Stepping on their paws: study explores recreation’s unfun impacts on wildlife

first_imgAmphibians, Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Ecotourism, Interns, National Parks, Protected Areas, Reptiles, Research, Tourism, Wildlife Article published by Maria Salazar In a meta study of 274 papers, researchers found that 59% of the time impacts on wildlife were negative.Reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates appear especially vulnerable to tourist impacts.More research is needed, especially in the developing world. In a video posted on YouTube on February 6, 2017, a woman fishes a juvenile shark out of the waters of the Fernando de Noronha, an archipelago-cum-national park off Brazil’s northeastern coast, wrestling with it as it thrashes furiously. As the clip plays, we realize the shark has clamped down on her right hand. A camera-bearing man moves into the frame and grabs the shark’s tail, trying forcefully to pry it off as a crowd gathers. After an agonizing twenty seconds, the man detaches the shark’s grip from the woman’s hand, and she throws the shark back into the ocean.Tourists in a platform of a giant Kapok tree overlooking the rainforest canopy. The study shows that outdoor recreation, which is allowed in most protected areas around the world, might be causing a tangibly negative effect on wildlife. Photo credit: Rhett Butler.It later transpired that the shark was an endangered lemon shark, and that there were signs around the park telling visitors not to kill, catch, disturb or feed animals in the park. The woman was fined around $6,420.To most people, having an area declared protected seems like a cause for celebration. Animals flourish, while humans get to enjoy nature – what’s not to like? But if this is true, why do stories like these keep showing up in the news and what impact do tourists have on the ostensibly protected species?Enter a team of scientists who decided to try and dig deeper. Their study, recently published in PLOS ONE, surveys 274 papers to better understand the impact human recreation has on wildlife in protected areas.“It’s common to assume that we can set aside land as protected, and it will do the job of conserving wildlife even if there are high levels of human activity in those areas,” said Courtney Larson, a Ph.D. student at Colorado State University, and team lead for the study. “We were interested in synthesizing the research that is out there on this topic and seeing if we could identify some patterns.”The team also aimed to discover gaps in the existing literature.First, the researchers decided that a bad impact on wildlife would mean signs like lower species richness, less survival and reproduction, or decreased weight. A good impact would mean just the opposite. Everything else would be categorized as “unclear.”They found that 93% of the papers had at least one impact on wildlife from recreation. And 59% of the time, it was bad.All uphillThe research came with many challenges. To identify gaps, the scientists needed as broad a scope as possible, including all types of wildlife and recreation activities in protected areas all over the world. This means they had to grapple with the myriad ways recreation affects wildlife.For example, the researchers noticed that recreation’s negative effects appeared to occur most often to reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. One paper documented how the Iberian frog (Rana iberica) stopped using stream banks with higher levels of human use. Another tracked the flat-tailed horned lizard (Phrynosoma mcallii) in the Colorado desert and found that lizards in areas with more off-highway vehicle activity had lower densities and mean body masses.The researchers took a bad impact on wildlife to include signs like lower species richness, less survival and reproduction, or decreased weight. A good impact meant the opposite. Everything else was categorized as “unclear.” Photo credit: Ggregoire Dubois.But the two hundred-plus papers focused on such vastly different topics that it made it difficult for them to say why these animals were more vulnerable – or if this was simply a case of skewed sampling.Surprisingly, they found that negative impacts were more often reported in relation to non-motorized activities, like hiking and boating, than motorized activities like viewing wildlife from off-highway vehicles. But the reason for this was also unclear.“This is absolutely a topic where more research would increase our understanding,” Larson said. “It’s important to keep in mind that there were very few studies that directly compared the effects of non-motorized and motorized activities. Additionally, we were not able to account for the fact that motorized activities usually cover larger areas than non-motorized activities, and can cause soil erosion and vegetation disturbance.”We’re working on itThe team also discovered some creative ideas people have carried out to try and minimize their negative impact on wildlife. For instance, some taught divers how to avoid damaging coral reefs, while others used official-looking volunteers to deter people from disturbing fur seals. Two papers examined whether fencing off protected areas helped keep people away.“[W]e don’t know enough about how effective these mitigation strategies are, so it’s difficult to say whether they are adequate,” said Larson, adding, “It’s also important to keep in mind all the benefits outdoor recreation provides for people – mental and physical health, connecting with nature, and a source of revenue for local communities. Rather than talking about curbing demand I think we need to explore more ways to balance these uses.”Gaps to fillMore than anything, Larson and her team identified various topics where research is scant.For one, they found that winter recreation seemed to have a greater impact on animals than summer activities. But because there were so few articles comparing winter and summer recreation, they could not be sure why this was so. Although it is likely that animals require more energy to escape from humans in snow, and that moving away from humans is harder given that food sources are scarcer in the winter, the team emphasized that more research has to be done.There was also a dearth of papers on recreation impacts in Africa, Latin America and Asia, since the research was conducted mostly in North America (37.7% of the papers), Europe (26.6%), and Oceania (13.1%). South America (9.1%), Asia (5.5%), Africa (5.1%), and Antarctica (2.9%) were largely ignored in the literature. Significantly, such percentages are disproportional both to the land area and to human population density of the continents.Finally, effects on individual animals need to be examined on a larger scale to understand how recreation might impact wildlife populations or communities.Tourists enjoying Yasuni National Park in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Negative impacts were more often reported in relation to non-motorized activities like boating than motorized activities like viewing wildlife from off-highway vehicles. But the researchers emphasize that more research has to be done to better understand this finding. Photo credit: Jeremy Hance“What can be measured almost always takes precedence over what cannot,” wrote essayist, environmentalist and historian Rebecca Solnit in her essay “Woolf’s Darkness: Embracing the Inexplicable.” With this piece of research, Larson and her team have pointed us somewhere new – towards a place where our relationship with animals is tangible and quantifiable; one capable of being measurably improved.And so, far from being shortcomings, these unanswered questions could be the legwork that helps us to begin to decipher the – as Solnit puts it – “mysteries and meanings” of our relationship with the 8.7 million or so other species that share our planet.Citations:Larson, C. L., Reed, S. E., Merenlender, A. M., & Crooks, K. R. (2016). Effects of Recreation on Animals Revealed as Widespread through a Global Systematic Review. Plos One, 11(12). doi:10.1371/journal.pone.016725(2017, February 9.) Tourist in trouble after grabbing shark for a video. news.com.au. Retrieved from http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/incidents/tourist-in-trouble-after-grabbing-shark-for-a-video/news-story/8763b0311b5441174e1a8025ac69292aRodriguezprieto, I., & Fernandezjuricic, E. (2005). Effects of direct human disturbance on the endemic Iberian frog at individual and population levels. Biological Conservation, 123(1), 1-9. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2004.10.003McGrann, M., Wright, G., Dial, R., McGrann, A. (2006). Off-highway vehicle impact on the flat-tailed horned lizard, Phrynosoma mcallii, in the Colorado Desert of southern California. California Fish and Game 92:67-80.Medio, D., Ormond, R., & Pearson, M. (1997). Effect of briefings on rates of damage to corals by scuba divers. Biological Conservation, 79(1), 91-95. doi:10.1016/s0006-3207(96)00074-2Acevedo-Gutiérrez, A., Acevedo, L., & Boren, L. (2010). Effects of the Presence of Official-Looking Volunteers on Harassment of New Zealand Fur Seals. Conservation Biology, 25(3), 623-627. doi:10.1111/j.1523-1739.2010.01611.xCassini, M., Szteren, D., & Fernandez-Juricic, E. (2004). Fence effects on the behavioural responses of South American fur seals to tourist approaches. Journal of Ethology, 22(2). doi:10.1007/s10164-003-0112-0Ikuta, L. A., & Blumstein, D. T. (2003). Do fences protect birds from human disturbance? Biological Conservation, 112(3), 447-452. doi:10.1016/s0006-3207(02)00324-5Solnit, R. (2014). Men Explain Things to Me: And Other Essays. London: Granta.Watson, Traci. (2011, August 25.) 86 Percent of Earth’s Species Still Unknown? National Geographic News. Retrieved from http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/08/110824-earths-species-8-7-million-biology-planet-animals-science/center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Liberian park protects Critically Endangered western chimpanzees

first_imgThe establishment of Grebo-Krahn National Park in southeastern Liberia was approved by the country’s legislature in August 2017.The 961-square-kilometer (371-square-mile) park is home to an estimated 300 western chimpanzees.There are about 35,000 Critically Endangered western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) left in the wild, and Liberia is home to 7,000 of them. The Liberian government designated a new national park in August 2017 that will protect an important population of Critically Endangered western chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus), as well as several other species of large mammals.The rainforests of the new Grebo-Krahn National Park in southeastern Liberia are home to some 300 western chimpanzees, according to the Wild Chimpanzee Foundation (WCF), based in Leipzig, Germany. A decade in the making, the 961-square-kilometer (371-square-mile) park won the approval of Liberia’s legislature on Aug. 22. Now, it only requires signatures from the president and the Minister of Foreign Affairs — formalities, WCF says — to become officially designated.Grebo-Krahn National Park is situated in southeastern Liberia and is part of the Taï-Grebo-Sapo forest complex that extends into Côte d’Ivoire. Map courtesy of the Wild Chimpanzee Foundation“Creating a new national park is of course very exciting — after years and years of collecting data and engaging the various stakeholders,” said Annika Hillers, a primatologist with WCF, in an email. “What bigger reward could there be?”But those years of work that WCF, other conservation organizations, and the Liberian government have put it were just the beginning, Hillers said.“It is now that we all have to work harder than ever, to make sure that Grebo-Krahn National Park is effectively protected and local communities are adequately involved,” she added.Grebo-Krahn forms the “heart” of the Taï-Grebo-Sapo forest complex, extending into neighboring Côte d’Ivoire. The contiguous habitat is a critical home to not only chimpanzees, but IUCN-listed Endangered pygmy hippos (Choeropsis liberiensis), Endangered western red colobus monkeys (Piliocolobus badius), and Vulnerable forest elephants (Loxodonta cyclotis).The path to the creation of this park began to crystallize in 2006, when the Liberian government passed a forestry reform law setting a goal of protecting 1.5 million hectares (5,792 square miles) of remaining forest areas. That included the Grebo National Forest, where the new national park is situated. Liberia had just emerged from a bloody 14-year civil war, and conservation groups like Conservation International and WCF were eager to help the Forest Development Authority, a government agency, protect the portion of standing Upper Guinean rainforest in Liberia.A plan emerged to section off what would become Grebo-Krahn National Park, but progress toward its official designation was slow. The growth of Liberia’s economy has been hamstrung by widespread poverty, low levels of education and few employment opportunities. And the devastation of the 2014 Ebola crisis, which killed nearly 5,000 Liberians, didn’t help.The country also lacks the infrastructure found that has helped make East Africa a global destination for wildlife-seeking tourists.“Even though the Upper Guinea Forest Ecosystem and its biodiversity are absolutely unique in the world, much more needs to happen before activities, such as ecotourism or also research activities, could generally provide reliable income for local communities,” Hillers said. “It is very tricky to find the right balance between effective nature conservation activities and support for local communities.”A western chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes verus). Photo ©Sonja Metzger / WCF courtesy of the Wild Chimpanzee FoundationIn part, that’s because many Liberians still depend on the forest. Bushmeat remains an important source of protein, which poses a threat to the mammals that inhabit the forests that now include Grebo-Krahn National Park. Illegal gold mining and the harvest of a tree from the genus Garcinia to make marketable “chewing sticks” within the park’s borders endanger its ecosystem. And a scarcity of agricultural land means that families are clearing areas of forest close to the park so they can feed their families.WCF says that the government doesn’t have the resources to pay enough guards to adequately protect the park. So the organization, in cooperation with the government, is working with local communities to galvanize their support, as they did in the years leading up to the park’s designation. Biomonitoring groups comprising community members help to catalog the life in the forest, and livelihood projects give community members alternatives, such as chicken or fish farming, to bushmeat hunting. Local participants in an “eco-guard” program work with law enforcement to protect the park’s wildlife, and they also engage with people in their communities, helping to explain the purpose of the park as a sanctuary for these animals.“Without the support and active involvement of local communities, no conservation project will be successful and especially sustainable in West Africa,” Hillers said.Endangered pygmy hippos (pictured here) also inhabit the Grebo-Krahn National Park. Photo by Chuckupd (Public domain), via Wikimedia CommonsThat community support will be especially important, as the vision to protect rainforests in West Africa extends far beyond Grebo-Krahn National Park.“We hope that this park will be part of a chain of existing and future protected areas stretching from Ivory Coast to Guinea covering huge parts of chimpanzee habitat,” said Mathias Rittgerott of the Germany-based NGO Rainforest Rescue in an email. “Without these protected areas, western chimpanzees will be at the brink of extinction soon.”Rainforest Rescue was among the organizations that backed the Grebo-Krahn National Park initiative financially. Scientists estimate that 35,000 chimpanzees of the western subspecies still live in West Africa, with 7,000 of them in Liberia.“Studies show that most known chimpanzee populations live outside of protected areas — meaning without any protection,” Rittgerott said. “That’s why additional parks are crucial.”Banner image of Sonja Metzger / WCF courtesy of the Wild Chimpanzee FoundationFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannon Article published by John Cannon Agriculture, Animals, Apes, Biodiversity, Bushmeat, Charismatic Animals, Chimpanzees, Conservation, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Politics, Extinction, Forest Elephants, Forests, Great Apes, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Hippos, Hunting, Land Reform, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Megafauna, Monkeys, National Parks, Parks, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Saving Species From Extinction, Threats To Rainforests, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Birdwatching poised to take flight in Colombia, study reveals

first_imgA new study identifies 67 communities with high potential for developing birdwatching ecotourism in Colombia.The country is home to more than 1,900 bird species, including 443 rare birds ‘highly valued by bird watchers.’The authors present ecotourism as an alternative to mining and logging as rural communities look for ways to develop economically after a decades-long conflict. Colombia is home to more bird species than any other country on Earth. It’s also well-known for a long-simmering conflict that has only recently begun to cool. Now, a pair of scientists based in Switzerland has mapped out the possibilities for birdwatching ecotourism to bolster economic development and safeguard forests as the country emerges from decades of strife.In Colombia, “The bird diversity is seemingly endless and birds come in waves of gaudy colors,” said R. Scott Winton, an ecologist at the Swiss Federal Institute Zurich, in an email to Mongabay. “Each new site visited brings a new set of species.”A club-winged manakin (Machaeropterus deliciosus) in Colombia. Photo by Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela.A recent peace agreement between the government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia in 2016 means that many spots in the country, once off-limits due to the presence of armed groups, are now open to visitors. In a study published today in the journal Tropical Conservation Science, Winton and fellow ecologist Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela identified the locations where rare birds — the ones that birders often seek out — hang out in Colombia using known ranges and a citizen science database called eBird. They then looked for overlap with communities that are trying to develop after the conflict.Their analysis revealed 67 spots where birdwatching could be successful.Colombian municipalities (black outlines) formerly affected by the conflict with high unrealized bird-watching potential. Protected areas and established eBird hotspots overlapping with these municipalities are highlighted in purple and by black points, respectively. Background gradient shows concentrations of endemic, near-endemic, small-ranged, and threatened birds. Image and caption courtesy of Ocampo-Peñuela and Winton, 2017.“The fact that many places had remained inaccessible for 50 years means that discovery still awaits,” said Ocampo-Peñuela, also of the Swiss Federal Institute Zurich. “With peace, birders will flock to Colombia.”In large part, so many bird species — 1,942 to be exact, including 74 found nowhere else on Earth — reside in Colombia because of the country’s unique and striking geography.“Colombia has a privileged location,” she said. Unlike any other Andean country, the mountain range splits into three separate spines through the country, known as “cordilleras,” creating unique habitats that stretch from high plateaus, or “paramos,” down to rivers in the valleys below.“Each slope of each cordillera has unique birds, as well as its valleys and paramos,” she said.That translates into “a ridiculous number of ecosystems for birds to fill,” Winton added.A yellow-headed manakin (Xenopipo flavicapilla). Photo by Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela.Many of those ecosystems are still intact largely because of the conflict that Colombia has endured for so long.“Conflict in Colombia has resulted in the conservation of large tracts of pristine forests because these were protected by the armed groups as the hiding place for them and their illegal crops,” Ocampo-Peñuela said.Until now, fighting between government and FARC forces has kept loggers, ranchers and miners interests at bay. But now that these areas are once again accessible by outsiders, many conservationists are concerned about what will happen next.“In such an important transition for Colombia, we fear that extractive industries, and the hope to make quick cash, will lead to the destruction of many important habitats,” Ocampo-Peñuela said.She and Winton contend that the development of ecotourism, centered on birdwatching, will help to ensure the preservation of these habitats since the birds won’t stick around if they’re destroyed. What’s more, they say that ecotourism would be beneficial to local communities. The National Audubon Society says that 150,000 birdwatchers from the United States alone could visit Colombia in the next 10 years, which could create 7,500 jobs and $47 million in income.“[Extractive] industries do create rural jobs, but often in an ephemeral boom-bust manner,” Winton said. “Plus, in their wake, they leave a degraded landscape less able to deliver other public goods, such as clean water.”A multicolored tanager (Chlorochrysa nitidissima), which lives only in Colombia’s mountains. Photo by R. Scott Winton.By contrast, locals can expect higher-paying jobs to meet the needs of typically well-off birdwatchers, and income from this type of employment is more likely to stay in the community than be siphoned off by large corporations.“So even if birdwatching tourism generates a much smaller gross compared to extraction, a much higher percentage will be delivered to rural communities in most need of economic stimulus,” Winton said.That’s a powerful incentive to protect the environment, he added.“Once people realize people will pay a lot of money to see their birds, suddenly the forest has a lot more value in an intact state and the calculation of whether or not to clear it for a cattle pasture changes.”A long-tailed sylph (Aglaiocercus kingii), a hummingbird found in Colombia. Photo by R. Scott Winton.CITATIONOcampo-Peñuela, N., & Winton, R. S. (2017). Economic and Conservation Potential of Bird-Watching Tourism in Postconflict Colombia. Tropical Conservation Science, 10, 1940082917733862. https://doi.org/10.1177/1940082917733862Banner image of birdwatchers by R. Scott Winton.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannon Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Animals, Avoided Deforestation, Biodiversity, Birding, Birds, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Community Development, Conflict, Conservation, Deforestation, Development, Drivers Of Deforestation, Ecology, Economics, Ecotourism, Environment, Forests, Logging, Mapping, Mining, Rainforest Animals, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforest People, Ranching, Research, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Sustainable Development, Tourism, Tropical Forests, Tropical Rivers, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Building conservation’s brain trust in Madagascar

first_imgForeigners have dominated scientific research in Madagascar, with more than 9 out of 10 publications on biodiversity led by foreigners from 1960 to 2015.A series of programs aimed at boosting early career Malagasy scientists is now bearing fruit as local researchers take on leadership roles in conservation.But Madagascar’s higher education system remains weak and deeply under-funded, so that the best chance of rigorous training and support for graduate work often comes through connections overseas.This is the fourth story in Mongabay’s multi-part series “Conservation in Madagascar.” ANTANANARIVO, Madagascar — Nothing says patience quite like tromping around wet woods in the middle of the night to collar bats and track them back to their daytime roosts. And creativity certainly played a role in a recent study tracking the bushmeat trade by scouring urban dumps for tortoise shells.Julie Hanta Razafimanahaka was a co-author of each of those efforts. But ask her what it takes to become a field biologist in Madagascar and you’ll get a different answer altogether.“Well,” Razafimanahaka said, “you have to be very lucky: that’s the first thing.” And it helps to be friendly too. “That doesn’t mean there’s no chance, it means you really have to talk with many people,” she added — especially researchers with foreign passports.Razafimanahaka got involved in the research project that led to her masters’ thesis not because she was particularly interested in bats, she recalled, but because she was able to finagle a meeting with a Welsh researcher doing fieldwork in her favorite part of Madagascar — the castle-like limestone formations of Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park.Nearly fifteen years later, she can trace the arc of her career back to that first meeting. The fieldwork in Tsingy de Bemaraha was part of a series of projects run by scholars at the University of Aberdeen with backing from the British government aimed at building up the CVs and skill sets of a new generation of Malagasy biologists to work on bat conservation.Yet when the fieldwork wrapped up in 2004, Razafimanahaka recalled, she and her peers found themselves out of work and feeling like the research they’d been part of was unlikely to yield much benefit for Madagascar. Today, Razafimanahaka runs an NGO called Madagasikara Voakajy, founded in 2005. For her, it’s a chance to follow through on the conservation recommendations that are often featured in academic papers on Madagascar but seldom heeded.Grandidier’s baobab (Adansonia grandidieri), a species Madagasikara Voakajy currently works to conserve. Photo by Bernard Gagnon via Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0.Voakajy now works at seven small sites across Madagascar that the group helped to attain protected status. “There were researchers who worked there before,” Razafimanahaka said of Voakajy’s sites. “And I think this applies almost everywhere in Madagascar. Researchers from overseas would come and do research — generally they won’t come back to tell you what they found. The difference in the protected areas where we’ve been working is we did research, and we came back, and talked with people about what we found. And discussed with them what should be done next. And now we are doing these those things,” she said. “I think that makes a big difference.”In recent years, a growing chorus of conservationists has pushed for more Malagasy leadership in local research, arguing that the work of Malagasy scientists is most likely to take root in conservation policy and practice over the long-term. Despite Razafimanahaka’s early frustrations, Voakajy’s creation is itself an indication that foreign partnerships can have lasting impact. Early international collaborations like the one that helped spawn Voakajy also launched the careers of a cohort of Malagasy scientists. Gradually, researchers like Razafimanahaka are stepping out of the shadows of their better-funded counterparts from overseas. How much farther the next generation will go, though, depends on how much can be done to shore up Madagascar’s higher education system.last_img read more

Faith in the forest helps Indonesia’s Dayaks keep plantations, loggers at bay

first_imgArticle published by Hans Nicholas Jong Banner image: The Dayak Punan prepare a meal over a fire. Photo by Vanessa Nirode, Agriculture, Conservation and Religion, Food, food security, Forests, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indonesia, Rainforest Agriculture, Rainforests Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Indigenous Dayak tribes of Borneo have longstanding traditions of performing various rituals throughout the agricultural cycle.These rituals keep communities united in protecting their forests, with which the Dayak maintain a reverential relationship — not just as a resource for food and livelihood, but also for spiritual fulfillment.The rituals also help ensure that the bounty of harvests is shared among all members of the community, even those who have experienced a poor yield. KAMBIYAIN, Indonesia — The village of Kambiyain lies deep within the forests of Indonesian Borneo, well off the national grid, and the nights here are typically dark and silent, save for the handful of homes with solar panels or diesel generators.But on a particular evening in May last year, the village was lit up with bright lights, and the sounds of conversation and laughter boomed from the community center, where everyone, young and old, had gathered to celebrate the harvest season.They sang songs in their indigenous Dayak language, as the men played traditional drums and the women served food their distant ancestors would have been familiar with. As the music died down, a village elder named Didi stepped forward to address the crowd.“We hold this event to express our gratitude to the universe for our abundant harvests,” he said.It’s an expression of thanks common across the Dayak heartland in Borneo, including in Kambiyain in South Kalimantan province, home to the Dayak Pitab subtribe; and one that’s been made routinely over the years for generations. The celebration this time is called Aruh Mahanyari, to give thanks for the harvest, with each tribe celebrating its own way.It’s also one of many throughout the year; the Kambiyain villagers also perform rituals before they begin clearing their land for farming, called Aruh Babanta, and during the planting period itself, Palas Paung.The Dayak indigenous tribe of Kambiyain village in South Kalimantan province, Indonesia, is holding an ‘aruh’ ritual to celebrate the success of their harvest. Photo by Indra Nugraha for Mongabay Indonesia.Sustainable forest managementAn integral part of the Dayaks’ farming cycle is the sustainable management of the forests they have called home for generations. For Didi and the others, this ingrained respect for the forest stems from more than just its role as the chief resource for their sustenance and livelihood, says Juliade, an activist with the NGO South Borneo Customary Empowerment Institute.“For them, agriculture isn’t merely to provide food, but also a way to communicate with their gods,” he says. “If there’s no forest, then they can’t communicate with their gods.”This deep connection with nature has allowed the community to persevere against the ongoing industrial-scale deforestation sweeping their region to make way for monoculture and mining interests. Other Dayak tribes, in South Kalimantan’s Meratus Mountains, face a persistent threat as plantation and mining operators encroach on their lands; but the Dayak Pitap in Kambiyain have managed to stand strong because the various Aruh rituals have united them, Juliade says.“It’s less likely for them to get tempted” to sell off their lands, he says. “The Aruh rituals are a symbol of their fight, because it shows that their identity is still strong.”As part of the Aruh Mahanyari, villagers are prohibited for a certain period from various activities, including farming, killing animals or cutting trees. “Even picking leaves is forbidden,” Didi says. If a member of the tribe flouts the tradition, such as by cutting down a tree, it’s a mark of disrespect toward the gods, Juliade adds.A shaman from the Dayak indigenous tribe in Kambiyain village, South Kalimantan, Indonesia, recites a prayer during the ‘aruh’ ritual. Photo by Indra Nugraha for Mongabay Indonesia.Strong bondsRecognition of just how important these rituals are to protecting the region’s diminishing swaths of indigenous forests has pushed at least one district in South Kalimantan, Hulu Sungai Tengah, to issue a bylaw in 2016 aimed specifically at preventing the rituals from dying out.Besides their benefits to the environment, rituals like Aruh Mahanyari also serve an important social function by guaranteeing that all members of the community can share in the natural bounty. Everyone who attends, regardless of whether they enjoyed a good harvest, gets a bag of rice — a practice that has allowed the Kambiyain villagers to ensure everyone has a sustainable supply of food throughout the year.“Those who get the bag of rice can’t say no,” says Unung, the village chief. “And the harvested rice can’t be sold. It must be consumed. That’s why we never go hungry. We always have enough food for our daily lives.“Here, we still have strong family bonds [within the community],” he adds. “To clear the land, plant and harvest, we usually help each other.”A more subdued version of the Aruh Mahanyari ritual is practiced by the Dayaks of Mamegang, another village in South Kalimantan. Unlike the village-wide festivity of Kambiyain, here each household marks its own celebration of the harvest.Arsanaedi, a Mamegang villager, says the main purpose of the ritual is to gather all members of the family together to give thanks, no matter if the harvest is bad.“Even if our harvests are not that satisfying, it’s still important to enjoy what nature has given to us and to give thanks,” Arsanaedi says. “We’re asking for the owner of the universe to give us abundant harvests next season.”last_img read more

Deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon dropped 13 percent in 2017

first_imgA new analysis of satellite imagery and data finds 143,425 hectares of forest were lost in the Peruvian Amazon in 2017, down 13 percent from 2016.The analysis identified newly deforestation hotspots in the San Martín and Amazonas regions.The main causes of the loss of forest in the Amazon appear to be cultivation of crops, small- and medium-scale ranching, large oil palm plantations and gold mining. A recent analysis of satellite images gives a glimpse into Peru’s widespread deforestation in 2017. The analysis, which was produced by the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), found 143,425 hectares of forest were lost across the Peruvian Amazon during 2017 — the equivalent of 200,000 soccer fields.Deforestation was down 13 percent from 2016, but the analysis reveals new forest loss hotspots and conservationists remain concerned for the future of Peru’s forests. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This story was initially published in Spanish on Mongabay Latam on Feb. 8, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Satellite images of an area in southern Peru’s Madre de Dios region show the advancement of deforestation from 2016 to 2018. Images courtesy of MAAPMAAP’s report indicates the five most-deforested areas in Peru are spread throughout the country’s Amazonian regions, from Madre de Dios in the south to Ucayali and Huánuco and San Martín in the central part of the country to the Santa María de Nieva area in northern Peru’s Amazonas region.According to the analysis, the main causes of deforestation in these areas are small- and medium-scale ranching, large-scale oil palm cultivation and gold mining.Matt Finer, MAAP’s principal investigator, told Mongabay Latam that advancements in early deforestation alert systems have allowed them to quickly produce a complete panorama of what happened last year.“Historically, we had to wait months and years to know the levels of deforestation that had been reached every year,” he said. A recently deforested area in the Amazonas Region. Images courtesy of MAAPOverall, MAAP found there was 13 percent less deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon in 2017 than in 2016. But experts still worry about the future of the country’s forests. Claudio Schneider, Technical Director of Conservation International Peru, considers the amount of deforestation in Peru to be too high.“Although efforts have been made to improve monitoring — because now we have more reliable data about deforestation — there still isn’t enough being done to stop the loss of forests,” Schneider said.He said that it is a complex issue, and that the Peruvian Amazon continues to be a neglected area with weak governance.“As long as people don’t work in a territorial way, in the titling of the land and in coordination with Indigenous communities and other sectors of the population, the Amazon will continue to be, a little bit, no one’s land,” Schneider said. He added that this disorganization is an open door for illegal activities such as mining or indiscriminate logging.Schneider says that to advance the fight against deforestation, the Peruvian government should launch a stronger land titling campaign for communities that reside in the country’s forests. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Gold Mining, Habitat Loss, Mining, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests Satellite imagery shows a new deforestation hotspot in the San Martín Region caused by the cultivation of oil palm. Images courtesy of MAAPIn the area around the Interoceanic Highway, deforestation totals 11,115 hectares and appears to be caused primarily by gold mining and agricultural activity, particularly in areas north of the highway. In Iberia, 3,220 hectares of forest were lost in 2017. In this area, the main drivers are the cultivation of corn, papaya and cacao, according to local sources.A large-scale agricultural project in northeastern San Martín resulted in the deforestation of 740 hectares during the last few months of 2017. According to MAAP, Peru’s National Forest Conservation Program, administered by the Department of the Environment, confirmed that there is a new oil palm plantation on the border between the regions of San Martín and Loreto.Another new deforestation hotspot is also located in the Amazonas Region, in Nieva District along the Bagua-Saramiriza Highway. In this area, 1,135 hectares of frest were lost in 2017. Deforestation in this area was due to crop cultivation and ranching, according to the report. The amount of deforested land has increased to 3,220 hectares in Iberia in Peru’s Madre de Dios region. Images courtesy of MAAPHe added that the satellite analysis has allowed them to learn that the same patterns and drivers of deforestation are repeated throughout many different areas of the country.In the Ucayali and Huánuco regions, MAAP estimates that deforestation affected 23,240 hectares in 2017. “In this area, the main drivers would be ranching and palm oil,” the report states.Madre de Dios, one of Peru’s most-deforested regions, once held a large area of forest that has been lost to the Interoceanic Highway, as well as a deforested area along its border with Brazil.last_img read more

How Tibetan Buddhism and conservation efforts helped Eurasian otters thrive in a city of 200,000 people (commentary)

first_imgAnimals, Commentary, Conservation, Conservation and Religion, Editorials, Environment, Habitat Destruction, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Pollution, Religions, Researcher Perspective Series, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) is now locally extinct in most of its former range in China due to hunting for its pelt, water pollution, and habitat destruction.Recently, researchers recorded a healthy population of otters in Yushu, Qinghai, a city of 200,000 people.What allowed this population to survive? Besides conservation efforts, Tibetan Buddhism traditions also played a vital role in reducing hunting and maintaining freshwater ecosystem health.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. In China, where most rivers are deprived of large mammals due to habitat destruction and over-exploitation, a healthy population of Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra) was recently found to thrive right in a city of over 200,000 people, due mainly to the joint support of conservation initiatives and Tibetan Buddhism.Yushu, located on the eastern Tibetan Plateau, is the capital city of the Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture. Two rivers — Zhaqu and Changu — flow through the city to join the Tongtian River in the east, the headwater of the Yangtze river. During a one-month survey, researchers from Shanshui Conservation Center recorded Eurasian otter activities 66 times with seven camera traps. Over 200 spraints (otter dung) and footprints were also discovered along 45 kilometers (about 28 miles) of river, indicating a thriving population of the species.The Eurasian otter used to be heavily hunted for its pelt. As it is now listed under CITES Appendix I and the Schedules of Nationally Protected Fauna and Flora in China, stricter law enforcement has reduced hunting. Even so, its population continues to decline, according to the IUCN, and the species has become locally extinct in most of its former range in many parts of the country. Being a top predator of the freshwater ecosystem, the Eurasian otter is susceptible to pollution and habitat destruction, both of which are common in most waterbodies in China. So, what spared this population in Yushu from the fate of disappearing?Overlooking the Yushu city from the Kyegu Monastery (结古寺). Photo Credit: Chen PENG.One unique fact about Yushu is that over 95 percent of its population is Tibetan. Consequently, this area is heavily influenced by Tibetan Buddhist traditions, which support the conservation of individual organisms and habitats in many ways.A fundamental component of Buddhism is love and compassion for all living beings. It comes from the idea of reincarnation and the belief that an animal could be one’s parent, sibling, or friend in another life. While meat consumption is necessary for local herders to survive in the harsh climate of Tibet, many choose to eat larger animals like yaks, so that fewer lives are taken. For this reason, many locals do not eat fish or other aquatic creatures, securing ample food sources for the otters.Also, the locals believe that cutting trees on sacred mountains will offend mountain gods, and, similarly, polluting water sources will infuriate the water gods. By protecting sacred natural sites in Tibetan Buddhism, people are also conserving important wildlife habitats.What’s more, the demand for otter pelts in the Tibetan region has been drastically reduced in recent years due to the advocacy of religious leaders against the use of animal fur.Baima Wenci, a staff member of the Shanshui Conservation Center, placing a camera trap outside an otter den. Photo Credit: Yifan (Flora) HE.With pro-nature cultural traditions combined with effective conservation initiatives, the chances of survival for otters become even higher. Since the late 20th century, the Chinese government has set conservation as a priority in the Sanjiangyuan region, a 316,000-square-kilometer (more than 78-million-acre) area that includes the headwaters of three great Asian rivers: the Yangtze, the Yellow, and the Mekong. Over 40 percent of the land in this area has been designated as the Sanjiangyuan Nature Reserve, and a series of conservation projects are in place, including grassland restoration, a firearm ban, and anti-poaching measures. Being part of the Sanjiangyuan region, Yushu benefits greatly from these projects.This is not the first time that Tibetan Buddhism has been found to support conservation goals. His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, the head of the Karma Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism, published a paper in Conservation Biology in 2011 discussing how Buddhism shares many values with the environmental movement. In the case of snow leopards (Panthera uncia), researchers demonstrated that Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and sacred mountains offer valuable habitat protection to this iconic species in the area. When domestic sheep and yaks are killed by snow leopards, local herders often show great sympathy and understanding towards the predators. Retaliatory killing rarely occurs here, in sharp contrast to other areas in China with frequent human-wildlife conflicts.Camera trap photo of an otter. Photo Credit: Shanshui Conservation Center.Of course, from a conservationist’s perspective, traditional values have many facets, and not all are beneficial. In the same rivers where the otters live, people have been releasing fish as a practice of sparing lives that were to be slaughtered. Most of these non-native fish would die, but a few carp species appear to be doing well, raising concerns over invasive species. Conservationists working in this area must address these kinds of challenges in ways that the local people are willing to accept.While the otters in Yushu benefit from both Tibetan traditions and conservation actions, they still face a number of threats, including levee construction, water pollution, and growing traffic in the city. To better understand the impact of human activities on the otter population, Shanshui Conservation Center will continue its efforts in monitoring and research. Eventually, Center staff hope to inform actions such as habitat restoration, anti-poaching, and native fish conservation, based on their findings.Camera trap photo of an otter. Photo Credit: Shanshui Conservation Center.CITATIONS• Dorje, O. T. (2011). Walking the path of environmental Buddhism through compassion and emptiness. Conservation Biology, 25(6), 1094-1097. doi:10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01765.x• Gomez, L., Leupen, B. T., Theng, M., Fernandez, K., & Savage, M. (2016). Illegal Otter Trade: An analysis of seizures in selected Asian countries (1980-2015). TRAFFIC.• Li, F., & Chan, B. P. L. (2017). Past and present: the status and distribution of otters (Carnivora: Lutrinae) in China. Oryx, 1-8.doi:10.1017/S0030605317000400• Li, J., Wang, D., Yin, H., Zhaxi, D., Jiagong, Z., Schaller, G. B., … & Xiao, L. (2014). Role of Tibetan Buddhist monasteries in snow leopard conservation. Conservation Biology, 28(1), 87-94. doi:10.1111/cobi.12135• Roos, A., Loy, A., de Silva, P., Hajkova, P. & Zemanová, B. 2015. Lutra lutra. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2015: e.T12419A21935287. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-2.RLTS.T12419A21935287.en. Downloaded on 07 March 2018.• Shao, Q., Liu, J., Huang, L., Fan, J., Xu, X., & Wang, J. (2013). Integrated assessment on the effectiveness of ecological conservation in Sanjiangyuan National Nature Reserve. Geographical Research, 32(9). doi:10.11821/dlyj201309007Yifan (Flora) He is a recent Master’s graduate from the School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, soon to join Conservation International as a social science coordinator. In early 2018, she volunteered at the Shanshui Conservation Center, working on Eurasion otter monitoring, human-wildlife conflict resolution, and ecotourism development in the Sanjiangyuan region in Qinghai, China.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Rivoli’s Burke signs loan deal with USL club

first_imgRivoli United striker Cory Burke will not be signing for any of his club’s premier league rivals as he has already inked a 12-month loan deal with United Soccer League (USL) outfit Bethlehem Steel in Philadelphia, according to club vice president Ansel Smart. In a YouTube video, posted on the Premier Leagues Clubs Association’s Facebook page yesterday morning, Smart explained that the deal was signed last week. “This Club is Bethlehem Steel, a USL Club in Philadelphia. The contract was signed this week, a few days ago,” Smart said in the video. Burke is expected to leave for the United States in January. Smart said the deal is not a full transfer at this time. “It is a loan. We are looking for him to do good so we can transfer him next season,” he explained while describing the loan deal as an opportunity for Rivoli to once again put their name and players (Burke) on the international market.” Local premier league club Montego Bay United had expressed an interest in signing Burke, who has scored 12 goals in the current season. “We have an interest (in Burke). He is a top striker and we would love to have him. We expect that come January, a few of our players might leave, so we have to do some forward thinking,” Lincoln Whyte, a director of Montego Bay United told The Sunday Gleaner.last_img read more

Daly’s game is lacking, but not his popularity

first_img“It was just brutal,” Daly said. “Nothing went right last year.” Still, Daly makes others feel good. People seem to feel a connection with him because he embodies a regular-guy persona and, like the fans in his galleries, deals with daily challenges. People now are returning the favor. Tiger Woods gave Daly an exemption to play in his Target World Challenge in December and Daly obliged. He finished last but pocketed a cool $170,000. Tournament organizers still can’t get enough of him. He asked and he received. “John Daly has a great crowd when he comes out here, just like Fred Couples,” said Tom Pulchinski, the Nissan Open tournament director. “Everyone loves to watch John Daly. He had a rough year, but he’s very popular and he brings in the fans. He likes to play, and he was aggressive enough to call me very early, so we gave him an exemption. That was a very easy decision.” Pulchinski said Daly called him sometime before Christmas, so Daly received an early present. The exemptions then flooded in. “I’ve had wonderful times at Riviera at the Nissan,” Daly said. Daly finished fourth in 2004, four shots behind champion Mike Weir. He has two other top-10 finishes and has made the cut nine of the 12 times he’s played at Riviera. Last year, he was 5-over par and missed the cut. The cigarette-smoking, Diet Coke-guzzling Daly definitely can play, and many admire his ability to hit the ball long off the tee. He’s driving an average of 305.9 yards this year. But if he doesn’t play well this year, perhaps the sponsors won’t be so free in lining up with exemptions. He played with Jason Gore in a charity shootout at Pebble Beach last week. Gore and Daly shared plenty of laughs, and the highlight was a chest bump after a clutch putt. Daly even playfully threw his wedge into a trap when he didn’t win a closest-to-the-pin contest. But when the master of ceremonies ushered Daly over to a microphone to chat for a bit on the green, Daly went under the ropes and said, “I’ve got to go eat.” Fans didn’t seem to mind, since the announcer joked that Daly isn’t a guy you want to mess with when he needs something to eat. He seems to have a bit of an edge. Daly’s best finish in a stroke-play event last year was a tie for 27th at the Verizon Heritage. He’s missed three of four cuts this year (Buick Invitational, FBR Open and AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am) and the pressure is mounting. He has just 166 FedExCup points. He’s proclaimed himself healthy, but he doesn’t have an improved golf game to show for it. Pulchinski was by no means extending pity with an exemption. He believes Daly could win. “He plays well here,” Pulchinski said. “It’s not like he plays here, draws well and never makes the cut. He has a chance to play well here. If he’s playing well and is in contention, he’ll draw a good television audience. If John was to pull off a win at Riviera &” People would be talking about Daly’s golf game once again. jill.painter@dailynews.com (818) 713-3615 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! His sports career was in jeopardy when he lost his PGA Tour card last year, when he earned just $192,000. Daly, who was plagued by injuries and more missed cuts than productive starts, chose not to go to qualifying school. He instead spent his off-season writing letters and placing phone calls in an effort to attract sponsor exemptions to keep himself on tour. The Nissan Open was the first to jump on Daly’s bandwagon. LOS ANGELES – John Daly has endured several marriages and battled alcohol, gambling and weight problems. He’s raised children, donated generously to charity, performed and written songs and started a wine company. He’s won a couple of majors, too. But Daly’s so much more than just a golfer. Golf seemingly has been the one constant in his life. center_img Wherever the 40-year-old Daly goes, fans follow in droves. Tournament organizers followed suit. He received so many exemptions – somewhere between 25-30 – he won’t be able to use all of them. A rough season of golf quickly was erased by the love he received from tournaments. “The sponsor’s exemptions have been going great,” Daly said. “But this whole West Coast, I was a little worried, I didn’t know what was going to happen. There’s so many great players that have come out of this (area), San Diego and L.A. and all that. L.A. was the first one that gave me one. It just makes me feel good.” Last year’s list of poor performances included making only eight cuts in 21 starts. He withdrew from five of those. last_img read more

Ronaldo hat-trick as Madrid warm up for PSG with big win

first_imgThey blew Real Sociedad apart in the first half at the Santiago Bernabeu, taking the lead inside a minute through Lucas Vazquez and finding themselves four goals ahead by the interval.Toni Kroos got Real’s other goal, as they made it three wins and a draw from their last four La Liga games, with 18 goals scored in that time.The defensive lapses that allowed the visitors to pull two goals back late on will be a concern for Zidane, but Ronaldo’s return to form is a huge boost.“He always has that mindset. He lives for that, for scoring goals, and today he showed with his three goals that you need to watch out for him,” Zidane said.“He could have scored one or two more, and it augurs well for Wednesday.”Madrid are still a huge 16 points behind unbeaten league leaders Barcelona, but they are now back up to third above Valencia, who play Levante on Sunday.With the visit of PSG in mind, Zidane rested both Gareth Bale and Casemiro to hand starts to Marco Asensio and Lucas Vazquez.The latter has played more games for Madrid under Zidane than anyone else and he opened the scoring after just 49 seconds, heading home a Ronaldo cross.Without their leading scorer Willian Jose due to injury, and with a dreadful past record at the Bernabeu, the visitors quickly crumbled.Asensio and Marcelo combined superbly to set up Ronaldo to make it 2-0 before the half-hour mark, and Kroos made it three with a trademark curling strike on his right foot from the edge of the area.Ronaldo then headed home a Luka Modric corner on 37 minutes, and it could have been more than 4-0 at half-time, too, with Karim Benzema and Ronaldo both hitting the post from close range.They could not keep up the same intensity after the restart, however. Instead, Juanmi headed against the post for the Basque side, who pulled one back on 74 minutes as substitute Jon Bautista was given space to slot past Keylor Navas.Ronaldo then completed his hat-trick, pouncing to finish after Geronimo Rulli had spilled a shot from Bale, on as a substitute.It was Ronaldo’s 11th league goal of the season, with seven coming in the last four games.Asier Illarramendi, the former Madrid midfielder, then made it 5-2 from close range.– Griezmann goal lifts Atletico –The quickest goal on Saturday was not scored by Real, but by Antoine Griezmann, who needed only 39 seconds to find the net in Atletico Madrid’s 1-0 win at bottom side Malaga that left them just six points off top spot.Antoine Griezmann was Atletico’s matchwinner at La Rosaleda © AFP / JORGE GUERREROThe French striker fired home his eighth league goal of the campaign from inside the box after a Saul Niguez shot was deflected into his path.It was Atletico’s eighth victory by a 1-0 margin in La Liga this season and put some pressure back on Barcelona, although they can again move nine points clear at the top by beating Getafe at the Camp Nou on Sunday.“We knew it was going to be difficult, but these are the kind of games we enjoy playing,” Griezmann told beIN Sports.“Now we need to keep fighting and trying to win all the games we have left, and then we’ll see,” added the Frenchman.Villarreal lost more ground in their quest for a top-four finish as they lost 2-1 at home to improving Alaves. Ivan Ramis scored in stoppage-time to give surprise package Eibar a 1-0 victory at Leganes that leaves them sixth.0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Ronaldo scored a hat-trick in a big Real Madrid victory © AFP / GABRIEL BOUYSMADRID, Spain, Feb 10 – Cristiano Ronaldo bagged a hat-trick as Real Madrid warmed up for their Champions League showdown with Paris Saint-Germain with a big 5-2 victory over Real Sociedad in La Liga on Saturday.Zinedine Zidane’s men have not scaled their usual heights this season and this was still not perfect, but they do look to be finding some form just in time for a potentially season-defining tie with the French side on Wednesday.last_img read more