Scimitar-horned oryx return to the Sahara nearly two decades after going extinct in the wild

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This is the second group to be returned to the wild since the species was listed as Extinct in the Wild on the IUCN Red List in 2000.Eight female and six male scimitar-horned oryx were released on January 21 in the hopes that they would join the herd of 21 oryx that were reintroduced to Chad’s Ouadi Rimé-Ouadi Achim Reserve on August 14, 2016.The initial group of oryx — 13 females and 8 males — have reportedly thrived in their new habitat. In fact, on September 21, 2016, the herd welcomed what is believed to be the first scimitar-horned oryx born in the wild in more than 20 years. Conservationists are celebrating the successful reintroduction of an iconic antelope species, the scimitar-horned oryx, to a portion of its historical range on the edge of the Sahara desert after 14 captive-bred animals were released in a remote region of Chad.This is the second group to be returned to the wild since the species was listed as Extinct in the Wild on the IUCN Red List in 2000. “Overhunting and habitat loss, including competition with domestic livestock, have been reported as the main reasons for the extinction of the wild population of Scimitar-horned Oryx,” according to the IUCN.Eight female and six male scimitar-horned oryx were released on January 21 in the hopes that they would join the herd of 21 oryx that were reintroduced to Chad’s Ouadi Rimé-Ouadi Achim Reserve on August 14, 2016. The initial group of oryx — 13 females and 8 males — have reportedly thrived in their new habitat. In fact, on September 21, 2016, the herd welcomed what is believed to be the first scimitar-horned oryx born in the wild in more than 20 years.A scimitar-horned oryx released in Chad’s Ouadi Rimé-Ouadi Achim Reserve in January 2017. © ZSL.“The mother was pregnant when she arrived in Chad from the breeding group, though her condition only became apparent 3-4 weeks after arrival,” Zoological Society London (ZSL) conservationist Tim Wacher, who has worked on scimitar-horned oryx projects since 1985 and was part of the team that reintroduced the antelopes to the reserve, told Mongabay. “The female and calf remain together; the calf has been growing very well, with growth indicators (e.g. horns already equal head length at 3 months of age) conforming exactly to normal.”The oryx released last August, during the wet season, became completely independent right away and ignored the supplementary food and water available to them at the release site. “They have put on weight and muscle since arriving and at the time of writing look in excellent condition,” Wacher said.The newly released oryx are also all in “very good condition,” Wacher added, though they were released during the dry season and, because the extensive green grazing that was enjoyed by their predecessors was not available to them, they are making more use of the supplementary food. Wacher said that this was to be expected, and their reliance on the supplementary food should reduce as the rainy season arrives.The scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah) was once widespread across the southern Sahara, but was driven to extinction during a period of extended civil unrest throughout the region in the 1980s and ‘90s. A captive breeding program designed to restore the antelope species to its former habitat in Ouadi Rimé-Ouadi Achim Reserve was undertaken as a joint initiative by the government of Chad and the Environment Agency of Abu Dhabi (EAD), with key support provided by global partners such as ZSL. For instance, two female oryx from the herd kept at ZSL’s Whipsnade Zoo were transferred to Abu Dhabi in 2014 to help EAD breed a representative ‘world herd,’ the descendants of which will be part of the reintroduction program.Mother and calf scimitar-horned oryx in Chad’s Ouadi Rimé-Ouadi Achim Reserve. The mother was pregnant at the time of release in August 2016. © ZSL.Each individual oryx released in the 78,000-square-kilometer (more than 30,000-square-mile) reserve is fitted with a GPS-enabled satellite collar to allow conservationists to monitor their movements. Another 37 oryx are in pre-release enclosures right now; the plan is to release them this coming August.“This reintroduction represents the result of decades of collaborative effort between national and international conservation organisations, the Chadian government, The Environment Agency-Abu Dhabi and local Saharan communities,” ZSL’s Wacher said in a statement. “Releasing these animals back into their native arid grassland landscape after two decades of absence was an emotional moment for all involved.”The birth of the first calf was especially encouraging, he said: “We have high hopes that one day in the not-too-distant future, herds of scimitar-horned oryx will once again be a common sight across their huge protected reserve and hopefully beyond.”First oryx leaving the enclosure. 21 January 2017. © ZSL.Scimitar-horned oryx released in Chad’s Ouadi Rimé-Ouadi Achim Reserve in January 2017. © ZSL.CITATIONIUCN SSC Antelope Specialist Group. 2016. Oryx dammah. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T15568A50191470. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-2.RLTS.T15568A50191470.en. Downloaded on 20 February 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Animals, Biodiversity, Captive Breeding, Conservation, Deserts, Environment, Ex-situ Conservation, Mammals, Protected Areas, Saving Species From Extinction, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

Manmade noise pollution even more prevalent in US protected areas than researchers expected

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored About 14 percent of the land mass in the United States has been afforded some kind of legally protected status, and noise pollution is noticeable even in these more remote areas where manmade disturbances are supposed to be kept to a minimum.According to a study published this month in the journal Science, the noise pollution from airplanes, highways, industry, and resource extraction is encroaching ever further into U.S. protected areas designed to preserve habitat for biodiversity.Using baseline sound levels for each study area established by machine learning algorithms that took into account geospatial features of the area, the researchers determined that anthropogenic noise pollution exceeds three decibels (dB), essentially doubling background sound levels, in 63 percent of the nation’s protected areas. Humans make quite a racket, and all of the excessive noise we make is not just a problem in urban areas. About 14 percent of the land mass in the United States has been afforded some kind of legally protected status, and noise pollution is noticeable even in these more remote areas where manmade disturbances are supposed to be kept to a minimum.According to a study published this month in the journal Science, the noise pollution from airplanes, highways, industry, and resource extraction is encroaching ever further into U.S. protected areas designed to preserve habitat for biodiversity.Rachel Buxton, a post-doctoral researcher at Colorado State University’s Warner College of Natural Resources and lead author of the study, led a team of researchers that recorded sounds at 492 sites across the country in order to quantify the extent of noise pollution in the U.S. Using baseline sound levels for each study area established by machine learning algorithms that took into account geospatial features of the area, the researchers determined that anthropogenic noise pollution exceeds three decibels (dB), essentially doubling background sound levels, in 63 percent of the nation’s protected areas. In 21 percent of protected areas, the team measured 10 dB of noise pollution, close to a ten-fold increase over background levels.Wilderness areas with some of the highest levels of protections were found to have the lowest amount of noise pollution, though 12 percent of those areas still experience manmade sound levels at least three dB above natural levels, the researchers found — “indicating that they are not entirely ‘untrammeled by man’ as defined by the Wilderness Act (U.S. C. 1131-1136, sec. 3c, 1964),” they wrote in the study.Three decibels of sound may not seem like much, but, according to the researchers, that’s enough to reduce the area that natural sounds can be heard by anywhere from 50 to 90 percent — meaning that natural sounds that can normally be heard from 100 feet away, for instance, can only be heard at a distance of 10 to 50 feet.“Next time you go for a walk in the woods, pay attention to the sounds you hear — the flow of a river, wind through the trees, singing birds, bugling elk,” Buxton said in a statement. “These acoustic resources are just as magnificent as visual ones, and deserve our protection.”Reduced capacity to hear natural sounds detracts from the restorative properties of spending time in nature, Buxton and her co-authors note, and also negatively impacts wildlife. By distracting or scaring animals, reducing the ability of prey species to hear predators, or interfering with mating calls, noise pollution in any given area can result in changes in species composition. Even plants can be affected if the rodents and insects that disperse seeds and pollinate flowers alter their behavior or location due to excessive noise.“Noise pollution causes cognitive impairment, distraction, stress, and altered behavior and physiology in ways that directly influence both wildlife and humans,” Buxton and her co-authors write in the study. “Moreover, noise pollution that alters the distribution or behavior of key species can have cascading effects on ecosystem integrity.”Buxton adds that while she and her team were surprised by the prevalence of noise pollution in U.S. protected areas, they “were also encouraged to see that many large wilderness areas have sound levels that are close to natural levels. Protecting these important natural acoustic resources as development and land conversion progresses is critical if we want to preserve the character of protected areas.”The study showed that high noise pollution levels tended to be concentrated in specific parts of U.S. protected areas, suggesting where noise-reduction tactics might be most effective. Some protected areas have already undertaken efforts to reduce noise, such as adopting shuttle services that reduce traffic and establishing specific zones where visitors are encouraged to enjoy nature in silence while also creating noise corridors that align flight patterns with roads to keep noise pollution from being pervasive throughout the area.The researchers found that there was 56 percent less noise above natural levels in critical habitats within protected areas that have adopted stringent noise regulations compared to measurements taken in habitats in unprotected areas.“Numerous noise mitigation strategies have been successfully developed and implemented, so we already have the knowledge needed to address noise issues,” George Wittemyer, an associate professor at Colorado State University and the senior author of the study, said in a statement. “Our work provides information to facilitate such efforts in respect to protected areas where natural sounds are integral.”An acoustic recording station at the iconic tourist attraction Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay, Golden Gate National Park, California. Photo Credit: United States National Park Service.CITATIONBuxton, R.T., McKenna, M.F., Mennitt, D., Fristrup, K., Crooks, K., Angeloni, L., & Wittemyer, G. (2017). Noise pollution is pervasive in U.S. protected areas. Science 356(6337), 531-533. doi:10.1126/science.aah4783 Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Health, Nature And Health, Noise Pollution, Plants, Protected Areas, Research, Roads, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Could fungi provide an alternative to palm oil?

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Amazon Palm Oil, Deforestation, Environment, Forest Loss, Forests, Fungi, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, Land Use Change, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests, Research, Tropical Forests Palm oil is used in everything from margarine and ice cream to cosmetics and certain fabrics.But the palm oil industry has a history of association with deforestation and human rights abuses. As oil palm plantations continue to expand to more tropical areas around the world, many are worried they will come at the expense of rainforests.A biotech startup in the U.S. thinks it has found an alternative to palm oil – fungus that can be grown on food waste.But while lab experiments have demonstrated some success, it remains to be seen whether fungus-derived oil can be produced in quantities large and cheap enough to compete with palm oil. Fungi – a kingdom grouping that includes mushrooms, mold and yeast – have long been heralded for their beneficial properties. They’ve been used to soak up oil spills, boost your immune system and lower cholesterol, among other environmental and medical feats. Now, researchers have found one more use for fungi – as a possible alternative to palm oil.The palm oil industry has a history of association with deforestation and human rights abuses. But palm oil is also one of the most versatile products on the market, found in everything from margarine and ice cream to cosmetics and certain fabrics. One study by the Eden Tree, a green investment group, found that palm oil is found in over 50 percent of food and non-food products in major grocery stores.Palm oil comes from the fruit of the oil palm tree. Photo by Kimberley Brown for Mongabay.So, can fungi offer an alternative oil for these products?“Technically, yes,” said Melanie Valencia, an environmental chemist from Ecuador and one of the minds behind CarboCycle, a biotech startup that developed the technology to extract lipids from fungi that are similar to palm oil.“It’s really about how I feed [the fungi],” she said, explaining that the microorganisms actually grow on organic waste.Numbers from the Environmental Protection Agency show organic waste makes up more than half of solid waste produced in the U.S., and releases harmful methane and carbon dioxide emissions as it sits and decomposes. Recycling the waste alleviates this problem. It’s also an input that’s easy to manipulate – change the waste properties and you can change the kind of oil it produces.CarboCycle is a project born out of the environmental engineering lab at Columbia University in New York City, through research conducted by Valencia, Kartik Chandran and Shashway Vajpeyi. While not yet out of the lab, CarboCycle has been awarded the Colombia Venture Challenge, while the MIT Technology Review named Valencia one of the Top Innovators Under 35 in 2016 for her role in the project.Their initial aim wasn’t to develop an alternative for palm oil, but rather to address climate change issues. This is why they ended up with a technology that tackles both deforestation and overflowing landfills, aiming to “close the carbon loop,” as per their organizational motto.Valencia’s colleagues in the lab collect organic food waste from Columbia University’s dinning hall. Image courtesy of Columbia Engineering.According to Valencia, the biggest ecological problem with oil palm is the enormous amount of space it uses. The total land devoted to palm agriculture spiked between 1990 and 2012, from 6 to 17 million hectares worldwide, according to a recent article in the journal Global Environmental Change. In many cases, industrial cultivation of oil palm trees has led to the deforestation and degradation of rainforest habitat. This has been particularly severe in Indonesia, where millions of hectares of tropical forest – including peat forest, which stores more carbon per hectare than any other ecosystem in the world – have been converted into oil palm plantations.“It’s taking away the carbon sequestration capacity from a ton of soil,” Valencia said. In this sense, “palm is a bigger threat to our ecosystem than oil,” especially since future projections show that demand for the product is likely to rise, she added.According to the World Bank, demand for palm is expected to double by 2050, as emerging economies consume more and more processed foods, in which palm oil is a major ingredient.The production of oil from fungi takes up significantly less space, Valencia says, since all of the work is done in the lab. It’s production has several stages, from fermenting the organic waste on which the fungi will grow, to collecting the final microorganisms (fungi), and extracting lipids (the oil) from their cells.Before being fed to the fungi, organic waste is pulped and processed. Image courtesy of Columbia Engineering.A machine processing some of the lipids that have been extracted by fungi and yeast products, which were grown using the organic waste. Image courtesy of Columbia Engineering.Another benefit of this process is its minimal retention time. The whole operation from beginning to end takes only two to four days, which means that under appropriate conditions CarboCycle could produce at very high rates. Valencia said storing the stock is her only concern about space.In the initial stages of their research, Valencia and her colleagues spoke to companies that use palm oil in their products, including major brands like Dannon and Johnson & Johnson, many of which said they were looking to take palm oil out of their production chain due to the negative PR the industry garnered over the years. This is one reason Valencia is optimistic about CarboCycle’s future. She and her colleagues are currently applying for grants, while looking for funding and businesses to partner with in order to really get CarboCycle off the ground and out of the lab.However, even though they are optimistic, Valencia said producing at scale is a whole other ball game, and one of the biggest challenges for startup companies trying to tackle environmental problems.This is not the first time that scientists have claimed to find an alternative to palm oil. Researchers have also looked at algae and yeast, but haven’t been able to produce either at scales large enough to compete with palm oil.Ashwin Ravikumar, an environmental scientist and assistant professor of environmental studies at Amherst College, said cost is another major barrier that laboratory-based alternatives to oil palm will face. Oil palm is too cheap to compete with, he said, mainly because land is so cheap, particularly in the Amazon where there is a major lack of forest protection.An oil palm plantation in La Concordia, Ecuador, that belongs to ANCUPA, the National Association of Oil Palm Cultivators. Photo by Kimberley Brown for Mongabay.However, he says that this reality should not be accepted as a fixed status quo.“To say that oil palm is cheap and that’s the way it is, like this fact that just exists out there, is to dangerously de-politicize the entire nature of the sector,” he saidAccording to Ravikumar, governments could play a major role here by increasing protected forest area and calling off development projects in certain parts of the Amazon, which would naturally increase the price of land. But, he said, many of them won’t.The Amazon in particular has been a major concern for environmentalists. Currently, around 85 percent of the world´s supply of palm oil is produced in Malaysia and Indonesia alone. But as demand rises and plantation land becomes less available in these areas, producers are increasingly looking elsewhere to expand cultivation. The Amazon and other tropical areas around the equator are hot spots for future plantations since oil palm trees need temperatures between 25 and 28 degrees Celsius, regular rainfall and strong sunlight to thrive.According to Ravikumar, this expansion could lead to deforestation of huge swaths of rainforest, and destroy local biodiversity, cultural diversity and carbon stocks in the process. Research published in a 2006 study in Nature estimates the Amazon rainforest stores between 90 and 140 billion metric tons of carbon, which, if released, could significantly affect climate change.Recently deforested land next to an established oil palm plantation and natural rainforest in Sabah, Malaysia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.But according to industry specialists, oil palm plantations do not have the same environmental impacts as they once did. Mauricio Viteri is a manager at Oleana, an umbrella organization that represents various actors in the palm oil sector in Ecuador. He says outside pressures have caused the industry to make major changes in all aspects of its production process. This includes establishing the industry-founded Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), the world’s largest palm oil certification body, to ensure producers follow environmental protection regulations and do not contribute to more deforestation.“Initially, yes, in places like Malaysia and Indonesia there was concern about the environmental impact [of oil palm]. But not in the Americas,” Viteri said.Environmentalists are skeptical that this accreditation goes far enough. Valencia herself said the certification is better than nothing, but the global community could be doing more.“I think we’ve overused the sustainable word,” she said, “We have the capacity to regenerate, so why not reach for that?”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Companies still not doing enough to cut deforestation from commodities supply chains: report

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki The latest “Forest 500” rankings are out from the Global Canopy Programme (GCP), and the main takeaway is that the global companies with the most influence over forests still aren’t doing enough to cut tropical deforestation out of their supply chains.Just five companies improved their policies enough over the last year to score a perfect five out of five in the 2017 rankings. Commitments to root deforestation out of timber and palm oil supply chains did increase, according to the report, but less than one-fourth of the Forest 500 companies have adopted policies to cover all of the commodities in their supply chains.Progress among financial institutions also continues to be sluggish, the GCP’s researchers found, with just 13 financial institutions scoring four out of five and 65 scoring zero. No financial institutions have received the maximum possible score. The latest “Forest 500” rankings are out today from the Global Canopy Programme (GCP), and the main takeaway is that the global companies with the most influence over forests still aren’t doing enough to cut tropical deforestation out of their supply chains.The annual Forest 500 report analyzes the 250 companies and 150 financial institutions (as well as the 50 most crucial jurisdictions and 50 other powerbrokers) that “have the largest potential to prevent tropical deforestation.” Every year since 2014 the GCP has assigned scores to each of these entities based on the strength of the policies they’ve adopted to address their exposure to deforestation risks from the production of four commodities — cattle, palm oil, soy, and timber (which includes pulp and paper) — that are collectively responsible for the majority of tropical forest destruction driven by agricultural operations today.This year’s rankings show that companies have made little progress since last year’s report, which found that, overall, the Forest 500 were not making enough headway to meet 2020 deforestation targets.Just five companies have since improved their policies enough to score a perfect five out of five in the 2017 rankings. Commitments to root deforestation out of timber and palm oil supply chains did increase, according to the report, but less than one-fourth of the Forest 500 companies have adopted policies to cover all of the commodities in their supply chains. The total number of companies that have received top marks now stands at 18, while 25 companies still score a zero out of five.Sarah Lake, who leads the Supply Chains Programme at GCP, notes that few companies in the cattle sector, in particular, have taken strong steps to sever their connections to deforestation in the tropics. Just 17 percent of cattle companies in the Forest 500 have a policy designed to help protect the forests where their cattle are produced or procured, and, what’s more, at least four Forest 500 companies have actually dropped policies addressing deforestation for cattle products since 2014.“Far more can be done to ensure that cattle rearing for beef and leather does not lead to tropical forests being cleared,” Lake said in a statement.But Lake also points out that the majority of Forest 500 companies have yet to take comprehensive action regarding their connection to forest destruction: “This year’s ranking clearly shows that while some leading companies have recognised the importance of tackling deforestation in their supply chains, most have not, and many are taking a piecemeal approach.”Progress among financial institutions also continues to be sluggish, the GCP’s researchers found, with just 13 financial institutions scoring four out of five and 65 scoring zero. No financial institutions have received the maximum possible score.There are a number of public-private partnerships to address deforestation, such as the New York Declaration on Forests and the Consumer Goods Forum, that have set 2020 as the deadline for meeting various benchmarks on halting tropical deforestation. If present trends continue, however, that deadline will not be met, according to the authors of the 2017 Forest 500 report.“At the current rate, the companies and financial institutions with the greatest influence on forests will fail to adopt adequate policies, or implement these policies by 2020,” they write. “As a result, global goals of zero commodity-driven deforestation by 2020 will be missed.”The strength of existing commitments varies by commodity, the authors add, with policies covering timber and palm oil being the most common and robust, while the cattle and soy sectors are lagging significantly behind. “Nevertheless, no sector is currently on track to achieve deforestation-free supply chains by 2020,” the authors note.“Companies need to develop policies across all their supply chains to ensure forests are protected, and financial institutions need to ensure that their investment policies recognise deforestation risks in their portfolios,” Lake said.Tropical deforestation for an acacia timber plantation in Sabah, Malaysia. Photo by Rhett Butler.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Cattle, Cattle Ranching, Corporate Responsibility, Corporate Role In Conservation, Corporate Social Responsibility, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Palm Oil, Pulp And Paper, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Research, Soy, Timber, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests, Zero Deforestation Commitments last_img read more

Trees are much more than the lungs of the world (commentary)

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Agroforestry, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Commentary Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agroforestry is a technique of growing trees and shrubs with crops, and is the focus of a new Mongabay series.Beside carbon sequestration, increased food security, biodiversity, topsoil depths, medicine and fiber production, plus other benefits accrue to agroforestry.Roger Leakey has studied, taught, and written about agroforestry techniques for decades and makes the point that trees are much more than ‘the lungs of the planet,’ but rather they also function like the skin, heart, kidneys, and intestines of the Earth, while acting as pharmacies, factories, and food pantries for humans.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. There are two important answers to the question “why do we need more trees in farmland?” One is global and one is local.Globally, trees are often recognized as the ‘lungs of the world’ because they exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide with the atmosphere. However, this is an understatement. If we think in these terms, trees are also the kidneys of the world as they regulate the flow and use of water by intercepting rain and releasing it slowly to the ground where it can either run off into rivers, or enter the groundwater. Plants can then absorb it for use in photosynthesis. This absorbed water is then transpired back to the atmosphere and blown on the wind until it falls as rain somewhere else.Cacao under mixed species forest shade, including Irvingia gabonensis (African mango) in Cameroon. Photo courtesy of Roger Leakey.Thus, trees are also like the skin of the world, being the interface between the vegetation and the atmosphere for the exchange of gases and water.Similarly, trees are like the intestines of the world exchanging nutrients between the soil and the vegetation, fueling the nutrient and carbon cycle.Finally, they are like the heart of the world, as they drive the ecosystems that make the world healthy and function properly. They do this by providing a very large number of niches for other organisms to inhabit, both above and below ground. Recent evidence has reported 2.3 million organisms on a single tree – mostly microbes – but also numerous insects and even bigger animals like mammals and birds. Others also live in the soil or, due to the microclimates created by the physical stature of the tree, on the associated herbs and bushes. It is all these organisms that provide the ecological services of soil formation and nutrient recycling, feeding off each other and creating an intricate web of food chains.All this is important for the maintenance of nature’s balance that prevents weed, pest, and disease explosions. They also provide services like pollination, essential for the regeneration of most plants, not to mention the very topical regulation of carbon storage essential for climate control.Cacao agroforest with fruit tree shade. Photo courtesy of Roger Leakey.At the local level, in addition to these ‘bodily functions,’ trees produce a wide range of products useful to us, and are often traded in local markets. There are literally tens of thousands of trees that produce edible and/or useful products – sources of items of day-to-day importance for us. So, we can also think of trees as shops, civic services, and industries. Thinking in this way, a treed landscape becomes similar to a town made up of supermarkets full of everyday needs; a bank providing annual interest on investment; a drug store or health clinic for medicines; a water tower; an art gallery; a zoo full of wildlife; a guardian of culture like a museum; a hotel providing rest for migrants; a tourist center for over-wintering or summer breeding habitat; a nightclub for nocturnal creatures; factories for fertilizers, pesticides and drugs; an energy provider, and even a skyscraper affecting the flow of wind around the other buildings.Using this analogy, we can see that by destroying trees we destroy facilities and functions important for life. Conversely, by planting trees we can multiply the products and services we need for a ‘good life’ in many different ways. In some places, trees are grown in large monoculture plantations, replicating the concept of a housing estate or industrial complex. This can be very productive but isn’t necessarily good for the environment. Alternatively, they can be grown at different densities and in different species configurations and for different products in association with food crops, livestock and cash crops.Some agroforestry fruits and nuts (1-7) and products (8-23) currently being marketed. Photo courtesy of Roger Leakey.This mixed cropping is known as ‘agroforestry’, a farming system which thrives off diversity and maximizes the availability of all the different benefits of trees and their services. In this way, agroforestry is highly beneficial to us – Homo sapiens – a dominant species in this agroecosystem. Agroforestry harnesses numerous environmental, social and economic benefits for our complex lifestyles.This is especially important in the tropics and sub-tropics where poverty-stricken subsistence farmers struggle to feed their families and scratch a living off highly degraded land. In this situation, it can be described as hunger busting since it can improve food crop yields on exhausted soils; farmer-friendly as it has numerous social benefits including enhanced livelihoods; wildlife-friendly as it provides habitat; climate friendly as it mitigates climate change and controls water flows; wealth-promoting by producing marketable products for businesses and industries, and health-giving by producing nutritious and medicinal products. So, we could create a new, green, and much more sustainable economy.Looking to the future, there are easily enough useful tree species for agroforestry to play all of the above roles in any corner of the inhabited world, very few of which have been cultivated to date. Interestingly, each of these species contains inherent 3- to 10-fold genetic variability at any one site, so it is easy to find and propagate individual trees that display an infinite number of useful and marketable traits suitable for a new array of businesses and industries.Multifunctional agroforestry landscape in Vietnam. Photo courtesy of Roger Leakey.However, we have hardly begun to identify the economic possibilities and need to do much more to explore all this potential. Maybe if we pursue this line of thinking, we can create useful and environmentally healthy rural landscapes which are as diverse as their urban counterparts, and create win–win–win scenarios combining better land husbandry, social empowerment, and income generation. I believe agroforestry has a bright future, but we need to learn how to manage this resource so that all people can share the benefits in harmony.I hope this colloquial expression of the value of trees explains why agroforestry is becoming increasingly recognized as being critical if we are to manage our planet sustainably. This is particularly vital where currently the land has been deforested and degraded because trees are considered to get in the way of modern mechanized agriculture, in which monocultures are the order of the day.Roger Leakey is Vice Chairman of the International Tree Foundation, Vice President of the International Society of Tropical Foresters, and is author of “Living with the Trees of Life – Towards the Transformation of Tropical Agriculture” (2012) and “Multifunctional Agriculture – Achieving Sustainable Development in Africa.” Learn more about his work at www.rogerleakey.com.This article is part of a new Mongabay series about the global scope of agroforestry, see all the features here.center_img Article published by Erik Hoffnerlast_img read more

More murders: Conservationists allegedly killed by soldiers in Cambodia

first_imgActivism, Crime, Environment, Forests, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Logging, Military, Murdered Activists, Protected Areas, Rainforests, trafficking, Tropical Forests Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Editor’s note: This story was updated Feb. 1 to include information and photos from a statement issued by the Wildlife Conservation Society.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Three people have been shot and killed by soldiers in northeastern Cambodia, apparently in retaliation for seizing equipment from illegal loggers.A police report names three individuals as responsible for the killings: a border police officer and two border military officers.Illegal logging and timber smuggling is commonplace between Cambodia and Vietnam, and officials from both countries are often complicit.Around 200 land activists were murdered worldwide in 2016, up from 185 in 2015. Three people have been shot and killed by soldiers in northeastern Cambodia, according to officials as reported by The Associated Press. Those killed were a conservation worker, a military policy officer and a forest protection ranger, reportedly because they had seized equipment from illegal loggers.Keo Sopheak, a senior environmental official in Cambodia’s Mondulkiri province, said the attack happened Tuesday afternoon as the conservation team was patrolling in Keo Siema Wildlife Sanctuary. Keo Sopheak said of the men killed was a Cambodian employee of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). The U.S.-based NGO is running a project at Keo Seima aimed at conserving its forests and wildlife through capacity-building initiatives with local communities.According to a statement provided by WCS, those killed were Ministry of Environment ranger Teurn Soknai, military police officer Sek Wathana, and WCS SMART officer Thul Khna.“Soknai was from the local Bunong Indigenous Community,” said Ken Serey Rotha, Country Program Director of WCS Cambodia. “He lived all of his life in Pu Cham village, O’riang District in Mondulkiri Province. He grew up surrounded by nature and wildlife and from a young age was aware of the importance of forests and excited by wildlife and conservation.  After gaining a bachelor’s degree in Human Resource Management from National University of Management, Cambodia, he worked for WCS as an assistant to the ecotourism project in KSWS for four years. As part of that role he developed the Jahoo Gibbon Camp near Andong Kralong village, at which tourists stay and bring extra income to this indigenous community. Jahoo is the Bunong word for female gibbon, a species that Soknai was passionate and knowledgeable about, frequently enthralling visitors with Bunong stories about the animal.  He joined the Ministry of Environment (MoE) to become a ranger in mid-2017 because he saw what was happening to the forest that he loved and wanted to protect it. Soknai was well-regarded in his village, and respected by colleagues and visitors because his passion for nature was clear for all to see. He is survived by a wife and two daughters of one and four years.” Photo courtesy of WCS Cambodia“Wathana, survived by his wife and daughters of two and five years, was born in Phnom Penh,” said Ken Serey Rotha, Country Program Director of WCS Cambodia. “After graduating from university he took a job at the Military Police as an Officer.  In 2016, he was moved to Keo Seima, and since 2017 he worked as a WCS counterpart and patrol team member. There he worked on the inter-agency patrol team with MoE rangers and the community patrol team, to protect the forest of KSWS. He was a hard-working and respected team member and will be missed by those who worked with him and knew him well.” Photo courtesy of WCS Cambodia“Khna grew up in Pen Meas, a rural village of rice farmers in Somroung Commune, Tramkork District, Takeo Province,” said Ken Serey Rotha, Country Program Director of WCS Cambodia. “He was the first member of his family to go to university, and graduated from the Royal University of Agriculture a bachelor’s degree in Forestry Science in 2016. He then went to Israel on a scholarship for 10 months to study GIS (Geographic Information System).  Khna joined WCS in 2017, as part of the GIS and SMART (Spatial Monitoring And Reporting Tool) team at WCS. He loved being part of this dynamic, young team exploring new ways of using spatial data for conservation. Part of his work involved improving the quality of monitoring data gathered by field teams, which he accompanied to the forest. Despite only being with WCS for less than a year, he was a popular member of the team and will never be forgotten. He is survived by his wife and one daughter of two and a half months.” Photo courtesy of WCS CambodiaKeo Sopheak said the three-person team had confiscated chainsaws and motorcycles from illegal loggers from Vietnam. He reportedly asserted that they were killed by soldiers: “The three were killed not by robbers or a guerrilla group but they were shot by government armed forces who backed the illegal timber cutting.”A report sent by Mondulkiri police chief Ouk Samnang to National Police Chief Neth Savouen and read by The Associated Press names three border security officials as responsible for the killings: Phal Penh, Keut Vehar and Ngur. Phal Penh was reportedly a border police officer while Keut Vehar and Ngur were border military officers.Illegal logging and timber smuggling is commonplace between Cambodia and Vietnam. According to the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), a UK-based NGO, around 300,000 cubic meters of logs were smuggled from Cambodia to Vietnam between November 2016 and May 2017.Most of Mondulkiri province is officially protected, but satellite data from the University of Maryland show areas of heavy tree cover loss along its border with Vietnam. Officials on both sides of the border are often complicit, according to watchdog groups like EIA, and reap huge financial rewards for enabling timber trafficking.Tuesday’s alleged killings are hardly the first. In 2016, the most recent year for which data are available, around 200 activists were murdered around the globe as they tried to protect land from extraction activities like logging and mining, according to UK-based watchdog organization Global Witness. That number was up from 185 in 2015.“Every day, rangers and law enforcement staff risk their lives to protect wildlife and forests,” said Ken Serey Rotha, Country Program Director of WCS Cambodia. “We should not allow criminals to destroy the forests of Cambodia and to threaten and murder those working tirelessly to protect this country’s natural heritage.“Soknai, Wathana, and Khna will always be remembered as conservation heroes.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Brazilian Supreme Court ruling protects Quilombola land rights for now

first_imgBrazil’s Supreme Court has soundly rejected a lawsuit filed in 2003 by a right wing political party that would have drastically limit the ability of quilombolas (former slave communities) to legitimize claims to their traditional lands.There are 2,962 quilombolas in Brazil today, but just 219 have land titles, while 1,673 are pursuing the process of acquiring legal title. Titled quilombola territories include 767,596 hectares (1.9 million acres); these settlements have a good record of protecting their forests. Brazil’s total quilombola population includes some 16 million people.While advocates for quilombola rights cheered the Supreme Court decision, major threats to the communities loom: successive administrations have drastically slashed the budget for titling quilombola lands, almost completely stalling the demarcation process. Also, a constitutional amendment, PEC 215 is moving through Brazil’s Congress.PEC 215 would shift authority from the Executive branch to Congress for giving out land titles to quilombolas, recognizing indigenous claims to ancestral lands, and creating protected areas. With Congress dominated by the ruralist caucus and agribusiness, PEC 215 threatens Brazilian forests and indigenous and traditional communities. Children dancing at a quilombola. There are nearly 3,000 quilombola communities in Brazil, but only 219 have received legal title of their lands from the Brazilian government. Photo courtesy of ISAAfter long consideration, Brazil’s Supreme Court (STF) ruled on 8 February by an overwhelming majority to reject a legal action initiated in 2003 by a right-wing political party to declare invalid a presidential decree (Decreto 4.887/2003), passed by President Lula in the same year. The action, had it succeeded, would have made it much harder for quilombolas (communities of former slaves) to gain rights to their traditional land claims and could have led to the dismantling of quilombola territories already created.Ten of the eleven STF ministers voted that Lula’s presidential decree was constitutional, as Quilombola communities and those working with them breathed a collective sigh of relief. The NGO Socioenvironmental Institute (ISA) called it “an important defeat” of “the Temer government, the rural caucuses (bancada ruralista) and the National Confederation of industry [a powerful business lobby].”The case has been in limbo since 2015. A ruling was scheduled three times last year but postponed each time. In April 2017, the Temer administration suspended all new land demarcations until a ruling was made, which was seen as a clear message that his government endorsed the legal action.Quilombola community members celebrate the Brazilian Supreme Court decision. Photo by Carlos MouraDemildo Biko Rodrigues, from the National Coordination of Rural Black Communities (CONAQ), told BBC Brasil that “the Brazilian state has taken a step forward in the process of redressing everything that has happened to our people.” He was pleased but surprised by overwhelming majority decision by the STF, “given the dark times in which we live.”The Liberal Front Party (PFL), which changed its name to the Democrats Party (DEM) in 2007, originally filed the suit. The party wanted to overturn a presidential decree, issued by President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva in 2003 that gave the Executive the authority to establish the procedure for creating quilombola territories. Since then, INCRA (The National institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform), an independent federal body, has been responsible for giving titles to quilombos and marking out their boundaries.If successful, the DEM’s suit would have transferred this power to Congress, where the right-wing rural caucus is very strong. Rodrigo Oliveira, an adviser to the Public Federal Ministry (MPF), an independent body of federal prosecutors, told Mongabay that if the STF ruling had gone the other way, “even quilombola land that had already been titled would have been at risk.” Put simply, if the STF had favored the suit, land titles already received by 219 quilombola territories from INCRA could have been cancelled, depriving 17,000 Brazilian families of their lands, making them vulnerable to eviction by land thieves.Brazilian forest, too, would have likely suffered. Ricardo Folhes, from the Federal University of Pará, said: “The quilombola territories are among the country’s best-preserved land, like indigenous territory and protected areas. If the judgement had gone against them, it could have meant another 800,00 hectares of forest at risk.”According to a variety of sources, including INCRA, Repórter Brasil, and Comissão Pro-Índio, the number of quilombola communities in Brazil today stands at almost 3,000, but just 219 have land titles, while 1,673 are pursuing the process of acquiring titles. The quilombola population on titled and non-titled land totals some 16 million Brazilians.French painter Jean-Baptiste Debret (1768-1848) was one of the few artists to portray the cruel reality of slavery in Brazil. That reality caused runaway slaves to hide in remote forests and avoid any association with government. Image courtesy of WikipediaWhen is a quilombola a quilombola?The Supreme Court, while confirming the constitutionality of the decree, also had the power to introduce significant changes to it. Here there was more dissent among the ministers.In particular, the quilombolas had feared that the court would introduce a much tougher, more limited legal definition of a quilombola community. Such settlements had typically been defined as being “set up by runaway slaves,” but in recent decades, following the 1988 Constitution and the advice of the Brazilian Association of Anthropology (ABA), authorities had adopted a broader definition, characterizing quilombolas as black communities “that have developed practices of resistance for the maintenance and reproduction of their characteristic way of life.”The 2003 DEM legal action, had it been approved, would likely have ended “self-identification,” by which a community can decide for itself whether or not it is a quilombola. Arguing that this process allowed widespread fraud, the DEM and rural caucus maintained that the community should only be able to call itself a quilombola if it had the backing of historical documents, proving its founding by runaway slaves.Anthropologists point out that such a narrow definition would exclude many legitimate quilombolas. Brazil only ended slavery in 1888, by which time roughly four million had been transported from Africa. Many runaways, fearing recapture, lived in remote areas, so didn’t find out slavery had been abolished until many years after emancipation. They were also extremely reluctant to have any government contact, meaning that their settlements lacked official records.The quilombolas — communities of descendants of runaway slaves — are fiercely proud of their African culture and tradition. Photo by Antônio Cruz / Agencia BrasilThe family of Josefa Bezerra de Matos, president of the Association of Quilombolas and their Descendants in Mundo Novo, a hamlet in the interior of Pernambuco state, is a case in point. She said: “My father and grandfather didn’t want documents, because they were frightened of them. As children, we were brought up to be fearful of white people. My father only got himself [a legally obligatory Brazilian] identity card at the end of his life.”Josefa has just one small photo of her grandfather, who was born a slave and ran away to gain his freedom. Josefa keeps this photo, taken when her grandfather was more than 100-years-old, in a matchbox which she carries everywhere. “I’m sure he protects us and looks out for us,” she said. “And he helps us when we have to talk to authority.”In the end, the Supreme Court decided by a comfortable majority that “self-identification” of quilombolas is permissible.Traditional inhabitants in the Quilombola of Paracatu in Minas Gerais state. Inhabitants of these former slave communities are known for preserving forests on their claimed lands. Photo courtesy of WikipediaThreats to quilombolas still loomIn its suit, the DEM also sought to impose a marco temporal, a timeframe requiring that those claiming title would have to prove they were occupying the land when Brazil’s new constitution was approved in 1988, unless they could demonstrate that they had been thrown off their land by “illicit acts.”Edson Fachin, an STF minister, said that many communities would have difficulty proving pre-1988 occupation, given that “quilombolas were absolutely invisible until very recently.” This was the position taken by most of his colleagues, though several voted against.Times have changed since 2003, when the DEM launched its suit. Quilombolas have become far more visible and political, and enjoy considerable popular support. Approval of the DEM’s legal action might well have provoked widespread public protests. Many in the rural caucus understood this shift in public opinion, and thought it warranted a change in tactics. The current DEM president, José Agripino Maia, told BBC Brasil that the party had changed its mind regarding the 2003 suit and believed it to have been “a mistake” to launch it. However, as the case was already in process, it was not possible to withdraw it.Although clearly delighted by the STF decision, Demildo Biko Rodriges sees the ruling as only “a first step,” to protecting the former slave communities, as “there is still a long road ahead before we achieve our rights.” Despite last week’s success, analysts agree that the future for quilombolas looks perilous.INCRA’s budget has been slashed in recent years, with funding to provide quilombola land titles falling from R$64 million (US$19.4 million) in 2010, to R$4 million (US$1.2 million) in 2017. Demildo Biko Rodigues said that the communities’ key challenge now is “to dialogue with the [Temer administration] so that more resources can be found to accelerate the demarcation process.”Lúcia M.M.Andrade, executive coordinator of the Comissão Pro-Índio in São Paulo, who has worked with quilombola communities for almost 30 years, said that the lack of resources is a huge problem. “It means that INCRA won’t be able to push ahead with the more than 1,500 requests for land title,” she said. “Of these, INCRA has not yet carried out the first phase – the identification of territory report (RTID) – for 84 percent of them. So there is little chance of changing the current situation in which just 9 percent have titles to their land.”A further danger looms. For 17 years the rural lobby has pressed for passage of a sweeping constitutional amendment – PEC 215. If approved, it would shift from the Executive branch to the Congress the authority for giving out land titles to quilombolas, recognizing indigenous lands, and creating protected areas. Given the power wielded in Congress by land-hungry rural elites and agribusiness, passage of the amendment would likely deal an enormous blow to environmentalists, social movements and NGOs — not to mention Brazil’s biodiversity and forests.According to many experts, risk of the passage of PEC 215 by Congress grows by the day.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.The future of these children, and others living in quilombola communities across Brazil, may depend on whether tor not the Brazilian Congress passes PEC 215. If approved, the amendment would shift from the Executive branch to the Congress the authority for giving out land titles to quilombolas, recognizing indigenous lands, and creating protected areas. Photo by Carol Gayao under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license Article published by Glenn Scherer Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon People, Controversial, Corporate Responsibility, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Politics, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Loss, Forests, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Slavery, Social Conflict, Social Justice, Threats To The Amazon, Traditional People, Tropical Deforestation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Cambodia creates its first marine national park where pirate fishers prowl

first_imgAnimals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Featured, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Green, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Illegal Fishing, Marine, Marine Animals, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Ocean Crisis, Oceans, Overfishing, Protected Areas, Seagrass, Wildlife Article published by Rebecca Kessler In February, Cambodia announced the establishment of its very first marine national park, covering 524 square kilometers (202 square miles) in the Gulf of Thailand.Koh Rong Marine National Park takes in the seven islands of the Koh Rong archipelago and the web of coral, seagrass and mangrove ecosystems around them.Wedged between Thailand and Vietnam, Cambodia’s tiny territorial waters have long been plundered by illegal fishing gangs feeding an ever-rising demand for seafood.But the declaration of the new park does nothing to protect the environment, at least in the short term, with no new patrols of the heavily fished waters until next year and a $2 billion island development plan allowed to continue unhindered. In February, Cambodia announced the establishment of its very first marine national park, covering 524 square kilometers (202 square miles) in the Gulf of Thailand. But the declaration does nothing to protect the environment, at least in the short term, with no new patrols of the heavily fished waters until next year, and a $2 billion island development plan allowed to continue unhindered.Declared in the name of protecting biodiversity and encouraging tourism, the Koh Rong Marine National Park takes in the seven islands of the Koh Rong archipelago, 10.5 kilometers (6.5 miles) offshore, and the web of coral, seagrass and mangrove ecosystems around them. It expands upon a conservation area set up in 2016 that already restricts certain kinds of fishing.“The existing plan is not enough; the new area extends to protecting terrestrial, as well as marine [areas],” Thay Chantha, director of marine conservation at Cambodia’s Environment Ministry, which is charged with managing the new park, told Mongabay.Wedged between Thailand and Vietnam, Cambodia’s tiny territorial waters have long been plundered by illegal fishing gangs feeding an ever-rising demand for seafood. Under the 2016 conservation plan, island locals were put to work patrolling their waters. The scheme appears to have curtailed illegal activity, but in no way eradicated it.“We cannot say they have been successful,” Chantha said of the patrols, which are managed by the Fisheries Administration, a government agency dogged by corruption and hamstrung by a severe lack of resources.The Koh Rong National Marine Park off Cambodia, in the Gulf of Thailand. Map courtesy of Google Maps.Little fish, big fishWith Cambodia’s tourism industry and economy booming, its tropical islands and coral reefs are becoming increasingly popular among domestic and foreign tourists. The Environment Ministry plans to assign at least 30 full-time rangers to patrol the new park’s waters. They will also begin policing environmental issues on the park’s islands, which are home to dozens of beach bars and guesthouses and a few thousand locals living in rudimentary villages. (The Fisheries Administration has no jurisdiction on land.)However, the new rangers won’t arrive until 2019 at the earliest, Chantha said, citing a lengthy formal process for recruiting civil service staff. And when they do start, those patrolling for violations on land will be hitting small targets only.“We are worried about households, about private restaurants and such that sometimes open in the community without conducting an EIA,” or environmental impact assessment, he said. “But the main developers, such as Royal Group, they already have their agreements with the government. For my department, that’s not our responsibility.”The Royal Group is Cambodia’s largest conglomerate, headed by Kith Meng, an Australian-educated tycoon and adviser to the Cambodian prime minister. In 2008, Royal Group was granted a 99-year lease on the jewels in the archipelago, Koh Rong and Koh Rong Sanloem. In December, the company’s flagship $30 million Royal Sands Koh Rong resort finally opened for business, more than two years behind schedule. Planned casinos, an airport, golf courses and a marina on the two islands have yet to break ground.In 2016, local officials ordered Royal Group to tear down a mainland pier and cease construction of an island port, saying they lacked proper paperwork, which scuttled plans to transport building materials. The conglomerate has also battled island residents over land ownership. Vice chairman Kith Thieng, Kith Meng’s brother, told Mongabay that Royal Group was not building on the island at present and that its newly minted 67-villa resort had taken steps to control its environmental impact. “There are systems in place to dispose of all waste,” he said.Koh Rong Sanloem, one of seven islands that make up Cambodia’s new Koh Rong Marine National Park. Photo by Wikirictor via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 4.0).Slow recovery for corals and seagrassRemote and largely lawless, the Koh Rong archipelago makes an ideal staging ground for outlaw fishing operations. Some of the most destructive techniques — such as blast fishing, which stuns schools of fish with explosives, and cyanide fishing, which mildly poisons fish — were once common in the area. Today’s criminal fishermen, though, are generally more discreet.Some use the islands for cover between stints fishing further out to sea for high-value catches like sailfish and mackerel, or for large quantities of lesser-value species like squid. Others trawl weighted nets through the shallow waters around the islands, laying waste to seagrass meadows in the hunt for shrimp and crabs.However, Cambodia’s 2006 fisheries law provided the impetus for authorities to begin reining in — ever so slowly — an anarchic fishing scene, giving ecosystems that host species such as seahorses, sea turtles and dugongs a chance to recover.“The health of the coral reefs is always improving,” said Pierre Kann, a dive instructor at the Koh Rong Dive Center. Foreign fishing boats “used to be everywhere,” he said. “Now you barely see them.”Kann has lived on and off the islands for much of his adult life. He said he is seeing thousands of recreational divers come through each week, up tenfold in three years. “A lot of high-ranking people are coming to dive, a lot of wealthy people coming to learn before they go on a holiday to the Maldives,” he said. “It is becoming very popular among Cambodians.”Expanding on the pre-existing 405-square–kilometer (156-square-mile) protected area, the new park takes in five additional islets to the north: Koh Koun, Koh Tatiem, Koh Touch, Koh Manoa Krav and Koh Manoa Knong. Some of these areas are still being discovered — or rediscovered — as illegal fishing activity recedes.“We spent days clearing away the ghost nets,” Kann said of old fishing nets entangled in coral at a new dive spot. “And underneath was the most beautiful thing. We called it ‘Secret Reef.’”A Vietnamese fisherman displays a receipt enabling him to fish illegally in Cambodian waters. He said Cambodian authorities gave it to him in exchange for a bribe. The receipt reads “ID Card / Name: Tev / Boat type: mussel dive / Date entered: 05-01-2017 / Expiry date: 09-01-2017.” Photo by Matt Blomberg.Pirate fishersIn spite of the archipelago’s visible recovery, a number of people interviewed by Mongabay said that illegal fishing by local and foreign vessels and the illegal trade of marine life have remained ubiquitous, even with fishing laws and a conservation area in place.“Two or three Vietnamese boats land on Koh Rong every day, sell their catch and go back to work,” one boat captain, who asked to remain anonymous, said of crews that sweep the ocean floor for species such as clams and sea urchins.“There is very little enforcement,” he said. “The marine police come to take payments and people are allowed to fish as they wish.”Policing Cambodia’s waters is a complex task. While the Fisheries Administration is barely equipped to fill its mandate enforcing fisheries laws, its work is multiplied and complicated by the presence of illegal foreign vessels. At the same time, its mission can easily be undermined by corruption among low-level officials with little incentive to venture out to sea at night to confront fishing gangs.Meanwhile, authorities charged with border enforcement are routinely accused of taking money in exchange for granting passage to foreign vessels — a type of arrangement that is pervasive in a nation of poorly paid civil servants. Foreign fishermen have told this reporter that they pay authorities for the privilege of fishing Cambodia’s waters, and produced receipts as evidence. Cambodia ranks 161st out of 180 countries in Transparency International’s latest Corruption Perception Index, falling five places from the previous year’s index.For decades, networks of crooked businesspeople and government officials have stripped Cambodia of its natural resources. But the country has recently reformed its Environment Ministry, and, it appears, sent it to begin sorting through a quagmire that stretches the length of the coast. Two years ago, the ministry was similarly handed control of the country’s forests, which, for decades, have been looted while ostensibly protected.Since 2012, the U.K.-based NGO Fauna and Flora International has been doing conservation work in the Koh Rong archipelago, including establishing and managing the original protected area alongside the Fisheries Administration. Its project manager for coastal and marine conservation in Cambodia, Marianne Teoh, welcomed collaboration with the Environment Ministry. Teoh said it was vital, however, that the ministry took into account the non-profit’s six years of research, planning and on-the-ground work when setting up the new marine park. “There is the opportunity now for the new legislation to build on the work at the site, to reinforce existing management capacity and enhance ongoing efforts,” she said.While the declaration of Cambodia’s first marine national park comes with no new patrols of its waters, discussions to redesign protection efforts in the archipelago are underway, according to Ouk Vibol, head of marine conservation at the Fisheries Administration. For now, the community patrols will continue. Vibol called them a success, saying they had reduced illegal fishing by 80 percent in less than two years. And Environment Ministry rangers will be welcomed to the fold, whenever their day comes, he added.“We don’t know about the Ministry of Environment side, but we will continue to do our work,” he said. “We all want to see more coral, more seagrass, more mangroves, more tourism and more income for locals. I hope the two ministries can get along.”Matt Blomberg is a freelance journalist based in Cambodia since 2012. He doesn’t tweet much, but you can follow him @BlombergMD.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

In other news: Environmental stories from around the web, March 16, 2018

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Conservation, Environment, Weekly environmental news update Article published by John Cannoncenter_img There are many important conservation and environmental stories Mongabay isn’t able to cover.Here’s a digest of some of the significant developments from the week.If you think we’ve missed something, feel free to add it in the comments. Tropical forestsCash convinces forest dwellers to cut down fewer trees, a new study in five developing countries finds (University of Colorado at Boulder/EurekAlert).The loss of Central Africa’s elephants could fundamentally alter the makeup of the region’s forests (Duke University/EurekAlert).“Major” biodiversity reports will headline Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services meeting in Colombia beginning March 17 (Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES)/EurekAlert).A study of some 80,000 plants and animals finds that climate change could wipe out local populations of half of species (University of East Anglia/EurekAlert, The Hindu, The Guardian).The growing role of zoos and aquariums in safeguarding the world’s biodiversity documented in a new book (Arizona State University/EurekAlert).New study looks at the impact of climate change on yellow fever in Africa (PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases/EurekAlert).Fragmenting forests in Costa Rica are a bigger problem for native plants than monkeys (Phys.org).Other newsAngola’s elephants need “active protection” if they’re going to survive, new study finds (PLOS One/EurekAlert).Ticks and Lyme disease on the rise in Canada as a result of climate change (Mother Jones/Undark).Mongolia is a land of wet and dry extremes that may not be worsened by climate change (University of Arizona/EurekAlert).Rising sea levels are imperiling Easter Island (The New York Times).White House chief of staff axes EPA head’s plans for debates to question climate change (The New York Times).The war on pollution in China appears to be working (The New York Times).Climate change panel looks for ways to involve more women in publications (Science Magazine).Avalanches in the Western Himalayas increase with rising temperatures (Phys.org).Stephen Hawking’s views on climate change and other threats to life on Earth (BBC News).Climate change drives extreme conditions in the Horn of Africa, threatening the region’s people with famine (The New York Times).Krill fishing could destabilize the Antarctic marine ecosystem (The Guardian).Weighing the costs and benefits of hydropower (Norwegian University of Science and Technology/EurekAlert).Photos document the effort to save the yellow-eyed penguin (The Guardian).New research: Stop overfishing and it will cut bycatch in half (Phys.org).Turtle and tortoise species are sliding toward extinction (The Revelator).Trash piles up in the Galapagos as ecotourism takes its toll (The Revelator).The high costs of sustainable aviation fuel (The Economist).Lazarus hare: A small mammal thought to be extinct in Nepal reappears after more than 30 years (INASP/ScienceDaily).Microplastics found in 90 percent of bottled water prompts WHO investigation (The Guardian).Banner image of an African savanna elephant by John C. Cannon.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

AI can ‘help us move mountains’ for people and planet, Watson developer says

first_imgAgriculture, Artificial Intelligence, conservation players, Interviews, Software, Technology, Technology And Conservation, United Nations, Wildtech Article published by Erik Hoffner IBM Master Developer Neil Sahota believes artificial intelligence (AI) can help humanity ‘move mountains’ in terms of improving lives and the environment.Sahota helped develop Watson, the supercomputer which is now being used in a variety of useful ways, like predicting crop yields for farmers in Africa.In this interview with Mongabay, he shares multiple examples of AI being used by actors ranging from the UN to NASA and NGOs, for good. Neil Sahota is an IBM Master Inventor and World Wide Business Development Leader in the company’s Watson Group. He works to create solutions powered by Watson, the supercomputer that he helped to develop which famously competed on the TV quiz show Jeopardy! against two human champions in 2011 and won. Sahota is a big believer in the power of artificial intelligence (AI) to improve the lives of people and the health of the environment, and while technology won’t solve all human or ecological problems, it has an important role to play, prompting Mongabay to ask him for an interview.An Interview with Neil SahotaErik Hoffner for Mongabay: At our conservation tech site Wildtech, we increasingly publish news about how AI and machine learning can be applied to conservation, from using eBird to track songbird populations to applications that can curtail illegal rainforest logging. What are your favorite examples of how AI can aid the environment?Neil Sahota: One of my personal passions in life is efficient water usage and conservation. In my pursuit of AI for Social Good, I’m always looking for opportunities in water management. One favorite example is Project Lucy, where IBM Watson is using AI to enhance African infrastructure, including water management in terms of dealing with water scarcity, and helping to maximize water use in agriculture. Imagine developing new farming techniques to grow more with less water! Another great example is Optimized System Controls of Aquifer Resources (OSCAR) by JEA where they’re boosting their water management capabilities by moving to “just-in-time” water. This is a great example of where they’re using AI to predict consumption patterns and prepare accordingly. In the future, they might be able to leverage AI and these consumption patterns to improve consumer behavior. Thus, they could help improve water conservation from two different points.Project Lucy infographic courtesy of IBMMongabay: How has Watson begun to be used for social good?Neil Sahota: We’ve started an across the board initiative called IBM Watson for Good. This spans across a lot of different domains like Project Lucy and Chatbots for Good which provide free help in some areas of law, therapy, and quitting smoking to name a few. In addition, the environment is a big focus for IBM Watson. We’re looking at solutions [to] better understand nature’s ecosystems. It’s a lot of ground to cover which is why we’ve opened up our technology for people to use, especially for social good. Hopefully by enabling people and organizations, we can build more sustainable and eco-friendly solutions much quicker. Mongabay: I’ve also read that the cognitive computing of Watson’s ‘sister’ in Africa (“Lucy”) is being used for applications like improved waste collection in Nairobi. Can you say more?Neil Sahota: Lucy is about possibility, and the work in Africa is showing how real these possibilities are. AI technology is opening up whole new opportunities that may allow us to improve things more dramatically than we realized. Take the waste collection in Nairobi for example. Improving route maps and adding sensors seem like obvious ideas today. However, Nairobi is the 4th most congested city in the world in terms of traffic and also suffers from poor conditions on some streets. By leveraging AI, the trucks can limit their exposure to potholes, bumps, and other obstacles to reach more locations for waste pickup, which has led to a reduction in the number of garbage heaps in the city. In turn, the trucks are helping the city to collect road condition information so that they can improve how they allocate infrastructure repairs. Likewise, Lucy is helping by using “telephone farms” (sensors that stream data on variables like soil moisture levels which are analyzed and sent back to farmers on mobile devices) in Kenya to collect crop data. With this type of infrastructure and cognitive computing power, Lucy is able to provide analytics and recommendations to the farmers on water usage, insect control, and yield forecasts.Mongabay: How do the AI program development teams you’re associated with decide what data to collect, and how are the end users involved in determining the need?Neil Sahota: AI is really about training. We have to establish the basic rules for decision making or “ground truth.” Think of it as teaching a child. We’re going to have our own perspectives on what’s trustworthy, important, and right. Thus, even if you have four organizations trying to improve crop yields using AI, they might have slightly different recommendations because each one will have a slightly different ground truth. As a result, the data (and access to data) is very important, but what’s even more important is the training strategy for the AI.AI data processing helps researchers assess the health and conservation status of vulnerable koala populations.Mongabay: You’re also working with the United Nations to develop a model and set of metrics to encourage nations and NGOs to pursue AI solutions for a more sustainable world. How exactly is the UN tapping AI for achieving things like the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?Neil Sahota: According to the U.N., there’s about a $US 5-7 trillion shortfall in investment to fulfill the SDGs. To bridge this gap, we’re looking at emerging technologies like AI to help. To entice governments and enterprises, the UN is developing a model to show the benefits of AI investment for initiatives aligned with the SDGs. The focus is twofold: 1) motivate more innovation, and 2) incentivize people to think about social good, in conjunction with commercialization. As a way of spurring adoption, we’re looking at a set of metrics that would give enterprises, agencies, and even countries an “SDG score” so they can gauge how successful their efforts have been so far.Mongabay: And individual governments like Singapore are using this kind of tech for things like beach protection now, yes? Neil Sahota: There are lots of examples of how artificial intelligence can help us protect our environment. Singapore’s beach protection is great example of how a government committed to environmental protection and which makes the investments can do a lot of good. Another great example is NASA’s Pre-Aerosol Clouds and Ocean Ecosystem (PACE) which is using machine learning to track the distribution of phytoplankton. While this may not sound like much, it actually has a profound impact on CO2 levels, and in turn, climate change and how plant and wildlife get impacted. Digital Crust is another great example of AI for environmental protection. It’s focused on a better understanding of subsurface processes in the planet which help understand impacts on groundwater and aquifers.MODIS/Aqua true color image showing riverine outflow and phytoplankton blooming in the Gulf of Alaska, with clouds to the south and snow-covered land in the north over Alaska on April 12, 2017. Credit: NASA GSFCAcross these examples, AI is helping us to consume lots of real-time data and look at millions of variables and analyze millions of possible trade-offs and outcomes. As a result, we are developing a much better understanding of what’s happening to the environment, what could happen to environment, and what steps we can take to improve or avoid environmental issues.Mongabay: What do you hope computational computing/AI/machine learning can be used for next, in terms of reshaping how people understand and use resources sustainably, to fight hunger, etc?Neil Sahota: My hope is the AI will help us as people become what I call “sustainably integrated.” At a macro level, people generally understand the big challenges we face. At a micro level, it’s much more difficult to recognize the impacts. For example, I stopped shaving with water to reduce my water consumption. When people hear this, they often say it doesn’t move the needle. In the grand scheme of things, it probably doesn’t. On average, we use about 1 gallon of water to shave our faces.However, what if my attitude inspired 100 people to do the same thing? Ok…. But does 100 gallons of water per day move the needle? What if those 100 people inspire 100 people each? Does 10,000 gallons per day move the needle? At some point, it does. This is where I hope we can leverage AI. If we had a little AI sustainability assistant to increase our awareness and help us change our behavior, even in a few small ways, it would really add up across the entire population. This won’t just move the needle for us; it’ll help us move mountains.This interview has been edited for clarity.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more