used in biofuels also required clearing far greater plots of land for an equivalent yield. The Indonesian government also said it had taken steps to address the environmental impact of the palm oil industry.Malins acknowledged that while such efforts had been made, they had been far from effective.“Sadly, there’s also no question that these measures have failed to date to prevent the most damaging practices of peat drainage and forest clearance,” he said. “A more sustainable palm oil industry is vital to continue to supply vegetable oil for food and oleochemicals, but it would be grossly irresponsible to continue using palm oil for biofuel while peat and forest clearance continue.” Banner image: An oil palm plantation. Photo by Bram Ebus for Mongabay. Biodiesel, Bioenergy, Biofuels, Energy, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Governance, Green, Indonesia, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

On an island of plenty, a community tempered by waves braces for rising seas

first_imgFor generations, the indigenous Papuans on Indonesia’s Auki Island have depended on rich coastal ecosystem around them for sustenance and livelihoods.But when an earthquake and a tsunami struck the area in 1996, they realized they needed to do more to protect these resources to sustain their way of life.A decade later, they enshrined practices such as sustainable fishing in a local regulation, which to date has already shown positive results for the islanders and the environment.But the threat of another disaster — rising sea levels as a result of global warming — looms over the community. This time, they’re preparing through mitigation programs, including protecting mangroves. AUKI, Indonesia — “We ladies have eyes on our feet,” Susanti Maryen says after a morning spent collecting saltwater clams and snails at a beach in Auki, an islet off the northern coast of Papua, in Indonesia’s far east.She’s only half joking: clamming here, a way of life for generations, involves traipsing the beach and finding, just by feel, the small crustaceans hidden in the sand underfoot.While the women of Auki forage for the community’s food along the shore, the men are taught to fish from a young age. What they don’t eat, they sell; Susanti says a plate of saltwater clams can fetch 50,000 rupiah ($3.70), or double that during the off-season.In this sense, the Papuans of Auki are like the myriad other coastal communities spread out across the thousands of islands that make up Indonesia, each hewing to age-old traditions of subsistence that revolve around the bounty of the sea. The waters and coasts of Cenderawasih Bay, where Auki is located, are home to 95 species of coral, 155 fish species and seven types of mangrove.The inhabitants of Auki Island in Indonesia’s Papua province have for generations depended on the rich resources of the sea and coastal ecosystem around them. They have a regulation in place to manage these resources in a sustainable way. Photo by Ridzki R. Sigit/Mongabay-Indonesia.But foraging for clams hasn’t always been easy for the women of Auki. Susanti, now 50, remembers when a magnitude-8.2 earthquake struck the region on Feb. 17, 1996. It was followed by a tsunami that washed over parts of Auki and nearby islands.The twin disaster not only destroyed many houses there, but also laid waste to the coastlines the residents had always been able to depend on; for a period after the quake and tsunami, there were no shellfish of any kind to be found on the devastated beaches.“The earthquake and tsunami caused erosion; the coastlines changed, and even new coral islands emerged,” says Matheus Rumbraibab, the chief of the indigenous council in Auki.But the disaster also brought with it a valuable lesson for the people of Auki: that they needed to better protect the natural resources, in the sea and on the coast, that were so central to their lives.In the years since, they learned how to adapt to the new conditions wrought by the quake and tsunami. In 2006, 10 years after the disaster, they decided to formalize those practices in a regulation governing the protection of Auki’s coastal ecosystems, which today covers mangroves, seagrass and coral reefs, among others.In Auki, it is forbidden to cut mangrove trees, which the islanders realize are crucial to help mitigate the rising sea levels spurred by global warming. Photo by Ridzki R. Sigit/Mongabay-Indonesia.The regulation includes prohibitions on fishing in certain areas of the sea around Auki, to allow fish stocks to replenish; in other areas, fishing is permitted, but catches are capped. Beyond these zones, Auki’s fishermen can operate freely, but may not use destructive methods such as blast fishing or poison fishing.The system in force here is a miniature of the Indonesian government’s own policy of staking out and managing marine conservation zones, but with a key difference: here in Auki, the people get to discuss and decide on the zones.The women, for instance, are responsible for monitoring the population of marine animals along and just off the coast every six months. They submit the figures to local authorities, who use them to compile routine reports. These reports, in turn, serve to warn the fishermen of any decline in the population of a particular species.“We wanted the population of saltwater clams, snails and reef fish to recover, that’s why we decided to regulate fishing and collecting,” says Frans Wandosa, the Auki village chief.A magnitude-8.2 earthquake 22 years ago devastated the islands in Papua’s Cenderawasih Bay, including Auki. Image courtesy of the USGS.Faithfully practicing this sustainable way of life for the past two decades has borne fruit for the people of Auki, particularly over the last three years, when saltwater clams have bloomed beyond the restricted zones.Residents of nearby islands have also adopted similar regulations, Frans says. But he’s also aware that despite the success in protecting local marine resources, the people of Auki and the other islands face a threat more relentless than a one-off earthquake and tsunami: rising sea levels as a result of global warming.“I think a portion of Auki’s coast will end up underwater,” Frans says. “That’s why we’ve established a program to gradually move people’s houses to higher parts of the island.” The villagers have gone along with the program; many still remember losing their homes to the tsunami.They also have plans in place to protect the coastal vegetation to mitigate the impact from rising sea levels or tsunami waves. The 2006 regulation bans the felling of mangroves, and also requires residents to report first before cutting any other trees on the island.“We keep asking the village authorities, representatives of indigenous communities and religious leaders to remind the people not to cut down trees,” Frans says.Susanti Maryen is one of the women on Auki who depend on the natural resources from its coastal ecosystems. Photo by Ridzki R. Sigit/Mongabay-Indonesia.At her home on a January evening, Susanti cooks the saltwater clams gathered earlier that day. A small portion will be for dinner; the rest she will sell at the local market the next day.Even here, on the stovetop of her kitchen, the sea is ever-present.“The trick to getting the clams to open up,” Susanti says, “is to cook them in seawater.”This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published here, here and here on our Indonesian site on Jan. 28, Feb. 9 and Feb. 10, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Adaptation To Climate Change, Climate Change, Coastal Ecosystems, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Fisheries, Global Warming Mitigation, Indigenous Communities, Mangroves, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Mitigation, Seagrass Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

Cambodia’s banteng-eating leopards edge closer to extinction, new study finds

first_imgIn just five years, the population density of Indochinese leopards within a protected area in eastern Cambodia has fallen from about 3 leopards per 100 square kilometers in 2009 to 1 leopard per 100 square kilometers in 2014, a new study has found.This is one of the lowest densities of leopards reported in Asia, researchers say.This statistic is worrying because the eastern Cambodian population is the last remaining breeding leopard population within a huge region spanning southeastern China, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam.Eastern Cambodia’s leopards are also part of the only leopard population in the world to prey predominantly on an animal weighing more than 500 kilograms — the banteng. For Cambodia’s last remaining Indochinese leopards (Panthera pardus delacouri), extinction could be just around the corner, a new study has found.The only breeding population of this leopard subspecies in Cambodia is believed to occur within a large protected area complex in a part of the country called the Eastern Plains Landscape (EPL). But in just five years, leopard density within one protected area in the EPL has fallen from about three leopards per 100 square kilometers (39 square miles) in 2009 to one leopard per 100 square kilometers in 2014, a team of scientists found.This is one of the lowest densities of leopards reported in Asia, researchers write in the recent study published in the Royal Society Open Science journal.“The low density means that this population of Indochinese leopard has a high risk of extirpation in the near future, unless effective conservation action is taken immediately,” said lead author Susana Rostro-García, a postdoctoral researcher at the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit (WildCRU) at the University of Oxford, U.K.This decline is especially worrying because the Indochinese leopard has already been wiped out from 94 percent of its former range.“This population in eastern Cambodia is the last remaining breeding population within a huge region spanning southeastern China, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam,” said co-author Jan F. Kamler, Southeast Asia leopard program coordinator for Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization. “So it’s critically important to try and save this unique population before it goes extinct.”An Indochinese leopard passes a camera trap in the study site. Camera trap image courtesy of Panthera/WildCRU/WWF Cambodia/FA.The loss of Cambodia’s Indochinese leopards would deprive the world of a unique member of the leopard family.When the team analyzed leopard droppings collected from the study area, they found that the male leopard’s main prey was the massive, 500-kilogram-plus (1,100-pound-plus) rare wild cattle species called the banteng (Bos javanicus). This finding was unexpected, the researchers say.Although previous research has recorded instances of African leopards preying on large-sized prey like giraffe or eland, these animals comprise a very small proportion of the leopard’s diet, the authors write. Instead, leopards, which typically weigh less than 90 kilograms (198 pounds) prefer to prey on smaller animals weighing about 10 to 40 kilograms (22 to 88 pounds).By contrast, male Indochinese leopards in the eastern Cambodian study site appear to prey predominantly on an animal more than five times its mass, making this the only known leopard population in the world to do so.The leopards there could be targeting banteng because the large herbivore represents about 70 percent of the available ungulate biomass within the study site, Rostro-García said. Moreover, tigers, whose main prey was the banteng, went locally extinct in the landscape a decade ago, allowing leopards to take over as the apex predator.“Tigers kill and displace leopards, and previous research showed that when tigers are present, leopards consume smaller prey to avoid encounters with tigers,” Rostro-García said. “Thus, the leopards in eastern Cambodia likely changed their predatory behavior to include the banteng, the largest herbivore, which may have been previously off limits to them when tigers were present.”The Indochinese leopard’s main prey in the study area was banteng, a rare species of wild cattle. Camera trap image courtesy of Panthera/WildCRU/WWF Cambodia/FA.But only the male leopards seem to be consuming banteng, the team found. The female leopards preferred muntjac (genus Muntiacus), a small deer. This difference is likely because male leopards can grow up to 50 percent larger than females, the researchers say, suggesting that the banteng might be “too large and dangerous” for female leopards to prey upon, but not for the larger male leopards.Despite the availability of prey of all sizes, Cambodia’s leopards are on the verge of extinction. And poaching is to blame, the researchers say.“Our conclusion was based on evidence we collected during the study: The presence of considerably higher numbers of snares in the core zone compared to previous years, and the documentation of several snared animals, including leopard, in the core zone in recent years,” Rostro-García said. “Other possible explanations, such as prey declines and differences in methods across years, were not likely given that prey densities remained stable across years, and we used the same camera-trap methodologies as in the previous study.”Poachers pass by a camera trap. Camera trap image courtesy of Panthera/WildCRU/WWF Cambodia/FA.In fact, a study published last year reported that Southeast Asia was in the middle of a “snaring crisis.” Between 2010 and 2015, patrol teams removed more than 118,000 snares from just three protected areas in Cambodia, the researchers found.Hunters use these snares to meet the rising demands for bushmeat in Southeast Asia. However, snares kill indiscriminately, trapping not just smaller rodents and mammals, but also larger leopards and baby elephants.“Many areas are covered with thousands of snares set to catch wild pig and deer to supply bushmeat markets,” Kamler said. “Leopards and other wildlife are often caught in these snares as bycatch, and the valuable parts sold to traders.”To protect the last remaining Indochinese leopards in Cambodia, Panthera is focusing on increasing its monitoring efforts and expanding its survey areas. “We are also working with our collaborators, WWF Cambodia, WildCRU, and the Ministry of Environment, to help strengthen environmental laws in eastern Cambodia to develop strictly protected core zones and increase fines from poaching,” Kamler wrote in a blogpost.An Indochinese leopard passes a camera trap in the study site. Camera trap image courtesy of Panthera/WildCRU/WWF Cambodia/FA.Citation:Rostro-García, S., et al. (2018) An adaptable but threatened big cat: density, diet and prey selection of the Indochinese leopard (Panthera pardus delacouri) in eastern Cambodia. R. Soc. open sci. 2018 5 171187; DOI: 10.1098/rsos.171187 Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Leopards, Mammals, Poaching, Protected Areas, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

Sserunkuma strikes late as Vipers dispatch Police

first_imgVipers are now second on the table, three points behind KCCA (file photo)StarTimes Uganda Premier League Vipers SC 1-0 Police FCSt. Mary’s Stadium, KitendeSunday, 09-12-2018KITENDE – Vipers SC came back to within three points of leaders KCCA FC, thanks to a 1-0 victory over Police in the StarTimes UPL game played on Sunday.Substitute Dan Sserunkuma was the hero on the day, scoring within minutes of coming on to seal the three points for the defending champions.A much changed Venoms side had Brian Kalumba have a first sniff on goal but his weak effort was comfortably collected by Davis Mutebi in Police’s goal. Applying all the early pressure, Vipers also got the first corner moments later but it resulted to nothing meaningful.Tom Matsiko had a chance to put Vipers in the lead but could not beat Mutebi who raced out of his goal to deny the former KCCA midfielder.On 24 minutes, Davis Kasirye set up Kalumba who shot first time but his effort was saved by Mutebi to ensure that game remains 0-0.Moments later, Duncan Sseninde beat Mutebi by rounding him and finding the back of the net but the goal was disallowed as first assistant referee, Isa Masembe signaled for offside.Police were struggling to create anything meaningful and their frustration was compounded by Ruben Kimera fouling defender Livingstone Mulondo inside the Venom’s penalty area.Despite dominating the game, Vipers had nothing to show at the end of 45 minutes as both sides went into the break locked at 0-0.In an attempt to try and convert their dominance into a goal, Vipers made a double substitution on 50 minutes with Kasirye and Matsiko coming off and replaced with Janjali Joseph and Tito Okello respectively.Five minutes later, Police also made their first switch as Johnson Odongo came on for Pius Kaggwa.Two minutes past the hour mark, Janjali put the ball in the net but his effort was ruled out for offside.Police’s first attempt on goal came on 64 minutes as left-back Arafat Galiwango shot venoumously but goalkeeper Bashir Ssekagya was equal to the task, pushing the ball out for a corner.Police looked to be starting to grow in the game and a minute later, Juma Balinya tried his luck from distance but his effort sailed wide of the target.On 67 minutes, the Cop’s made their second change with Norman Ojik replacing Ronald Nyanzi.The first yellow card of the game went to Galiwango on 68 minutes.With time running out on Vipers, Brian Kalumba shot from distance but his effort sailed over the goal.With 15 minutes to play, Vipers dealt their last card, sending on Dan Sserunkama in place of Sseninde.Two minutes later, Sserunkuma scores with his second touch of the ball to send the home crowd into cheer and at most relief.On 79 minutes, the dread-locked forward should have made it 2-0 but his effort was saved by Mutebi while one on one with the keeper.Moments later, Sserunkuma was again denied from close range as the former Express striker shot tamely at goal following a Rahmat Ssenfuka long ball.In the last minutes, Police could not mount any serious attack on Vipers goal and the Venom’s saw out the game to take three valuable points.The three points gained take the Venoms into second on the log with 21 points after 9 games. Vipers who have a game in hand are only three points behind leaders KCCA FC.For Police FC, they remain 8th on the table with 14 points.Action will resume on Tuesday with six games.Comments Tags: police fcStarTimes Uganda Premeir Leaguevipers sclast_img read more

Powell reflects on Blitzbokke’s season

first_img13 May 2014 After steering the Springbok Sevens team to a credible second place finish in the HSBC Sevens World Series in his first season in charge, Blitzbokke coach Neil Powell admitted on Monday that he needs to improve the depth of his squad to make them more competitive next season. When he took over the reigns as head coach at the start of the 2013/14 season in October last year, Powell’s immediate aim was to install a good level of consistency, and to reach the semi-finals of each of the nine World Series tournaments. The Blitzbokke were on course to achieve their two main goals mid-way through the season, with the team playing in no less than five consecutive Cup Finals and winning tournaments in Port Elizabeth and Las Vegas.A heavy toll Prior to the Tokyo Sevens, the Blitzbokke had pushed New Zealand all the way at the top of the leaderboard and even moved to the top of the standings. However, the trip to the Far East eventually took a heavy toll on the team, after several regulars, such as Kyle Brown and Cecil Afrika, were ruled out of action because of injury. Stephan Dippenaar also joined the casualty list in Glasgow, with the result that Powell had to call on rookie Shaun Adendorff and the relatively inexperienced WJ Strydom to plug the gaps. Mark Richards was also thrown into the fray, having last played for the Springbok Sevens at the Gold Coast tournament last October. Losses in the quarterfinals of the last three tournaments allowed New Zealand to finally pull away from the South Africans to land a fourth consecutive World Series title.Influential figures missed Powell, reflecting on the past season and his first in charge, said the team missed especially the influential figures of regular captain Brown and experienced playmaker Afrika. “Look we definitely missed Kyle and Cecil in Glasgow, while we had Stephan (Dippenaar) injured in Glasgow and unavailable for London. On top of that, we also lost Werner Kok with an ankle injury on Sunday in London,” Powell explained in a statement. “However, I am making no excuses for our below par performances in Tokyo, Hong Kong and Scotland. In London, we always knew it was going to be tough to play a full strength New Zealand team [in the quarterfinals] and they deserved their win. “However, I think the guys did extremely well and displayed huge courage to come from behind to beat Samoa and also to overcome Kenya in the Plate Final.” Increasing depth The Springbok Sevens coach said his next aim is to increase the depth of his squad: “The injuries to our regulars was unfortunate and part of the game. On the plus side, it did gave us chance to give players such as Shaun Adendorff, WJ Strydom and Mark Richards more playing time. I am sure they benefitted a lot from playing in Glasgow and London. “However, we will have to increase the strength and depth of our squad because next season will be an important one as we look to qualify for 2016 Olympics,” Powell said.Senatla’s impact He also praised the impact of speedster Seabelo Senatla, after the dangerous wing was crowned top scorer in Las Vegas and London, following a long injury lay-off. Senatla was close to his best at Twickenham and was the top points’ and try scorer after dotting 13 tries. “Seabelo made a huge impact after his return to action and he was really hungry to play after missing the first part of the season because of a back injury. Justin Geduld also deserves credit for his consistency throughout the season,” Powell remarked.Dream Team selection Geduld was included in the World Series Dream Team after a string of impressive performances for the Springbok Sevens at London and in several other events. While the HSBC Sevens World Series has come to a conclusion, the Blitzbokke still have a huge assignment ahead of them at the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow on 26 and 27 July. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Factual Friday

first_imgThis post was uploaded by Rachel Brauner of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service-Wounded Warrior Program and published on the Military Families Learning Network blog in support of military child care. The photo was found on the U.S. Air Force’s Flickr photostream.last_img

PDP leader accuses BJP of ‘communalising’ Jammu

first_imgThe Bharatiya Janata Party’s ruling coalition partner, the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), on Friday accused its ally of “communalising human rights and governance issues” in the Jammu region.“There is nothing right about the right wing. The outburst by so-called leaders of Jammu about certain measures to safeguard the tribal community is unwarranted and uncalled for. This follows the politicising of the probe into the rape and murder of eight-year-old Asifa,” said PDP leader Firdous Tak, also an MLC from Kishtwar in the Chenab Valley.Referring to the BJP’s stand on tribal rights over forest land, which the BJP is openly opposing, Mr. Tak said: “The majoritarian approach of pushing the minorities to the wall is not new in Jammu. The BJP is following the footprints of the Congress to represent the majority opinion.”Warning against playing communal politics, the MLC said: “Every time you [the BJP] play the communal card, you are hurting the constitutional mandate.”Tribal rights and the rape and murder of an eight-year-old nomad girl have had the two coalition partners pulling in different directions.Sources said that Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti on Thursday refused to meet the BJP MLAs who are demanding that the rape case be handed over to the Central Bureau of Investigation. Ms. Mufti’s stand has further soured relations.last_img read more

Hockey: India finish with five defeats at Olympics

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Amazon Great Indian Festival starts from Oct 10, here are the key highlights

first_imgAmazon is back with its yearly sale. The e-commerce company, like every year, is holding the Great Indian Festival this year also. It is a five-days sale that this year starts from October 10 at 12 AM and will end on October 15 at 11:59 PM. This will be the third Great Indian Festival sale hosted by the company.The sale will offer a range of offers, discounts, deals and more across all categories including smartphones and gadgets. There will be offers on all leading brands and exclusive deals for certain bank card holders. The Prime Members will get an early access to the sale under the Prime Early Access program. The Prime subscription cost has now been increased from Rs 499 to Rs 999 a year.Amazon has partnered with SBI Bank to offer a 10 per cent instant discount to SBI debit card holders. There are discounts on exchange offers and buyers can also items via no cost EMI payment option. Amazon is also giving Rs 300 extra balance instantly on adding Rs 3000 in your Amazon Pay wallet instantly . There is up to 80 per cent off on fashion apparels, up to Rs 3500 off on Amazon devices and more during the sale.The sale will have an Amazon app jackpot giving users a chance to win prizes worth over Rs 5 lakhs. The devices included under this jackpot are iPhone X, GoPro Hero 5, HTV Vive, Sony Smart TV, Echo Plus, Apple iPad and wireless speaker. The company will also hold Golden Hours Deals from 8pm to 12pm every day during the sale.advertisementAmazon says that it will sell the Moto E5 Plus at the lowest price ever during the sale. The Xiaomi Mi A2 will also go on the discount for the first time. There will be an “Amazing exchange offer” on the Redmi 6 Pro. There will be app only deals also which can be availed via Amazon app only.The Amazon Great Indian Festival starts on the same day as the Flipkart Big Billion Days sale. Flipkart on its first day of sale will have offers cross categories like Fashion, TVs & Appliances, Home & Furniture, Beauty, Sports, Toys, Books, and more. The second day of the sale will have offers cover mobile phones and electronic devices.ALSO READ: Flipkart Big Billion Days sale to start from October 10, here are the key highlightslast_img read more