Brazil assaults indigenous rights, environment, social movements

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Dams, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon People, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Controversial, Corruption, Culture, Dams, Energy, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, Featured, Forests, Green, Hydroelectric Power, Hydropower, Illegal Logging, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Rivers, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img The Temer administration and Congress, dominated by the increasingly militant bancada ruralista agribusiness lobby, are encouraging violence, say critics, as attacks reach record levels against the landless peasants of the agrarian reform movement and against indigenous groups fighting for land rights assured by the 1988 Constitution.In May a Parliamentary Commission of Enquiry, dominated by the bancada, recommended prosecution of 67 people, many of them serving in the federal government, who the commission claims have allegedly committed illegal acts by supporting indigenous groups and their land claims.Also in May, Congress approved MPs (administrative orders), handed down by Temer, removing 486,000 hectares of the National Forest of Jamanxim and 101,000 hectares of the National Park of Jamanxim from protection, likely allowing land thieves to claim these formerly protected Amazon areas for private ownership, ranching and mining.The Chamber of Deputies also rushed through MP 759, giving real estate ownership rights to hundreds of thousands of small land owners illegally occupying land in Brazil. Critics say the MP is also a massive gift to wealthy land thieves. Another bill, now on hold, could gut environmental licensing rules for infrastructure and agribusiness projects. Sunset over the Amazon. Brazil’s sudden fierce legislative and administrative attacks on the environment, indigenous people and social movements originate with the country’s agribusiness lobby, which is hungry to take over protected land in the Amazon and across the nation. Photo by Rhett A. Butler“The first five months of 2017 have been the most violent this century,” Cândido Neto da Cunha, a specialist in agrarian affairs at the National Institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform (INCRA) in Santarém, Brazil, told Mongabay. According to the Catholic Church’s Pastoral Land Commission (CPT), which has been compiling statistics on rural violence since 1985, 36 people have already been assassinated in rural conflicts this year.The latest violence came on 24 May when nine men and a woman were killed in what seems to have been a deliberate massacre on the Santa Lúcia estate in the rural district of Pau D’Arco located 860 kilometers (535 miles) south of Belém, the capital of the state of Pará.For many years, landless families had lobbied for the creation of a land reform settlement on this estate, saying that the man claiming to own the land, now deceased, was a land thief. His widow agreed to hand over the property, but had second thoughts when INCRA officials, who cannot pay above the market price, refused to pay her what she asked.In the meantime, landless families had occupied the area and a security guard, working for the ranch, was killed on 30 April. A posse of military and civil police went in to evict the families and to investigate the death. The families say the police arrived shooting. This version is disputed by the police, who claim that the peasant families shot at them first. However, no police officer was killed or wounded.A landless peasant occupation at KM Mil, a settlement near the Thousand Kilometer marker on highway BR 163 near the town of Novo Progresso in Pará state, Brazil. Violence against peasants involved in the agrarian reform movement is increasing across the nation as wealthy land thieves are emboldened by the Temer administration which has done little to stop the attacks. Photo by Thais BorgesAs Cunha pointed out, this is only the latest in a series of violent land conflicts this year. On 19 April, ten peasants, including children, were tortured and then murdered in the rural district of Colniza in the northwest of Mato Grosso. On 30 April a group of Gamela Indians were attacked by a large group of armed men sent in by farmers. Over two dozen Indians were injured, with four hospitalised in critical condition. Two had their hands lopped off and their legs cut at the joints.On 25 May, 19 organizations, including the CPT and the landless movements (MST), published a letter in which they railed against the systematic “impunity of human rights violations in the countryside.” They went on: “The State is not only complicit and absent… but also an active agent in encouraging the violence, not only through the policies and programs carried out by the Executive, but also by the action of the Legislative which is destroying rights won by the workers.”Wave of violence spurred by bancada militancyCunha made a similar point, linking the spike in violence to the government’s rapid dismantling of environmental laws, agrarian reforms and indigenous protections, a process that gained greater momentum, he said, after Osmar Serraglio, a well-known member of the bancada ruralista agribusiness lobby in Congress, was appointed Justice Minister in February.“Violence is one of the ways in which agribusiness and land thieves get rid of ‘obstacles’ to their never-ending expansion,” explained Cunha.Indigenous leaders tear-gassed by police in front of Brazil’s National Congress in April. They were protesting the surging violence against Indians seen since Temer took power, as well as the government’s assaults on indigenous land rights. Photo by Wilson Dias courtesy of Agencia BrasilThis past weekend, Serraglio was suddenly sacked by Temer without explanation, though possibly because of the Justice Minister’s alleged involvement in the Weak Meat (Carne Fraca) scandal. He had received large donations from JBS, the world’s largest meat processor, a company at the heart of the scandal which threatens to bring down Temer’s governmentHowever, his, or even Temer’s, removal seems unlikely to threaten the power of the bancada. Even if the President falls, a scenario that seems increasingly likely, the agribusiness lobby will remain strong — or grow even stronger. That’s because the bancada holds a firm grip on Congress, which will likely have a big say in selecting Temer’s successor who will most likely be chosen in indirect elections in Congress.The only way that the agribusiness lobby’s power might be challenged is if Congress passes a constitutional amendment that mandates immediate direct elections for president — a solution to the crisis many social movements are demanding, but which, as yet, seems unlikely to happen.Agribusiness attacks on indigenous rights For the moment, the bancada (the members of which have again refused to grant Mongabay an interview), is pressing ahead with a program that heavily favors agribusiness and is extraordinarily hostile to Indians, the environment and social movements.On 30 May a Parliamentary Commission of Enquiry into FUNAI, the federal agency responsible for Indian affairs, and INCRA (the National Institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform), approved the final version of its report. The Commission, whose members came mainly from the bancada, called for 67 people to be indicted for allegedly illegal activities in support of the indigenous movement. The list included a former justice minister (José Eduardo Cardozo), anthropologists, FUNAI employees, INCRA employees and 30 Indians.Brazil’s large scale farmers and commodities companies (such as Amaggi), aren’t the only ones to benefit wildly from an agribusiness-friendly Brazilian government that attacks indigenous land rights and environmental protections. International commodities companies like ADM, Cargill and Bunge will also greatly benefit. Photo by Thais BorgesThe list of names will be handed to the Public Ministry and other authorities for possible prosecution. Though no other action has yet been taken against those named in the list, the report has created a climate of trepidation, with many of those named by the Parliamentary Commission fearful of possible arrest and prosecution.The report’s rapporteur, Nilson Leitão, who had initially called for the closing down of FUNAI, changed his position, in the face of widespread criticism, with the report proposing, instead, the “restructuring” of FUNAI.Bancada attacks on the environmentAlso on 17 May, in the midst of a rapidly escalating political crisis, the Senate found time to approve two provisional measures (MP756 and MP758) forwarded by the Temer administration to dismember the National Park of Jamanxim and the National Forest of Jamanxim ­— two conservation units running beside the BR-163 highway in the Amazon.The conserved lands were created as a barrier to prevent the agricultural frontier from penetrating deeper into the rainforest, and the units also act as a critical environmental corridor connecting the Xingu and Tapajós river basins. In recent years the federally protected Jamanxim preserves have come under increasing pressure due to an invasion by land thieves, with 68 percent of illegal forest felling in federal conservation units occurring within these protected areas.The Amazon rainforest, which saw a decrease in deforestation until recently, has seen a significant increase over the last two years, likely a result of pressures coming from land thieves and Brazilian agribusiness. Satellite photo courtesy of NASADuring the commission stage, the bancada tried to increase the areas to be removed from protection to 1.2 million hectares (4,633 square miles), but the outcry from environmental organizations and some Parliamentarians was so loud that the lobby backed down. Even so, the MPs will remove protection from 598,000 hectares (2,309 square miles), legitimatizing the illegal seizure of federal lands by land grabbers who stand to make a hefty profit when they sell the former federal property to cattle ranchers and other developers.In the final MP drafts approved by the Senate, 486,000 hectares (37 percent) of the National Forest of Jamanxim and 101,000 hectares (12 percent) of the National Park of Jamanxim will be converted to Areas of Environmental Protection (APAs), a weaker kind of environmental protection in which private ownership, mining and cattle ranching are permitted.All protection will be removed from another, relatively small, area to clear the way for the building of the Ferrogrão Railway, which will link the north of Mato Grosso state to the Tapajós River, providing an important export corridor for soy and corn. The Temer government prioritized and fast tracked the approval of the Ferrogrão grain railway at the end of last year, again, doing the bidding of the bancada which also pressed at the time, in an as yet aborted attempt to build industrial waterways to transport agribusiness commodities across the Amazon.MPs are federal administrative acts, a mechanism originally only intended to be used in emergencies. Critics note that it is hard to seriously argue that providing land thieves with free federal land is an “emergency.” It is for this reason that Maurício Guetta, the lawyer for the NGO ISA (Socioenvironmental Institute), called the measure “absolutely unconstitutional”.However, it was not Temer, but impeached president Dilma Rousseff, from the Workers Party (PT), who first used the MP policy instrument irresponsibly, a move much questioned at the time, when she reduced the size of conservation units to make way for huge hydroelectric dams along the Tapajós River.Land speculators are doing a brisk trade in the Amazon basin. In a process known as “speculative clearance,” land thieves, backed by violent militias, lay claim to public lands covered in rainforest. That land is then deforested and illegally sold to cattle ranchers. Each tract of stolen federal land can bring in an estimated R $20 million (US $6.4 million). In May, the Brazilian Congress removed 486,000 hectares from protection in the National Forest of Jamanxim and 101,000 hectares from protection in the National Park of Jamanxim. Critics say the preserves were dismembered to legitimize the illegal occupation of federal lands by wealthy land thieves. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerTemer now has until the end of June to veto the two measures. If he does nothing, they will go into effect. Environment minister José Sarney Filho called on Temer to use his veto, saying that the measures “represent a reversal in the efforts of the Brazilian government to fulfil the commitments that it undertook in the Paris Agreement to combat global warming.”The bancada is using still other parliamentary mechanisms to push its agenda through. It was revealed this week by the Estado de S. Paulo newspaper that the bancada had included a “jabuti” (red-footed tortoise) into an MP. Jabuti is the nickname for an amendment opportunistically inserted into legislation on a very different issue to get it quickly approved.In this case, the jabuti was inserted into MP 752/15, a measure dealing with private concessions in the rail and airport sectors that has already been approved. The intention of the jabuti is to exempt banks from environmental crimes unless it can be proved that they directly caused the damage. If it is approved, IBAMA will, for instance, be unable to collect the R $47.5 million (US $14.5 million) fine it imposed on Santander bank for financing in 2015 the planting of soy and corn in an environmentally protected area in the state of Mato Grosso where such activity is banned. IBAMA is mobilizing in an eleventh hour attempt to persuade Temer to veto the jabuti.A blue and yellow macaw. The decisions being rapidly made by the Temer administration and Brazil’s Congress could do massive harm to Amazon biodiversity for decades to come. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerLegitimizing land theftOn 24 May, the day that social movements were carrying out a large anti-Temer demonstration in Brasilia, the Chamber of Deputies rushed through another provisional measure – MP 759. This measure will profoundly alter the real estate situation in Brazil, giving ownership rights to hundreds of thousands of people who have been illegally occupying land. Romero Jucá, the rapporteur of the measure, said it would be a great boost to the economy, allowing the owners of thousands of small stores to legalize their businesses.While some government action was clearly required on this issue, Edmilson Rodrigues, a left-wing federal deputy, was highly critical of the way in which such an important change was being rushed through as a provisional measure “without public consultation with the affected populations, without hearing social movements.” He said that, in practice, the government was handing over “nothing less than 88 million hectares (340,000 square miles) to the pernicious real estate market.” He added: “it will put an end to agrarian reform and legitimize land thieving.”Yet another monumental change is in the pipeline.A bill to make it far easier to obtain an environmental license for an economic project, which had already been strongly criticized by environmentalists, underwent a further change, when bancada member Mauro Pereira, the rapporteur for the bill, presented a new draft to the Chamber’s Finances and Tax Commission at the end of April.Traditional life in the Amazon could be seriously threatened if the Brazilian Congress passes legislation to gut environmental licensing for infrastructure projects, such as dams. Phot by Mauricio TorresUnder the new version, almost everything — from mining in conservation units, to paving roads in Amazonia, and the extension of agribusiness to new areas — will no longer require a license. Mega-projects, like the Belo Monte hydroelectric dam, which will still have to be licensed, will only have to fulfil a series of environmental conditions in order to obtain one.With a few notable exceptions, such as the BBC’s Brazil service, the media in Brazil and abroad is ignoring this hugely important change. With a new scandal erupting almost every day and with 90 politicians, including Temer, accused of corruption, the media is transfixed only on the latest twist in the political drama. This provides a convenient smokescreen behind which the bancada can push ahead at full steam.Voting on the environmental licensing bill in the Commission (five of whose members are on Odebrecht’s list of politicians it bribed) had been scheduled for 3 May, but it was withdrawn at the last moment, thanks to heavy pressure from the Environmental Ministry and the Federal Public Ministry, an independent branch of government. But another date could be set to move the measure forward at any moment.The dismemberment of conservation units, national parks and other protected areas by the Temer administration and Congress are being made to satisfy the country’s very powerful agribusiness lobby, with very little thought given to conservation. Photo by Rhett A. ButlerToo much, too fastEnvironmentalists and agrarian reform specialists question whether Temer’s provisional government, with just 7 percent popular support, should be carrying out such sweeping and significant structural reforms, drastic changes that will clearly impact the environment, indigenous groups and land ownership for years to come.Cunha told Mongabay: “We are really worried. We are no longer in a situation in which rights are not being respected, as happened under Dilma. What we are living through today is the reversal of rights and social victories. The little that we have achieved is being overturned.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.A pair of macaws in flight. The Amazon basin is under extreme threat, as the Brazilian government passes measure after measure to gut environmental, indigenous and social movement protections. Photo by Rhett A. Butlerlast_img read more

Economic headwinds buffet once-resilient Sumatran forest-farms

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Agroforestry, Deforestation, Environment, Farming, Forestry, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Indonesia, Logging, Oil Palm, Palm Oil, Palm Oil And Biodiversity, Palm Oil and Diversity, Plantations, Protected Areas, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Banner image: A Krui forest-farmer harvests damar resin. Photo courtesy of David Gilbert. Farmers in Indonesia’s Krui region have long cultivated valuable damar resin trees among typical crops such as coconuts and rice.These agroforests have for more than a century served as an economic bulwark for local communities against the encroachment of palm oil and timber operations.Since 2000, however, a fifth of the region’s damar agroforests have been razed for sawmills and oil palm plantations, with land grabs and low resin prices driving the decline. For more than a century, agroforests in the Sumatran port town of Krui used to be a prime example of how interspersing native tree species among crops could give locals an economic alternative to the ubiquitous oil palm and timber plantations that blanket the island.Farmers practicing the method typically benefit from multi-crop harvests while at the same time nurturing a more productive and sustainable farming ecosystem. Until the end of the 1990s, Krui’s agroforests were still largely intact amid the spread of timber and oil palm plantations, with most forest-farmers opting to plant the native rainforest tree species damar (Shorea javanica). During that period, less than 5 percent of households reported clearing damar agroforests.But by 2014, one-fifth of damar agroforests in Krui had been razed to make way for sawmills and oil palm plantations, according to a new study by environmental anthropologist David Gilbert from Stanford University.In his recent research published in the journal Human Ecology, Gilbert said that the single largest cause of agroforest clearing was for oil palm, notably over the last 15 years.  In his paper, “The ‘Capitalist Squeeze’ and the Rise and Fall of Sumatra’s Krui Agroforests,” Gilbert argues that a complex process of state support for logging and agribusiness, inheritance patterns, and emergent inequalities among Krui smallholders have compelled the regions forest-farmers to abandon damar agroforestry over the past decade.Damar trees in Pahmungan village in Sumatra’s Lampung province.Krui is located in Lampung province, bounded by the Indian Ocean and Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park. Farmers there have since 1875 cultivated damar trees among their coconut and rice crops. Damar yields a valuable resin that is used in the production of incense, varnish, paint and cosmetics, and these agroforests have long come to be regarded by the Krui forest-farmers as a central component of their identity and heritage. In addition to their economic value, they also conserve soil, water systems and biodiversity.In recent decades, however, sawmills and oil palm plantations have widened their reach into the Krui area.In the late 1980s, the Indonesian Ministry of Agriculture licensed two oil palm plantation companies, PT Karya Canggih Mandiri Utama (KCMU) and PT Panji Padma Lestari (PPL), to operate in the southern Krui region.PT KCMU was granted a concession that overlapped onto the community lands of the Tenumbang, Ngambur and Bengkunat people, while PT PPL was granted a concession on the land of the Malaya clan. Almost all the land covered by the proposed concessions was already being intensively managed by the coastal communities to cultivate damar, coconuts and rice, according to a 2006 report by local and international NGOs.Residents feared that the oil palm plantations would destroy their damar trees and gobble up their farmland, according to an environmental impact assessment for the PT KCMU concession that was carried out in 1996. Inevitably, the military-backed dictatorship of Suharto sent in soldiers to force the communities to accept the company’s presence on their land.After Suharto’s fall in 1998, there was a resurgence in opposition to PT KCMU among the local communities, which rescinded their letters of support for the establishment of the company’s plantations on their lands. “Clearly, those letters had been signed under duress,” the NGO report said.But the damage was done. The company had already set up a palm oil mill in an area of Krui that was previously damar agroforest, and by 2014 it had cleared a tenth of the historical agroforest area.“It’s an early case of [a] modern land grab in [the] specific locale of Krui,” Gilbert said. “But we can’t say it’s the whole case.”From 2000, the local government also began licensing sawmill operations in Krui.PT PPL, meanwhile, saw its permit revoked following strong resistance from local communities, who allied with activists and researchers.Economic factorsThe arrival of the timber and palm oil operations was not the only driver behind the forest-farmers’ move away from agroforestry.Gilbert identified other factors, such as declining damar resin prices, fierce local competition, and a power imbalance between smallholders, traders and brokers. He said activists and forest-farmers had failed to address the inequalities in the damar commodity chain, stripping farmers of their bargaining power to determine sales prices.A recent survey of the commodity chain done by WWF found a wide disparity between the prices at which forest-farmers and major traders were selling damar resin. There is also no union or cooperative for either farmers or small traders in Krui, further weakening their bargaining power.“It’s difficult to unite them,” WWF Indonesia communications and education officer Hijrah Nasir said in an interview. “The root of the difficulty might be … the competition [between farmers and traders].”Combined, these factors have made damar agroforestry increasingly unattractive for farmers, who then sell their trees to the timber operations and their land to the palm oil companies whenever an urgent need for money arises.“Starting from 2010, there’s no land grab,” Gilbert said. “Forest farmers lost their area without being dispossessed. These are individuals making their own decisions.”The decline of the Krui agroforests has altered the region’s landscape and the people’s livelihoods dramatically, he added.“It has reduced the biodiversity and reduced the autonomy and freedom [of Krui forest-farmers],” Gilbert said.Many of the farmers who sold their land to PT KCMU, often for five times what they previously earned in a year, are now out of work, with jobs in the oil palm industry seen as difficult. Some have moved to northern Krui, looking for work in the damar agroforests there, where the farmers have long resisted selling their lands.“It serves as a lesson for people in northern Krui. They held off from the expansion [of timber and oil palm plantations] because they received a lesson from their southern sisters and brothers,” Gilbert said.Back to the woodsGilbert said a renewed coalition, one built on an awareness of all these factors, could encourage Krui forest-farmers to continue to invest in their damar agroforests. The coalition could establish cooperatives, negotiate direct-to-factory sales agreements, and set up savings programs for the farmers.This might help gird the Krui agroforestry sector against the current economic headwinds, says the WWF’s Nasir.“If forest-farmers and traders unite as a community [representing] Krui damar agroforestry, they will have high bargaining power in the global market, seeing how Krui holds a monopoly on the damar [resin] in the region,” she said. Article published by Hans Nicholas Jonglast_img read more

Ancient human sites may have distorted our understanding of the Amazon’s natural ecology

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Scientists have traditionally based their knowledge of the Amazon rainforest on surveys from fewer than 1,000 plots of land, which they had assumed were representative of the rest of the forest.Research now shows that many of these sites were occupied and modified by ancient peoples, and the trees are still regrowing from those disturbances.These recovering trees absorb carbon at a faster rate than mature trees, so estimates of how well the rainforest can absorb carbon dioxide may be too high. Pristine areas of Amazon rainforest are usually considered to be ancient, untamed jungles overflowing with old trees and biodiversity that have grown for centuries untouched by human hands. But that perception is starting to change.Archaeological and agricultural evidence indicates this romantic idea may be a myth. An estimated eight to 20 million people once lived in the Amazon before their populations collapsed around A.D. 1500, when European settlers arrived. Now, a recent study suggests that human habitation left an imprint on the Amazon that modern ecologists have not fully taken into account when estimating the rainforest’s ability to recycle carbon or evaluating its biodiversity.Many areas of Amazon rainforest are not as old or as undisturbed as was thought, the study shows. When today’s scientists examine the forest’s ecology, they are primarily looking within environments where ancient native peoples lived, cleared land, and cultivated crops. These relatively “young” areas of rainforest are still recovering from human occupation, so they are not representative of the entire Amazon forest.Faster-growing trees in these areas may have led scientists to overestimate the amount of carbon the Amazon as a whole can store, the researchers state.“Everything we know about Amazonian ecology and biodiversity comes from less than 0.0005% of the forest,” said Dr. Crystal McMichael, a paleoecologist at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands and the study’s lead author. The sites that scientists use to gain that knowledge are more likely to have been inhabited and altered by ancient people, she said. “That kind of skews our understanding of everything.” McMichael and team’s analysis appeared earlier this year in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.The lush Amazon canopy appears wild and untouched by humans, but land was cleared and many tree species were cultivated by humans for thousands of years. Photo Credit: Rhett A. Butler.McMichael and her colleagues compiled published maps of the plots used by Amazonian research teams to sample the rainforest. Modern scientists have used nearly 1,000 sites to gather data about trees and biodiversity. Of these sites, researchers have studied about 200 plots again and again to gauge how much carbon flows in and out of the forest’s vast array of trees. All told, these survey sites span about 250,000 hectares — a tiny swatch within the greater Amazon basin, which covers some 500 million hectares (or more than 1.2 billion acres).The team then built a novel statistical model of where ancient Amazonian people probably lived. They considered areas of “terra pretas,” or dense rich soil good for farming; geoglyphs, or geometric earthworks; other architectural sites and lake sediments; and evidence of agriculture. Finally, they compared these predicted sites of human occupation, as well as previously known sites, to the data-gathering sites long used by ecologists.The results showed that ecologists have disproportionately measured trees and other forest growth on sites that were likely to have been occupied by ancient peoples. Since humans have a huge impact on their environment, and rainforests take a long time to grow, this land is likely still recovering and does not represent the rainforest as a whole. Thus, the information we have about rainforest trees — which kinds are most common, how tall or densely they grow, how quickly they grow from season to season, and how much carbon they can store in their trunks, leaves, and roots — may not be accurate when ecologists extrapolate to the entire Amazon.Brazil nut trees (Bertholletia excelsa), one of the “hyperdominant” species in the Amazon rainforest, were likely cultivated as food sources by ancient populations along with palms and fruit trees. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.“This pioneering study of the rainforest challenges us to set a new benchmark for measuring things. It gives us a better chance to use the past to predict the future,” said Dr. Alexis Mychajliw, a conservation biologist at the Le Brea Tar Pits and Museum in Los Angeles, California, who was not involved in the study.The clearest impact of the research is on our understanding of tree ecology in the Amazon. More than 200 species of trees are considered “hyperdominant” because they make up about half of the trees found in the rainforest. But many of these trees were probably cultivated on purpose, especially near where people lived, since they were useful as food or shelter. These people-associated trees are probably not as numerous in the rest of the rainforest, the study’s authors believe.As a result, they maintain, scientists may need to start over to see the Amazon as it really is. Over the course of thousands of years, ancient peoples played a key role in the ecological development of the rainforest. Like other populations, they changed the land to suit their needs by burning, cutting, tilling, planting, and building. Before European-introduced diseases decimated the ancient native people around the year 1500, many parts of the Amazon were likely as cultivated as regions in Europe.If some parts of the rainforest have been growing in their current wild state for only 500 years or so, it also changes what scientists can expect from the impact of this “new” growth on climate change. Ecologists believe the Amazon rainforest plays an important role in regulating the global carbon cycle by sequestering massive amounts of carbon released into the atmosphere by human activities. But since the Amazon testing sites used to measure this are probably still growing faster and thus sucking more carbon out of the atmosphere than the rest of the rainforest, scientists might be overestimating how much carbon the rainforest can store in the future, the authors state.“When we think of the Americas, we tend to think of the baseline as after [Christopher] Columbus and the Europeans arrived,” Mychajliw said. But ancient people lived in the Amazon for thousands of years before that, dramatically affecting the landscape, she noted. “And, it is likely that we are underestimating how many people were actually living there back then.”Paleoecologist Crystal McMichael, lead author of the study, conducting fieldwork in Ecuador. Photo courtesy of Crystal McMichael.CITATION• McMichael, C. N., Matthews-Bird, F., Farfan-Rios, W., & Feeley, K. J. (2017). Ancient human disturbances may be skewing our understanding of Amazonian forests. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(3), 522-527. doi:10.1073/pnas.1614577114Kimber L. Price is a graduate student in the Science Communication Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Other Mongabay stories produced by UCSC students can be found here. Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon People, Amazon Rainforest, Environment, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforests, Research, Trees, Tropical Forests last_img read more

NASA: Global surface temperatures in 2017 second-hottest on record despite no El Niño

first_imgCarbon Emissions, Climate Change, Environment, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Research, Temperatures Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckicenter_img According to scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City, global average temperatures in 2017 were 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (or 0.90 degrees Celsius) warmer than the 1951 to 1980 average, which makes 2017 temperatures second only to 2016.In their own analysis, scientists at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) determined that 2017 was the third-warmest year on record, behind 2016 and 2015.Despite the small discrepancy in rankings, which is due to the different methods each team employed for analyzing temperature data, both agencies’ analyses find that the five warmest years on record have all occurred since 2010 and that Earth’s long-term warming trend continued through 2017. An analysis of global temperature data by scientists with the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) found that 2017 was the second-hottest year on record since 1880 — which the scientists say is especially significant given that there was no El Niño last year.According to scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City, global average temperatures in 2017 were 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (or 0.90 degrees Celsius) warmer than the 1951 to 1980 average, which makes 2017 temperatures second only to 2016.“Despite colder than average temperatures in any one part of the world, temperatures over the planet as a whole continue the rapid warming trend we’ve seen over the last 40 years,” Gavin Schmidt, director of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, said in a statement.In their own analysis, scientists at the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) determined that 2017 was the third-warmest year on record, behind 2016 and 2015. Despite the small discrepancy in rankings, which is due to the different methods each team employed for analyzing temperature data, both agencies’ analyses find that the five warmest years on record have all occurred since 2010 and that Earth’s long-term warming trend continued through 2017.NOAA added in a statement: “2017 marks the 41st consecutive year (since 1977) with global land and ocean temperatures at least nominally above the 20th-century average.”The BBC reports that a third major agency that tracks global temperature data, the UK Met Office, concluded that average global temperatures in 2017 were lower than 2016 but virtually identical to 2015.All three agencies noted that 2017 had no El Niño phenomenon, which warms tropical Pacific Ocean waters and causes corresponding short-term variations in global average temperatures, whereas an El Niño event was in effect for most of 2015 and the first four months of 2016. In fact, a La Niña event, which creates cooler Pacific waters and hence tends to drive down global average temperatures, started in late 2017.An additional analysis by NASA found that if the effects of recent El Niño and La Niña events were excluded, 2017 would have gone down as the warmest year on record.“It’s extraordinary that temperatures in 2017 have been so high when there’s no El Niño. In fact, we’ve been going into cooler La Niña conditions,” Peter Stott, acting director of the UK Met Office, told BBC News. “Last year was substantially warmer than 1998 which had a very big El Niño. It shows clearly that the biggest natural influence on the climate is being dwarfed by human activities – predominantly CO₂ emissions.”According to NASA, Earth’s average surface temperature has risen about two degrees Fahrenheit, or a little more than one degree Celsius, over the course of roughly the last century, and this change has been “driven largely by increased carbon dioxide and other human-made emissions into the atmosphere.” The agency added that “Last year was the third consecutive year in which global temperatures were more than 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit (1 degree Celsius) above late nineteenth-century levels.”Weather dynamics can have a large impact on regional temperatures, however, which is why different regions of the planet might not have experienced the same amount of warming in 2017. According to NOAA, South America experienced its second-warmest year on record last year, while Asia experienced its third-warmest year, Africa its fourth, Europe its fifth, and North America and Oceania experienced their sixth-warmest year.Data released by NOAA last week showed that 2017 was the third-hottest year on record in the 48 contiguous states in the U.S. — but the costliest in terms of weather and climate disasters, of which the U.S. saw 16 last year that inflicted damages of $1 billion or more.This map shows Earth’s average global temperature from 2013 to 2017, as compared to a baseline average from 1951 to 1980, according to an analysis by NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. Yellows, oranges, and reds show regions warmer than the baseline. Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/Scientific Visualization Studio.last_img read more

New app hopes to reduce wildlife deaths on India’s roads, railway lines

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Animals, Biodiversity, Citizen Science, Conservation, Conservation Technology, data collection, Endangered Species, Forests, handheld, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Infrastructure, Roadkill, Roads, Technology And Conservation, Wildlife, Wildtech Roadkills, a newly launched Android app, lets users in India record information on deaths of animals — both domestic and wild — on roads or railway lines, and upload geotagged photos.Such roadkill data can be useful for both researchers and people planning infrastructure projects across the country, conservationists say.The app data can help identify what sections of roads and railway lines animals use the most, for instance, which could in turn help guide measures that would reduce or prevent wildlife deaths.Warning: Some photos may be disturbing or graphic. India’s growing network of roads and railway lines, often crisscrossing forests and wild lands, has turned deadly for wildlife. In December last year, for example, an 8-year-old male tiger died in a road accident on a four-lane-highway in the state of Maharashtra, while a speeding train killed five elephants in the state of Assam.Countless other animals, from frogs and snakes, to birds and jackals, frequently collide with high-speed cars or trains in India, but their deaths go unnoticed, unrecorded.A newly launched mobile-based app hopes to tackle this problem.Roadkills, an Android app currently supported by the Wildlife Conservation Trust (WCT), lets people record information on deaths of animals, both domestic and wild, on roads or railway lines, and upload geotagged photos. Such data can be useful not just for researchers, according to Milind Pariwakam, a wildlife biologist with the WCT, but for people planning infrastructure projects across the country. The app data can help identify what sections of roads and railway lines animals use the most, for instance, which could in turn help guide measures that would reduce or prevent their deaths.“Small research teams can only monitor a few roads at a time,” Pariwakam told Mongabay. “But development is going to happen everywhere, and the scale of this problem is so huge that resources are always going to be limited no matter how big an organization you are. So we thought ‘Why don’t we mobilize citizens to collect roadkill data instead?’”An 8-year-old male tiger was hit and killed by a speeding vehicle on Dec. 29, 2017, on a national highway in Maharashtra state. Photo by Sheetal Navgire/WCT.Users can see all of the app data on a map on the Roadkills website. And those wanting to analyze the data themselves, or use it for other purposes, can write to the team, a press release notes, adding that “the data will be shared free of cost under a Creative Commons license.”While the team’s long-term plan is to use the data to reduce roadkill, their immediate objective is to grow the user base and keep the users engaged. “Only then can data actually start flowing in and some action be taken,” Pariwakam said.But users should be careful while using the app, he cautioned. “People drive fast on highways, which is also the reason for roadkills. So while recording a roadkill would be nice, your own safety is of utmost importance,” he said.Stopping on some roads, such as parts of national highways that pass through some national parks, is also illegal. And people should be mindful of not breaking the law to collect data, he added.The team is currently working on an iOS version of the app, which they say will be out within the next couple of weeks.“We call upon other wildlife conservation organizations to join this initiative and make the data collection effort larger and more inclusive,” said Anish Andheria, the WCT president. “The data will be made available for better planning of roads and railway lines for a wildlife-friendly and better society.”A dead jungle cat on an Indian highway. Photo by Vishal Bansod/WCT.Indian fox roadkill on a highway. Photo by Anish Andheria/WCT.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Villagers cite self-defense in tiger killing, but missing body parts point to the illegal wildlife trade

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Villagers in Indonesia have killed a critically endangered Sumatran tiger, after labeling it a menace to the village.Conservation authorities, though, have found strong indications that the animal may have been killed for its body parts, which are highly prized in the illegal wildlife trade.Habitat loss and poaching have already driven two other species of tiger in Indonesia to extinction, and conservationists warn the Sumatran tiger is being pushed along the same same path.Warning: The article contains some disturbing images. JAKARTA — Conservation authorities in Indonesia are investigating suspicions that the illegal trade in tiger parts drove the killing of one of the rare big cats earlier this month.The male Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) was killed on March 4 by residents of Hatupangan village in Mandailing Natal district, North Sumatra province, who had labeled it a nuisance and a menace to the village. The residents then strung up the tiger’s body in the village hall for display.But an autopsy carried out soon after found that several body parts had been cut from the tiger’s corpse, likely destined for the illegal trade in wildlife parts.Hotmauli Sianturi, head of the North Sumatra Natural Resources Conservation Agency (BKSDA), goes over the autopsy results on the Sumatran tiger that was killed earlier this month. Photo courtesy of North Sumatra Natural Resources Conservation Agency.The tiger had been spotted roaming near the village since February, and villagers believed it was a supernatural creature. On Feb. 16, the big cat attacked a hunting party that had embarked into the forest to track the animal. Two people were reported injured in the incident, in which the tiger managed to escape.A team from the provincial conservation agency, the BKSDA, arrived the following day to caution the villagers against trying to capture or hurt the tiger, which is a protected species under Indonesian law. The officers did not manage to find the animal, and so decided to remain in the village.A few days later, the villagers reported another tiger sighting and asked the conservation officers to kill the animal. The BKSDA said the villagers forced the team to give written approval that the villagers could kill the tiger to prevent it from hurting another human. The villagers also told the team to immediately leave and to never return.“The team received verbal abuse and one of our vehicles was damaged by the people,” the agency said later in a statement.The BKSDA team subsequently sought help from the district police. Local authorities and the villagers agreed on March 2 to set a trap to capture the tiger.On the morning of March 4, the villagers found the tiger sleeping under a resident’s stilt house. They stabbed the animal multiple times with a spear, killing it. It was also reported that local police officers shot the tiger with a stun gun.“We told the villagers that the tiger is a protected animal, but they didn’t like our way of handling the situation,” said Hotmauli Sianturi, head of the North Sumatra BKSDA.After managing to retrieve the tiger’s body from the village hall where it had been strung up, the BKSDA carried out an autopsy that showed several body parts missing. These included a fang, claws, and patches of skin from the head and tail.Hotmauli said her agency was looking into the possibility that the tiger had been killed upon request from traders of wildlife parts. Tiger claws and fangs are highly prized in this illegal trade as symbols of potency and power. Hotmauli said her agency was working on the case with the provincial police.The killing took place a day after global celebrations for the United Nations’ World Wildlife Day, whose theme this year was “Big cats: Predators under threat.” It was aimed at bringing attention to the alarming decline in the population of iconic species such as tigers, lions and leopards around the world.Indonesia’s Ministry of Environment and Forestry said on March 5 that it would improve efforts to educate residents living near tiger habitats to protect the critically endangered species.“The main point is to have everyone agree to protecting wildlife habitat areas,” Bambang Hendroyono, the ministry’s secretary-general, told reporters in Jakarta. “It’s become an important task for us to maintain the animals’ survival.”The Sumatran tiger is a key conservation focus for the Indonesian government and wildlife activists; two other tiger subspecies native to Indonesia, the Javan tiger (Panthera tigris sondaica) and the Bali tiger (Panthera tigris balica), were officially declared extinct in 2003 due to poaching and habitat loss — the same threats stalking the Sumatran tiger today.Habitat reduction has also resulted in more frequent cases of human-tiger conflict, and the problem is only set to worsen through the continued clearance of forests for plantations and roads. A series of road development projects currently planned by the government are expected to cut through Mount Leuser, Kerinci Seblat and Bukit Barisan Selatan national parks — all of which are home to Sumatran tigers.Under Indonesia’s 1990 Conservation Act, the killing of protected species such as Sumatran tigers, or the trade or distribution of the animal or its body parts, carries a prison sentence of up to five years and fines of up to 100 million rupiah ($7,000). However, the illegal wildlife trade continues to flourish, as law enforcement against poaching is widely perceived as ineffective; perpetrators are rarely prosecuted, and when they are, they receive token sentences that are far lower than the maximum prescribed punishment. Conservationists have also pointed out the seeming impunity in the case of influential figures and officials involved in the illegal wildlife trade.The latest incident marks the third reported wildlife killing by humans in the country this year, following the deaths of two orangutans in Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo.A veterinarian performs an autopsy on the Sumatran tiger that was killed by villagers in northern Sumatra. The autopsy found several body parts, typically prized in the illegal wildlife trade, were missing. Photo by Ayat S. Karokaro/Mongabay Indonesia.Banner image: A Sumatran tiger at Dublin Zoo in Ireland. Photo courtesy of Neil Turner/Flickr.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animal Cruelty, Animals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Cats, Conservation, Crime, Critically Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Human-wildlife Conflict, Mammals, Rainforest Animals, Tigers, Wildlife, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade center_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

“Save the Krill” urges Greenpeace report

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A recent report by Greenpeace International describes the role of krill in Antarctica’s marine food chain and calls for nations to restrict their krill fishing in areas under consideration for protected status designation.Automatic identification system signals from commercial krill-fishing vessels allowed Greenpeace to map the precise routes these ships take around the Antarctic Peninsula and to identify transfers of catch and fuel between ships.The report warns that krill fishing competes for food with other marine wildlife, and that anchoring and pollution from the ships could damage the larger ecosystem.Video footage and samples collected from submarine dives by a recent Greenpeace expedition will be analyzed and presented at meetings this summer to support the creation of marine protected areas in the Weddell Sea and other regions around Antarctica. In Antarctica, it’s usually the whales, seals and penguins that take the spotlight, but a new report focuses on an animal further down the food chain: the Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba).In a report issued last week, Greenpeace International outlines the vital role that this minute crustacean plays in Antarctica’s marine ecology and documents incursions of krill-fishing vessels into coastal waters around the Antarctic Peninsula. The report claims that increased demand for krill oil coupled with easier access to the Southern Ocean due to warmer temperatures could result in disruption of vulnerable ecosystems. The group is calling for krill-fishing companies to cease fishing in proposed marine protected areas (MPAs) in the Weddell Sea and other Antarctic waters.Krill form the backbone of Antarctica’s food chains, Louisa Casson, a Greenpeace campaigner based in the group’s United Kingdom office, told Mongabay. The tiny shrimp-like creatures feed on photosynthetic plankton and in turn become a vital food source for the Southern Ocean’s iconic wildlife, including five species of baleen whales, numerous seal species, seabirds like penguins and albatrosses, fish and squid.Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba). Photo by Uwe Kils via Wikimedia Commons.To observe the krill and fishing industry firsthand, Greenpeace sent its icebreaker ship, the Arctic Sunrise, on an expedition to the Antarctic Peninsula and the Weddell Sea in January of this year. The crew, Casson told Mongabay, “saw krill vessels in the immediate vicinity of whales and penguins so that you can see that they are directly competing for the same food.”Krill are the largest catch in the Antarctic, with up to 5.6 million metric tons allowed to be harvested each year. The current catch limit, divided among sub-regions of the sea, is meant to represent less than 1 percent of Antarctica’s estimated krill population.“There probably isn’t a fishery in the world [with] a catch limit in place that is such a small proportion of what we think the population of krill to be,” said Keith Reid, an Australia-based science manager for the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). The group, composed of representatives from 24 nations plus the European Union, all with commercial interests in the region, is in charge of monitoring krill fishing activity and closing sub-regions to fishing once a target limit has been reached. The system enables CCAMLR to manage the fisheries in a way that is sustainable for the Southern Ocean’s ecosystems, Reid said. He acknowledged that it is up to the individual nations to enforce compliance by their commercial fleets.The issue isn’t with the amount of krill being caught, but with where they are being caught, according to Cassandra Brooks, an Antarctic policy adviser and assistant professor at the University of Colorado Boulder’s Environmental Studies Program, who is not associated with Greenpeace or CCAMLR.A Weddell seal and a gentoo penguin on Greenwich Island, part of the South Shetland Island group, Antarctica. Photo by Paul Hilton/Greenpeace.The report includes a detailed map of krill trawler routes around the tip of the Antarctic Peninsula over the past five years, based on data from the vessels’ automatic identification system signals. According to Brooks, the map shows that the ships are coming very close to shore, including areas home to penguin colonies, which could endanger the penguins and other predator populations.“This is the highest resolution [Antarctic] krill fishing data I’ve seen,” said Brooks, “[and] this data is actually hard to come by because it is proprietary and not widely shared.”Greenpeace claims that these trawlers were fishing within the boundaries of proposed MPAs, an allowed activity that the group says the trawlers should end in order to preserve the habitat and food chain in these sensitive areas. CCAMLR does not actively monitor authorized fishing vessels’ routes and relies on ships to self-report when they enter a designated area to fish.Greenpeace also mapped interactions between trawlers and the large refrigerated cargo vessels (also known as “reefers”) that take on catch and supply fuel to allow the trawlers to remain longer at sea. The report warns that rough water conditions during a fuel transfer could result in an oil spill that would damage the Antarctic’s near-pristine ecosystem. Some of the ships, said Casson, “have appalling safety records [with] very low standards in terms of pollution from oil and sewage.” In addition, Greenpeace has evidence that some transfers occurred in or near designated protected areas. The anchoring required to carry out the transfer can damage these sensitive seabeds and the animals that live there.The Iris Reefer, a vessel that takes on catch from fishing vessels and supplies them with fuel, at anchor in Discovery Bay, in the Antarctic. Photo by Daniel Beltrá/Greenpeace.Overall, Brooks said the report did a good job presenting krill-fishing environmental and safety concerns, although she stressed that the issues have previously been raised by other advocacy groups and scientists, some within CCAMLR.Scientists aboard Greenpeace’s expedition ship collected samples and video of the seafloor that revealed a complex invertebrate community, according to Casson. Various experts are scrutinizing the video footage to identify the species it captured and determine the uniqueness and vulnerability of the ecosystems. The group will present the results at CCAMLR’s scientific meeting this summer and may use them to bolster support for the proposed MPAs.Designating coastal waters as MPAs is becoming an accepted fishing management tool in many countries. Evidence has shown that by eliminating or substantially reducing fishing, these areas can become safe havens for sea animals and biodiversity.In 2016, CCAMLR’s members approved the designation of over 1.5 million square kilometers (nearly 600,000 square miles) of Antarctica’s Ross Sea as an MPA that came into force in December 2017. To reach unanimous consent required several years of negotiations. A proposal in 2017 to create a second MPA off the east coast of Antarctica did not garner enough support to move forward. Additional MPAs in the Weddell Sea and along the Western Antarctic Peninsula have been proposed by the EU and the Chilean and Argentine governments, respectively, but according to Reid, it has not yet been determined if either one will be discussed at this year’s October meeting.Casson said that Greenpeace is particularly focused on protecting the Weddell Sea. Historically, sea-ice coverage has made the Weddell Sea impenetrable to industrial fishing ships. Greenpeace warns that the convergence of sea-ice melt from rising ocean temperatures and increased demand for omega-3 fatty acids derived from krill oil will encourage industrial fishing enterprises to expand into this newly accessible region. The report cites a 2017 market research prediction that global demand for krill oil will double by 2021, largely for dietary supplements, followed by food for farmed fish and pets, and pharmaceuticals.Reid countered that getting into the Weddell Sea is still difficult. (Greenpeace’s own mission was forced to scale back its planned submarine dives in this region, according to Casson.) Furthermore, in Reid’s past decade working for CCAMLR, he said he has seen numerous forecasts of rapid krill-fishing increases that failed to materialize. “I remain alert but not terribly concerned,” he said, adding that he is certain that CCAMLR’s monitoring and trigger mechanisms are sufficient to rein in an uncontrolled krill-fishing expansion.Greenpeace’s broader goal is to establish a network of large sanctuaries in the Southern Ocean. In the meantime, the group’s awareness campaign aims to encourage the Antarctic krill industry to voluntarily halt expansion into newly accessible waters. Casson referred to a similar concession made at the opposite pole in 2016, when the Arctic cod-fishing industry agreed to avoid fishing in the thawed waters of the Northern Barents Sea until a scientific evaluation can be conducted.“There’s a precedent there of the industry actually working alongside environmental groups to not expand further into these areas that are sensitive,” Casson said.Aerial view taken off James Ross Island in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Photo by Daniel Beltrá/Greenpeace.Banner image: Gentoo penguins on Greenwich Island, part of the South Shetland Island group, Antarctica. Photo by Paul Hilton/Greenpeace.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Rebecca Kesslercenter_img Biodiversity, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Featured, Fish, Fisheries, Fishing, Governance, Marine Animals, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Marine Protected Areas, Oceans, Overfishing, Protected Areas, Research, Wildlife last_img read more

Jordan says NBA superteams will create 28 ‘garbage’ teams—report

first_imgJordan, 54, also said he lacks the patience to be a coach, saying his biggest problem is the focus level of today’s players.“For me to ask an individual to focus on the game the way I played would, in some ways, be unfair and if he didn’t do it, there’s no telling where my emotions would be,” Jordan told the magazine.Regarding Woods, whose major total ranks second to the 18 won by Jack Nicklaus, Jordan said the injured star is in a transitional phase perhaps made more difficult by today’s social media.“I don’t know if I could have survived in this Twitter time where you don’t have the privacy that you would want.”Tiger, Jack both great ADVERTISEMENT Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Michael Jordan. AFP/GETTY IMAGES FILE PHOTONEW YORK—Retired NBA legend Michael Jordan has warned that the “superteam” era will create a league with 28 “garbage” clubs that will struggle.Jordan, who sparked the Chicago Bulls to six NBA titles in the 1990s, addressed the topic in an interview with Cigar Aficionado magazine unveiled Thursday on its website.ADVERTISEMENT Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Pacquiao conqueror Horn wins top Aussie award LATEST STORIES Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. center_img View comments He also talked about his pal Tiger Woods, a 14-time major champion golfer struggling to return after multiple back operations, and said he himself might not have “survived in this Twitter time.”Jordan’s toughest talk was on the state of the NBA, where several teams have stockpiled talent to try and dethrone the reigning champion Golden State Warriors, who last season united stars Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry to form a dominant squad that claimed a second title in three seasons.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smogIn the past few months, the Cleveland Cavaliers, Houston Rockets and Oklahoma City Thunder have added star talent to their rosters.“I think it’s going to hurt the overall aspect of the league from a competitive standpoint,” Jordan told the magazine. “You’re going to have one or two teams that are going to be great and another 28 teams that are going to be garbage, or they are going to have a tough time surviving in the business environment.” Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Jordan would not be drawn into a comparison of Woods and Nicklaus in the Greatest of All Time debate.“That’s more for stories and hype,” Jordan told the magazine. “Jack and Tiger never played against each other. They never played with the same equipment.“I never played against Wilt Chamberlain. I never played against Jerry West. To now say that one is greater than the other is being a little bit unfair.“How much did each one impact, change or evolve the game? Obviously Jack won more during the time he played. Tiger evolved it to where it crossed a lot of different boundaries, where it’s not just a white guy’s sport — black guys, African-Americans, all minorities play the game.“He played it at a level to where it generated so much interest financially that it grew the game from a financial standpoint. Now does that constitute him being the greatest? To say he’s any less than Jack, I think, is unfair.”Jordan on Rory: ‘Truly amazing’ Jordan moved the Nicklaus-Woods win argument to the NBA level, comparing his title total to the record 11 won by former Boston Celtics legend Bill Russell.“Yeah, Jack has got 18 majors and Tiger has got 14. And that’s how people are judging certain things,” Jordan said. “I won 6 championships. Bill Russell won 11. Does that make Bill Russell better than me? Make me better than him? No because when you try to compare different eras and equate who is better than the other, it’s an unfair parallel, an unfair choice.”Jordan also praised Northern Ireland star Rory McIlroy, saying he admires him but has yet to play a round with him.“Very talented. Never played golf with him yet,” Jordan said. “Seen him on the range. We’ve talked. I’m a big fan. For someone that small to generate that much power is truly amazing.” Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson MOST READ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player awardlast_img read more

Reality bites in PBA Draft; road to pros not always easy

first_imgComelec assures no disruption in operations with retirement of execs Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “It’s gonna be hard, realistically, it’s hard,” said coach Topex Robinson, whose career was a counter-narrative to the tale of woe of many a college star. Robinson was not that big a name in college but was blessed with a lot of success in the pros while playing for Red Bull.“Only a handful have easy access to the PBA,” Robinson, now a coach, added. “Most people who stay in the league are the ones who always outwork everybody.”Dario’s personal trainer, Patrick Tancioco, thinks his ward can eventually sign a contract despite the odds.“He wants to prove something. He feels like people have written him off,” Tancioco, who worked with Dario prior the UAAP season, told the Inquirer.“We had to start by cleaning his lens,” he revealed. “He was impatient. He wasn’t comfortable. He has had his share of breakout performances in the past. Earlier this year, he felt he was underutilized. It’s tough to actually perform if one’s not physically and mentally ready.”Dario is ready now. There is a blueprint for guys like him to land a contract and he hopes to follow that to the letter.Dirty work“Coach Topex told me that in the draft, teams aren’t looking for stars,” Dario said. “He said that clubs are looking for the guys who are willing to do the dirty work, the stuff most players overlook.”For someone who once dreamed of being like Jayson Castro or LA Tenorio, and who looked to fit the bill just two weeks before the draft, Dario now has as his peg Anjo Caram, an NCAA star who earns his contract by being Meralco’s go-to defensive guy at the guard position.“I’ll just continue to be myself—a super pesky defender. And hit open shots. I’m confident with those,” Dario said. None of them had remarkable pro careers.Cautionary talesFor every Kiefer Ravena who fulfills his potential in the pros, there are cautionary tales of college MVPs that keep scouts wary during the Draft: RR Garcia, Dylan Ababou, Rabeh Al-Hussaini and Ken Bono have all struggled to find stardom in the pros.Teytey Teodoro, another proven scorer in the NCAA for Jose Rizal U, also had trouble keeping his stock up during the Draft. He was picked first—in the third round. Just one spot ahead of Dario, who was relieved just to be taken by Blackwater.But the road to the PBA has just begun for the likes of Dario.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball PLAY LIST 05:02SEA Games 2019: Philippines clinches historic gold in women’s basketball02:43Philippines make clean sweep in Men’s and Women’s 3×3 Basketball06:27SEA Games 2019: No surprises as Gilas Pilipinas cruises to basketball gold02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award View comments Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college ‘Duterte legacy:’ Gov’t boasts achievements so farcenter_img Sarah Geronimo’s ‘Tala’ enters Billboard’s world digital song sales chart P260,000 each in aid to displaced Marawi folk released by US Diego Dario (middle) was part of UP’s seniors corps in the last UAAP season, along with star Paul Desiderio (right). But while Desiderio was picked fourth overall in the PBA Draft, Dario had to wait until the third round before getting selected. —Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netOnce upon a time, Diego Dario played in the center of the basketball universe. His University of the Philippines won hearts in a gallant effort to topple Ateneo in the UAAP Finals, and Dario was in the middle of it, hitting booming triples that sent thousands of people roaring.Less than two weeks later, he was just another face in a group of hopeful amateurs waiting—some eagerly, some pensively—for their names to be called in the PBA Draft.ADVERTISEMENT As name after name got called and Dario still remained seated, the roars of the UAAP Finals grew more and more distant.“It’s the life I chose,” he told the Inquirer. “The chatter during the Draft Combine was that there was a lot of guards—that there were too much of us.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissSPORTSCoronation night?SPORTSThirdy Ravena gets‍‍‍ offers from Asia, Australian ball clubsWell, there’s that. But the PBA Draft is a fickle monster and teams usually don’t take small sample sizes—such as two games—in order to decide on an investment.In fact, Philippine basketball is littered with players who made quite a name for themselves in college but struggled to keep their names high on the list of PBA teams during Draft day. Jojo Duncil, the spearhead of University of Santo Tomas’ miraculous title run in 2006, was selected late in the second round (15th overall). Ronjay Enrile, a one-time folk hero at Letran, was selected 17th overall. Sarah Geronimo’s ‘Tala’ enters Billboard’s world digital song sales chart Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Bench keeps Alab PH fresh for next game Tim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’ MOST READlast_img read more

Budget disastrous, a failure – Jagdeo

first_img…says it lived up to “low expectations” of publicOpposition Leader Bharrat JagdeoMoments after Finance Minister Winston Jordan delivered a near four-hour Budget 2018 presentation, Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo shredded the coalition Government’s fiscal plan for the next year, saying that it was without a doubt one of the most “disastrous” budgets ever presented to the nation.Speaking to reporters from the Committee Room at the Parliament Building on Monday evening, the former President noted that the Budget, which was themed “The journey to the good life continues”, failed on every standard, especially as it related to addressing key matters of concern to the public.Some of the officals and media in the viewing gallery in the National Assembly“He has failed on every one of those parameters. Issues surrounding jobs, welfare, framework for growth and development, clarity of the Government’s vision in different areas, big-picture issues on where the country is going – we had hoped that all of these would be part of the budget presentation… they have lived up to the low expectations people had of the Government,” the Opposition Leader stated.A view from inside Parliament ChambersAccording to Jagdeo, the Finance Minister merely took the routine work programmes from the various ministries and read those inconsequential details out to the nation, while failing to address key manifesto promises such as job creation. “This sort of things is not what it takes to inspire a country to produce, to expand welfare, to generate jobs and so, on all those counts we have seen an utter abysmal failure on the part of the Minister of Finance and the Government,” he stated.Fictitious jobsAccording to Jagdeo, the biggest job creation initiative is GO-Invest expecting to bring in $154 billion in new investments next year. However, this, he said, is nothing but fictitious, since similar claims were made before when Government touted $180 billion in investments were expected to be facilitated by GO-Invest and create 10,000 jobs.“They lied then and it is now true now. That’s about US$750 million ($154 billion) of investments and they haven’t said in what sector. Even with the oil and gas sector, they can’t meet US$750 million in investments next year so that’s fictitious and it’s likely that the 5000 jobs that they are projecting to create next year is also fictitious,” he argued.Moreover, Jagdeo said that calling the measures outlined by the coalition Government “pathetic” would be a mild description.“There is nothing here that inspires; nothing that says to the Private Sector “we’re working as your partner”…there is nothing to say to any group of Guyanese, whether you’re a young person, whether you’re a pensioner, you’re a child going to school, whether you’re a farmer, a bauxite worker or anyone working in retail, trade or a servant that (you) have a better year to look forward to, based on this Budget. There is nothing to look forward to!” says the former President.Non-performing economyExamining the financial performance of the country’s economy, the Opposition Leader posited that the growth rate could not have matched the revised projection of 3.1 per cent despite Government collecting some 8.7 per cent more in total revenues through taxes and other means than last year. This, Jagdeo noted, confirms what the Opposition has been saying all along, that the economy is not performing.“They collected $8.2 billion dollars more taxes in 2017 than in 2016. We’ve been saying that this government is taking more taxes out of peoples’ pocket while arguing that they were too heavily taxed under the PPP,” he said.In addition to $10 billion being transferred from statutory agencies into the treasury, Jagdeo highlighted that there was a massive deterioration in the current account of the balance of payments of over US$200 million, while the marginal increase in the capital account is as a result of the inflows from ExxonMobil investments and disbursement. He added that the country’s debt has gone up and was projected to keep going up.The Opposition Leader went on to say that the announcement of plans to carry out a countrywide land valuation to increase rates and taxes was a contradiction of the Minister saying that there were no new taxes in the budget.“They are introducing a measure now that, having exhausted the taxes measures at the national level, they are now taking this to the NDCs (Neighbourhood Democratic Councils) and municipalities across the country,” he stated.Sugar, riceJagdeo also reflected on the Minister’s statements about the sugar industry, that the Special Purpose Unit (SPU) would guide the divestment of sugar and also reconfigure the remaining estates. Referring to the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo) being termed an “old antiquated industry” that needs to be gotten rid of, Jagdeo said that had the PPP/C Government taken that approach regarding the bauxite industry when it took office in 1992, then bauxite production in Linden would not have continued.“We created alternatives for the people and still bauxite mines open in Linden and then we manage to privatise it. But this is their approach, an industry that about 100,000 of our people depend on, that’s already wreaking havoc on your balance of payments; now we’re seeing how impactful the sector is on everything else and this is your approach to it – short-sighted,” he asserted.With regard to the rice sector, the Opposition Leader pointed out that it was the only industry that was sustaining the economy’s growth rate and would be driving the grow rate in the future without any help from Government, except the fact that work is being done to upgrade the grains.EnergyTouching on Government’s popularly touted ‘Green State Development Strategy’ (GSDS), Jagdeo said that the coalition’s approach towards the energy pillar of the plan was one that was in contradiction of the overall objective of the strategy, which is the sustainable use of energy in a green economy.He referred to Jordan’s announcement of entirely scrapping the Amaila Falls Hydro Project and moving ahead with the Moco Moco Hydro Project. According to the Opposition Leader, the latter would only supply Lethem with half a megawatt of power while 50 megawatts of power will be generated from natural gas.“That would violate the objective of this (GSDS) plan, which is to have a 100 per cent of our energy come from renewable sources by 2025. And he sees nothing wrong with it,” Jagdeo asserted.TransparencyHe went on to outline that other energy projects such as the solar farm at Mabaruma along with others are being done without any transparency.This led the former Head of State to further highlight that Government failed to address key issues in the emerging oil sector such as the release of the oil contract in the name of transparency.“Frankly speaking, the worst period in modern history in terms of transparency and the use of public funds is now,” he stated as he listed several projects that Government was yet to fully come clean with the details on such as the new Demerara River crossing and the D’Urban Park.Moreover, while Minister Jordan lectured on the oil industry and how to spend impending resources wisely, at the same time Jagdeo said there was a deliberate act on the part of Government to delay the establishment of the Sovereign Wealth Fund.“This was a promise made two and a half years ago to get it done, but this is basically a delaying tactic. I think they do not want the Sovereign Wealth Fund in place because the Sovereign Wealth Fund will restrict their ability to waste and to use the resources wantonly and in a manner they’re using public resources now,” he stated.According to the Opposition Leader, a platitude approach was taken on other major issues of national importance such as constitution reform, debt management, Local Government Elections and the international Sustainable Development Goals.InfrastructureHe went on to reiterate that the coalition Government continues to piggyback on old projects started under the People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C) regime that are now coming to fruition.In fact, this is exactly the case in the infrastructure sector, Jagdeo said, noting that most of the road projects were initiated by the previous Administration. He specifically mentioned the Cheddi Jagan International Airport (CJIA) Expansion Project, which the Opposition Leader said has turned into tragedy with the alterations to the original design.“This country needs an airport that will look to future; it is unbelievable that you would just reduce the air bridges to two from eight when we have aircraft on the tarmac waiting (to disembark passengers)…They just reformulated the project and now we’re gonna have an airport that we will have to go back to (in the future to again expand),” he posited.last_img read more