Will changes to Indonesia’s mining law hurt or help the environment?

first_imgIn January, Indonesia relaxed regulations on the export of unprocessed ores, but also required some mining companies to change their operating licenses — most notably U.S.-based Freeport-McMoRan.The 2017 regulation amends a 2014 ban on unprocessed mineral exports. That ban aimed to build a domestic smelting industry but effectively shut down many small mining operations, an unintentional boon for the environment.Indonesia’s long-term mining and mineral processing ambitions could cause serious environmental damage. Better enforcement of environmental law would have a bigger impact than export restrictions, experts say. The Indonesian archipelago is home to a myriad of plants and animals, including Sumatran tigers, birds of paradise, orangutans and leatherback turtles. It is also home to extensive mineral resources such as copper, nickel, tin and bauxite.As one of the world’s leading exporters of these minerals, any changes in mining policies have direct consequences on both the local environment and the global economy.Most recently, a change to Indonesia’s mineral export regulations has seen it locked into a high-stakes public confrontation with Freeport-McMoRan Inc., the U.S. company that operates one of the world’s biggest gold and copper mines in the province of Papua.Debate abounds about whether these policies are good for business. But are they good for the environment?A mining operation in Riau Province on the Indonesian Island of Sumatra. Photo by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.To smelt or not to smelt?The roots of the current controversy over mineral exports go back to January 2014, when regulations limiting the shipment of unprocessed minerals came into effect. The law aimed to boost export revenue by adding value to Indonesia’s raw ores before shipping, and to encourage the growth of domestic refining and smelting capabilities.Mineral exports from Indonesia dropped abruptly in response to the regulations.“It was effectively a moratorium on mining these minerals, given that few smelters had actually been built,” said Eve Warburton, a Ph.D. candidate at Australian National University, whose research interests include the politics of natural resource policy in Indonesia.“With these policies, automatically, there was a decline in operations. Planned mines were postponed, which also meant a reduction in [environmental] damage as a result of limitations on exploration and production,” said Hendrik Siregar of the Auriga Foundation.However, Warburton and Siregar both noted that while export regulations may have temporarily halted some mining operations, the law was not designed with environmental protection in mind.“The long-term goal to establish a domestic smelting industry is not an environmentally friendly one at all,” Warburton said.Smelting adds airborne sulfur dioxide and ash to the air, toxins that Indonesia has had little experience dealing with. “Smelting can be a very polluting process, especially in places like Indonesia where environmental standards are often not enforced or adhered to in the mining sector,” said Warburton.Mining on the shores of Lake Sentani in the Indonesian Province of Papua. Photo by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.What is happening now?A full-scale export ban on concentrates was set to take effect in 2017, but now, with companies lagging behind expectations on smelter development, the restrictions on exports of nickel ore and bauxite have instead been relaxed.The government will continue to allow ore exports by companies who can demonstrate they are in the process of developing smelters. It has also proposed allowing the export of concentrates of copper, zinc, lead, manganese and iron to continue until 2022, provided mining companies are building smelters.However, before concentrate exports can resume, companies must now comply with a range of new rules. In addition to presenting plans to build smelters within five years, they must also convert their Contracts of Work (the legal agreements governing foreign mining operations established before 2009) to special mining business licenses or IUPKs.Freeport-McMoRan, the operator of the Grasberg gold and copper mine, has been fighting the government’s demands to convert to an IUPK, divest 51 percent of its shares and construct a smelter. Freeport’s CEO recently described these demands as “in effect a form of expropriation of our assets,” Reuters reported.On Feb. 10, Freeport abruptly stopped production at Grasberg and began laying off workers, and it has since threatened to take the case to international arbitration. Meanwhile, Indonesian President Joko Widodo has vowed to stand firm.A young Sumatran elephant (Elephas maximus sumatranus), one of the many species whose habitats are threatened by Indonesia’s plans to develop its mining industry and the infrastructure that supports it. Photo by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.Beyond FreeportA large domestic smelting industry in Indonesia may lead to increased airborne pollution, but Warburton’s worries extend beyond this. Regardless of the fate of the mineral ban, she and other environmentalists want to see better enforcement of existing environmental regulations so that mining companies adhere to international best practices, state officials do not issue mining licenses in protected forest lands, and mining companies adhere to proper waste-reclamation procedures.In 2009, when the Indonesian government first threatened to ban raw ore exports, mineral companies both large and small were enjoying an export boom in which regulations and monitoring were poor. Companies were extracting and exporting as much cheap ore as they could, particularly to China. In Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia’s most abundant source of nickel, the effects of this rampant mining can be seen in offshore siltation, where mud from decades of mining has leaked into the sea, killing seagrass and fish.Decades of tin production on two of Indonesia’s islands, Bangka and Belitung, have also wreaked environmental havoc. The intensity of tin mining and the uncontrolled, irresponsible way it has been carried out have polluted agriculture and fishing areas and led to rampant forest clearing and siltation of marine ecosystems.“This nature of mining like this is extractive, exploitative … Especially in coastal areas where it pollutes the ocean,” said Parid Ridwanuddin, deputy head of legal and policy advocacy at the People’s Coalition for Fisheries Justice (KIARA).“There was an explosion of mining licenses during the boom, which coincided with decentralization,” said Warburton. “Many of these licenses went to small and inexperienced companies. Monitoring was extremely poor, and the impact on the environment in coal and nickel mining areas has been devastating.”When the 2014 ban was put into effect, it had an outsized impact on smaller companies because they didn’t have the capital to invest in smelting facilities. “In some ways, by reducing the number of companies active in the nickel sector, the ban unintentionally did the environment a favor,” said Warburton.Bigger companies such as Vale, that had the capital to survive and already owned a smelter, generally opposed relaxing the ban. However, the large state-owned mining company, PT Antam, suffered significant losses. Other companies that responded to the ban by ramping up smelting production now find their market undercut as restrictions are relaxed.Companies in Sulawesi, a province with big nickel and bauxite sectors, that shut down after the ban will likely find it hard to start up again, if they do indeed have to demonstrate investments in smelting facilities. “The expectation would be, however, that mining companies that survived the ban will start up their operations again, and this will bring flow-on effects for local industry and for local government coffers,” said Warburton.Meanwhile, according to Ridwanuddin, although the international trade in metal ores may be affected by a mineral ban, domestic demand for construction materials is ensuring that mining continues apace. Coastal areas in places like East Kalimantan and East Nusa Tenggara have been targeted by the cement industry, he said: “The current administration is very focused on infrastructure, which leads to demand for cement.”A mining road cuts through the rainforest in West Kalimantan in Indonesian Borneo. Photo by Rhett Butler for Mongabay.Systemic problemsThe environmental effects of the relaxation of the export ban, and the spat with Freeport, remain uncertain. Greater government control over foreign miners appeals to nationalist sentiment, but it doesn’t necessarily result in better environmental practices.In general, Warburton said, publicly listed multinational and Indonesian companies (though not all of them), tend to engage in best practices because they are answerable to shareholders, international media, and the laws of their home country. But big private Indonesian companies, and private companies from other countries operating in Indonesia, are not always well monitored.Some of Indonesia’s biggest mining companies also have direct and personal connections to powerful political figures, which gives them a degree of immunity.“Ultimately, the problems that most concern Indonesia’s environmentalists are the fact that regulations are implemented only loosely and with high levels of discretion, court cases can be bought and sold, and the bureaucrats tasked with monitoring Indonesia’s mines are grossly under-resourced,” said Warburton. “In my mind, these remain the most pressing environmental problems, regardless of whether the government enforces or relaxes an export ban.” Environment, Environmental Politics, Gold Mining, Infrastructure, Mining, Pollution Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Additional reporting by Fidelis E. Satriastanti. Article published by Isabel Estermanlast_img read more

Climate change is increasing the mortality rate of African wild dog pups

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki The African wild dog (Lycaon pictus), a native of sub-Saharan Africa, is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List, which reports that there are only an estimated 6,600 adults in 39 subpopulations left in the wild — and that their numbers continue to decline due to ongoing habitat fragmentation, conflict with humans, and infectious disease.Compounding these threats to the species’ survival, according to a paper published in the Journal of Animal Ecology yesterday, climate change appears to be increasing the mortality rate for African wild dog pups.Researchers discovered that the packs spend less time hunting in hot weather. They also found that more pups died as the days got hotter, which they theorize is because, simply put, decreased hunting time means less food to feed the young. New research suggests that African wild dogs’ chances of survival might be dealt a serious setback as global temperatures continue to rise.The African wild dog (Lycaon pictus), a native of sub-Saharan Africa, is listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List, which reports that there are only an estimated 6,600 adults in 39 subpopulations left in the wild — and that their numbers continue to decline due to ongoing habitat fragmentation, conflict with humans, and infectious disease.Compounding these threats to the species’ survival, according to a paper published in the Journal of Animal Ecology yesterday, climate change appears to be increasing the mortality rate for African wild dog pups.Researchers with ZSL (Zoological Society of London), the Botswana Predator Conservation Trust, and the African Wildlife Conservation Fund monitored 73 African wild dog packs in Botswana, Kenya, and Zimbabwe through the use of tracking collars. They discovered that the packs spend less time hunting in hot weather. They also found that more pups died as the days got hotter, which they theorize is because, simply put, decreased hunting time means less food to feed the young.“Our findings suggest a consistent impact of high ambient temperatures on African wild dog behaviour and reproduction,” the authors of the study write. “High ambient temperatures were associated with reduced activity, longer inter-birth intervals, and poorer pup recruitment.” They add that “Impacts of high ambient temperatures on reproductive success were apparent in all three study areas, irrespective of whether or not reproduction was seasonal.”Adult wild dogs with pups in Zimbabwe. Photo Credit: ZSL / Rosemary Groom.In Botswana, for instance, where the researchers monitored African wild dog packs for the past 24 years, the average daily maximum temperature during the pup-rearing season increased one degree Celsius over the course of the study period. At the same time, the researchers observed a drop in the average number of pups surviving in each pack, from five to three.African wild dogs are not a species typically seen as possessing traits that would make them particularly vulnerable to the effects of a changing climate, the researchers write in the study. That makes their findings all the more important.“Our study shows the truly global impact of climate change,” Rosie Woodroffe of ZSL’s Institute of Zoology and the study’s lead author said in a statement. “When most people think about wildlife in a changing climate, they think of polar bears clinging to melting ice, but even species who have adapted to tropical weather are being impacted by the changes to their environment.”Woodroffe added that she and her team are now focused on identifying conservation interventions that might help mitigate the impacts of global warming on African wild dogs and determining where those efforts will be most effective.It’s estimated that there may be as few as 700 packs of African wild dogs left in the wild, and they’ve all been forced into a tiny fraction of their original territory as human populations have encroached further into rural areas.A study published last week that looked at range contractions for the world’s large terrestrial carnivores found that the vast majority of them — 80 percent — have seen their global territory shrink by 20 percent or more. The African wild dog was one of the hardest hit in this regard, having lost some 93.2 percent of its historical range.The authors of the Journal of Animal Ecology study note that other large carnivores in Africa are unlikely to suffer the same impacts due to climate change, or at least not to the same degree as African wild dogs: “These impacts of high ambient temperatures on wild dogs reflect their largely diurnal activity pattern, and probably their cursorial hunting habit. Other large African carnivores may be less affected because they are more nocturnal (lions, leopards, hyaenas) or engage in short daytime hunts which do not lead to over-heating.”There are viable populations of the dogs in several national parks and game reserves, particularly in East Africa and in Southern Africa. Despite numerous successes in preserving biodiversity and habitat, however, protected areas aren’t impervious to the effects of climate change.“Worryingly, this new threat may be affecting wild dogs deep inside wildlife areas where we would expect them to be protected from human impacts,” she said. “With habitat fragmented and destroyed in cooler areas, wild dogs have literally nowhere to go. Sadly, climate change may bring extinction a step closer for this amazing species.”A pack of wild dogs in Kenya. Photo Credit: ZSL / Helen O’Neill.A wild dog in Kenya. Photo Credit: ZSL / Helen O’Neill.Pair of wild dog pups in Zimbabwe. Photo credit: ZSL / Rosemary Groom.CITATIONWolf, C., & Ripple, W. J. (2017). Range contractions of the world’s large carnivores. Royal Society Open Science, 4(7), 170052. doi:10.1098/rsos.170052Woodroffe, R., Groom, R., & McNutt, J.W. (2017). Hot dogs: high ambient temperatures impact reproductive success in a tropical carnivore. Journal of Animal Ecology. doi:10.1111/1365-2656.12719Woodroffe, R. & Sillero-Zubiri, C. (2012). Lycaon pictus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2012: e.T12436A16711116. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2012.RLTS.T12436A16711116.en. Downloaded on 19 July 2017.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Climate Change And Extinction, Conservation, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Impact Of Climate Change, Mammals, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

Pangolins reduced to small, isolated populations in Bangladesh: new study

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Deforestation, Endangered Species, Environment, Forests, Green, Mammals, Pangolins, Poaching, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Trafficking Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Shreya Dasguptacenter_img With the help of the Mro tribe in Bangladesh, researchers have found that pangolins do persist in many forested areas of the country, but in small, isolated populations.Of the four Asian pangolin species, the Chinese pangolin seems to occur most commonly in Bangladesh, while the Indian pangolin is possibly rare or extinct within the country, the researchers say.The study also found that pangolin hunting has shot up since 2010, most likely due to a sharp rise in the price of pangolin scales. Pangolins, one of the most trafficked mammals in the world, are fast disappearing from earth. Yet, we know very little about these solitary animals. Even basic information such as pangolins’ populations is severely lacking, scientists say, making it difficult to plan conservation actions to save the animals.Now, with the help of the Mro tribe in Bangladesh, researchers have found that pangolins do persist in many forested areas of the country, but in small, isolated populations. The numbers of these armored mammals have plummeted in Bangladesh largely due to poaching for their scales, concluded the study published in PlosOne.Lead author of the study, Scott Trageser of the Creative Conservation Alliance (CCA) in Dhaka, Bangladesh, said that they first started looking into pangolins when a local honey collector in Lawachara National Park in northeast Bangladesh told them of a “large, scaled fish, ‘bon rui’ that was lurking in the forest”.“Lawachara is our main study site in the northeast but we had never seen a pangolin in years of surveying,” said Trageser. “This was exciting new information for us in 2015 so we began searching for a live individual as virtually nothing was known about them in Bangladesh. When we discovered the presence of several pangolins in Lawachara, we went one step further and decided to research which forested areas country-wide still harbored pangolins.”The study found that pangolins occur in small, isolated populations in Lawachara National Park and surrounding areas. Photo by anonymous (public domain).Some of the study’s findings surprised the team.For instance, some researchers have previously suggested that the pangolin species most commonly encountered in Bangladesh is the endangered Indian pangolin (Manis crassicaudata). The critically endangered Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) is either extremely rare or extinct, they concluded.However, Trageser’s team found that it is, in fact, the other way round. The Chinese pangolin seems to occur in Bangladesh in small, isolated populations, at least within Lawachara National Park, adjoining protected areas, as well as in the bordering tea plantations. The Indian pangolin, in contrast, is possibly rare or extinct within the country. Overall, the team found “no recent or historical evidence” of the Indian pangolin or the Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) occurring in Bangladesh.“There is a chance we will still find Indian Pangolin in northwestern Bangladesh, but for now this means that there is one less country able to fight for the survival of these two species,” said study co-author Animesh Ghose of CCA. “I believe we will have success in keeping viable populations of Chinese Pangolin in Bangladesh but we cannot do the same for the Indian or Sunda pangolin.”Pangolin hunting has also shot up since 2010, the researchers found. This spike in poaching was most likely due to a rise in the price of pangolin scales, the researchers concluded from their interviews with hunters from the Mro tribe in the Chittagong Hill Tracts in southeast Bangladesh. While the price of 1 kilogram (2.2 pounds) of pangolin scale was below $100 in 2008, it had risen to about $500 by January 2016.One of the hunters the researchers interviewed said that although he had killed 32 pangolins since 2010, only two of these were in 2014. The researchers believe that this points towards a sharp decline in pangolin numbers in the area. The team’s camera trap survey in the area, too, yielded more than 16,000 photographs of 19 mammal species, but none of pangolins.In fact, the commercial harvesting of pangolin scales — destined for consumption in China via Myanmar — may have wiped out pangolins from most areas within the Chittagong Hill Tracts, the team concluded.Proroy Mro, a Mro hunter living in the Chittagong Hill Tracts and a co-author of the study, told Mongabay that he now realizes that only a few pangolins may be left near his village when earlier there used to be many. Proroy Mro and Passing Mro, trained as “parabiologists” by the researchers, helped collect data on pangolins and provided insights into the historical population trends of the animals.Jahidul Kabir, Conservator of Forest (wildlife) at Bangladesh Forest Department (BFD), however, wasn’t convinced by the hunting data. “The crime data is based on interviews only,” he told Mongabay. “We need more authentic and eviden[ce] based information. May I request CCA to give BFD some intelligence based crime data that might contribute for conservation.”Trageser’s team is continuing with their surveys.“Chinese Pangolins are critically endangered and need our help if they are going to continue to call Bangladesh home,” Tregeser said. “Our talented field biologist, Animesh Ghose, is currently assessing their range and status in Bangladesh by utilizing the traditional ecological knowledge of the Mro via our parabiologist Proroy Mro. Funded by the Rufford Small Grants, they will visit most of the forested areas of the northeast and southeast to determine the pangolin’s extent of occurrence.”The Chinese pangolin is listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List. Photo by Sarita Jnawali (From Wikimedia Commons, CC BY 2.0)Update, 10/2/2017: The story was updated to include a comment from Jahidul Kabir, Conservator of Forest (wildlife), Bangladesh Forest Department.Citation:Trageser SJ, Ghose A, Faisal M, Mro P, Mro P, Rahman SC (2017) Pangolin distribution and conservation status in Bangladesh. PLoS ONE 12(4): e0175450. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0175450last_img read more

Black rhinos in Tanzania now monitored via sensors implanted directly in their horns

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Anti-poaching, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Black Rhino, Conservation, Conservation Technology, Environment, Mammals, National Parks, Poaching, Rhinos, Technology, Technology And Conservation, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation In a first for the species, several black rhinos in Tanzania’s Mkomazi National Park have had small, networked sensors embedded directly in their horns in order to allow park rangers to monitor the animals much more closely than in the past.The sensors make use of LoRaWAN technology (which stands for “Long Range Wide Area Network”), designed to allow low-powered devices, like sensors in rhino horns, to communicate with Internet-connected devices, like computers in a ranger station, over long-range wireless networks.LoRaWAN is one of several technologies currently being put to use for real-time monitoring of wildlife. The network in Tanzania’s Mkomazi National Park, where the sensors were recently deployed, covers the entire rhino sanctuary in the park. In a first for the species, several black rhinos in Tanzania’s Mkomazi National Park have had small, networked sensors embedded directly in their horns in order to allow park rangers to monitor the animals much more closely than in the past.The sensors make use of LoRaWAN technology (which stands for “Long Range Wide Area Network”), a wireless communication protocol and system architecture that is expected to do for the Internet of Things (IoT) what 3G and 4G connectivity did for mobile phone networks. In other words, LoRaWAN is designed to allow low-powered devices, like sensors in rhino horns, to communicate with Internet-connected devices, like computers in a ranger station, over long-range wireless networks.The sensors were deployed by a company called The Internet of Life, which uses IoT technology to protect endangered wildlife, and the ShadowView Foundation, which specializes in applying innovative new technologies to environmental and wildlife conservation. Instead of GPS, a relatively power-hungry technology, the battery-powered sensors use a geolocation system developed by a company called Semtech that makes it possible to update the rhinos’ location as much as a couple times every hour. Many GPS-enabled IoT applications consume so much energy that updates are only possible once or twice a day.All of the location data generated by the sensors is transmitted to a command center, where each black rhino being tracked appears on a digital map. Various other systems are integrated into this control room, according to project leader and Internet of Life founder Tim van Dam, all of which are part of the Smart Parks communication and management platform developed by the Internet of Life and ShadowView Foundation.A sensor being implanted in a black rhino’s horn. Photo courtesy of ShadowView Foundation.Other Smart Parks technologies being utilized in Mkomazi National Park’s control room include solar-powered LoRaWAN-based sensors that track when gates of the 50-square-kilometer rhino sanctuary within the park are opened or closed, solar-powered vehicle trackers that allow for monitoring of park personnel and tourists in high-risk areas, and digital radios for voice communication with ranger patrols.“Rhinos always need protection from the foot patrol — rangers protecting every individual rhino,” van Dam told Mongabay. Combining all of the systems used to manage and protect the park in one networked command center ensures that rangers can always be close to the rhinos and able to take action or call for help quickly. “Any strange behavior will be detected and the park rangers will step in.”When they’re running, black rhinos can achieve top speeds over 50 kilometers or 30 miles an hour, meaning humans can only keep up in a car or on a motorbike. But van Dam said that the rhinos typically move quite slow, making it easy to tell when they’re stressed. However, the goal is not to simply be reactive when a poacher enters the park or a rhino runs into some other kind of trouble: “Most intel is used to prevent such situations, so most of the time the system is used for tactical reasons,” van Dam added.The black rhinoceros, also known as the hook-lipped rhinoceros, is listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. The species is also listed on CITES Appendix I, meaning that all international commercial trade of black rhinos or products derived from the animals is prohibited.LoRaWAN is one of several technologies currently being put to use for real-time monitoring of wildlife. The network in Mkomazi National Park covers the entire rhino sanctuary, van Dam said. He also noted that the area covered by the Smart Parks system in Akagera National Park, which lies in in eastern Rwanda on the border with Tanzania, is even bigger, at over 1,000 square kilometers.ShadowView and The Internet of Life say they intend to continue building on the Smart Parks system by deploying new applications like better fence monitoring, networked camera-traps, and sensors for tracking firearms and other equipment in the near future.Black rhino (Diceros bicornis) in the Ngorongoro crater, Tanzania. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Guyana seeks offshore oil wealth in a green economy

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Genevieve Belmaker ExxonMobil expects to produce some 2-2.5 billion oil-equivalent barrels from Guyanese waters, which could add up to more than $100 billion.Given the fact that Guyana’s Gross National Income is $4,250 per capita, the promises of oil are causing a stir in the political landscape.Although the amount of oil that reaches the Guyana coast from a spill may be small, the country’s Environmental Protection Agency notes it would impact marine resources. GEORGETOWN, Guyana – Venezuela may have the world’s largest oil reserves according to OPEC, but oil experts are looking to its bordering neighbor Guyana as the next big thing. Widely known as an eco-tourist’s heaven, Guyana lays claim to indigenous jaguars (Panthera onca), giant otters (Pteronura brasiliensis), giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) and huge swaths of forest that cover some three-quarters of this South American country.Promises of oil may seem at odds with a conservationist image, but Guyana is no stranger to extracting natural resources. Gold, timber and bauxite have long been principal exports.It is not the first time investors have come in search of oil, either. In the interior of the country close to the border with Brazil, wells were drilled in the Takatu Basin back in the 1980s. However, the new off-shore oil discoveries are on a different level.According to ExxonMobil, which is at the forefront of the new discoveries, it expects to produce some 2-2.5 billion oil-equivalent barrels. In real money, using figures published in Forbes, that could add up to more than $100 billion.For many in Guyana, news of the oil discovery is a hot topic, with people pinning hopes on the find for everything from increased government spending, to more jobs and personal wealth. Talk of billions of dollars (US dollars, not Guyanese) is causing excitement in a country where the Gross National Income per capita rests at $4,250 – compared to $56,180 in the US according to 2016 World Bank figures.Detail of Guyana’s position in South America. Connormah/Wikimedia CommonsThere is also skepticism about whether the money will trickle down so Guyana gets the best deal. Under its contract with ExxonMobil and partners, the government is set to receive 2 percent in royalties on gross earnings and 50 percent of the profits from the sale of the petroleum. An Economist article in June reflected the concerns of many onlookers when it asked in its headline: “Will oil corrupt a small Caribbean state?”The politics of oilExxonMobil announced its first find, the so-called Liza field, in May 2015 – the same month that Guyana welcomed in a new coalition government after 23 years of the People’s Progressive Party. Since then, the US oil giant has declared four additional wells: Payara, Snoek, Liza Deep and most recently Turbot-1 all part of what’s known as the Stabroek Block. They’re not stopping there.“The results from this latest well further illustrate the tremendous potential we see from our exploration activities offshore Guyana,” said Steve Greenlee, president of ExxonMobil Exploration Company, in a public statement. “ExxonMobil, along with its partners, will continue to further evaluate opportunities on the Stabroek Block.”Production of the oil is due to begin in 2020, the year of the next general election. So promises of how the oil revenues will be spent are likely to dominate the campaign trail. The current administration, led by President David Granger, came to power on a platform of change and promising to invest in a green economy.Combining these promises with oil extraction is a tricky balance.“The two positions are not incompatible,” N. Johann Earle, Public Affairs and Communications Officer at the Ministry of Natural Resources, told Mongabay by email. “The government of Guyana has developed a green state development strategy that will put Guyana on a low emissions pathway.”The framework of the strategy refers to the economic potential of oil, yet also outlines an ambitious aim to reduce Guyana’s dependence on fossil fuels and achieve close to 100 percent renewable energy usage by 2025.Exxon facilitates oil spill management training. Photo courtesy Guyana Department of Public Information.ExxonMobil’s local arm, Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited (EEPGL) – which is the operator of the Stabroek Block and holds a 45 percent interest (the remaining 55 percent is held by Hess Guyana Exploration Ltd and CNOOC Nexen Petroleum Guyana Limited) – believes an oil spill is “unlikely.” In its official Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for Guyana’s Environmental Protection Agency, it notes that, “The modelling indicates only a 5 to 10 percent probability of any oil reaching the Guyana coast.”However, this figure doesn’t factor in the effectiveness of an oil spill response.While the likelihood of an oil spill reaching the Guyana coast may be small, the country’s Environmental Protection Agency notes that a spill at a Liza would impact marine resources found near the well including sea turtles and other marine mammals. Air quality, water quality, seabirds and marine fish could also be impacted.Worries over spillsThe very existence of oil drilling is enough to worry some in Guyana, especially given the recent oil spill at nearest Caribbean neighbor, Trinidad.Annette Arjoon-Martins, president of the Guyana Marine Conservation Society, is particularly concerned about the potential impact on the endangered sea turtles that breed and live along Guyana’s north-west coastal region.“The oil spill modeling in ExxonMobil’s Environmental Management Plan shows that if there is an oil spill, the current will take that oil right into the northern part of the Shell Beach Protected Area,” Arjoon-Martins said. She added that what’s needed is more funding to beef up the under-resourced Environmental Protection Agency, plus more awareness raising and capacity building among the people living along this section of the coastline. “They don’t really see the indigenous peoples in Region 1 as a big stakeholder.”The Guyanese coast in Ogle. Photo by Carinya Sharples.Aside from the risk of oil spills, other environmental concerns were raised during public consultations and highlighted in the EIA. These included concerns about potential impacts on fishing livelihoods, the management of waste streams, and emissions.Organized opposition to extraction on environmental grounds is currently fairly small, and the voices of some of the main conservation groups seem strangely absent from public discourses. A recent talk entitled Oil & The Environment was the first forum, said its organizers, to focus exclusively on the environmental aspect of oil extraction.A week later, leading non-profit organization Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development announced plans to relaunch its Science Programme – with a grant of $300,000 from ExxonMobil.On a more political front, there is also a call by some – including Bharrat Jadgeo, leader of the main opposition party – for the government to release its still-unpublished production sharing agreement with ExxonMobil and its operational partners. Some details have been released but Minister of Natural Resources Raphael Trotman told local news station HGPTV that the government has been advised not to publish the full contract at present, citing foreign affairs implications, sovereignty and national security.Guyana’s application to join the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative was recently approved, so Jadgeo and others may get their wish. According to oilnow.gy, an online news resource on Guyana’s oil and gas industry: “Companies publish what they pay and governments publish what they receive from exploitation of natural resources. Guyana will also be expected to publicly disclose contracts and agreements with companies under EITI requirements.”This move may also speed up the creation of a special department within the Ministry of Natural Resources focusing just on oil and gas.“The Petroleum Commission of Guyana [PCG] is not active as yet, as it is dependent on the passage of the Petroleum Commission of Guyana Act in the National Assembly,” explained ministry representative Earle. “The PCG will be empowered by its own act and will regulate the petroleum sector in Guyana.”Competing interestsWhile ExxonMobil and its partners may be pinning their hopes on Guyana, Venezuela is still very much in the picture. Part of the Stabroek Block is claimed by Venezuela in a long-running border dispute with Guyana.In March, Guyana’s government published a public statement citing a report in El Nacional and condemning what it called the “inflammatory” resolution put forward by Venezuela’s Energy and Petroleum Commission calling for “the immediate cessation of on-going offshore oil exploration and exploitation activities under Guyanese license in the Stabroek concession block well.”ExxonMobil and Venezuela have issues, too. Ten years ago, then-president Hugo Chavez sought to restore national control of the oil industry by taking a majority stake in the country’s oil reserves. Ever since then, ExxonMobil has sought to increase the $1 billion compensation offered by Venezuela for its lost assets. Ironically, ExxonMobil’s CEO during this period was Rex Tillerson, who is now US Secretary of State and waging a different kind of battle with Venezuela over constitutional changes by President Maduro and the impact of economic crises. In August, President Trump imposed financial sanctions on Venezuela – though oil is still being exported to the US.The stakes are high for everyone involved. ExxonMobil has invested significant money and time during a period of volatile oil prices. Guyana badly needs the jobs and revenues it hopes oil extraction will bring. But times are also changing. With the growing shift towards renewable energy – including among oil and gas giants – Guyana’s oil discovery could mark the last gasp of the fossil-fuel era. Or the beginning of a new, renewable age.At the Oil and The Environment talk in Guyana, an audience member spoke of the difficulties of explaining the benefits of oil to his indigenous community: “Oil and water don’t mix,” he said.Whether that’s true of Guyana, the land of many waters, remains to be seen.Banner image: A turtle at Shell Beach in Region 1 of Guyana. Photo courtesy of Guyana Marine Conservation Society.Carinya Sharples is a Guyana-based foreign correspondent. You can find her on Twitter at @carinyasharples.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Coastal Ecosystems, Natural Resources, Offshore Drilling, Oil, Oil Drilling last_img read more

Tanzania used as case study for quickly and cheaply identifying wildlife corridors in need of conservation

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Conservation, Corridors, Environment, National Parks, Protected Areas, Research, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Corridors Researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a methodology that they say can help identify the most important wildlife corridors to keep open in a cost-effective and timely manner.In a study summarizing their results published in the journal PloS one, the authors note that wildlife populations that are isolated due to not having access to corridors that allow them to move between protected areas can suffer from compromised genetic variability and are less able to shift their range in response to global climate change.The researchers used what they describe as “least-cost methods” to develop a methodology for assessing wildlife corridors at a national scale, which they then applied to Tanzania as a case study. As local wildlife populations around the world are increasingly forced to rely on reserves hemmed in by agricultural land, urban areas, and other human developments, it’s more crucial than ever that we keep corridors open between protected areas. So researchers at the University of California, Davis have developed a methodology that they say can help identify the most important wildlife corridors to keep open in a cost-effective and timely manner.In a study summarizing their results published in the journal PloS one, the UC Davis researchers note that wildlife populations that are isolated due to not having access to corridors that allow them to move between protected areas can suffer from compromised genetic variability and are less able to shift their range in response to global climate change — all of which makes it that much harder to save a species from extinction, if and when it comes down to that.“The long-term viability of wildlife species relies on maintaining connectivity between protected areas,” Jason Riggio, a graduate student in UC Davis’ Department of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology and lead author of the study, said in a statement. “Large-scale conservation corridors can serve as essential linkages between habitats.”Riggio and coauthor, UC Davis professor Tim Caro, used what they describe as “least-cost methods” to develop a methodology for assessing wildlife corridors at a national scale, which they then applied to Tanzania as a case study. By combining up-to-date data on land conversion in East Africa with interview data on wildlife corridors, they hoped to determine which of Tanzania’s wildlife corridors might still be open (referred to as the corridor being “structurally connected”), which corridors have been closed off due to conversion of the land for human purposes, where any other potential wildlife corridors might be located, and which protected areas with lower levels of protection, such as forest reserves and wildlife management areas, could serve as crucial links between more fully protected areas like national parks and game reserves.Essentially, what Riggio and Caro did was look at land conversion patterns to model corridors that could be used by wildlife to move between Tanzania’s protected areas, then interviewed locals to determine whether or not the corridors they had discovered were actually useful to local animal populations. “Interviews with people living within or adjacent to wildlife corridors can provide accurate information on wildlife movements that can be obtained fairly easily,” Caro said in a statement. “These data can then be used to validate connectivity models.”He and Riggio found 52 intact corridors connecting protected areas in Tanzania, 23 more than had been identified by official surveys the Tanzanian government conducted in 2009. They also discovered that 21 of the 24 corridors that the government report stated were likely to have already been severed were actually still structurally connected.“Nonetheless, nearly a sixth of all the wildlife corridors identified in Tanzania in 2009 have potentially been separated by land conversion, and a third now pass across lands likely to be converted to human use in the near future,” Riggio and Caro write.There are still some east-west corridors connecting protected areas, the researchers add, but there are no open wildlife corridors linking protected areas in northern and southern Tanzania, while two reserves — Gombe Stream National Park and Pande Game Reserve — were found to now be completely isolated.However, Riggio and Caro did discover two reserves with lower levels of protection, Uvinza Forest Reserve in western Tanzania and Wami-Mbiki Wildlife Management Area in the eastern part of the country, that act as “crucial stepping-stones” between national parks or game reserves and therefore deserve to be the focus of increased conservation efforts.“While most people will never have heard of these small reserves,” Riggio said, “they are absolutely vital for linking larger parks.”While other methods for identifying wildlife corridors worthy of heightened conservation, such as fitting animals with GPS collars, can be cost-prohibitive and limited to smaller spatial scales, Caro said that the methodology he and Riggio developed is much more cost-effective and can be done at the national scale. That’s important, he says, because as connectivity between protected areas continues to erode, new methods for quickly and cheaply determining where wildlife corridors still exist are essential.“Our method of modeling landscape connectivity using spatial data on anthropogenic land conversion, combined with interviews to validate these models is readily applicable to other regions,” Caro said. “We need to identify wildlife corridors very rapidly before they disappear.”A tower of giraffes, Tanzania’s national animal, in Arusha National Park. Photo via Wikimedia Commons, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.CITATIONRiggio, J., & Caro, T. (2017). Structural connectivity at a national scale: Wildlife corridors in Tanzania. PloS one, 12(11), e0187407. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0187407Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001 Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Audio: David Suzuki on why indigenous knowledge is critical for human survival

first_imgAmazon Dams, Biodiversity, Climate Change, conservation players, Coral Reefs, Dams, Dead Zone, Environment, Flooding, Global Warming, Hydroelectric Power, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Peoples, Interviews, Lemurs, Mammals, National Parks, Oil, Podcast, Pollution, Primates, Wildlife Suzuki is a biologist by training and a former professor of genetics who’s just as well known for his outspoken views on the need to protect nature. Suzuki is the author or co-author of more than 50 books and the host of the long-running science program The Nature of Things. He’s also the founder of the David Suzuki Foundation and the Blue Dot Movement, the latter of which aims to enshrine the right to a healthy environment in the Canadian Constitution.Mongabay interviewed Suzuki last year about the Blue Dot Movement, and we thought now, at the start of 2018, would be a great time to check in with him about what progress has been made, what environmental issues he thinks are most pressing as we forge ahead into the new year, and his plans to convene a gathering of First Nations keepers of traditional ecological knowledge with Western scientists.*Here’s this episode’s top news:Peru declares a huge new national park in the AmazonStudy: Amazon dams are disrupting ecologically vital flood pulsesGlobal warming, pollution supersize the oceans’ oxygen-depleted dead zonesBelize imposes offshore oil moratorium to protect reefsThere’s a new member of the lemur familyYou can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, Google Play, iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.*Editor’s note 5/30/2018: The conference noted by Dr. Suzuki in the audio recording is now planned for February 2019.David Suzuki. Photo courtesy of the David Suzuki Foundation, licensed under CC BY 3.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we feature a conversation with iconic Canadian scientist, author, television presenter, and activist David Suzuki.Mongabay interviewed Suzuki last year about the Blue Dot Movement, which aims to enshrine the right to a healthy environment in the Canadian Constitution, and we thought now, at the start of 2018, would be a great time to check in with him about what progress has been made.Suzuki also discusses the environmental issues he thinks are most pressing as we forge ahead into the new year and his plans to convene a gathering of First Nations keepers of traditional ecological knowledge with Western scientists. On today’s episode we feature a conversation with iconic Canadian scientist, author, television presenter, and activist David Suzuki.Listen here: Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Global warming may poison monarch butterflies, study finds

first_imgCitation:Faldyn, M. J., Hunter, M. D., & Elderd, B. D. (2018). Climate change and an invasive, tropical milkweed: an ecological trap for monarch butterflies. Ecology.Banner photo: a monarch butterfly feeds on tropical milkweed. Photo by Korall via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Monarch numbers have plummeted in recent decades and scientists think it’s due in large part to the reduction of milkweed in the U.S. and Canada from increased herbicide use, as well as deforestation of monarch overwintering grounds in Mexico.A recently published study finds a new threat: warming temperatures may be making milkweed, the only plant monarch caterpillars can eat, too toxic for the butterflies.The researchers estimate that at current warming rates in the southern U.S., tropical milkweed will be too toxic for monarchs within 40 years.Monarchs prefer tropical milkweed to native species and the plant is now widespread throughout the southern U.S. Monarch butterflies depend on milkweed and its poisonous compounds that are deadly to most other insects. But a new study finds global warming may be making the very plant monarch butterflies need to survive too toxic even for them.Their vibrant red-orange wings with contrasting black veins and white dots make monarchs (Danaus plexippus) easy to recognize not only to humans but also to birds on the lookout for a snack. It’s a warning that tells would-be predators an important message: Poisonous – do not eat.Monarchs get their protective poison from the milkweed plant, which is actually a group of species nested under the genus Asclepias. The great Swedish botanist and founder of modern taxonomy Carl Linneaus named this group after Asclepius, the Greek god of healing, because of the plant’s use in traditional medicine. But milkweed plants also have a deadly side. They produce compounds called cardenolides that are steroids capable of stopping the heart.Scientists believe milkweed plants produce cardenolides as a defense against plant-eating insects and other animals. But some species have coevolved around this defense. And some, like monarch butterflies, don’t just cope with these toxins – they’re able to sequester them in their tissue to make themselves poisonous and bad tasting to their own predators.A monarch caterpillar feasts on a milkweed leaf. Photo by USFWS Mountain-PrairieBecause of their unique defense, monarch butterflies are obligate feeders on milkweed, and their caterpillars cannot eat anything else. This relationship is a risky one, and monarchs seem to be paying a price; their numbers have plummeted in recent decades and scientists think it’s due in large part to the reduction of milkweed in the U.S. and Canada from increased herbicide use. (Other factors, like deforestation of monarch overwintering grounds in Mexico, may also be contributing to their decline.)But now, scientists say they have discovered another threat to monarchs. In a study recently published in the journal Ecology, researchers at Louisiana State University (LSU) put forth findings that indicate global warming may be making remaining milkweed plants more toxic.The study found that one of the monarch’s favorite milkweed species, Asclepias curassavica, commonly called tropical milkweed, responds to warmer temperatures by producing more cardenolides. The researchers say that monarchs prefer this species because it tends to have more cardenolides than milkweed native to North America, but that they can withstand these toxins only up to a certain point.“It’s a Goldilocks situation for monarch butterflies. Too few of these chemicals in the milkweed, and the plant won’t protect monarch caterpillars from being eaten,” said Bret Elderd, associate professor in the LSU Department of Biological Sciences. “But too high of a concentration of these chemicals can also hurt the monarchs, slowing caterpillar development and decreasing survival.”A monarch caterpillar tastes the flower of a tropical milkweed plant. Photo by Judy Gallagher via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)Tropical milkweed is prized not only by monarchs but by humans as well. With its attractive, long-lasting orange flowers and leaves that don’t shed, gardeners often opt for this species over native species – planting it has even been touted as a way to help monarchs – and it is now widespread throughout the southern U.S. But at current warming trends, Elderd and his team found that tropical milkweed there may get too toxic for monarchs within the next 40 years. Or sooner, if heat waves hit the region.“If I’m a monarch butterfly, and I’m responding to past environmental conditions, I’ll lay my eggs on A. curassavica,” Elderd said. “But under conditions of global warming, I’ll be doing my offspring a disservice without knowing it.”This isn’t the first strike for tropical milkweed when it comes to monarch butterflies. Previous research found monarchs that were raised on tropical milkweed tended to change their migration behavior and have higher rates of disease and parasitic infection.Unlike tropical milkweed, swamp milkweed (Ascelpias incarnata) is native to North America and produces fewer toxic cardenolides. The researchers say this is a better choice for monarchs in a warming world. Image from the public domain.Elderd and his team hope their study will help further understanding of the complex impacts climate change may have on wildlife, and inform better decision-making on the part of conservationists.“Overall, we have shown the importance of examining how species interactions may respond to abiotic changes due to climatic drivers,” the authors write in their study. “This is particularly true for specialists and their response to global warming.“Without gaining proper insight into how these interactions shift as the planet warms, we may be unwittingly setting ecological traps.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Animals, Butterflies, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Extinction, Deforestation, Environment, Global Warming, Insects, Invertebrates, Plants, Research, Wildlife last_img read more

Saulong plan: Body attack

first_imgGALLERY: Barangay Ginebra back as PBA Governors’ Cup kings It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson View comments According to head trainer Joven Jimenez, who trains both Saulong and Ancajas at their Survival Camp in Brgy. Ramirez, Magallanes in Cavite, there are loopholes in Iwasa’s defense which they intend to pounce on.“He (Saulong) must cut the ring and fight at close range to negate Iwasa’s height and reach advantage,” Jimenez said in Filipino. “He will target the body.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkWith Iwata’s reputation as a stylist, Jimenez expects him to move a lot and avoid a slugfest despite being the heavier puncher based on record, 16 knockouts in 24 wins and two losses.Saulong, who hails from Occidental Mindoro and resides in Santa Rosa, Laguna, totes a 21-2-1 slate with eight KOs and is ready to go the full 12 rounds. Sea turtle trapped in net freed in Legazpi City MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Nueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbed Ernesto Saulong hopes to follow Jerwin Ancajas’ path to success when he challenges Ryosuke Iwasa for the International Boxing Federation junior featherweight crown at Ryogoku Kokugikan in Tokyo on March 1.His morale boosted by the fourth successful IBF junior bantamweight title defense of stable mate Ancajas in Corpus Christi, Texas, on Feb. 4, Saulong said the fight plan is up for execution against the southpaw Japanese champion.ADVERTISEMENT The 28-year-old Saulong will be accompanied by Jimenez and his manager, engineer-businessman Ariel Araja, when he leaves for Tokyo this Sunday. —ROY LUARCASports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextcenter_img Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Regatta cup charts different course Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours LATEST STORIES UK plans Brexit celebrations but warns businesses may sufferlast_img read more

We cannot go on with an illegal Government, punitive measures must be applied now

first_imgDear Editor,The present shenanigans by Granger and crew is a direct violation of Article 106 (6) and (7) of the Constitution of this country. It has been seven months to the date of a Successful NCM, but the Government of David Granger remains intact. We have seen the PNC-led Government trying every which way to circumvent this aspect of the Constitution, with their lying excuses, absolutely nothing has changed. There have been several rulings by our final appellate court, the CCJ, and not one, I repeat not one of its rulings has been adhered to.In all of this, Granger can consider himself “successful” because his Government has remained in office without any change or respect for the Constitution or any ruling of the final court. He can also consider himself a clever fox in outsmarting the Opposition Leader in every aspect of a successful no-confidence vote on his Government, so, Granger and his cabal persist.So, let us for one final time, review the occurrences of this Government since the December 21, 2018, NCM;1. A successful passage of a No-Confidence Motion and the automatic activation of Articles 106 (6) and (7)2. The Granger Government appealed the matter, hoping for a favourable response from the Court.3. The Chief Justice ruled that the NCM was valid and the Government has to resign and call elections.4. The PNC-led Government then appealed the High Court ruling to our Court of Appeal which in part granted them a reprieve in that the Appeal Court erroneously stated that 34 constitutes a majority vote to topple the Government.5. The Opposition then went on to the CCJ, which is our final court on the matter. The CCJ upheld every aspect of the rulings of the High Court of Guyana including the matter of the unilateral appointment of the GECOM Chairman, Retired Justice Patterson, on the grounds that his appointment was illegal, null and void.6. The Granger Government was asked by the CCJ to respect the constitutional ruling of Articles 106 (6) and (7).7. To date, Granger has not honoured any of the CCJ’s ruling, but has remained in office illegally since.Now, this is the position we have come to in our country, where we have a President who is illegally occupying his post and presiding over a Government that does not want to face the electorate. This is a vexing situation to which we have come and there are calls for something more serious and pressing to force him to comply with the law, this will only come in the international community issuing sanctions on the Granger regime. The ABC and E Governments must start the process of issuing travel bans, and the revocation of visas. we are also looking forward to the seizure of the assets of Government officials overseas. These and other punitive actions will force Granger to comply.Finally, Granger is still on a “three card game of tricks” with that move of not selecting a nominee submitted by the Opposition Leader. Instead of selecting a name from the Opposition’s list, he has stubbornly stalled the process with a list of his own choosing, which is another blatant violation of the Constitution of Guyana. The Constitution of Guyana emphatically states that the President must choose a name from the list submitted by the Opposition. Granger will have none of that, which is a very sad and dangerous place to be.Now, it is very clear that this President is hell-bent on having his way, and his mistaken belief that nothing can be done about it, well I have news for Mr Granger.This is what is going to happen come midnight on Monday, July 15, 2019, if a name is not selected by Granger, and I am speaking of a name from Jagdeo’s list, not one from Granger’s list. If Granger does not select a name from the Opposition Leader’s list, then Jagdeo will have one recourse and that is to call on the assistance of the United Nations to intervene.They have the right to intervene in the domestic affairs of any country that has a dictator regime as its Head and one who refuses to respect the rule of law. Guyana is a signatory to the UN Charter on such matters, so they must adhere to the UN Charter.The Opposition Leader also has the option of calling on the UN to send in troops to supervise the process, because we do not have faith in a “kith and kin”. Security forces to supervise a free and fair process or a process free from fear. I rest my case.Respectfully,Neil Adamslast_img read more