SP spins in with K200,000 for Cricket PNG

first_imgThe cheque presentation was made today at the SP Brewkettle in Port Moresby. The sponsorship comes under SP’s Export Radler Brand.General Manager of CPNG, Greg Campbell thanked SP saying they (SP) have been a sponsor for CPNG many times in the past and was grateful they had renewed their sponsorship.“This is of course not a new partnership between SP and CPNG, and we look forward to building this relationship with promising prospects at present and the near future,” said Campbell.He added the money will not only be used for the high performance programs for the Hebou PNG Barramundis and the City Pharmacy Lewas, but also for carrying out education and awareness programs in schools and to get more youths involved in the sport.Managing Director of SP Brewery, Stan Joyce said that he had every confidence that the sponsorship will continue to raise the bar of cricket in PNG.“Cricket has grown from strength to strength over the years due to its administration. It’s successes on the field is attributed to its success in managing the code in a transparent and efficient manner,” said Joyce.last_img read more

New year, wishes intact – AS.com

first_imgThe plans of Paco López, El Cholo and the call to Valera2019 your team finished it at its best. With +12 on the descent, tranquility. Something grounded at home (5 wins, two losses; outside is something else, six losses) and in the boot of Roger, with 61% effectiveness in the auction. His doublets against Valencia and Celta are gasoline of good feelings. Sergio León, tonsillitis, and Miramón, knee, are low. The high is Coke, always pundonor. The eleven, gala. With Morales always there, the ball stopped by Bardhi and Roger. Back Aitor, goalkeeper who else stops, in a duel with Oblak. With their farewell, the rojiblancos will begin this 2020 in which the purposes remain the same. Aspire for everything, look straight ahead at Madrid and Barça, although the first one is five points away in LaLiga and the second one is seven, in this month of the Spanish Super Cup and Copa del Rey. The effort in this team is still not negotiated, whether in transition or not. It’s cholista law. A Cholo who has been writing the same wish for months. A 9. These days are key. The exit of a Lemar, which is not due to muscle injury, may be the key. Vitolo returns to the list. Savic and Koke not yet. Atleti closes the first round with party around the countryside, with Three Wise Men, chocolate and roscón and six goals in the last three games. A feast after so much hunger. 20 has been in the league. And he does it before the Levante de Paco López, who has not won. And that is one of his wishes in the letter to 2020. Only he was left. Filipe Luis. The last to leave Atlético of the first Cholo men, those who formed their eleven at La Rosaleda, on January 7 eight years ago. Those who gave so much, foundations of how much came later. Tiago, Gabi, Miranda, Godín, Juanfran … The last two left last summer, like Filipe, who turned off the light on that photo. Today, like the others, You will receive a tribute for both. Similar to Juanfran before Atleti-Osasuna. Only he was missing.center_img The novelty in the Atleti is Correa, maximum assistant, will very deservedly occupy the site of Lemar. The rest, what he has: Herrera and Thomas on the pivot, Saul on the left and João on top. The bands for Trippier and Lodi, two wasps, in a tribute to whom he ran so much left and today will look from the box. Obrigado, Philip. Forever one of noi.last_img read more

As America’s Endangered Species List turns 50, uncertainty abounds

first_imgArticle published by Rhett Butler On March 11, 1967, 78 animals were added to the Endangered Species List following the passage of the Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966.That legislation laid the groundwork for the Endangered Species Act, which was passed in 1969 and greatly strengthened in 1973.But with the new administration promising a roll-back of environmental regulations, there are concerns that protections for endangered species could suffer.J Mark Fowler, a wildlife advocate and filmmaker, says this development would be a tragedy for America and the world. With little fanfare, America’s Endangered Species List turned 50 last weekend.On March 11, 1967, 14 mammals, 36 birds, 22 fish, and 6 reptiles and amphibians were added to the list following the passage of the Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966. That legislation laid the groundwork for the Endangered Species Act, which was passed in 1969 and greatly strengthened by Richard Nixon and a Democrat-controlled Congress in 1973.Today more than 700 species of animals and 900 species of plants in the United States are listed under the Endangered Species Act. Another 673 foreign species are listed as threatened or endangered.But with the new administration promising a roll-back of environmental regulations, there are concerns that protections for endangered species could be one of the early casualties.J Mark Fowler, a wildlife spokesman and filmmaker who currently serves as Chairman of Wildlife & Conservation at the Explorers Club and Director of The Nature Initiative at Grace Farms Foundation, says this development would be a tragedy for America and the world.Fowler told Mongabay during a March 2017 interview that wildlife protection is a bipartisan issue, with animals serving as an inspiration for children and adults alike.AN INTERVIEW WITH MARK FOWLERMongabay.com: What is your background and how are you involved in wildlife conservation?J Mark Fowler: I currently serve as Chairman of Wildlife and Conservation at the Explorers Club, and I am Director of the Nature Initiative at Grace Farms Foundation in New Canaan, Connecticut. My personal and professional mission is to preserve wildlife habitat, restore endangered species and inspire the public to explore and reconnect to the natural world.I have been working with wildlife and educating the public about wildlife since I was a boy. I was lucky enough to have grown up being exposed to the most beautiful wildlife and wild places on the planet, while traveling with my father Jim Fowler, Host of Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom. We also have a wildlife preserve in Georgia, where I grew up around endangered species such as wolves, eagles, bears, and panthers, as well as African wildlife such as zebras, Eland antelope, and ostrich, among many others.Since I have been able to grow up and be exposed to the most majestic and awe-inspiring wildlife on the planet, I have become a champion for endangered species preservation. Once you see the beauty of the natural world, you have to share that excitement with the public.In order to advocate for wildlife and endangered species, I hosted a nationally syndicated wildlife TV series named Life in the Wild, which was Emmy-nominated, and I have produced National Geographic documentaries.Today, most of the incredible animals that I grew up seeing in the wild, such as elephants, lions, rhinos, tigers, giraffes, cheetahs, gorillas and leopards, are all highly endangered and facing extinction, so I have focused my efforts on being a full time endangered species advocate and spokesperson for wildlife.Mongabay.com: This past weekend was the 50th anniversary of the first Endangered Species List (ESL). Why was that such a big deal?J Mark Fowler: The 50th anniversary of the Endangered Species List is so important because we as a nation finally realized that our most beautiful and majestic animals were on the verge of disappearing and we took action to save them. The bald eagle, gray wolf, Florida panther, grizzly bear, California condor, American alligator, and manatee among many others, were all on the brink of extinction due to habitat loss and unregulated hunting until Mar 11th, 1967 when we as a nation took action to save them by listing them on the first Endangered Species List (ESL).Listing these animals as endangered species enabled them and their habitats to be protected from logging, mining, drilling, development and unsustainable hunting. In 1967 there were 78 animals listed on the ESL, and today there are over 1600 endangered animals and plants on the ESL. Since its inception 99 percent of the animals put on the Endangered Species List have been saved from extinction. It has been a major success in preventing extinction!Because we took action 50 years ago and made endangered species preservation a priority, multiple generations since have grown up seeing our most beautiful and majestic animals come back from the brink and start to thrive again. If we hadn’t made endangered species preservation a national priority 50 years ago, all the generations since would have most likely been only able to see gray wolves, grizzly bear, bald eagles, red wolves and Florida panthers in old photographs.Mongabay.com: What is your outlook for the Endangered Species Act, especially in the context of the current political climate?Mark FowlerJ Mark Fowler: The Endangered Species Act is a groundbreaking law that had bipartisan support and was signed by Republican President Richard Nixon. The ESA has become a groundbreaking force for US and international wildlife conservation. In fact, the Endangered Species Preservation Act established the framework for the creation of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), which affords 35,000 threatened and endangered species of plants and animals varying levels of protection worldwide. The U.S. is the leader in endangered species protection, recovery and reintroduction.But major challenges lie ahead. Some of the most majestic animals on earth—both domestic and international—are still threatened with extinction.Today, the Endangered Species Act itself is under major threat of becoming extinct. The new Congress and the Trump administration are calling for de-regulating, defunding, dismantling and even repealing the ESA, so that public lands and protected habitats can be opened up to oil, gas, mining, and logging.Mongabay.com: Would gutting the ESA and other environmental regulations have impacts beyond the U.S. border?J Mark Fowler: Gutting the ESA would have major ramifications domestically and internationally. The current Endangered Species List covers not only domestic wildlife, but it also governs and restricts the trade of rhinos, lions, elephants, cheetah, leopards, tigers and hundreds of other endangered species abroad. The ESA is the best and most wide-ranging tool internationally to protect the planet’s most beautiful species.Mongabay.com: Why do you think wildlife conservation has become such a politicized issue when it still enjoys such wide public support?J Mark Fowler: Today, the new Congress and the Administration are trying to deregulate protected public lands and wildlife habitats for short-term gains from oil, mining, gas, and logging extraction. This could heavily impact our national parks, forests, wildlife preserves, and national monuments. It makes exploitation of nature a higher priority than protecting wildlife, wilderness and the natural world for all of humanity. This runs completely against all recent polling, which shows that 9 out of 10 US citizens support the Endangered Species Act.The reason wildlife conservation and endangered species preservation are so important to the public is that almost every child grows up loving animals and wildlife. Many kids want to be wildlife experts or veterinarians when they grow up. In fact more people go to zoos per year than all sporting events combined. This little-known fact shows that we as humans have an innate need to connect with wildlife and nature. This is particularly an issue in our modern society: we may be more connected digitally than ever, but we are more disconnected from the natural world than anytime in human history, so we need to continue to make endangered species preservation a priority so wildlife and their habitats are around for future generations.Many biologists are calling the current age “the sixth mass extinction”. A human-caused worldwide extinction, due to habitat loss; damage from unregulated industry; pollution of land, sea, air and water; exploitation of wildlife; and the effects of climate change. The ESA is the most effective tool in stopping this mass extinction.Mongabay.com: What can people do to help?J Mark Fowler: What can you do? Get Involved: Vote, donate and volunteer in support the Endangered Species Act and preservation on a local, national and international basis. Engage with your local members of Congress and voice support for the Endangered Species Act.How we treat nature, wilderness, wildlife, directly affects the quality of life for all humans on Earth. Help preserve the most beautiful and iconic species on the planet for future generations to come. Conservation, conservation players, Endangered Species, Endangered Species Act, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Interviews, Wildlife center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Mounting outcry over Indonesian palm oil bill as legislators press on

first_imgDeforestation, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Fires, Forest Fires, Forestry, Forests, Haze, Palm Oil, Peatlands, Plantations, Politics, Rainforests, Southeast Asian Haze, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wetlands, Zero Deforestation Commitments Article published by mongabayauthor Banner image: A palm oil mill in Indonesia, where fruit from oil palm trees are processed into crude palm oil to be refined elsewhere into more complex chemicals. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The bill cements the right of oil palm planters to operate on peat soil, at a time when President Joko Widodo is trying to enforce new peat protections to stop another outbreak of devastating fires and haze.The bill has also been criticized for outlining a variety of tax breaks and duty relief schemes for palm oil investors, although those provisions have been dialed back — but not completely eliminated — in the latest draft.The bill’s main champion in the House of Representatives is the Golkar Party’s Firman Soebagyo. He says it will help farmers and protect Indonesian palm oil from foreign intervention.Responding to mounting public criticism, some cabinet members recently asked the House to abandon the bill, but Soebagyo, who is leading the deliberations, says they will continue. JAKARTA — A new palm oil bill is the latest battleground in the fight over how to regulate Indonesia’s plantation sector in the wake of the 2015 fire and haze crisis, one of the worst environmental disasters in the country’s history.Legislators pushing the bill say it will help farmers and protect the nation’s palm oil industry from foreign intervention. But critics say it is actually a plum deal for large corporations, as well as a means for vested interests to undermine peatland protection measures President Joko Widodo installed to prevent a repeat of the 2015 fires, which burned an area the size of Vermont, emitted more carbon daily than all of Europe and sickened half a million people.The Indonesian Palm Oil Association (GAPKI) has expressed its support of the bill. The lobby group’s leaders speak often of a conspiracy by Western soybean and rapeseed oil interests to undermine Indonesian palm oil for competitive purposes. The Southeast Asian nation is the world’s largest producer of the commodity, found in everything from chocolate to laundry detergent. Firman Soebagyo, a member of House of Representatives Commission IV overseeing agriculture, plantations, fisheries, maritime affairs and food, is leading the deliberation on the bill. He frames it as needed to counter a foreign assault on Indonesian palm oil and ensure that the country’s poorest citizens can prosper. It is the same argument he has used to excoriate sustainability pledges made by the world’s largest refiners and users of palm oil. As a result of public pressure, consumer goods giants like Unilever and processors of the oil such as Wilmar International have promised to purge their supply chains of deforestation, peatland conversion, land grabbing and labor abuses; but while some Indonesian officials support these policies, Soebagyo and others have worked to dismantle them.“We won’t be lied to by developed countries that propagandize about palm oil harming the environment,” Soebagyo said last year with regard to the bill. “We oppose this negative campaign, because palm oil is our future.”President Jokowi’s administration responded to a mounting public outcry over the bill last week when State Secretary Pratikno sent a letter to the agriculture minister outlining criticisms of the bill. And then on Monday, at a meeting with the House’s Legislation Board, which is headed by Soebagyo, cabinet members questioned the need for the bill, since it overlaps with existing laws. Soebagyo replied that the ministers had not seen the latest draft of the bill, dated July 13, and that the House would press on.A sea of oil palm on Indonesia’s main western island of Sumatra. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Perhaps the greatest point of contention is that the bill cements the right of oil palm interests to operate on peat soil. The large-scale drainage of Indonesia’s peat swamp regions by plantation firms is the chief underlying cause of the fires that burn almost every year across the now-dried-out landscapes. These fires are a carbon bomb that makes Indonesia one of the top greenhouse gas emitters. After the 2015 disaster, President Jokowi declared a moratorium on peatland drainage. Industry groups and some government officials have spoken out against this and other measures on the grounds that they hurt investor confidence.Art by Prabha Mallya for Mongabay.Specifically, green groups point to an article of the bill that says plantations can exist on peat. While the stipulation is vague, critics argue it could be used to undermine attempts to keep plantation firms from expanding further into the nation’s peat zones, at a time when many are pushing for them to be dislodged from peatlands they already control. “This is a ‘rubber article’ — its interpretation is so wide, you can easily play around with it,” Greenpeace campaigner Annisa Rahmawati said in an interview. “It could be used to undermine the spirit of Jokowi’s commitment.”Farmers need to be allowed to plant peat with oil palm, Soebagyo believes. “For peat, the only thing farmers with two or three hectares can really make money off of planting is oil palm,” he said on the sidelines of Monday’s meeting. “If they’re not allowed to do that, how will they live? Are watermelon and pineapple really enough?”One of the bill’s selling points, according to Soebagyo, is that it obligates companies to form “partnerships” with farmers. In principle this is not new: oil palm firms have long been required to give the local community 20 percent of their land for smallholder cultivation. Companies typically ignore this mandate, with government officials failing to hold them accountable. “It’s rubbish,” Rahmawati said of the notion that the bill does anything more for farmers than existing legislation.“The laws aren’t the problem,” she added. “The problem is the implementation and enforcement of those laws.”An oil palm fruitlet in Indonesia’s Aceh province. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Another point of contention is corporate handouts. Previous drafts of the bill outlined a variety of tax breaks and duty relief schemes for palm oil investors; a coalition of NGOs decried that as “a corporate effort to drain state finances.” While those provisions were dialed back in the latest draft, it still mentions “fiscal incentives” to be provided by the state, suggesting that such measures could be laid out in implementing regulations to be issued by one or more ministries after the bill’s passage.New draft or not, the bill remains a problem, said Khalisah Khalid, head of campaigns at the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (Walhi), the country’s largest environmental pressure group and a member of the coalition. “They’re claiming they’re a big industry Indonesia should take pride in, but they’re always asking for privileges while there’s never been an improvement,” she said in an interview. The 2014 Plantation Law “already gives them many privileges.”Indonesia recently introduced a major subsidy via the Crude Palm Oil Supporting Fund, which, along with an increase in the required rate for blending palm oil with diesel fuel, is meant to prop up domestic demand for the commodity. (The CPO Fund, as it is known, was also justified on the basis of helping small farmers, but last month the Oil Palm Smallholders Union (SPKS) sued its management body, claiming the fund has only been used to benefit large companies.) Of the financial measures offered in the palm oil bill, Gadjah Mada University professor Rimawan Pradiptyo said in February, “Such excessive incentives will trigger the expansion of oil palm plantations, which will affect the sustainability and diversity of our forests.”Soebagyo replied to concerns about the bill fueling unsustainable land clearing by pointing to an article in the latest draft that obliges the government to draw up a masterplan for the industry. “We don’t have a blueprint and thus there’s no limit on how many hectares [plantations can expand].”The latest draft says nothing about a floor or ceiling for potential expansion, although such details could be stipulated in implementing regulations. It gives the government five years to create the masterplan.Felled oil palm trees on an illegal plantation in Indonesia’s westernmost Aceh province, where some local administrations have embarked on a drive to eradicate the illicit estates. Photo by Junaidi Hanafiah for Mongabay-Indonesia.The backlash against the bill is also about what it does not do. At a time when a huge number of oil palm firms are accused of grabbing indigenous lands, the bill says nothing about the need for companies to obtain free, prior and informed consent of communities before operating in their territory. At a time when reports of forced labor and other abusive practices are cropping up with increasing regularity, the bill says nothing about worker treatment.In the country’s easternmost region of Tanah Papua, where the industry is quickly expanding into some of Indonesia’s last best forests, civil society groups under the banner of the Papuan Coalition of Palm Oil Victims said lawmakers should be using their time to debate the long-awaited indigenous rights bill instead.“That’s much more important than this palm oil bill,” said John Gobay, a representative of the Meepago Tribal Council, one of the groups. FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Catch-all fisheries are squeezing Asia’s seahorses

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Rebecca Kessler Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Green, Illegal Fishing, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Overfishing, Wildlife center_img Tens of millions of seahorses are traded each year as pets, trinkets and for use in traditional medicine.But the greater threat comes from incidental bycatch by indiscriminate fishing gear, according to researchers.Seahorse researchers argue that improving fishing practices would protect seahorses, as well as many other species and their habitats. Some of the fishing boats around Phu Quoc Island off southwestern Vietnam use trawl nets that drag along the seafloor, catching everything in their sweep. Others send divers into the water to snag seahorses by hand.A recent study in the journal Fisheries Research by the Canada- and U.K.-based conservation group Project Seahorse estimates that between 127,000 and 269,000 seahorses are taken from the waters off this one island each year. Around Phu Quoc seahorses are harvested intentionally, but that isn’t the case in most places. By and large it is indiscriminate fisheries ensnaring seahorses as bycatch that is putting populations under pressure, the group contends.Fishermen check their seahorse haul. This boat had over 200 on board. Photo by Allison Stocks/ Project Seahorse.Trinkets and tonicsPhu Quoc isn’t the only place where fishermen target seahorses. In the Philippines, for instance, fishermen go out at night with lanterns and handpick seahorses from the ocean.But the study found that fishermen around Phu Quoc are using not just diving gear but also, for the first time on record, bottom trawls notorious for their destruction of the seafloor to specifically target seahorses. Some local fishermen earn the majority of their income from seahorse fishing alone, said Allison Stocks, a marine biologist with Project Seahorse, who led the study.According to a separate report from Project Seahorse, both incidental and targeted fishing results in an estimated 16.7 million seahorses caught across Vietnam every year. Contrary to past studies, which found that Vietnam’s seahorse consumption was small, the new report estimates that up to 40 percent of seahorses caught in the country enter the domestic market, which the authors say is both large and unregulated. Live seahorses are sold in shops on islands like Phu Quoc. Both live and dried seahorses end up in tonics (purported to cure backache, increase sexual virility, and much more), which are popular throughout the country. Others are dried, painted and made into key chains and other trinkets.Seahorse tonics for sale on Phu Quoc Island, Vietnam. Photo courtesy of Allison Stocks/ Project Seahorse.Many more seahorses, live and dried, are transported internationally, primarily to China. Worryingly, the researchers found that most Vietnamese seahorse exports were illegal and unreported.By Project Seahorse’s estimate, around 20 million seahorses are traded around the world each year. Kealan Doyle, a marine biologist and founder of the Irish NGO Save Our Seahorses, believes that the number is likely to be much higher. His organization floats figures as high as 150 million seahorses, which it extrapolated from undercover work in Chinese markets. But Sarah Foster, a program manager at Project Seahorse, says she hasn’t seen data that supports such a high number.Trade in all species of seahorses is regulated under Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). That means countries may issue export permits only if they can prove the trade isn’t harmful to wild seahorse populations. In 2013, Vietnam became the first country to face an export ban by CITES due to high levels of trade of the spotted seahorse (Hippocampus kuda), which is popular due to its large size and attractive speckled complexion. The ban remains in place.Since then, a handful of the 80 exporting countries have decided to self-impose export bans until they can monitor the impact on wild populations. This list includes Thailand, one of the world’s largest exporters, whose decision to halt trade in 2016 theoretically shrunk the legal trade in seahorses considerably. Other big exporters to self-impose bans include China, Malaysia and Indonesia.But Daniel Kachelreiss, a marine species officer at the CITES Secretariat in Geneva, said that export bans, or “zero-quotas,” like these don’t necessarily help conservation of the species in question.“Having a zero-export quota is a way of more visibly saying we cannot make a NDR,” he explained, using the acronym for “non-detriment finding” — a study proving the fishing doesn’t harm wild populations. He added that if underlying threats, such as bycatch, are not addressed in tandem, a ban could have little effect at all.Dried seahorses for sale in Hong Kong. Seahorses are frequently used in traditional medicine. Photo by Tyler Stiem/ Project Seahorse.Foster said she believes it’s unlikely that the bans halted all trade and that it’s probably occurring at similar levels, only now out of sight. Moreover, the majority — up to 95 percent — of seahorses taken from the water are caught as bycatch in trawls and other indiscriminate fishing gear, not by targeted fisheries like the one in Phu Quoc, according to a 2011 paper she co-authored. Some of this incidental seahorse catch enters the international trade; some does not.“Even though there is a trade ban, that fishing is still happening,” Foster said.The median bycatch numbers are quite low, one seahorse per vessel per day, which can give the false impression that bycatch is not a problem, she and her colleagues found earlier this year. In contrast, designated seahorse fisheries can result in far higher catch rates; in Vietnam the team found rates of between 23 and 32 seahorses per vessel per day.But when the number of fishing vessels sailing out daily around the world is totted up, those single bycaught seahorses quickly become millions every year. Project Seahorse estimated that 37 million seahorses are caught this way in just 22 countries each year. The number caught incidentally around the globe is probably much higher.Ending the use of seahorses in traditional medicine would be great, Foster said, but it probably wouldn’t make much of a difference to the survival of seahorses in the wild. “Even if seahorses were not being consumed by traditional medicine, they’d still be getting caught in massive numbers by non-selective fishing gear. That’s the problem that needs to be solved,” she said.“There is just an unsustainable amount of fishing effort,” Foster went on. “If countries can get that fishing effort in check such that fishing of seahorses is sustainable, then the trade will be sustainable.”The spotted seahorse (Hippocampus kuda) is widely distributed but listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN because it’s one of the most commonly traded species. In 2013, in an effort to make the country’s trade sustainable, CITES placed a ban on Vietnam exporting H. kuda. Photo by Bettina Balnis Guylian/ Seahorses of the World.Creatures of PoseidonThere are at least 43 species of seahorse, all in the genus Hippocampus, and they are incredible specimens of evolution. The ancient Greeks seemed to have known this as they depicted the god Poseidon’s great chariot pulled through the Mediterranean by seahorses. Maybe the Greeks were impressed by their camouflage capabilities, which allow them to blend seamlessly into a bed of coral, or their coiling, prehensile tail, which can anchor them to almost anything in their watery habitat.Male seahorses also go through a true birth. The female deposits eggs in a male’s pouch and leaves him to brood the young. Many species are monogamous, mating with one partner for their entire lives. “They are just magical,” Foster said.Unfortunately for seahorses, those same adaptations are playing against them in a human-dominated world. Their camouflage abilities make them rather difficult to study and monitor, and their monogamous nature means that killing or capturing one is more like killing a few thousand future seahorses because the partner does not mate again, Doyle said.Nobody is sure how populations are doing in the wild generally since there have been no systematic surveys, but some appear to be declining locally. In unpublished research, fishermen around Phu Quoc reported that seahorse catches had declined by up to 95 percent between 2004 and 2014.Many species of seahorse cover a wide geographic range, so global extinction is unlikely. But extirpations, or local extinctions, are a real possibility for some heavily exploited species like H. kuda, according to Foster.She and other seahorse researchers regard the little fish as key ambassador species for marine ecosystems. “At Project Seahorse we like to say if we can save the seahorses we can save the seas,” she said.That may sound like a piece of canny marketing, but the group says that measures to protect seahorses, such as stopping harmful, non-selective fishing practices like bottom trawling, also aid other small fish and the ecosystems themselves.Bycatch from trawl fishing in Vietnam includes a range of small fish, octopus, squid, and seahorses. Small average daily catches add up to an estimated 37 million seahorses caught this way every year in just 22 countries, according to research by Project Seahorse. Photo by Allison Stocks/ Project Seahorse.Foster said that enforcing bans on coastal trawling in Thailand and Indonesia, particularly in protected areas, would be a good start.Off Phu Quoc, for instance, the few protected marine areas are not respected, Stocks said. She has frequently seen buoys used to mark the no-fishing zone washed up on the shore after being cut, presumably by fishermen. And she said catches from small vessels are not regularly inspected — a common occurrence in large fishing countries around the world.In Doyle’s view, however, what is needed to secure the future of seahorses is community buy-in. He said that when people see the benefits of protecting their local fauna, they’ll be more likely to do so.In Vietnam, Stocks saw that local people continue to fish seahorses, and anything else for that matter, as long as it makes them money. The seahorse decline hasn’t gone unnoticed by locals, and many understand that if current fishing rates continue, seahorses could soon disappear from the area. But needs must: “Fishing is how there’s food on the table. That’s how they survive,” Stocks said. “It’s kind of like if I don’t do it, someone else will.”This applies to catch-all fishing as well. Eliminating bottom trawling would do away with one of the major threats to seahorses, as well as numerous other species and their habitats. “But what does that mean for the people? Is that realistic, unless there is a system in place to provide alternatives?” Stocks said.She and other experts consulted for this story agreed that a sustainable trade in seahorses is possible. Positive steps are being made in the aquarium trade, for instance, where the availability of captive-bred animals has reduced the pressure on wild seahorses.But achieving full sustainability means answering questions that go far beyond the Hippocampus genus and the waters of Phu Quoc. It means dealing with the methods used in both industrial and small-scale fishing and, ultimately, figuring out how coastal people can maintain their livelihoods.White’s seahorse (Hippocampus whitei). This species is listed as Data Deficient by the IUCN, and was previously listed as Vulnerable, but there have been too few studies to say whether it remains at risk in the wild. Photo by Sylke Rohrlach via Flickr [CC BY-SA 2.0].CitationsStocks, A.P., Foster, S.J., Bat, N.K., Vincent, A.C.J. (2017). Catch as catch can: targeted and indiscriminate small-scale fishing of seahorses in Vietnam. Fisheries Research 196:27-33. Vincent, A.C.J., Foster, S.J., Koldewey, H.J. (2011). Conservation and management of seahorses and other Syngnathidae. Journal of Fish Biology 78(6):1681–1724.Vincent, A.C.J., Foster, S.J. (2017). Setting precedent in export regulations for marine fishes with seahorses. Fisheries 42(1):40-43. Lawson, J.M., Foster, S.J., Vincent, A.C.J. (2017). Low bycatch rates add up to big numbers for a genus of small fishes. Fisheries 42(1):19-33. last_img read more

Haiti’s most popular ecotourism destinations

first_imgArticle published by Genevieve Belmaker Coral Bleaching, Coral Reefs, Ecotourism, Forests, Islands Haiti has been described by experts as a locale of “one of the richest” stores of botanical diversity in the Caribbean.Home to some of the most pristine coral reef in the Caribbean, Haiti also boasts magical cascading natural pools and waterfalls that are also steeped in local lore and legend.Given its need for conservation coupled with being home to rare natural wonders, a possible boon for Haiti’s future might be found in ecotourism, a $600 billion a year global industry. The tropical Caribbean island of Haiti is a paradise with a rich, fascinating history, natural wonders, and diverse cultural offerings. It has also been named by some as the next big thing in regional tourism.But ecotourism in particular could become important for Haiti, with its rich land and sea biodiversity. Globally, the business of ecotourism generates more than $600 billion a year and is connected to hundreds of thousands of jobs.Haiti’s botanical diversity was described as “one of the richest” in the Caribbean by the US Forest Service in a report for USAID in 2010. It’s also under tremendous pressure and the clock is ticking. Less than 2 percent of Haiti remains forested. Endemic species of Haiti’s fauna – about 75 percent of their animals – are on the “brink of extinction,” according to USAID .Ecotourism could help turn the tide for Haiti’s 35 protected areas. The country’s coastline of 1,100 miles (1,775 kilometers), coastal shelf of over 1,900 square  miles (5,000 square kilometers), and five main offshore islands makes for a rich, biodiverse and varied regional ecology.Here are a few popular ecotourism options in Haiti:Waterfalls and natural poolsBassin Bleu near Jacmel. Photo courtesy of ExperienceHaiti.org.One of Haiti’s numerous waterfalls, Bassin Bleu is particularly stunning and popular. Just outside of a town called Jacmel, it is the finale in a series of three waterfalls after Bassin Palmiste and Bassin Clair.The series of cascading turquoise pools and waterfalls are steeped in the depths of Haiti’s tropical forest and local legends, and are only accessible by foot. The journey also requires making river crossings and using ropes to descend.MountainsThe mountains of Haiti. Photo by PO2 Daniel Barker/DVIDS.A good portion of Haiti’s 10,714 sq miles (7,750 square kilometers) of terrain is made up of mountains. In the north, the highest point in Haiti can be reached by hiking along a wide central plain, the Chaine de la Selle. It is perched at 9,100 feet (2,777 meters) above sea level.Haiti is about the size of Hawai’i, and there are numerous options for hiking, mountain biking, and exploration. The country has 10 national parks, several of which were just recently established.Scuba diving and snorkelingLabadee, Haiti. Photo courtesy of Brian Holland/Wikimedia CommonsHaiti is home to 11 ports, and is a diving and snorkeling paradise. There are 17 marine reserves, many of which are popular scuba diving, snorkeling and boating destinations. Overall, there is captivating variety of human and natural wonders to explore – from shipwrecks to coral reef.Security concerns may have contributed to the health of some of the reefs in the area by keeping away more cautious visitors. Much of Haiti’s coral reef seems to have escaped the coral bleaching affecting surrounding locations in the Caribbean.Banner image: Black-spotted Nudibranch (Ceratophyllidia papilligera). Photo by Nick Hobgood/via Wikimedia Commons.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Safe spaces: Tackling sexual harassment in science

first_imgConservation, Featured, Forestry, Forests, Rainforests, Research, Science, Social Justice, Tropical Forests, Women In Science Through this 3-month long investigation, Mongabay examined a variety of common situations in sciences where people are victimized by uneven power dynamics and abuses of authority in the sciences across the Americas.Most of those who spoke to Mongabay for this story asked to remain anonymous for fear of serious repercussions for their career.Though those interviewed were based throughout the Americas, Mongabay has received other tips from around the world describing a wide variety of abuses of power. Far away from the red carpets of Hollywood, an aspiring scientist in Guyana, South America, is being discouraged by her parents from going on a field trip because of worries for her reputation and safety. They’ve heard stories of what can happen to young women on such expeditions.“Often more than 90 percent of our field staff are male,” logistics assistant Natasha* told Mongabay. “I’ve heard reports of sexual harassment, and when females go along on these trips, particularly if they are young and unmarried, there’s a perception that because she’s with these men, she will be having sex. Valid or not, this is discouraging for women.”This is #metoo in the world of conservation. There are no shiny pins saying “Time’s Up.” No speeches. No applause. Just ordinary women beating back inappropriate sexual comments, unwanted advances and aggressive behaviour to progress in their chosen career.A field biologist conducts a survey for special status plants. NPS photo.In 2017, high-profile reports of sexual harassment at the hands of male scientists and professors rippled across the scientific community and even into the mainstream media, but they’re just the tip of the iceberg.Under the surfaceWhen Angela* heard the news reports about sexual harassment of scientists in Antarctica it brought back unpleasant memories of her own time at McMurdo, the largest US research center on the icy continent.“When I saw the headline, there were at least three people I was guessing it would be,” the life sciences doctor told Mongabay. “And Dave [Marchant, the man accused] wasn’t one of the three [I thought of]. That’s how rampant this problem is.”The choice to not speak out, said Angela, is often out of self-preservation.“Almost every woman I know in science has a harassment or discrimination story to tell – but, and I speak only for myself, we don’t want to make waves or open old wounds.”Recently, Scientific American published a comprehensive overview, Confronting Sexual Harassment in Science, highlighting moves by different US institutions to intervene in and prevent such behaviors. Another piece in Science magazine also dug into the issue.In one study cited, the Survey of Academic Field Experiences (2014), approximately two-thirds of respondents stated that they had personally experienced sexual harassment – defined here as inappropriate or sexual remarks, comments about physical beauty, cognitive sex differences, or other such jokes.A Mosaics in Science program participant conducts field work at Lava Beds National Monument. NPS Photo.More than 20 percent reported that they had personally experienced sexual assault.To get a sense of some of the issues at play, Mongabay spoke to a cross-section of women working in science across the Americas to hear their experiences.An unwanted lessonFor some of the women we spoke to, it began in the classroom.Just a couple of months into starting her PhD, conservation biologist Monica* was emailed explicit photos by her lab professor. “We’re talking sexual images, very inappropriate,” she told Mongabay. “I thought: this must be a mistake. But then it happened again.”While she said her gut reaction was to raise it with the dean, she ultimately decided not to – worried she wouldn’t get her PhD, would fall out with the university or have to start again. “So I never did anything about it. I just left his lab and started with my next advisor.”For others, the huge pressures to succeed manifested in unequal “consensual” relationships with senior staff.“I have several colleagues who were taken advantage of by their PhD advisers,” Natalia*, doctor of ecology, told Mongabay in an email exchange.“Whereas both parties may at different times perceive this as a ‘normal relationship’, so many times in retrospect (or even as it’s happening) the junior person feels that they have no choice to say no to sleeping with their adviser because it will impact everything – their entire career.”Alone in their fieldThe same power games, harassment and inappropriate behavior continue into the workplace.A graduate student conducts shorebird research at Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska. NPS photo.One of the women Mongabay spoke to described being harassed and belittled. In one instance, a high-level official asked her, “Why don’t you just go and have a family and kids?” Another woman recalled a male colleague who would try to initiate explicit conversations, such as “When did you lose your virginity?”For manager Aesha*, even networking has proved problematic. “There are a lot of risks,” she said. “I’ve found myself in situations where I’ve networked with someone, given them my number to keep in touch, and conversations around work quickly became inappropriate and sexual.”Setting boundaries and shutting down unwanted behavior in the field is even trickier.While on expeditions, Monica said she has experienced bullying by men who seemed to be intimated by her familiarity or comfort with the work or setting: “It’s pretty strong when someone immediately wants to undermine you and shake your confidence because they’re insecure.”This can also manifest when romantic advances are turned down. “A couple of times people have tried to discredit me in some way in my work or make up something because it was very clear they were not ok with being rejected,” she said. “It’s really hard because you can’t put out all these fires that other people have lit.”Reporting upThere is an impression among some people that sexual harassment, abuse and intimidation don’t happen in science, especially not in so-called “conscious” fields such as conservation and ecology.On the Essequibo River close to Iwokrama River Lodge. Photo by Carinya Sharples/MongabayScientist Raquel Thomas-Caesar told Mongabay she has found most educated men who care for the environment to be respectful and compassionate.But, she said, she was surprised on one occasion, many years ago, when a trusted, overseas colleague in a supervisory position made an unwelcome sexual approach.She said she never reported the incident as she dealt with the situation privately – but also because she didn’t feel confident that upper-level management would address the situation adequately.Today, Thomas-Caesar makes use of her current employer’s sexual harassment policy to discipline such behavior and there have been a few occasions where staff have been dismissed.Changing the climateHaving specific policies in place is important when tackling institutional sexual harassment, but the reporting process must also be clear, open and non-judgmental – and those found guilty properly penalized.In November 2017, the Huffington Post reported that an engineering professor at Princeton University had been found “responsible for sexual harassment”. His reported punishment: to attend training.“People are really mad on campus right now,” said Andrea Graham, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, in an interview with Mongabay in December. “They’re really angry at such a light punishment.” In response, the university has set up an advisory committee to review its sexual-misconduct policies.Meanwhile, in her own department, Graham chairs a Climate Committee that aims to promote transparency, diversity and inclusivity. The committee, set up in early 2016, is made up of two peer-selected graduate students, post-doctoral students, one staff member and three faculty members.“Just opening the conversation has been incredibly therapeutic and already productive,” she said. “Activism, or just actions, and cultural change induced by how awful things are right now maybe ultimately will make it all worthwhile. That’s what makes it feasible for me to march on despite the horrible news every day.”*Names have been changed to protect the identities of individuals.Carinya Sharples is a Guyana-based foreign correspondent. You can find her on Twitter at @carinyasharples.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Radar returns to remote sensing through free, near-real-time global imagery

first_imgA recent MAAP analysis demonstrated the power of radar imagery to enable near real-time deforestation monitoring under cloud cover. The analysis focused on the Madre de Dios region in southeastern Peru, an area experiencing ongoing deforestation driven in large part by gold mining along the rivers and wetlands. Using radar, the project detected the loss of 3,260 acres [1,320 hectares] of forest over the past year.Time series of deforestation in the Madre de Dios / Tambopata region of southeastern Peru. This animated series of Sentinel-1 radar images shows the spread of deforestation (shown in purple) from gold mining operations between January 2017 and February 2018, within a generally forested landscape, shown in yellowish-green. Image credit: MAAP, Data: ESA, SERNANP (Peru)Deforestation by gold miners expanded rapidly within study areas A, B, and C. Study area D is the Tambopata National Reserve, where illegal gold mining-related deforestation intensified in 2016 but was effectively halted in 2017.Detecting land use change that takes place during dark or rainy periods can offer radar data greater speed and accuracy in assessing total deforestation than is possible using just optical image data.This second image indicates where radar detected deforestation between January 2017 and February 2018 in these same study areas. Around half of this loss took place between October 2017 and February 2018, the rainy season, when the availability of good optical images was more limited due to persistent cloud cover.“We documented the illegal gold mining deforestation of over 1,600 acres [650 ha] between October and February, a time of year when there is little cloud-free optical imagery due to the beginning of the rainy season,” Finer said.Radar-detected deforestation between January 2017 and February 2018 (indicated in yellow and red) in the same study areas. Red indicates the 1,609 acres (650 ha) of forest lost since October 2017, during the rainy season. Image credit: MAAP, Data: ESA, SERNANP (Peru)An optical image of the same area misses some of the rainy-season deforestation detected by the radar imagery, suggesting that at this spatial extent and time period, radar more accurately detected the gold mining deforestation.An optical image of the same area did not capture all wet-season deforestation as well as the radar image. Each technology has advantages; freely available data allows monitoring teams to integrate findings from the two systems. Image credit: MAAP, Data from Planet Team (2017). Planet Application Program Interface: In Space for Life on Earth. San Francisco, CA. https://api.planet.comNew tools to analyze new data typesFiner said that although the Sentinel-1 imagery is free, it can be challenging to analyze because it uses just one band in the microwave part of the electromagnetic spectrum, “so it looks very different than an optical image and may be difficult for non-experts to analyze.” In contrast, Landsat has 8 or 11 different bands, and tools exist to analyze those bands to visualize where forest loss has occurred.“However, there are techniques, such as multiple polarizations, that provide richer data for [radar] analysis,” Finer said. “For example, in MAAP #79, we present dual polarization images, so there is a bit of color to them instead of just black and white of the single polarization image.”Intact palm wetland along a rainforest lake in southeastern Peru. Miners seek gold in the sediments, cutting trees and inputting harmful mercury into waters to identify the tiny gold pieces in the soil. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriThe MAAP project and others aim to spark more interest in radar monitoring among forest monitoring agencies and to develop tools for analyzing radar data. “Just like with optical imagery years ago,” Finer explained, “the transition from expensive to freely available data is sure to spark much innovation.”“There are initiatives to develop an automated forest loss detection system, similar to what [Global Forest Watch] GLAD alerts do with Landsat imagery,” Finer explained. “We plan on using radar much more this year in Peru and hope to show its power and utility to government officials working to improve the country’s near real-time monitoring and response capabilities.” The European Space Agency’s launch of the Sentinel-1 satellite has made 20-meter resolution radar imagery of the whole planet freely available.The “all-weather, day-and-night supply of imagery of Earth’s surface” complements standard optical satellite imagery in detecting forest loss, even under heavy cloud cover.The Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP) demonstrates the benefits of analyzing free radar imagery to accurately quantify wet season loss of rainforest in the Peruvian Amazon. Satellite imagery has transformed how we assess changes in forest cover.The standard optical sensors carried by Earth-orbiting satellites capture the energy from sunlight reflected off objects on the Earth’s surface. These sensors recognize levels of brightness and color in the reflectance, which enables users to distinguish between greener and browner vegetation, or row crops and savannah, as well as among objects, such as tree species, with different chemical properties.They cannot, however, see though clouds. Clouds block the reflectance data from reaching the sensor, which limits the effectiveness of even high-resolution (3-5 meter) satellite data, such as Planet or DigitalGlobe, in rainy regions like the Amazon.The Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), which uses remote sensing data to highlight deforestation hotspots in the western Amazon and activities that cause forest loss, has addressed this challenge with an alternative, 80-year-old technology—radar.MAAP now combines medium- and high-resolution optical data with the power of radar imagery to enable its team to monitor deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon year-round, in near real-time.The rainforest along a meandering river in southeastern Peru. Clouds block the “view” that satellites’ optical sensors have of the Earth below. Photo credit: Sue PalminteriAn all-weather, day-and-night source of imageryRadar technology uses radio waves to determine the location, distance, or velocity of objects.Originally RAdio Detection And Ranging, or RAdio Direction And Ranging, radar was developed for military use during the First and Second World Wars. It remained effective but expensive. That barrier changed in 2014, when the European Space Agency (ESA) launched its new Sentinel-1 satellite into space.Similar to the now-freely available 30-meter resolution Landsat optical imagery, the Sentinel-1 project provides a constant supply of free, 20-meter radar data for the entire planet.“With Sentinel-1, regardless of weather conditions, there is a crisp new image every 12 days at 20 meters resolution,” MAAP’s director Matthew Finer told Mongabay-Wildtech. “That is pretty incredible for monitoring in the Amazon.”ESA developed Sentinel-1—actually a pair of satellites, orbiting on opposite sides of the Earth— to monitor a wide range of natural and human activity, from the Arctic sea-ice extent to forest, earthquakes, oil spills, ships, and volcanoes.How can radar “see” changes on the Earth, such as deforestation, across landscapes that are shrouded in cloud cover for much of the year?How satellite-carried radar sensors emit radiation down to Earth and receive some of the reflected energy. Knowing the height and speed of the satellite and other details allows users to delineate the size, structure, and movement of objects on the Earth’s surface. Image credit: MAAPUnlike optical sensors, that only capture reflected energy and thus require the sun’s radiation, radar emits its own radiation, which can pass through the clouds. This energy, typically in the microwave portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, hits the Earth and bounces back to its sensor, even at night or in cloudy conditions.The radar sensor detects, measures, and times the backscattered microwave radiation. The time required for the radiation to travel to the object and return back to the sensor determines the object’s distance from the sensor.Radar cannot see color, but this time differential allows it to determine the structure and surface roughness of objects, such as buildings or trees of different height, width, and density. This process is repeated for all objects as the satellite passes by, enabling it to produce a two-dimensional image of the surface below.Quantifying site-level deforestation In the Peruvian Amazon, Sentinel-1 obtains imagery every 12 days with a resolution of  approximately 20 meters (66 feet), Finer said in an email. Article published by Sue Palminteri FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. A basic gold-mining operation along the Madre de Dios River in Peru on left. Photo credit: Sue Palminteri Aerial image of the fine-scale but devastating impact of gold mining to the southwestern Amazon’s rivers, wetlands, and forests. Photo credit: Rhett A. Butler Amazon, Analysis, data, Forests, Mapping, Monitoring, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Satellite Imagery, Sensors, Surveillance, Technology, Wildtech Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Dogs in India are a problem for wildlife, study finds

first_imgIndia is home to an estimated 60 million dogs, the fourth highest in the world.In a pan-India online survey, people reported domestic dogs attacking 80 species of Indian wildlife, of which 31 are listed under a threatened category on the IUCN Red List.Some experts have called for rethinking both dog population management and dog ownership policies in India, and addressing the threat of dogs as a conservation problem for wildlife. Dogs may be a human’s best friend, but can be a deadly menace to wildlife, including endangered species, according to a survey in India, home to the world’s fourth-biggest population of dogs.The findings, reported in a new study published in Animal Conservation, highlighted dog attacks on some 80 species, including threatened ones dwindling in numbers, such as the golden langur (Trachypithecus geei), the great Indian bustard (Ardeotis nigriceps) and the green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas). Nearly half of these attacks took place in or around protected areas, the survey found.India is home to about 60 million of the world’s estimated 1 billion dogs. In a bid to understand the impacts of free-ranging dogs on native wildlife in the country, which many experts claim is an “underreported” fact, Chandrima Home of the Bangalore-based Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment (ATREE) and colleagues zoomed in on dog-wildlife interactions in India through an online survey and scrutinized reports from national print media.“We found it is largely a problem across India, despite the limitations of an online survey,” Home told Mongabay-India. “Dogs were reported to attack nearly 80 species of wildlife and most of the attacks were on mammals, largely ungulates like cattle and small carnivores. In some places, respondents reported multiple attacks. Majority of these attacks were by free-ranging dogs unaccompanied by humans and in packs. Nearly half of the attacks led to the death of the animal.”A pack of dogs predating on a hog deer across the highway adjoining Kaziranga National Park. Photo by Arif Hussain and Dipen Nath of Aaranyak.Wildlife going to the dogsOf the species that dogs reportedly attacked, 31 are listed under a threatened category on the IUCN Red List, including four critically endangered species. These include the great Indian bustard and the Bengal florican (Houbaropsis bengalensis), as well as the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla). Others include the green sea turtle, Himalayan goral (Naemorhedus goral), Asiatic wild ass (Equus hemionus), red panda (Ailurus fulgens) and the golden langur.Some 73 percent of the 249 responses to Home’s online survey reported seeing domestic dogs attack wildlife, while nearly 78 percent of the respondents perceived the presence of dogs in and around wilderness areas to be harmful to wildlife.Globally, cats, dogs and even rodents and pigs are known to disrupt wildlife, endangering about 600 species that are classed as vulnerable to critically endangered in the IUCN Red List. Studies show dogs have contributed to 11 vertebrate extinctions and imperiled 188 threatened species worldwide.The high dog density in India is attributed to poor dog ownership rules and a lack of sustained efforts in population control, exacerbated by increased availability of food waste. Home said she believed a combination of all these factors influenced the negative impact of dogs on wildlife.“Since domestic dogs occur at densities higher than natural predators, the frequency of attacks on prey species is also likely to be high, especially in and around protected areas which are generally small in size in India,” she said. “Large mammals find it difficult to fight back when dogs charge in packs.”In India, most free-ranging dogs are loosely associated with humans, Home said. Even if they are pets, they are generally off the leash and therefore have a propensity to interact with wildlife in several cases, due to their proximity to buffer zones and protected areas.Dogs can venture out into these areas even if they are being fed at home. It is important to recognize the fact that a large proportion of these attacks occur without an accompanying human present, indicating that whether they are owned or not, these dogs’ free-ranging nature can have significant impacts on wildlife, Home said.“The effects of these attacks on populations that are actually in decline could be disastrous,” she said. “It’s almost like the final nail in the coffin. When a species such as the great Indian bustard has shown already serious decline due to numerous reasons, predation by domestic dogs can push the species to extinction.”However, the researchers cautioned against an “observation bias” in the data accumulated, since larger-sized species tend to get reported more.Dogs chasing an Indian wild ass in the Little Ran of Kutch, Gujarat. Photo by Kalyan Varma.Dogs exacerbate edge effectsAbout 48 percent of the attacks were reported within protected areas and the buffer areas around them, pointing to, as Home says, a “pervasive threat” to biodiversity. This highlights the role of dogs in driving changes at the boundaries of habitats, also called the edge effect, which has important implications for forest fragmentation and conservation.“When habitats are fragmented, there are several edge impacts,” Home said. “For example when a road passes through a protected area, there are impacts on the species that are at the boundaries. Similarly the movement of dogs within such areas and longer forays can extend the impact of the edge.”As an example, primatologist Parimal Bhattacharjee cites a recorded aggression in a small forest fragment in the northeastern state of Assam, in which a troop of six endangered Phayre’s leaf monkeys (Trachypithecus phayrei) were forced to abandon their regular areas following intense barking by domestic dogs.“Coupled with the fact that there is large scale destruction of habitat for the procurement of agricultural land and setting up new human settlements, high dependency of locals on fuel wood, the aggression between the Phayre’s leaf monkeys and dogs may result in expulsion of the monkeys from their native area,” Bhattacharjee, who was not associated with the study, told Mongabay-India.Dogs predating on a hog deer across the highway adjoining Kaziranga National Park. Photo by Arif Hussain and Dipen Nath of Aaranyak.Similarly, there are reports of golden langurs forced to clamber down from trees to cross roads and move across to the other side of the forest due to habitat fragmentation, and coming under attack from domestic dogs.“These [golden langurs] are non-urban species and when they enter villages at the edge of forests, they are subjected to aggression by dogs owned by villagers to protect livestock from predators,” Bhattacharjee said. “In certain areas, canopy construction was carried out to protect them from a combination of road kills and dog attacks.”Conservation biologist Sanjay Gubbi says domestic dogs have both direct and indirect impacts on wildlife, competing for prey with wild carnivores.“They hunt wild animals from smaller wildlife such as hare, monitor lizards to large mammals such as chital and sambar,” Gubbi of the Nature Conservation Foundation, who was not associated with the study, told Mongabay-India. “We see this regularly in our camera traps where domestic dogs are carrying or chasing wild prey. Hence they compete for prey with wild carnivores. Lowered wild prey density affects species such as leopards and can cause leopards to shift to domestic prey leading to increased human-wildlife conflict.”The experts also underscored domestic dogs as carriers of diseases that can be transmitted to wild animals such as the dhole, wolf, jackal, fox and other canids and felids.Dogs feasting on cattle carcasses at the Jorbeer dump in Rajasthan. Photo by Anoop Kumar/Desert National Park, RajasthanWhose dog is it anyway?About 87 percent of the people responding to the online survey felt the need to control dog populations around wilderness areas — an observation that underscores the need to rethink population management and address the threat of dogs as a conservation problem for wildlife, experts say. Some of the population control methods the respondents suggested using included trap-neuter-release, euthanasia, reducing food availability, or translocation of dogs to dog shelters.“When it comes to dog population management nobody actually wants to look at one of the most important problem in India, that is, dog ownership policies,” Home said. “People like to feed dogs (easy way to show compassion) but do not want to be responsible pet owners. Also sterilisation is considered the only way to curb population.“Restricting free-ranging behaviour is very important and that can only come with strong laws,” Home added. “In certain cases, hard decisions also have to be taken but in a humane way. One cannot have dogs around sensitive conservation areas. Disowned and feral ones should be removed. Animal welfare should not just be about dogs but also the gamut of wildlife being affected by the dogs themselves.”Dog feeding on barking deer. Photo by Siddharth Edake/The Energy and Resources Institute.However, behavioral biologist Anindita Bhadra, of the Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata, flagged a concern regarding the perception of dogs not being a part of the local biological diversity. “This is a very western view of dogs — dogs being considered only as pets. This is a very myopic view. Would researchers say the same about dholes or dingoes?” Bhadra said.Andrew Rowan, chief scientific officer for The Humane Society of the U.S. and former president and CEO of Humane Society International, said the issue of stray dogs killing wildlife in India is very similar to complaints in the U.S. by conservation biologists that cats are responsible for a huge proportion of bird mortality.“The core problem is the encroachment of human communities into protected areas and the humans are then accompanied by dogs who may, or may not, remain close to their human commensals as they explore their environment,” Rowan said.Citation:Home, C., Bhatnagar, Y.V., and Vanak, A.T. (2018) Canine Conundrum: domestic dogs as an invasive species and their impacts on wildlife in India. Animal Conservation. DOI: 10.1111/acv.12389This story was first published on April 3, 2018, by Mongabay-India. Article published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Animal Behavior, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Mammals, Protected Areas, Wildlife last_img read more

Buffon stars, Ronaldo draws blank

first_img DARTED IN With just minutes remaining, however, midfielder Bernardo Silva darted in to score the equaliser. In Group G, Riyad Mahrez struck the close-range winner in a 1-0 victory against FC Copenhagen that kept Leicester well on track for the next round after three straight wins. Leicester are five points clear of Copenhagen and FC Porto, which came from behind to beat Club Brugge 2-1 and condemn the Belgian side to a third successive loss. Juventus stayed top of Group H with seven points and ahead of Europa League champions Sevilla on goal difference. Sevilla won 1-0 at last-place Dinamo Zagreb, with French midfielder Samir Nasri scoring from close range during the first half. PARIS (AP): Gianluigi Buffon kept the shots out, while Cristiano Ronaldo failed to put them in. While Buffon starred in goal for Juventus, saving a penalty and making two remarkable saves in a 1-0 win at Lyon, it was a frustrating night for record-chasing Ronaldo in the Champions League. The Real Madrid forward needed only two goals to become the first player to score 100 career goals in European club competitions. But he could not muster even one for the holders in a 5-1 rout of Polish strugglers Legia Warsaw – which had lost five of their past seven matches. Madrid’s goals came from Wales forward Gareth Bale, an own-goal by Tomasz Jodlowiec and further strikes by Marco Asensio, Lucas Vazquez and Alvaro Morata, sealing an emphatic victory in Group F. Madrid are level on seven points with Borussia Dortmund, but the German side leads on goal difference after winning 2-1 at Sporting Lisbon. Prolific striker Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang – with his ninth goal in nine games – and Julian Weigl scored in the first half for Dortmund. Midfielder Bruno Cesar pulled one back midway through the second half after an indirect free kick was awarded near the penalty spot. Colombia midfielder Juan Cuadrado scored the winner for Juventus in the 76th minute with a brilliant angled strike, keeping the Turin team top of Group H. In Group E, Tottenham striker Son Heung-min came back to his old club Bayer Leverkusen, but the German side did most of the attacking in a 0-0 draw that suited Monaco perfectly. Monaco came from behind to salvage a 1-1 draw at CSKA Moscow and top Group E with five points, one point ahead of Tottenham and two clear of Leverkusen. CSKA Moscow striker Lacina Traore could barely contain his delight after scoring against Monaco – the club loaning him to CSKA – wheeling away in delight with his finger raised after pouncing from close range.last_img read more