Valencia presents an ERTE

first_imgGiven the consequent forecast of a significant decrease in income, the predisposition of players and coaches of the first team and youth team, in addition to senior management, has been at all times, since the beginning of the talks and in an exercise of responsibility and trust mutual, to help ensure the economic sustainability of the club at a time of difficulty and uncertainty for the future for all.In addition, with the priority of ensuring its commitment to protect its most vulnerable workers against the uncertain evolution of the situation, Valencia CF will supplement its income with a very high percentage of its workers. The club is particularly grateful for the solidarity effort of the first team, by reducing their salaries, to help the entity protect all workers and their families in such difficult circumstances.As a centennial entity and the main civil institution of the Valencian Community, Valencia CF reaffirms itself, more than ever, in its desire to be a benchmark, an example of commitment and a source of help for a society hit by an unprecedented circumstance, especially in its most vulnerable sectors. This is how it is being through various initiatives and this is how it will continue to be done, in a special way as long as the effects of this crisis continue.Valencia CF also wishes to publicly express its solidarity with all those affected by the pandemic, show its deepest condolences to those who have lost a loved one, and share the full force of Valencianism with those who continue to fight to overcome the disease. In particular, the entity wants to express its greatest appreciation and gratitude to all those people, many of them from Valencia, who fight daily on the front line of battle in our land to help leave as soon as possible a situation that continues to shock all of our society”. Valencia has joined the list of League clubs to present a Temporary Employment Regulation File (ERTE). The Mestalla club presented the documentation on the morning of April 20 and in the afternoon made it official through a statement.This economic measure is added to the agreement reached with the captains of the workforce for a salary reduction ranging from 18 to 9 percent depends on when and how the competition resumes. As revealed by AS, the presentation of an ERTE due to the Covid-19 crisis began to be seen by Valencia two weeks ago, despite the fact that at the start of the health crisis Anil Murthy had transmitted the contrary to employees by email. But the club uses this “legal instrument provided for situations of activity reduction due to force majeure” and does so to guarantee the jobs of its employees, who will receive in most cases full payment of their wages . Valencia, which will benefit from tax advantages once the government approves the ERTE, “will make an income supplement for a very high percentage of its workers.” Statement from Valencia in which the ERTE announces“In the current context of an exceptional health crisis worldwide due to the lethal coronavirus pandemic COVID19 and the forced indefinite cessation of its activity as a result of the State of Alarm decreed by the Government, Valencia CF wishes to show its satisfaction at having reached this Monday its objective of adapting to this situation, maintaining its commitment to protect the jobs of all its workers and the wages of its vast majority, through individual agreements and a Temporary Employment Regulation File (ERTE), the legal instrument envisaged for situations of reduced activity due to force majeure.last_img read more

Damage to Raja Ampat 12 times higher than previously thought

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by alexa Raja Ampat is home to one of the most spectacular coral reefs in the world.The cruise ship that hit the reef on March 4 damaged 18,882 square meters of coral reef, the Indonesian government said this week.A preliminary estimate had identified only 1,600 square meters of damaged reef. JAKARTA — The extent of coral reef damage from the grounding of a Bahamian-flagged cruise ship at Raja Ampat earlier this month is about 3.5 times as big as an American football field — much greater than previously thought, the Indonesian government said this week.On March 4, the 90-meter-long Caledonian Sky, owned by tour operator Noble Caledonia, ran aground at low tide on a shoal in West Papua province and damaged 18,882 square meters of coral reef in the Dampier Strait, according to an official statement released on Tuesday.The ship had earlier that day taken 102 tourists on a bird-watching expedition, part of a 16-night journey from Papua New Guinea to the Philippines.The damaged area is almost 12 times larger than a preliminary estimate had identified. The latest assessment is the result of a joint investigation by the Indonesian government and the London P&I Club, Noble Caledonia’s insurer.“Both parties have agreed and signed off on the investigation result,” said Arif Havas, the deputy coordinating minister for maritime affairs.More than 13,000 square meters of reef were totaled by the 4,290-tonne cruise ship, he said.The boat further inflicted “medium damage” on 5,612 square meters of reef from sand whipping and coral debris caused by the ship’s movement. In an attempt to refloat it, a tugboat was requested to help it break free from the shallow area, which harmed the reef even worse.“Coral with medium damage only have a survival rate of 50 percent,” Arif said, adding that the government would update its compensation assessment if the reef failed to recover.The Caledonian Sky after it ran aground at Raja Ampat. Photo courtesy of Stay Raja AmpatPresident Joko Widodo’s administration has appointed a team led by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry to calculate the financial losses of the damaged coral reef.Ricardo Tapilatu, who led the preliminary evaluation team, said in an interview immediately after the disaster that the standard compensation rate was $200-$400 per square meter.But due to Raja Ampat’s special biodiversity and its status as one of the world’s most popular dive sites, as well as the fact that the damage occurred in a national park, he added, the rate would be higher than normal.Tapilatu’s initial survey also showed the destruction of the ecosystem’s structural habitat and the reduction or loss of diversity of eight coral genera. Conservation International, an NGO, reported in 2002 that Raja Ampat — which means “Four Kings” in Indonesian — was home to nearly 1,400 varieties of fish and 603 species of coral.The area could take 100 years to recover, Tapilatu said.Noble Caledonia, which is headquartered in London and was founded by a Swede, has apologized for the “unfortunate” incident and said it would cooperate with the Indonesian government “towards a fair and realistic settlement.”Coordinating maritime minister Luhut Pandjaitan said his office would involve several foreign governments in the case, including those of the UK, Sweden and the Bahamas. On Mar. 17, he summoned British ambassador Moazzam Malik to his office in Jakarta to discuss the matter.“I’m disappointed to learn about the damage to this coral reef in West Papua, as we are with any environmental incident that occurs in Indonesia or anywhere else in the world,” Malik said as quoted by news agency AFP.“We hope the matter can be resolved quickly between the Indonesian authorities and the company that is responsible for this accident and was managing the ship.”Raja Ampat, home to some of Indonesia’s best dive sites. Photo by Jonathan Chase/Wikimedia CommonsIn the meantime, the Coordinating Ministry for Maritime Affairs is seeking for approval to upgrade Raja Ampat’s status to a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area, a designation of UN agency the International Maritime Organisation (IMO).The status will earn Raja Ampat “special protection through action by IMO because of its significance for recognized ecological or socioeconomic or scientific reasons and which may be vulnerable to damage by international maritime activities.”“We can learn from the underwater tourism in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, where cruise ships can still enter sensitive sea areas,” said Oegroseno, the deputy minister. “However, there are clear boundaries to prevent such activities from damaging the marine ecosystem.”The coordinating maritime ministry has also said Indonesia is mulling the revision of how many foreign cruise ships should be allowed to enter the archipelago country’s waters, as well as the size and type to be permitted.“We want our marine potential to provide us a lot of benefits, both economically and ecologically,” Oegroseno said. “ We must be very clever at making the related policies.”Banner image: Yellow fish and coral at Raja Ampat. Photo by Sterling Zumbrunn for Conservation International*A previous version of this article described Noble Caledonia as a Swedish company. It is headquartered in London and was founded by a Swedish national.center_img Coastal Ecosystems, Coral Reefs, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Ecotourism, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Policy, Law Enforcement, Marine Protected Areas, National Parks, Oceans, Protected Areas last_img read more

New genus created for arboreal toads in Indonesia

first_imgThe proposed genus was created to fit two new species of toad.The name of the genus, Sigalegalephrynus, was inspired by the toads’ resemblance to a wooden puppet from North Sumatra.The toads appear to have mating calls that are unlike those of other amphibians in the Sunda Shelf. A group of researchers in Indonesia has created a new genus of arboreal toad to fit what they say are two new species, according to a recent article in the journal Herpetologica.The authors propose that the newly described toads, Sigalegalephrynus minangkabauensis and Sigalegalephrynus mandailinguensis, be classified under the genus Sigalegalephrynus, after finding indications that the two “form a distinct lineage” among Southeast Asian members of the true toad family Bufonidae.The researchers — from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), the University of Texas, Broward College, Brawijaya University and Hamburg University — came across the species while inventorying the reptiles and amphibians of Sumatra’s highlands in 2013-2014.Sigalegalephrynus minangkabauensis. Photos courtesy of HerpetologicaThe toads live in forests and caves. Brown and medium-sized with gangly limbs that flare out at the end, their common name was inspired by a resemblance to Sigale-gale, a wooden puppet from North Sumatra.The researchers named the toads after ethnic groups in the provinces in which they were discovered — the Mandailing of North Sumatra and the Minangkabau of Jambi.The description of Sigalegalephrynus mandailinguensis is based on specimens the researchers found on the forested slopes of Mount Sorikmarapi, a volcano in Batang Gadis National Park.The description of Sigalegalephrynus minangkabauensis is based on an individual from Mount Kunyit, Jambi, which exhibited close morphological affinities to the specimens from Batang Gadis.The toads appear to have mating calls that are unlike those of other amphibians in the Sunda Shelf, a biogeographical region that encompasses most of Southeast Asia.The toads are distinguishable from each other by characteristics like the shape of their finger pads and the webbing of their feet.Sigalegalephrynus mandailinguensis. Photos courtesy of HerpetologicaThe discovery comes amid an increasing urgency to find and classify species in Indonesia, where land is being rapidly cleared of forest and other habitats needed to sustain endemic species, said lead author Utpal Smart.“With more thorough exploration like ours, Indonesia will probably rank as the most biodiverse country in the world in terms of herpetofauna,” he said in a statement.Smart noted that the rapid pace of forest destruction in Indonesia — now greater than that of Brazil, previously the highest — particularly crucial because almost half of all amphibians in the country are found nowhere else in the world.“We hope that our efforts will eventually educate and alert people to the massive yet understated ecological crisis that is playing out in the islands of Sumatra and Java,” he said. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Amphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Forests, New Species, Rainforests, Species Discovery, Tropical Forests, Wildlife last_img read more

REDD+ Africa: looking past Trump’s U.N. proposed climate budget cuts

first_imgArticle published by Glenn Scherer Adaptation To Climate Change, carbon, Carbon Credits, Carbon Finance, Carbon Market, Carbon Trading, Climate, Climate Change, Climate Change Denial, Climate Change Politics, climate policy, Climate Politics, Drinking Water, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Estuaries, Featured, Foreign Aid, Forest Carbon, Global Environmental Crisis, Global Warming, Global Warming Mitigation, Globalization, Green, Mangroves, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Redd, Redd And Communities, Sustainability, Sustainable Development In March, the Trump administration proposed the elimination in its entirety of the Global Climate Change Initiative (GCCI), established by President Obama to integrate climate change funding into U.S. foreign assistance.Though Congress has yet to finalize a 2018 budget, Trump’s cuts if implemented, would end the GCCI, reducing to zero all U.S. payments to U.N. climate change programs, including the Global Climate Fund (GCF), Global Environmental Facility (GEF); Clean Technology Fund (CTF); and Strategic Climate Fund (SCF).These losses would impact UN-REDD+ programs (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) in Africa and around the world only to a degree, since many are funded by other nations or supported by private groups.However, Trump’s proposed cuts, if approved, would impact REDD+ programs in Malawi in the short term, and likely in other countries, if U.S. international climate change funding is not restored. Community residents at Cassou Forest in Burkina Faso watering a plant nursery. Reforestation is seen as essential to carbon sequestration in Africa and around the globe. Photo by Sophie MbuguaIn July, a community-led Kenyan conservation organization called Mikoko Pamoja, Mangroves Together, was among the 2017 Equator Prize winners. The program was singled out as an exceptional REDD+ project, Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation, a global United Nations initiative to combat climate change.Mikoko Pamoja’s effort, carried out on the southern coast of Kenya about 50 kilometers from Mombasa, is the first community-run REDD+ project of its kind in the world. It has been validated to generate and sell mangrove carbon credits to companies and individuals globally.REDD+ is a U.N. policy mechanism that helps developing countries reduce greenhouse gas emissions on forested lands. Negotiated under the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 2007, the initiative was expanded in 2010 to include sustainable forest management, and conservation and enhancement of forest carbon stocks among its tools.At the time, the UNFCCC also established the Green Climate Fund (GCF), a financing mechanism for advancing low-emission, climate-resilient solutions in the developing world. Developed countries agreed to mobilize $100 billion per year for GCF by 2020.As of 2017, about $10.3 billion had been pledged for GCF by 43 national governments, though a mere $6.3 million had been disbursed. Since 2008, over $4 billion in support for REDD+ has been pledged and partially distributed through multilateral funds or programs.That was how things stood after the GCF Board meeting in Songdo, Korea this April.But as REDD+ projects gear up in Africa, and in developing nations around the globe, the long term future of the GCF, REDD+ and other U.N. climate programs are in doubt due to the election of Donald Trump — the only current major world leader, to outspokenly deny the reality of human-caused global warming.The July 2017 Green Climate Fund board support for the early phases of REDD+ acknowledged that current funding levels are inadequate for supporting the mechanism, and the GCF board called for action to mobilize significant multiple sources of funding from public, private, domestic, international, multilateral and bilateral sources.Recent deforestation at Mau Forest in Kenya. Conversion of forests to agriculture is one of the major causes of deforestation in Africa. Photo by Sophie MbuguaTrump sows climate chaos abroadIn March, 2017, the Trump administration’s “skinny budget” proposed the elimination in its entirety of the Global Climate Change Initiative (GCCI), established by President Obama to integrate climate change financial considerations into U.S. foreign assistance through a range of bilateral, multilateral and private sector mechanisms.The GCCI, according to Meena Raman of the Third World Network (TWN), was part of Obama’s plan to provide the “fast-start finance” needed to address climate change agreed to at the 2009 Copenhagen climate summit.The Trump administration, in its March 2018 budget proposal called for combined cuts of $10.1 billion to the two primary agencies doing international climate work, the U.S. State Department and U.S. Agency of International Development (USAID).Trump’s proposal to end the GCCI, and eliminate all international climate-related spending (a cut of at least $1.3 billion dollars), has yet to be acted on by Congress, which has until October 1st to approve next year’s budget, though that vote could be delayed until December.Many Democrats in Congress were quick to reject the administration’s proposed cuts. “I am deeply disappointed and dismayed to find out that despite the concerns raised by bipartisan Members of Congress… President Trump appears determined to gut U.S. national security by slashing the State Department and USAID,” said Democratic Senator Ben Cardin of Maryland.Rainforest in Madagascar. Deforestation across Africa is worsening climate change, diminishing biodiversity, degrading watersheds, stealing away traditional livelihoods and impoverishing the landscape. REDD+ is intended to keep forests intact and carbon out of the atmosphere. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayPotential Trump climate program cuts: by the numbersUnder Obama, the GCCI funding request for 2016 was $1.3 billion. It roughly allocated $500 million for the GCF; $12 million for the UNFCCC/IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change); $168 million for the Global Environmental Facility (GEF); $170 million for the Clean Technology Fund (CTF); and $59 million for the Strategic Climate Fund (SCF). It also included $25 million for the Montreal Protocol and $348 million for international climate change programming at USAID. Another $459 million was allocated for international climate programs at the State Department.Trump’s proposed 2018 “America First” budget would eliminate all international climate change programs, climate change research and partnership programs. Ending GCCI would reduce to zero all U.S. payments to all U.N. climate change programs, including the GCF, GEF, CTF, and SCF. Trump also proposes discontinuing all funding to Obama’s Clean Power Plan, reducing the likelihood of the U.S. meeting its Paris Climate Agreement carbon reduction pledge.How much damage this might do to REDD+ in the short and long term remains uncertain. “The U.S. cutbacks to REDD+ are hitting some of the key countries that directly benefitted from U.S. support on REDD+, such as Malawi. But for the UN-REDD+, we do not envisage the Trump proposed cuts as being a major [immediate] threat, as UN-REDD+ is mainly funded through bilateral initiatives from Germany, Norway, the UK, and Japan,” said Tim Christophersen, a lead expert of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) on Forests and Climate Change.USAID is investing $1.8 million in REDD+ and $100,000 in REDD+ preparedness in Malawi as part of its “fast track” climate finance program. This would likely be lost if Congress votes to approve Trump’s proposed aid cuts.Of the $10.3 billion promised to GCF by the world’s nations, $3 billion was originally pledged by the United States. President Obama rushed to honor that commitment, at least partially, paying out $1 billion before leaving office. But Trump says he will renege on the remaining $2 billion GCF pledge.Experts expect those cuts to be confirmed by Congress, though some in his own party have balked at the administration’s foreign aid cuts. GOP Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina believes Trump’s budget is “dead on arrival, it’s not going to happen, and it would be a disaster. This budget destroys soft power, it puts our diplomats at risk and it’s going nowhere.”Downtown Kinshasa, DRC. Rapid population growth and urbanization are resulting in severe deforestation across Africa, as rural forests are converted to agriculture to feed city dwellers. Photo courtesy of MONUSCO Photos licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic licenseSo far, no other country has indicated it will step in to fill the resulting climate funding gap. “The impact of this reduction is likely to become more apparent at the point in time when GCF starts discussing replenishments,” Ravi Prabhu, Deputy Director General for Research with the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), told Mongabay. He explained that the GCF board will likely set a replenishment trigger when there is a gap of $6-7 billion between what has been allocated and what has been pledged, with a $2-3 billion buffer.Given the U.S. withdrawal of funding, he added that “there was a feeling among experts that the GCF might need to reduce the trigger amount in order to replenish in time, and that “the board would prioritize discussions to make this happen sooner rather than later”.U.S. climate cuts serious to developing worldThe United States is the biggest historical emitter of greenhouse gases, contributing to costly global impacts ranging from sea level rise to extreme weather. In 2015 alone, the U.S. emitted 6.5 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalents. That’s why critics argue that the U.S. elimination of international climate change aid is irresponsible, and why the U.S. should keep its financial commitments to developing countries under the UNFCCC.Raman urges Congress to reject Trump’s cuts and to meet U.S. climate obligations to the rest of the world, warning that America “has withdrawn from the Paris Agreement, but it has not withdrawn from the UNFCCC. Hence, it still has a legal obligation to provide the financial resources under the Convention. The issue is how to force it to do so when [the U.S.] has no political will to do so.”Tony Simons, the director general at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), told Mongabay that the proposed cuts are tragic because the U.S. has broken faith with a collectively negotiated international agreement and failed to address a global crisis.“It signals undoing all the knitting that has been done over the years [via international negotiations]. Climate change is long term and intergenerational. However, it’s encouraging that many sub-nationals [states] and companies in the U.S. are behind the collective process,” Simons told Mongabay.A tea plantation in Cameroon. Large scale agribusiness, driven by the developed world’s hunger for palm oil, rubber, tea and other commodities is driving African deforestation. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayRaman noted that the financial gap resulting from the U.S. default is significant. She sees grave implications for developing countries, which urgently need climate financing to bypass dirty fossil fuel technologies and to implement green, low-carbon energy sources quickly.In particular, lack of finance will heavily impact the capability of developing nations to meet their Paris greenhouse gas emission commitments, known as Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDC’s) submitted to the UNFCCC before Paris.Analysis shows that developing countries need around $3.5 trillion to implement their INDC’s by 2030, while the cost of adapting to climate change in developing countries could rise to between $280 and $500 billion per year by 2050, according to the U.N. Environmental Programme (UNEP).Raman believes the U.S. shortfall can be made up by other developed countries increasing their contributions: “If this is not done, then developing countries will not be able to do more climate action, as they have no resources of their own, [and that will] negatively affect the poor and the planet overall.”Trump administration officials contacted for comment by Mongabay failed to respond to the author’s queries.Jessica Sulubu of the Ihaleni Self-Help Group attends to mangrove seedlings in Kilifi coastal Kenya. The community supports itself partly by conserving mangroves and then selling mangrove seedlings to other communities who are reforesting mangroves along the Indian Ocean. REDD+ projects could help scale up such projects to address the social and economics needs of coastal communities. Photo by Sophie MbuguaREDD+ future projects at stake in AfricaThe Mikoko Pamoja project was launched in 2013 by two local communities that wished to sell carbon credits earned via mangrove conservation. Like other REDD+ initiatives, the project is built on an international partnership; it is supported by the Association for Coastal Ecosystem Services (ACES), a Scottish charity, and by the Plan Vivo Foundation, headquartered in the United Kingdom.Mikoko Pamoja now makes 3,000 tons of carbon (CO2) available for trade annually on the voluntary carbon market. The revenue earned flows into a community benefit fund, supporting local development projects in education, water and sanitation, and mangrove reforestation. About 3,500 community members are now benefiting from access to cleaner water, while 700 children receive educational materials through their schools.This REDD+ initiative has so far conserved 117 hectares (289 acres) of carbon-storing Rhizophora mucronata and Sonneratia alba, two types of mangrove listed as threatened by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.In the heart of Africa, another project is reaping the benefits of REDD+ financial investment. In the Congo basin — a mosaic of flooded forest, savanna, swamp, and rivers spanning six countries — the Isangi REDD+ project is among initiatives significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions by preventing deforestation caused by forest conversion to agricultural uses.Located in the Isangi territory, Yangambi District, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the project is expected to significantly reduce deforestation rates and annually sequester more than 280,000 tons of carbon in conserved forests over the next 30 years.This REDD+ project’s work sprawls across 180,000 hectares (695 square miles), and is financed by the Jadora Limited Liability Company based in the United States, and by Safbois, a private company in the DRC.Firewood for sale along a road in Burkina Faso. REDD+ programs can help communities in the developing world to jump from wood burning to alternative energy sources, bypassing dirty fossil fuels such as coal and oil. Photo by Sophie MbuguaAn estimated eight percent of carbon stored in living forests planet-wide is held within DRC forests, giving that country the fourth largest carbon reservoir on Earth, according to the NGO Greenpeace. As a result, the Congo basin rainforest — covering portions of Cameroon, Republic of the Congo, Central African Republic, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and the DRC — plays a critical role in regulating the global climate, and in maintaining these forests as a hedge against runaway climate change.While these particular projects are not directly reliant on U.S. funding for their continued existence, experts say that their success to date in combatting climate change in the developing world demonstrates why it is crucial that REDD+ funding continue growing.The urgent need to curb deforestation in AfricaBetween 2011-2015, intact forests worldwide stored an average of 2.1 gigatons of CO2 annually, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), proving that forest conservation via initiatives such as REDD+ is vital for carbon storage and greenhouse gas emissions reductions.Globally, forests cover slightly over 4 billion hectares (15.4 million square miles), or about 31 percent of the world’s land surface. But in Africa, while forests cover about 675 million hectares (2.6 million square miles), they account for just 23 percent of Africa’s land area, says the FAO and World Bank.Africa’s forests are also in rapid decline. Despite current efforts to reduce deforestation through REDD+ and other initiatives, about 3.4 million hectares (13,127 square miles) of forest are currently being lost annually — the world’s highest rate of continental deforestation, according to FAO’s 2016 State of the Forests report.Collecting firewood in the town of Basankusu, DRC. Despite current efforts to reduce deforestation through REDD+ and other initiatives, about 3.4 million hectares (13,127 square miles) of forest are currently being lost annually in Africa — the world’s highest rate of continental deforestation. Much of that loss is due to over-reliance on wood fuel. Photo by Francis Hannaway licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported licenseThat report attributes the rapid loss to over-reliance on wood fuel — still the primary energy source in Africa for cooking and heating — and to agricultural expansion, urban growth, infrastructure development, and mining.Deforestation and forest degradation account for roughly 30 percent of Africa’s greenhouse gas emissions, according to the 2012 World Bank Action Plan for Engagement in Forests and Trees in Africa. And that’s clearly why, say experts, REDD+ needs greater U.S. support, not less.Building Africa’s REDD+ capacity REDD+ initiatives are at varying stages of preparation and implementation across Africa. Projects are funded either by UN-REDD, the UN’s Global Environmental Facility (GEF), private companies, bilateral agreements, or through multilateral initiatives, such as those funded by the World Bank and the African Development Bank. Those funded by the GEF could be the ones most likely immediately impacted by Trump’s proposed budget cuts.Larwanou Mahaman, a forest ecology professor at the University of Niamey in Niger, and a senior project officer at the African Forest Forum (AFF), told Mongabay that despite the fact that some REDD+ projects in Africa have started off well, very few countries as yet have operational projects.“In most [African] countries, it’s [still] just paperwork — preparing the readiness phase, strategy, policies and legal frameworks — that go towards implementing REDD+. Local communities haven’t started benefiting from REDD+” as yet, Mahaman said. The ecology professor attributes this slow start to a lack of expertise available for writing bankable proposals, as well as a lack of organized environmental data, such as country forest inventories — data vital to the REDD+ application process.Smoldering charcoal mounds in North Kivu, DRC. The majority of rural communities in Africa depend on charcoal for energy, something that REDD+ projects can address. Photo by Sophie MbuguaThe African Forest Forum (AFF), an NGO, is trying to build that capacity by training African governments, civil society, researchers and the private sector in how to complete the REDD+ project application process in order to access currently available funds.Christophersen explained that African countries have yet to realize major REDD+ results compared to their counterparts in Latin America, “whose measurable REDD+ carbon emissions cuts can now be sold to voluntary markets.”The Côte d’Ivoire REDD+ start-up exampleChristophersen singles out Kenya, the DRC, Zambia and Côte d’Ivoire as among the few African countries to have so far effectively implemented REDD+ national strategies. Côte d’Ivoire has created a detailed roadmap for the implementation of its national REDD+ process, and could stand as an example and guide to the rest of the continent.That being said, the country stands in great need of REDD+ assistance. Its total forest area has fallen sharply due to high rates of deforestation and degradation. From 2001 to 2015, Côte d’Ivoire lost more than 1.8 million hectares (6,949 square miles) of forest.Over that same period, it only managed to restore about 230,000 hectares (888 square miles) of forest, says Global Forest Watch, which estimates that Côte d’Ivoire’s current forest biomass carbon stock stands at 1.9 billion metric tons.Côte d’Ivoire has been supported by UN-REDD, and has jointly implemented forestry programs through the FAO, UNEP, and UNDP totaling $791,000 — not nearly enough to address the nation’s serious rate of deforestation, but at least a start. It seems likely that the country’s REDD+ work will be largely unaffected by Trump’s proposed budget cuts.The benefits of REDD+ are many: projects keep forests intact, help sequester carbon, protect watersheds, conserve biodiversity, and aid communities in diversifying livelihoods. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayAfrica plays catch-upLaunched in 2008, UN-REDD in Developing Countries is currently supporting 64 partner nations across the Asia-Pacific, and Latin America and the Caribbean, including 28 countries in Africa. But the program is still far from meeting its potential, largely due to the complexities and unpredictable fluctuations of the voluntary carbon trading market.“Voluntary markets simply cannot generate sufficient funding to create the [sequestered] carbon volumes required to make a real difference to deforestation rates. Apart from which voluntary markets often simply displace deforestation to other areas within a country,” says PrabhuSome African countries have yet to sign up for national REDD+ assistance, noted Prabhu. This national sign up procedure is required to avoid “leakages” within each country, where one community might be preserving its forests, while another community might be cutting theirs down.“Countries aren’t signing up at the national level,” says Prabhu. So far “it’s mainly private projects being implemented, selling carbon to the voluntary markets, which do not prevent [in-country] leakages.” For example, “Mikoko Pamoja could be preserving one area of mangrove, but another [Kenyan] community might be cutting forests elsewhere. In the end, the net effect on climate [could be] zero [if the] REDD+ projects… are not nationally coordinated.”Christophersen said that African nations urgently need to change their approach to land use by implementing new top-down policies to govern and regulate forests. “REDD+ aims to bring to [each] country a policy coherence and effectiveness that changes the deforestation trends nationally. You can’t do that by [stand alone] projects.” Instead a holistic approach is required, “that includes policies of land tenure and its governance.”But even if all of Africa’s nations get their REDD+ act together, there is still the question of where the big money needed to do the job will come from — especially now that the U.S. has withdrawn its support for climate change related foreign aid.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Carol Van Strum, crusader against Agent Orange, wins prestigious environmental award

first_imgThe international David Brower Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding environmental and social justice work was presented to Strum on March 1, 2018.Strum is the author of “A Bitter Fog,” which tells the story of the fight she helped lead against aerial herbicide spraying in the Five Rivers area of Oregon, which led to a temporary ban on aerial pesticide spraying on federal forests.Though the ban was rescinded, the work done by Strum and others on the issue contributed to a new national forest policy that favors selective harvests without herbicides. Longtime environmental activist Carol Van Strum is now also the recipient of a prestigious environmental protection award for her decades of work. Strum was awarded the international David Brower Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding environmental and social justice work on March 1, 2018.Van Strum is the author of “A Bitter Fog,” which tells the story of the fight she helped lead against aerial spraying of Agent Orange and other herbicides in the Five Rivers, Oregon, area in the 1970s and ’80s. After a long legal battle, aerial pesticide spraying on federal forests was banned. Although the ban was rescinded, the work by Van Strum and others contributed to a new national forest policy that favors selective harvests without herbicides. She has also authored three other books and continued her activism and legal work in the defense of the environment.Van Strum’s massive collection of documents showing fraudulent studies and false data used for poisonous industrial products was digitized and put online under the moniker of the Poison Papers.Last year Van Strum got involved in another legal battle in to uphold the first American voter-approved ban on aerial pesticide spraying in Lincoln County, Oregon. The Lincoln County Community Rights group is up against a lawsuit from the timber industry to reverse the vote. Van Strum is supporting their efforts through the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund.Mongabay, where Van Strum previously worked as an editor, caught up with her by email:Mongabay: What are your thoughts about being named for this honor?Van Strum: I am pleased, but hardly for myself. It’s never been about me. The award honors mainly the many people and communities who have put the issue of mass poisonings on the map — that is, whether a corporation or government has the right to expose us to poisons without our consent.How much of what you experienced in fighting the use of Agent Orange in Oregon in the 1970s to ’80s, which you detail in your book “A Bitter Fog,” still applies today?What we accomplished back in the ’70s and ’80s was ultimately a complete halt to herbicide use on national forests, entailing a shift from vast clear-cuts to selective harvest and mixed species replanting. On private and corporate owned timberlands and state forests, however, the practice of clear-cutting and massive, aerial herbicide spraying continues, poisoning soil, wildlife, and water.Particularly in the Pacific Northwest, which is temperate rainforest, there is no possible way to apply poisons aerially without contaminating the surface waters, creeks, rivers, lakes and estuaries that are ubiquitous features of the landscape.Community efforts are growing to assert human and environmental rights to life and health over the rights of corporations to make profits.Carol Van Strum, 2014. Photo courtesy of Celina Kishna.There is so much new science on healthy forests in the past decade alone. Is selective harvesting of trees without herbicides still a solid approach?My own personal observations are a resounding yes. If you travel or fly around the area where I live, in the central Oregon Coast Range, you can tell immediately what lands are private/corporate owned and which are national forest.The corporate lands are effectively strip-mined, vast areas of bare soil punctuated by dead stumps here and there, the whole dead landscape sliding into creeks and rivers, not only poisoning aquatic life but silting up the spawning grounds of endangered coho and other salmon.The national forest, by contrast, is green and thriving, with a varied canopy of hemlock, cedar, alder, maple, et cetera, as well as the commercially valuable Douglas fir.Forests obviously grew quite well without herbicides before modern plantation forestry was invented.Back in the 1970s, when the USDA embraced the use of herbicides no longer allowed in Vietnam, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers amazingly criticized the idea, saying that northwest forests had evolved over millions of years to the most efficient possible use of the soil, climate, water, and geology of this area, and it was sheer arrogance to think humans could improve on that.Fraudulent studies and corruption where the use of pesticides and herbicides are concerned — still an issue today?Absolutely! The fraud and corruption detailed in “A Bitter Fog” are just better concealed today, as E.G. Vallianatos’s recent book, “Poison Spring,” makes abundantly clear.Vallianatos was a research chemist at the U.S. EPA for 25 years, during the time the fraud was first uncovered. What he reveals is that the entire process of pesticide registration is a sham, as EPA simply accepts summaries of safety testing submitted by the companies, and then EPA staffers cut and paste entire portions of those summaries into a registration approval.[According to the book], the EPA thus rubber-stamps whatever companies send them, making it extremely difficult for the public ever to see the actual studies or examine the raw data from the companies, which are not available under the Freedom of Information Act because they were never provided to the EPA.Tell us about the Poison Papers.The Poison Papers, also available as the Gemstone Files, are a huge, unwieldy mass — several tons — of documents that accumulated in my barn over the last 40 years of research and working on pesticide and poison cases such as the lawsuits against the Forest Service, the Agent Orange veterans’ litigation, personal injury cases by exposed workers, and numerous other cases involving PCBs and dioxin.The documents reveal corporate and government cover-ups of dioxin studies, collusion enabling continued registration of pesticides based on fraudulent or nonexistent studies, and blatant decisions to continue marketing known carcinogens and teratogens. Many if not most of the material is from discovery in such cases.Before a leaky roof or forest fire or local rodents could destroy the documents, we scanned them and made them available to the public both as the Poison Papers and as The Gemstone Files. The funding ran out, however, before we could begin to index and label the documents so they are difficult to use, but a team at Columbia University is seeking funding for that possibility.Carol Van Strum. Photo courtesy of Peggy Brewster.The Lincoln County Community Rights lawsuit you’re involved in could have a huge impact. What direction do you see the future of aerial pesticide spraying going?I think the community rights movement is getting stronger nationwide every day, as communities assert their rights to protect citizens from the corporate devastations of aerial spraying, fracking, off-shore oil drilling, and other horrors. Certainly neither the federal nor the state governments, bought and paid for by corporate interests, will act to protect us, so it is up to local governments to do so.The big issue is whether state and federal laws that place profits over people can pre-empt local government ordinances. Ultimately I think local folks will prevail, but how long that might take is a big question.The other issue I hope to see in future is recognition that the environment itself — nature — has an inherent right to exist without threat of damage or extinction. For this reason I have intervened in the current industry lawsuit challenging our voter-approved county ban on aerial spraying, representing the ecosystems of the county, speaking like the Lorax for the trees, the wildlife, the rivers.Banner image: Carol Van Strum, winter 2017. Photo courtesy of Nicholas Merrell.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Avoided Deforestation, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, forest degradation, Forest Loss, Forestry, Forests, Herbicides, Sustainable Forest Management center_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Cities need forests too: A call for forests amid our concrete jungles (commentary)

first_imgMore than half the world’s population lives in cities, and that’s set to rise to two-thirds – more than 6 billion people – by 2050. Yet we still depend on forests more than we think.Having wild places around is critical, not just for nature but also for people. A wealth of studies have shown that cities with plenty of trees feel like healthier, happier places than those without.While deforestation has many drivers, one underlying challenge is that society doesn’t value forests enough. That’s something we can – and need to – change as individuals and as a collective. It starts with spending time in forests, connecting with nature, and showing that we care.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Human beings evolved among trees. Even today, hundreds of millions of people live in and around forests, and depend upon them directly for their food, fuel, and livelihoods.Many of us, however, now live in concrete jungles instead. More than half the world’s population lives in cities, and that’s set to rise to two-thirds — more than 6 billion people — by 2050.Yet we still depend on forests more than we think. Take Hong Kong, where I live, for example. It’s the very picture of a modern metropolis, and one of the most densely populated regions on Earth. Step back from the skyscrapers and the bustling streets, though, and nearly a quarter of Hong Kong is forested.Hong Kong’s forests were once home to a vast range of species, including elephants and tigers. But over the centuries, large areas were cleared, and most of the remaining trees were felled for fuel during the Second World War.Over the last half-century, however, forests have been making a comeback through active replanting and natural regeneration. Protected parks cover around 40 per cent of Hong Kong’s territory today, and, while there are no plans to reintroduce tigers, these parks harbor incredible biodiversity: more than 2,100 native plants, 50 species of mammals, over 500 species of birds, and 230 different butterflies.For a city of more than 7 million inhabitants, having these wild places around is critical, not just for nature but also for people. A wealth of research has shown that cities with plenty of trees feel like healthier, happier places than those without.Forests and Hong Kong. Photo Credit: Alice Zhuang/WWF.As air pollution emerges as a major global health risk, urban trees can be highly effective filters, removing harmful pollutants and particulates from the air. They also shield us against noise pollution, which can have significant physiological and psychological impacts.Hong Kong, like many major cities, also depends on its forests for its water supply. Forests are like giant sponges that soak up rainfall and release it slowly, keeping reservoirs recharged while also reducing the risk of flooding.In addition to mitigating global climate change by storing carbon, trees help to control local temperatures, as well. As climate change brings more extreme heatwaves, urban “heat islands” are an increasing problem. Strategically placed trees in cities not only provide much-needed shade, but can also affect the local micro-climate — they have been shown to cool the air by as much as 8°C, and reduce air conditioning use by 30 percent.But having access to forests and other green spaces also benefits us on a much more personal level. Most days, I take my dog for a walk in the forest and feel re-energized by the experience. It’s not just about the physical exercise: getting out into nature is the best way of mentally recharging your batteries.The Japanese concept of shinrin-yoku (“forest bathing”) recognizes all of these benefits for humanity, and it is now taking off in other countries as urban dwellers seek to reconnect with nature. Forest bathing is about immersing yourself in the sights, sounds, and sensations of the forest — and a growing body of evidence suggests it has multiple health benefits, such as reducing stress, reducing blood pressure, and boosting the immune system.Around the world, we are losing millions of trees every day. Even here in Hong Kong, development continues to chip away at forests and other natural areas — a phenomenon WWF and many local organizations are working hard to prevent.While deforestation has many drivers, one underlying challenge is that society doesn’t value forests enough. That’s something we can — and need to — change as individuals and as a collective. It starts with spending time in forests, connecting with nature, and showing that we care.To celebrate International Day of Forests today and Earth Hour on Saturday, I urge you to take the first step. Connect to forests — go down to the woods. Take a walk. Take the kids or the dog. Take a forest bath. Take a moment to breathe deeper.Forests of Hong Kong. Photo Credit: Alice Zhuang/WWF.Alistair Monument leads WWF’s Forest Practice. He is a qualified forester and auditor with 25 years of experience in over 40 countries, from multi-stakeholder initiatives, ethical certification, and conservation, to workers’ rights, ethical finance, and strategic program development. Alistair was previously the Asia Pacific Director at the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and was the founding Director of Accreditation Services International, FSC’s accreditation agency and FSC’s Asia Pacific Regional Office. Air Pollution, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Commentary, Conservation, Editorials, Environment, Forests, Global Warming, Health, Noise Pollution, Pollution, Public Health, Researcher Perspective Series, Urbanization, Water Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

JC not ‘letting up’

first_img WINNING WAYS Jamaica College captain Allando Brown, who has been a difference maker and leader for the Inter-Secondary School Sports Association/FLOW Manning, Super and Olivier Shield holders, is promising ‘no let up’ as his school fight to defend their titles this season. Brown, who also represented the national Under-20 football team and Arnett Gardens in the Red Stripe Premier League, has been rock solid at centre for JC. He has scored some crucial goals and provided priceless leadership in the heart of defence to either keep clean sheets or limit opponents scoring. “Jamaica College is always about fighting spirit. No one can beat Jamaica College at 1-0. Trust me, I like the fight from our team always,” he said recently after their Walker Cup quarter-final penalty shoot-out win over Charlie Smith. Brown pulled an equaliser back in that game and scored a penalty, and although his team was eliminated in the semi-finals by Wolmer’s Boys, Brown later led them back to winning ways, courtesy of a 2-1 win over Vere Technical in the Flow Super Cup on Saturday. “Still hard work. The hard work never stops for us,” he said. “Our aim is to get all titles”. The captain maintained that he is motivated to give his all to the team previously led by former outstanding JC footballer Junior Flemmings. “I have to give credit to Junior Flemmings. I have been playing with Junior from under-14, and seeing how he executed as a leader, I am happy to come out here and follow and get the job done,” he said. Flemmings netted over 20 goals for the JC team last season, and is seemingly missed by a JC team which seemed more ruthless and clinical in front of goal last season when they took three of four titles.last_img read more

Oladipo’s triple lifts Pacers over Celtics

first_imgLATEST STORIES Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Stevens said Hayward, coming back from leg surgery, would remain restricted to fewer than 30 minutes per game for the foreseeable future.“He’s in the ‘increase by a tick’ phase,” Stevens said. “We’ll just keep evaluating him week to week. It’s a long-term plan based on getting him back to not only playing one game but 82 games. He’s probably pretty frustrated by it at times, but does a good job not showing it.”DÉJÀ VUOladipo’s shot came just more than one year after his first signature finger-pointing, “My city” celebration. On Oct. 29, 2017, three months after being traded to Indiana from Oklahoma City, Oladipo’s 3-pointer gave the Pacers a 97-94 win over San Antonio.UP NEXT:Celtics: Play the second-game of a five-game road trip against Denver on Monday.Pacers: Host Houston on Monday night. Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college View comments Giannis Antetokounmpo powers Bucks in bounce back win over Celtics PLAY LIST 02:29Giannis Antetokounmpo powers Bucks in bounce back win over Celtics01:38GCTA mess: BuCor given til March to review records of PDL returnees02:08‘Andas wall’ prevents blocking of Black Nazarene image02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award “We’re living on the edge a little too much,” said Horford, who had 14 points and six rebounds. “Maybe this will wake us up.”Tyreke Evans had 17 points for the Pacers, Bojan Bogdanovic scored 16, and Domantas Sabonis added 12 points, nine rebounds and five assists.Indiana trailed 28-18 after the first quarter, and by as many as 13 in the first half, but forged a tie at 45 at halftime and knotted the score at 72 on Evans’ last-second 3 to close the third period.“It was huge moving forward, just to get a good spirit and energy for our season,” Indiana guard Darren Collison said. “We all came together. Everybody had their moments. In those situations when you’re playing a good team you can’t lose focus. You just never know when the game is going to change.”Marcus Morris had a team-high 23 points and six rebounds for the Celtics.“We got beat by a good team,” Boston coach Brad Stevens said. “Oladipo made a big shot.”TIP-INSCeltics: Irving finished with 18 points and six boards, and Hayward was the only starter not to score in double figures, finishing with four points and seven rebounds. . Marcus Smart contributed three points and nine assists. . The loss also snapped Boston’s three-game win streak in Indianapolis.Pacers: TJ Leaf, a second-year forward out of UCLA, entered with only two points all season but scored five Saturday in his customary second-quarter stint. Leaf played the first five minutes of the fourth quarter and added a dunk to finish with seven points. . The team waived forward Ben Moore and recalled center Ike Anigbogu from the G League.WORKING HIS WAY BACK Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew The All-Star guard, who was battling bronchitis, finished with 24 points and 12 rebounds and said he envisions his heroics.“Moments like this, yeah,” Oladipo said, “and moments like this down the line.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissThe game was a tense affair with 10 ties and 18 lead changes and a compelling matchup between Indiana and Boston.The Celtics led 101-97 when Kyrie Irving hit a 3 with 37.2 seconds to go, but Jaylen Brown fouled Oladipo at 29.2 seconds, and he made both free throws to set up the dramatic finish. Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew MOST READ Indiana Pacers guard Victor Oladipo, right, passes the basketball defended by Boston Celtics guard Jaylen Brown during an NBA basketball game, Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/R Brent Smith)INDIANAPOLIS — Victor Oladipo heard the final buzzer and pranced to the sideline, pointing both index fingers to the floor, and mouthing, “My city.”Oladipo’s 3-pointer with 3.4 seconds remaining Saturday night gave Indiana a 102-101 comeback victory over the Boston Celtics and was yet another example of his increasingly routine heroics at Bankers Life Fieldhouse.ADVERTISEMENT With 11 seconds left, Oladipo rebounded Irving’s miss, dribbled across midcourt and pulled up from the right wing, launching over the outstretched arms of Boston center Al Horford. As the ball dropped through the net, Oladipo skipped toward the bench.“We were really calm,” Oladipo said. “The crowd was excited, but we were calm. We knew we needed one more stop.”After the Celtics used a timeout to advance the ball and draw up a final play, Gordon Hayward inbounded but had his pass deflected and stolen by Oladipo, snapping a four-game win streak for Boston, which reached the Eastern Conference finals last spring.The Pacers, coming off a first-round playoff exit, passed an early-season test in large part by repeatedly earning free throws. While Boston attempted only nine, and made six, Indiana shot 19 of 25 from the line.That came in handy on a night Boston shot 43 percent (38 for 88) and the Pacers 41 percent (36 for 87).ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Lamb has season-high 19, Hornets rout Cavaliers Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plumlast_img read more

Courts Pee-Wee Tournament refuelled and ready!

first_imgThe 7th annual Courts’ Pee-Wee Tournament is expected to kick-off in the coming weeks, giving younger school football enthusiasts opportunity to showcase their skills.Already a staple part of the physical education programmes at primary institutions of learning in Georgetown, on the East Bank, and on the East and West Coasts of Demerara, the competition is again being sponsored by Courts Guyana and organised by the Petra Organisation.The Petra Organisation is striving to upkeep the competition, and with assistance of Courts Guyana and new sponsors Banks DIH, that is a possibility.Petra’s Co-Director Troy Mendonca spoke on the history of the tournament, and noted that it was once played through clubs. He said that when an alternative was needed, the organisation turned to the schools.Further, he highlighted the contributions that the tournament has made over theCourts’ Managing Director Clyde DeHaas makes a point during the launch of the seventh edition of the Courts Pee Wee Tournamentcourse of its existence.“So I want you, the youngsters, to understand that what you’re going to enjoy for the next seven weeks is preparation and hard work for seven years. More so, this program is in keeping with efforts being made at the FIFA level, and by extension the GFF, where a lot of emphasis is being placed on youth football,” Mendonca said.Courts’ Managing Director Clyde DeHass noted that the company has found a partner in Petra, and is happy to be exercising its corporate social responsibility.“I think it was a very good alignment of the celestial bodies that the meeting took place, and we found the right partner in the Petra Organisation, whereby we can channel some of the funds we have available for development and to play our part as a corporate entity.” He explained.Stressing that the company would do its utmost to continue the tournament over the years to come, Mendonca said, “And I can tell you that, after six years, we have not been disappointed. We have seen this competition grow (from) year to year (and from) strength to strength; because even if we have the funds we want to spend to develop communities, if we don’t have a partner to help execute the plans, then we cannot do anything.”Also coming on board for sponsorship is Banks DIH, under its Rainforest Waters and Malta Supreme brand. Here’s what their brand Manager, Clayton McKenzie, had to say: “Banks DIH wouldn’t be supportive of a programme if it is not worth it. We look at the investment in children and physical activity, because we at Banks DIH believe that sports is equally important to academic development and academic achievement.”The tournament will kick off on September 29 with 32 primary school teams involved. The teams, which hail from Georgetown, East Bank, East Coast and the West Coast of Demerara, are being placed in eight groups of four. In previous years, the tournament was held at the Thirst Park ground. However, the matches will now strictly be hosted at the YMCA playing field, and will begin at 10hrs every Saturday for the next seven weeks.Participating schools are: Marian Academy, Mae’s, School of the Nations, West Ruimveldt, South, St Pius, Smith’s Memorial, Winfer Gardens, Enterprise, Sophia, St Margaret’s, St Agnes, Tucville, St Ambrose, North Georgetown, F.E. Pollard, J.E. Burnham, St Stephens, Stella Maris, Colaaco, Victoria, Grove, Mocha- Arcadia, Redeemer, St Gabriel’s, Soesdyke, Timehri, Supply, Golden Grove, Goed Fortuin, Den Amstel and Clonbrook.last_img read more

Hazmat spill prompts Universal Hilton evacuation

first_img Approximately 30 employees were evacuated. Most declined medical treatment, opting to see their private physicians. Two males, a 53-year-old man complained of throat irritation and chest tightness. A second, 44-year-old man, with a history of asthma complained of severe shortness of breath. Both were transported to area hospitals. It took 71 firefighters a little over two hours to render the two floors safe to be occupied. UNIVERSAL CITY – Laundry room employees at the Universal Hilton Hotel inadvertently mixed ammonia and bleach, causing throat irritation and shortness of breath to two men and the evacuation of 30 employees, fire officials said. The Report of a chemical spill occurred at 4:08 p.m. Thursday at 555 Universal Hollywood Drive in the Cahuenga Pass area. Callers complained of throat irritation and shortness of breath, prompting dispatchers to upgrade the incident to Hazardous materials crew callout to the hotel. Firefighters found that the spill affected two floors, one housing the laundry and one housing the kitchen area. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more