Pacific MMI to cover Team PNG’s travel insurance

first_imgThe sponsorship will also cover the PNG Olympic committees’ insurance needs.Managing director of PMMI Wayne Dorgan officially announce the sponsorship today at the PMMI conference room in Port Moresby saying that PMMI is proud to support team PNG with their travel insurances to give them final accreditation to the Olympics“Basically PMMI is providing travel cover insurances and liability to support the side going away,” Dorgan said.PNG Olympic Committee chairman of fundraising Syd Yates thank PMMI for the support and urge that the PMMI has been a great partner over the years and hope that will continue with the relationship from time to time in other events.Team PNG’s Chef de Mission to Rio Emma Waiwai also thanked PMMI for the important aspect of team PNG’s engagement in international events for having their back covered.Rio bound PNG athletes including Ryaan Pini (swimming), Thadius Katua (Boxing), Raymond Ovinou (Judo) , Maxemillion Kassman and Samantha Kassman (Taekwondo), Morea Baru (weightlifting), Toea Wisil and Theo Piniau (athletics) now have full accreditation to travel and take part in the 2016 Rio Summer Olympicslast_img read more

Manmade noise pollution even more prevalent in US protected areas than researchers expected

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored About 14 percent of the land mass in the United States has been afforded some kind of legally protected status, and noise pollution is noticeable even in these more remote areas where manmade disturbances are supposed to be kept to a minimum.According to a study published this month in the journal Science, the noise pollution from airplanes, highways, industry, and resource extraction is encroaching ever further into U.S. protected areas designed to preserve habitat for biodiversity.Using baseline sound levels for each study area established by machine learning algorithms that took into account geospatial features of the area, the researchers determined that anthropogenic noise pollution exceeds three decibels (dB), essentially doubling background sound levels, in 63 percent of the nation’s protected areas. Humans make quite a racket, and all of the excessive noise we make is not just a problem in urban areas. About 14 percent of the land mass in the United States has been afforded some kind of legally protected status, and noise pollution is noticeable even in these more remote areas where manmade disturbances are supposed to be kept to a minimum.According to a study published this month in the journal Science, the noise pollution from airplanes, highways, industry, and resource extraction is encroaching ever further into U.S. protected areas designed to preserve habitat for biodiversity.Rachel Buxton, a post-doctoral researcher at Colorado State University’s Warner College of Natural Resources and lead author of the study, led a team of researchers that recorded sounds at 492 sites across the country in order to quantify the extent of noise pollution in the U.S. Using baseline sound levels for each study area established by machine learning algorithms that took into account geospatial features of the area, the researchers determined that anthropogenic noise pollution exceeds three decibels (dB), essentially doubling background sound levels, in 63 percent of the nation’s protected areas. In 21 percent of protected areas, the team measured 10 dB of noise pollution, close to a ten-fold increase over background levels.Wilderness areas with some of the highest levels of protections were found to have the lowest amount of noise pollution, though 12 percent of those areas still experience manmade sound levels at least three dB above natural levels, the researchers found — “indicating that they are not entirely ‘untrammeled by man’ as defined by the Wilderness Act (U.S. C. 1131-1136, sec. 3c, 1964),” they wrote in the study.Three decibels of sound may not seem like much, but, according to the researchers, that’s enough to reduce the area that natural sounds can be heard by anywhere from 50 to 90 percent — meaning that natural sounds that can normally be heard from 100 feet away, for instance, can only be heard at a distance of 10 to 50 feet.“Next time you go for a walk in the woods, pay attention to the sounds you hear — the flow of a river, wind through the trees, singing birds, bugling elk,” Buxton said in a statement. “These acoustic resources are just as magnificent as visual ones, and deserve our protection.”Reduced capacity to hear natural sounds detracts from the restorative properties of spending time in nature, Buxton and her co-authors note, and also negatively impacts wildlife. By distracting or scaring animals, reducing the ability of prey species to hear predators, or interfering with mating calls, noise pollution in any given area can result in changes in species composition. Even plants can be affected if the rodents and insects that disperse seeds and pollinate flowers alter their behavior or location due to excessive noise.“Noise pollution causes cognitive impairment, distraction, stress, and altered behavior and physiology in ways that directly influence both wildlife and humans,” Buxton and her co-authors write in the study. “Moreover, noise pollution that alters the distribution or behavior of key species can have cascading effects on ecosystem integrity.”Buxton adds that while she and her team were surprised by the prevalence of noise pollution in U.S. protected areas, they “were also encouraged to see that many large wilderness areas have sound levels that are close to natural levels. Protecting these important natural acoustic resources as development and land conversion progresses is critical if we want to preserve the character of protected areas.”The study showed that high noise pollution levels tended to be concentrated in specific parts of U.S. protected areas, suggesting where noise-reduction tactics might be most effective. Some protected areas have already undertaken efforts to reduce noise, such as adopting shuttle services that reduce traffic and establishing specific zones where visitors are encouraged to enjoy nature in silence while also creating noise corridors that align flight patterns with roads to keep noise pollution from being pervasive throughout the area.The researchers found that there was 56 percent less noise above natural levels in critical habitats within protected areas that have adopted stringent noise regulations compared to measurements taken in habitats in unprotected areas.“Numerous noise mitigation strategies have been successfully developed and implemented, so we already have the knowledge needed to address noise issues,” George Wittemyer, an associate professor at Colorado State University and the senior author of the study, said in a statement. “Our work provides information to facilitate such efforts in respect to protected areas where natural sounds are integral.”An acoustic recording station at the iconic tourist attraction Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay, Golden Gate National Park, California. Photo Credit: United States National Park Service.CITATIONBuxton, R.T., McKenna, M.F., Mennitt, D., Fristrup, K., Crooks, K., Angeloni, L., & Wittemyer, G. (2017). Noise pollution is pervasive in U.S. protected areas. Science 356(6337), 531-533. doi:10.1126/science.aah4783 Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Health, Nature And Health, Noise Pollution, Plants, Protected Areas, Research, Roads, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

6 families whose homes were razed by fire get help from GRC

first_imgThe families that received their donations on FridayThe Guyana Relief Council (GRC) continues in its mission to provide relief by donating to six families on Friday who had lost their homes by fire.Donations of groceries, mattresses, furniture and disability tools were handed over to the families at the Council’s head office, Riverview, Ruimveldt, Georgetown.The beneficiaries are the Boodie family of the West Bank of Demerara (WBD); the Clarks; the Lumelino family of Timehri, East Bank Demerara (EBD); the Andrews family of Haslington, East Coast Demerara (ECD), the Bacchus family of Grove, EBD, and the Alder family of Haslington, ECD.Welfare Convener of GRC, Rohini Bonar said that out of the six families, two have been able to rebuild and as such, the organisation saw it fit to present them with furniture.She expressed gratitude to the individuals and organisations for the generous donations as it assists greatly in helping the Council carry out its mandate.“The Guyana Relief Council expresses sincere gratitude to those organisations and individuals who continue to give support so that we would fulfil our motto of Caring and Sharing” Bonar thanked.GRC is mainly funded through fundraisers, which are held several times yearly. Just last month, the Chinese Food Festival was held and in October, the Council will hold their Grand Annual Luncheon at the Guyana Pegasus.A team in Florida also hosts a fundraiser once annually which they use to purchase and send donations to the organisation.The Government of Guyana also makes a small donation towards the cause, however, according to Bonar, the said donation is not nearly enough.“We get a Government subvention but really and though we are grateful, that cannot run the office of the Guyana Relief Council. So we really have to do a lot of fundraising to achieve helping persons” Bonar disclosed.The Yvonne Hinds Home of Hope shelter is also housed aback the Council and is used to render assistance to fire victims following disasters.For the year 2019, 50 families consisting of over 200 persons received relief from the organisation. Those desirous of sending donations to GRC are asked to contact the organisation on 225-3081.last_img read more