Abilene Christian Claims Both Tennis Player of the Week Awards

first_imgAlongside brother Jonathan, Josh Sheehy helped edge out the Cardinals’ and Islanders’ top-line doubles pairs. Sheehy is now 6-0 across singles and doubles play against Southland Conference opponents. Honorable Mention: Francois Kellerman, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Memishishi and teammate Sarh Adams surrendered just three points across the duo’s doubles triumphs, topping Lamar’s No. 1 duo 6-1 and earning a 6-2 victory over their Islander counterparts. Men’s Tennis Player of the Week – Josh Sheehy, Abilene Christian – Senior – Arlington, TexasNow tied for the team lead with 15 wins, including 14 at the No. 1 position, Sheehy didn’t drop a single set in either of his four matches last week. He defeated Lamar’s Axel Vila Antuna 6-4, 6-3 and took down Texas A&M-Corpus Christi’s William Mottet 6-4, 7-5, marking Sheehy’s 60th career No. 1 singles victory. Honorable Mention: Carlotta Romito, McNeese; Rhea Verma, Northwestern State; Sahaja Yamalapalli, Sam Houston State. Continuing its homestand with two 11:44 a.m. CT matches, Abilene Christian (18-4, 4-0 SLC) can claim the regular-season conference title with a win over Incarnate Word on Friday and will turn around to host UTSA on Saturday. FRISCO, Texas – Abilene Christian’s Josh Sheehy and Nini Memishishi are the Southland Conference Men’s and Women’s Tennis Players of the Week, the league announced Tuesday. Southland Conference Players of the Week are presented by MidSouth Bank.center_img Needing two wins to wrap up the regular-season conference championship, the Wildcats (12-8, 8-0 SLC) will travel to Northwestern State, who’s also 8-0 in league play, for an 11 a.m. match on Friday before visiting third-place Central Arkansas at 11 a.m. Sunday. Women’s Tennis Player of the Week – Nini Memishishi, Abilene Christian – Sophomore – Tbilisi, GeorgiaAfter beating Lamar’s Jasmin Buchta in straight sets, Memishishi found herself in trouble after being blanked 6-0 in set one by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi’s Carolina Bulatovic. Memishishi went on to win the final two sets to claim her third-straight singles win. Memishishi’s four total victories led the Wildcats to a 6-1 win over Lamar and a 5-2 win over Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, both at home. Abilene Christian extended its team win streak to four matches and secured a berth to the 2019 Southland Conference Women’s Tennis Tournament. Southland weekly award winners are nominated and voted upon by each school’s sports information director. Voting for one’s own athlete is not permitted. To earn honorable mention, a student-athlete must appear on at least 25 percent of ballots. Sheehy won all four of his top-line matches in a pair of 5-2 home wins over Lamar and Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, helping the Wildcats clinch a spot in the 2019 Southland Conference Men’s Tennis Tournament. This marks Sheehy’s fourth weekly honor of the season and the eighth weekly honor for the program this spring.last_img read more

Q&A with Abdon Nababan, outgoing head of Indonesia’s indigenous peoples alliance

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago holds its congress once every five years. The next one will take place this week in Tanjung Gusta village on the island of Sumatra.The Southeast Asian country is one of the planet’s most ethnically diverse, with hundreds of different languages spoken within its borders.After 10 years at the organization’s helm, Abdon Nababan will yield his position to someone new. This week in Sumatra at a rare congress of the world’s largest indigenous peoples alliance, thousands of tribal representatives from every corner of Indonesia will gather to determine the future of their movement. A new national leadership will be chosen, and Abdon Nababan, one of the group’s most instrumental characters since its founding nearly two decades ago, will finally step away.The Batak man from near North Sumatra’s giant Lake Toba has amassed a substantial resume. Since his election as head of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN) in 2007, Nababan and his team have won a court battle that freed all customary forests from state control, mapped an area of indigenous territory the size of South Carolina, and successfully prodded the government to recognize the rights of nine communities to the lands they call home. They have raised the cachet of indigenous peoples in a society long run by a military dictatorship that seemed to want nothing to do with them, save for exploiting their natural wealth. This week, Joko Widodo will become the first president to deliver a speech at an AMAN congress, an emblem of how far the organization has come under Nababan’s watch.Mongabay spoke with Nababan ahead of the congress about the strategies he has employed, the qualities needed to lead AMAN and more.Abdon Nababan speaks at the Global Landscapes Forum in Paris in December 2015. Photo by Pilar Valbuena for CIFOR/FlickrAN INTERVIEW WITH ABDON NABABANMongabay: What is AMAN’s ultimate goal? To secure for every one of Indonesia’s indigenous groups the legal right to use and own the forests they live in?Abdon Nababan: I always start with myself. I began in this work from the environmental side. So that’s my main goal. But I know that the easiest, cheapest, most logical way to do that is to support indigenous peoples. I was working hard as an environmental activist but getting no results. So I looked back to my community.After university, I joined Walhi [Indonesia’s largest environmental pressure group] and became coordinator for forest investigations. I saw that the best forest we have is not in the national parks; it is the forest that is protected by indigenous peoples. And this good forest provides everything to those who protect it.I was involved in campaigns to mobilize action against [PT Inti Indorayon Utama, a paper milling firm in North Sumatra]. Part of the area was my ancestral land. So this movement became very personal. This is not somebody else’s problem; this is my community’s problem, my brother and sister’s problem. I realized we had to bring culture to the core of the environmental movement. Mongabay: You played a lead role in organizing the first indigenous peoples congress, held in the late 1990s as Suharto’s military dictatorship collapsed. Was it a challenge to unite hundreds of communities under a single platform?Nababan: The most important principle of AMAN is to respect differences, to bridge the gap between majority and minority. In AMAN, big ethnic groups have the same rights as small ones.Our platform called for an end to the militarization of indigenous lands. For company licenses to be revoked. For no more domination by imported religions. To stop transmigration. We wanted to dissolve the religion ministry and the transmigration ministry. When we brought all that together, people felt like this is our problem.Some said we should make it more moderate. I said no — for the new organization, we need really strong positions. How we play with that, that’s strategy.Petrus Asuy, a Dayak Benuaq man from Muara Tae village on Borneo, stands in the ruins of a farmhouse he says was demolished by an oil palm plantation firm that grabbed his community’s ancestral land. Photo by Philip JacobsonMongabay: AMAN’s initial stance was totally adversarial. Fast forward to the 2012 congress, where government officials attended for the first time. This time around the president himself will deliver a speech. What happened to bring that about?Nababan: I’m good at nurturing relations with good people. During the SBY era, I identified people inside, like Pak Kuntoro [Mangkusubroto, head of a now-defunct presidential unit on development oversight]. We could talk frankly about this movement; I trusted him. It wasn’t because ideologically we were similar. He came from the extractive industry; he was the minister of mining. And he clearly believes in the free market. But he has a good heart. I started from there.If I know good people, I try not to put them on that black side. I can be really critical of government while maintaining good relations with people. To assess our enemy and ourselves is very important. That’s the quality for leader of AMAN.Nababan, left, sits next to forestry minister Siti Nurbaya at the 2015 Nusantara Festival, an annual cultural event, in Bali. Photo by Cory Rogers for MongabayMongabay: Is it easy to approach government officials? Are they open to talking about these issues?Nababan: Not in their office. But if you know their family — maybe he or she is an indigenous person, and then you can learn about his group, and bring him back to his identity. Two or three years later, he or she will be your friend. Government officials are educated to be the enemy of indigenous peoples, but in their daily life they are doing indigenous things. Split personality, you know? My role is to bring him to real life. ‘Every year you go home to your village; what are you doing in your village actually?’ It’s about self-identification. You have to make them understand, ‘This is about me. This is about my forest, this is about my land, this is about my water.’ That ability is destroyed by school. So it should be restored. Officials are some of the most educated people, so they’re a little farther away. The more education you get, it requires greater effort.If you’re not strategic, you will spend energy on small small things. We have very limited resources. No money. Even to have new activists to work with us we have to have training, it’s very expensive. That’s why the situation forced me to be strategic. Mongabay: How have the strategies employed by AMAN evolved over the years?Nababan: If you see Indonesia, it’s a very huge country, with very diverse cultures and ecosystems. So the vision is about local sovereignty, how peoples can regulate and govern their own lives. Of course, indigenous peoples will have a different vision for that.The first strategy is how to make this movement feasible. How to make indigenous peoples feasible. We bring something different, from our daily life. That’s the meaning of the movement. If you are not feasible, you are not subject to anything. To say that you exist. And people can see you. Through mobilizations, actions, campaigns, demonstrations, blockades.And of course to do that you have to ask a lot of people to have new awareness about their identity as indigenous peoples. So education is the second thing, to educate more and more people to join the club. And then the third is advocacy. How to change your environment. The outside. The state. The nation. The World Bank. The government. Everything. In the end, we want to run the country based on our knowledge, our values.Recently cut rainforest tree in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for MongabayMongabay: Some say the government should maybe think twice before letting indigenous communities own their lands and forests, because they might sell them on to investors. Conservation biologist Erik Meijaard wrote in 2014: “What will communities or individual people do when they can get legal title to what was previously state-owned land?….I would think many will immediately sell their land to whoever is the highest bidder: likely industrial-scale companies investing in oil palm, pulp and paper, rubber, and mining.” Your response?Nababan: I don’t need to respond, because from what I learn about him, he doesn’t understand the history of colonization of indigenous peoples, the history of destruction of indigenous peoples. If he only looks at the current situation, he’s right. It happens. Because he visited the frustrated peoples with no hope. Maybe there’s no more forest. So that’s why I didn’t really have to say something about it. Because we can — with AMAN, with this big organization — we can show more cases the better, the best practices than what he found on the ground.Mongabay: Do you hear this from the government?Nababan: Of course. But we say, how many hectares? I can show you that a million hectares are still good forest because it’s protected by indigenous peoples. Show me Erik’s findings, how many hectares? Because from our participatory mapping we can show, this forest is still the best forest we have. Because their indigenous system still works. So the problem right now with many indigenous peoples, they are indigenous peoples, but their indigenous systems already broke. So we say don’t victimize the victim. Let’s empower their system. It’s not their fault. They are the victim of government policy — the policy to always hand out concessions to companies.The problem is there is no recognition, so it becomes nebulous, and then the elites try to sell the land. You know how their land market works. Because there’s no clear legality. Just put in the decree [that gives an indigenous community title to its land] that they cannot sell it. That’s the basic value.Mongabay: What about development in general?Nababan: We have no problem with development. The important thing is who controls the development: indigenous values or the greedy capitalist from Washington? If the community controls the model of development, I think no problems. They can grow themselves with development. But now development eats them. Because development is controlled by someone. So it’s a matter of what development you mean.A Dani man in Indonesia’s Papua, one of the most linguistically diverse regions in the world. Photo by Rhett Butler for MongabayMongabay: What qualities should AMAN’s next secretary general possess?Nababan: I think for next leadership, they don’t need like me. AMAN has come a long way. In the past if you say indigenous peoples rights, you are labeled anti-development, or communist, or if you are in Papua you are separatist. Today you can talk about indigenous peoples wherever you want.The challenge for AMAN is how to prevent the military from taking power again. They are still there, ready to take over Jokowi’s government. Because this government is too transparent. Military and also the conglomerates don’t like that. So that’s why the quality for leadership for AMAN for the next is like that, how to keep the civil society and the political party stronger, to consolidate the democracy against these military radical things. Not really talk about indigenous peoples but how to protect this from militarization, radicalization. They must have the capacity to build political alliances.Mongabay: What’s next for you?Nababan: I don’t know. My focus is on strengthening the local structure. So I need more time to travel. I’m really concerned with Papua. My heart is there. Because there is a civilization gap. And we have to have something to bring there, to bridge the gap. If not, no future for Papua. The militarization is still there. Papua is an indigenous island. It’s really genocide happening. Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Activism, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forestry, Forests, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Interviews, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Norway vexed as Brazil sends mixed message on Amazon forest protection

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Amazon Soy, Cattle Ranching, China’s Demand For Resources, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Illegal Timber Trade, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, timber trade, Tropical Deforestation Last week, Brazil’s President Michel Temer fully vetoed MP 756, and partially vetoed MP 758, two provisional measures which he himself introduced and which Congress approved that would have cut conserved Amazon lands by 600,000 hectares (2,316 square miles).Almost simultaneously, Brazil’s environmental minister, José Sarney Filho, announced urgent plans for the administration to introduce a new bill to Congress to dismember the same conservation units described in the vetoed MP 756.Also last week, Norway gave a stern warning to Temer on his visit to Oslo, telling him that Brazil could lose millions of dollars from the Amazon Fund if Brazil’s deforestation rates continue rising.7,989 square kilometers of Brazilian rainforest were lost between August 2015 and 2016. A rise in annual Amazon deforestation to 8,500 square kilometers would reduce Norway’s funding to Brazil to zero. Brazil defended itself, claiming preliminary annual data shows a recent leveling off of its deforestation rate. A Press conference in March 2017 in Oslo between president Michel Temer and prime minister of Norway Erna Solberg. Last week, Solberg sternly warned Temer that Brazil must show a more serious commitment to preventing deforestation or lose millions in funding from Norway. Photo by Beto Barata/PR published on FlickrLast week saw a busy, but contradictory, stream of actions likely to impact Amazonian forests. Brazilian president Michel Temer — supposedly at the urging of supermodel and environmentalist Gisele Bündchen — killed measures to dismember a national forest and national park in Pará state. But the day before the veto, his administration quietly announced plans to send a new bill to Congress to dismember the very same conservation units (CUs).At the end of last week, Temer traveled to Norway and met with that country’s prime minister. Oslo, citing a 29 percent increase in deforestation in Brazil between August 2015 and August 2016, warned Temer that his nation stands on the verge of losing millions of dollars in financial aid that Norway annually pays to Brazil to help rein in Amazon deforestation.This week, China announced plans to supply Brazil with a $20 billion fund for infrastructure development, including railways, to move soy and other grains from Brazil’s interior to the coast. Past large scale transportation projects have resulted in significantly increased deforestation.Wildlife in Jamanxim National Forest, Pará. Attempts by the agribusiness lobby to dismember this national forest in the Amazon would open vast now fully protected areas to private land ownership, large scale farming and mining. Photo by Assor Fuchs/ICMBio CollectionPresidential vetoHours before leaving for Russia to meet with Vladimir Putin last Monday, 19 June, President Temer vetoed two provisional measures (MPs) 756/16 and 758/16, (one in full, the other in part) which he himself had initiated, and which had gone through changes in Congress and been approved by both chambers in May.MP 756 was vetoed in full. It would have dismembered the National Forest of Jamanxim, in Pará state, reducing the area of fully protected lands by 486,000 hectares (1,876 square miles), and converting those lands to an Area of Environmental Protection, which allows for private ownership as well as mining and agriculture. The measure would also have decreased the size of São Joaquim National Park, in Santa Catarina state, from 49,000 hectares (189 square miles) to 39,000 (150 square miles).MP 758 was partially rejected. Under the legislation, 101,000 hectares (389 square miles) of Jamanxim National Park would have become an APA, but this portion of the measure was vetoed. However, the Official Gazette of the Union published on June 20 noted a reduction of 862 hectares (3.3 square mile) from the national park, as this item was not vetoed by president Temer. The publication doesn’t mention the land’s future use, but the 862 hectares would likely allow for the construction of the Ferrogrão railroad, parallel to the BR-163 highway. The new railway would transport soy and other commodities to the coast.In a message to Enuncio Oliveira, the president of the Senate, Temer explained his veto of MP 756 as having the potential to “compromise and weaken environmental preservation in a sensitive region of the Amazon.”Jamanaxim National Forest, shown before and after its proposed dismemberment. The future of the national forest remains very uncertain, despite Temer’s veto because the administration immediately announced a new bill that would similarly reduce the fully protected area in the park. Map by Maurício Torres. Data source: Brazilian Institute of the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources(IBAMA)When is a veto not a veto?The veto news, however, was met with apprehension by environmentalists. In a video released a day before the presidential veto signing, Environment Minister José Sarney Filho announced, along with Senator for Pará, Flexa Ribeiro — an important member of the bancada ruralista agribusiness lobby — that the government would be sending an urgent request to Congress for a new bill nearly matching the content of MP 756 that would reduce the Jamanxin National Forest by 300,000 hectares (1,158 square miles).According to Sarney Filho, Temer’s veto was necessary apparently not because of environmentalists’ pleas, but because the MPs had been approved without public hearings, leading the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), independent federal litigators, to promise to file suit against the measures in court if they were signed into law.The environmental minister claimed the new bill will aim at ending “land conflict” in the region. The disputed portions of Jamanxim National Forest and National Park have long been occupied by land thieves, who have cleared and raised cattle illegally on the federal lands. MP 756 / 758 seemed to be targeted at legitimizing those illegal land uses and claims.“It is a situation difficult to understand. The government will send a bill to the Congress that will have the same effect as the measures vetoed by Temer,” said André Guimarães, executive director of the Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM). The new bill will be “worse” he told Mongabay, as it could be even harder to defend against; unlike an MP, the new measure cannot be easily challenged by the MPF independent federal litigators.Norway Climate and Environment Minister, Vidar Helgesen (left), and Brazilian Environmental Minister Sarney Filho in a meeting in Brasília in March 2017 to sign a letter of intent for financing sustainable rural activities. Brazil stands to lose millions of dollars from Norway’s Amazon Fund if it can’t curb its deforestation rate. Photo by José Cruz/Agência BrasilIn a statement, Greenpeace Brasil declared: “The veto seems to be only a political maneuver, since minister Sarney Filho anticipated that the government would send a bill with identical content. This means that the veto serves only to transfer from the president to the Congress the responsibility of unprotecting this significant portion of the Amazon rainforest…. The MPs 756 and 758 were disfigured in their passage through Congress. In the same way, it is also expected that this [new] bill will receive amendments to unprotect other CUs [conservation units]. The government maneuver brings back the initial threat, with the aim of recovering all the text that was vetoed.”Meanwhile, journalist Fabiano Maisonnave reported in the Folha de S.Paulo newspaper last week that Rodrigo Maia, president of Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies, and serving as president in Temer’s absence to Norway, was planning to propose a bill replacing MP 756 on Friday 23 June, while the president was still abroad, in order “to spare Temer.”Maia then denied the story in a letter published in the Readers’ section of Folha de S.Paulo. Journalist Maisonnave said that the information contained in his story was obtained from a high-ranking member of the government’s environmental ministry. The story’s accuracy was further reinforced by the fact that the government had stated that a replacement bill would be presented by the end of last week, despite Temer’s absence. No such printed bill has been forthcoming as of today.When contacted by Mongabay, the communications office at the Ministry of the Environment said that the bill replacing MP 756 had still not been drafted. ICMBio, the agency responsible for the protection of federal conservation units (CUs), said that it is conducting meetings to address the matter.On Saturday, Sarney Filho announced that the new bill will only be sent to Congress if it is endorsed by ICMBio. However, the agency had announced earlier its plan to follow the lead of the Minister of the Environment, doing whatever he announced in his video concerning the MPs’ veto. As such, it remains unclear as to who will be the first to move the bill forward.A blue and yellow macaw. If deforestation rates continue rising in the Amazon, significant biodiversity, including plants and animals still not described by science, will likely be lost. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayNorway losing patience with Brazil’s forest preservation effortAnother factor may have influenced Temer’s decision to publically veto the MPs that would have reduced protections on vast areas of already protected Amazon rainforest. On Friday, 16 June, Norway’s Climate and Environment Minister, Vidar Helgesen, sent a letter to Sarney Filho, expressing strong concern about Brazil’s increasing deforestation rates and reminding the environmental ministry of the rules of Norway’s Amazon Fund. (It was the government of Brazil that unilaterally set up the rules when the fund was established, said Helgensen’s letter.)“Reversing [the worrying upward deforestation] trend will… determine the future of our results-based partnership,” Helgesen wrote. Based “on current [deforestation] trends, the results-based contributions that can be received into the Amazon Fund… are already significantly reduced. Even a fairly modest further increase [in Brazilian deforestation] would take this number to zero.”“As you are aware, a set of policy measures that have caused strong public reactions in Brazil are making their way to Congress,” he added. “In parallel, budgets for key institutions that provide vital services for forest protection are being cut and their mandate to operate effectively is [being] put under pressure.” Brazil recently made drastic cuts to FUNAI, the agency that monitors indigenous preserves that protect significant amounts of forest, and to IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental protection agency.Straight to the point, Helgesen wrote:“[A]s long standing allies, please allow me to observe that many of the dichotomies of the current debates in Brazil, seen from the outside, appear to be false…. The alternative to these dichotomies is a more… sustainable vision of rural development in Brazil.”Norway is the largest funder of the Amazon Fund, having donated US $1 billion to Brazil since its creation in 2008 to decrease deforestation. The resources are managed by BNDES, Brazil’s gigantic national development bank.Norway’s contributions to the Amazon Fund are based on results in reducing deforestation. “When deforestation increases, the reward… must necessarily be reduced. If Brazil would like to receive contributions to the Amazon Fund at the previous level — some hundred million dollars annually — they will need to drastically reduce the present rate of deforestation,” said Lars Løvold, Director of the Rainforest Foundation Norway.7,989 square kilometers of Brazilian Amazon rainforest were destroyed between August 2015 and July 2016, an increase of 29 percent over the previous year. Under current benchmarks, a rise in annual Brazilian Amazon deforestation of 8,500 square kilometers, or more, would result in a zero annual Amazon Fund payment from Norway. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabaySarney Filho defended Brazil’s record, telling Helgesen that preliminary data suggests that the 29 percent increase in the deforestation rate seen between 2015 and 2016 may have leveled off since then. Data, he said, “indicate that we may have stopped the rising curve of deforestation recorded from August 2014 through July 2016. We hope that the new data will soon reveal a downward trend,” Reuters reported.In Oslo, Prime Minister Erna Solberg met with president Temer last Friday. After the meeting, at a news conference, she expressed deep concern about the increased deforestation in the Amazon, as well as about the Lava Jato corruption investigation in Brazil, which recently put President Temer in its sights. On Monday, 26 June, Brazil’s top prosecutor charged President Temer with taking multimillion dollar bribes, which will likely further destabilize his government.Last week, Solberg confirmed Oslo’s reduction in its contribution to the Amazon Fund for 2017, a cut of 50 percent, to about US $60 million. She cautioned that if Brazil does “not reach the targets, [the transfer of funds will] be reduced or there will be no payments [at all].” The environmental cooperation agreement between Norway and Brazil is valid until 2020, and might not be renewed if Brazil’s deforestation rates continue to rise.Data released by Brazil’s National Space Research Institute (INPE) last November showed that 7,989 square kilometers of Brazilian Amazon rainforest were destroyed between August 2015 and July 2016. Under current benchmarks, a rise in annual Brazilian Amazon deforestation of 8,500 square kilometers, or more, would result in a zero annual Amazon Fund payment from Norway.In other news this week, China announced a $20 billion fund available to Brazil for the construction of railroads and other infrastructure to benefit soy and corn agribusiness, and rapidly move commodities from the interior to ports. Past large scale transportation improvements to Amazon infrastructure have led to markedly increased deforestation. China is a major buyer of Brazilian grains.Brazil’s contradictory forest protection effortsBrazil has promised to significantly curb its deforestation rates under the Paris Climate Agreement, but its actions in recent months could potentially undermine that goal.President Temer has also yet to decide whether he will sign the revised Terra Legal legislation, MP 759, called the Conversion Law Project PLC 12/16, a measure designed to help peasant families obtain small plots of land. The new version introduces loopholes allowing wealthy landowners to use the program, threatening the environment. Analysts say the new law, if passed, will allow another 20 million hectares (77,200 square miles) of the Amazon biome and 40 million hectares (154,440 square miles) of the Cerrado, savanna biome, to be legally cleared. Temer must make a decision by 4 July.The government has also made no move to reverse massive cuts to its environmental and indigenous agencies. Legislation that would drastically simplify and streamline the environmental licensing process for major infrastructure and agribusiness projects, reducing rainforest protections, also apparently continues to move toward passage.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Sunset over the Amazon. Though Brazil may lose millions of dollars from Norway’s Amazon Fund if deforestation worsens, China just announced a $20 billion investment in Brazilian infrastructure, including major railways to transport soy and corn to the coast. Development on such a large scale could seriously threaten the Brazilian rainforest. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Water sources under threat from mining in Ecuador’s mountains

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Drinking Water, Environment, Gold Mining, Grasslands, Mining, Mountains, Parks, Protected Areas, Resource Conflict, Water, Water Pollution, Wildlife The Azuay páramos are restricted, alpine ecosystems that exist above the tree line but below the permanent snow line.Those who live in southern Ecuador’s páramos oppose gold and copper mining planned for in the region.Representatives from a mining company claim that the company won’t affect local communities and that they have permission to work. AZUAY PROVINCE, Ecuador — What happened on October 8 and 9 in Ecuador’s Río Blanco area was not entirely unexpected. On August 12, a group of inhabitants decided to take “de facto” measures — such as setting up a tent at the entrance of Junefield mining company’s camp — with the goal of stopping the beginning of the exploitation of copper and gold reserves in the mountains in southern Ecuador’s Azuay Province. For two months they occupied the area, despite the growing tension between them and the miners. It was a situation that could explode at any moment.Residents of Río Blanco set up tents at the entrance to the mining camp in an attempt to stop mining activity. Photo by Marlon PuertasDuring the cold night of October 8 and into October 9, this tension came to a head, with allegations from both sides of attacks. Members of the community say that for 24 hours, they were harassed by the mining company’s private guards, as well as the police, who were in the area with the goal of preventing clashes.“They threw stones at our roofs; it was a permanent harassment,” said one of the protesters in a video posted to social media, showing images of the dwellings that were affected.The mining company also claims its people were attacked with stones. The Secretary of the Interior, César Navas, posted photos on social media of two injured police officers. An operation to quell the violence began immediately, and two inhabitants of Río Blanco were arrested. The community members say that one of them is a minor.The Public Ministry of Ecuador is currently investigating the incident.All of this is occurring at a decisive moment for the Río Blanco mining project. A source of controversy for a decade due to its location in the páramos – restricted, alpine ecosystems that exist above the tree-line but below the permanent snowline – critics worry about the project’s potential effects on the water sources that supply rivers in the region. This controversy has grown in the past year, with the extraction of gold and silver reserves set to begin by the end of 2017. Divided opinionsSome adjacent communities support the project. “If you go towards Río Blanco, be careful. Those people are violent,” said a man who worked on the construction of a house in the middle of the páramos in the Cochapamba community, 3,200 meters above sea level. He interrupted his work to tell Mongabay Latam that “they are the people who don’t let us work. They make problems for mining. They’re hurting us.” In August, there was an alleged episode of violence around the mining camp, for which the Public Ministry received a complaint from the mining company’s representatives. After that, a woman from the community was injured near the mining camp.For the most part, mining activity is supported by residents of the community of Cochapamba but rejected in Río Blanco. Photo by Marlon PuertasThe journey to the Río Blanco community —which belongs to the parish of Molleturo in the Cuenca administrative region — is reminiscent of times when mules were the only mode of transportation. There’s a narrow dirt road, which sits at the foot of a mountain on one side with a steep cliff on the other. The road is sprinkled with stones, natural obstacles which, combined with the fog, slow down the journey. On a detour that links the port city of Guayaquil to Cuenca, the journey is around 12 kilometers (7.5 miles).On the way to Río Blanco, messages criticising the mining project are written on rocks in the mountains. Photo by Marlon PuertasCochapamba is both in the middle of this route and in the middle of the controversy. Here, community members largely support the Chinese-owned mining company. They have a striking difference in opinion with the community members of Río Blanco, who mostly oppose the company. During discussions between the mining company and area residents, a group of people from Río Blanco told Mongabay Latam that they received job offers, offers for public works, and offers for basic public services. The community members say that these offers never materialized, and they now demand that the company leave the area. According to Río Blanco resident Rubén Durazno, “they offered us health centers, services. Even the doctors didn’t show up.” Magdalena Fajardo adds that “they even painted the sky to convince us. Time passed, and nothing.”The páramos of Río Blanco is more than 3,000 meters above sea level. Photo by Marlon PuertaAt least a dozen rural community members expressed their concerns to Mongabay Latam during a visit to the area. Among them was Rubén Cortés, who explained that they fundamentally depend on their crops in the area.“We sow, we eat it ourselves, and we can’t sell it because it’s difficult to transport,” Cortés said. “The water comes from the mountain, and right now it’s drying out. Seventy percent is already dry, the roads already opened up, we closed our eyes to the water, and then the animals drank the water from the natural springs; before, there was a single pocket of water, about four years ago, now it’s still there but it’s still only a little. Eight months ago, the situation became more intense. The mine entrance is already open; the tunnel is already made.”Cortés said that for a time, Río Blanco community members worked for the mining project. “Now we don’t want anything,” he said. “The community already woke up, and the resistance will continue because they lied to us. They said there wouldn’t be contamination and there is, and now we’ve realized it. We went to other mines to see how they are, and there isn’t any mine that isn’t harmful.”The Río Blanco community is about 3,555 meters above sea level and lacks some basic services. The water consumed there comes from natural sources. Photo by Marlon PuertasSeveral rural community members, including Tomás Guamán, say that mining has divided the people in the area.“I have seen so many injustices, many conflicts between families. Instead of socializing, they come to make everybody fight,” Guamán said.Juan Criollo said they will continue with their cause: “Mining isn’t convenient. Where are future generations going to live? Because of this, we ask for support. Not all is well. They offer work, money, gold; but we want our freedom, our nature.”The community members claim that the fighting isn’t just between them, but also includes other Ecuadorians, especially those who live on the coast and receive water from the páramos. “We’re fighting for everyone,” said local resident Mónica Durango.The Vice Governor of Azuay, Cecilia Alvarado, claimed that what is occurring in Río Blanco isn’t an isolated incident, but rather an international strategy that mining companies use wherever they operate. “The companies harass the villages, and then they end up saying that the community is the criminal,” Alvarado said during the Public Hearing of the Páramos, a meeting promoted by the organization Ecological Action. The meeting was held on October 12 in Cuenca, and included representatives from communities, civil organizations, and authorities to try to solve the problems in Azuay Province.While the central government granted the concessions, local and regional governments like the municipality of Cuenca and the province of Azuay have issued resolutions against the mining. This was because they said that mining in the páramos would imply the contamination of the water sources that supply water to the nearby cities. The province of Azuay banned metalic mining in the páramos in October 2016, and the municipality of Cuenca did the same in January 2017 during a political campaign. For Rafael Correa’s administration — which lasted until May 24 — and for that of current president Lenin Moreno, these bans don’t come with any legal obligation.“[The mayor of Cuenca, Marcelo Cabrera] knows that he doesn’t have constitutional abilities and that mining is already prohibited near water sources,” Correa said shortly after the municipal resolution.A history of exploitationMining in Río Blanco is not a new problem. In 1998, the International Minerals Corporation (IMC) began feasibility studies that were concluded in 2006 and later updated in 2009. According government figures from August 2016, the project would generate about $200 million for the State.Exploration and mining studies in Río Blanco began in 1998. Exploitation has not yet begun, but critics of the project worry it will soon. Photo by Marlon Puertas In December 2012, IMC announced its exit from Ecuador and the sale of its Río Blanco project due to unfavorable conditions for project development, according to Ecuadorian newspaper El Comercio.The multinational company’s complaint was amplified with what it described as the state’s excessive expectation of gross profits, as well as the unhappiness of the area’s inhabitants due to governmental absence and the lack of basic services.A new company stepped up: Junefield, established in Ecuador as Ecuagoldmining. But the new investors found themselves in the same situation as their predecessors, with opposition from local residents who disagreed with the mining projects. They spoke of how the streams from which they got water began to dry up, and their pastures disappeared.That same year, two technicians from the French Public Institute for Water and Earth Studies (BRGM), hired by the municipality of Cuenca, completed a six-day inspection of the páramos and the areas earmarked for mining concessions. The report concluded that “the presence of groundwater wasn’t clearly identified” in the conceded areas. It recommended more thorough studies be conducted to determine the possible environmental impact of the mining. The government pointed to these ambiguous results to sustain its position that there are no natural water sources that could be affected, but area residents and ecological organizations used the report to demand more detailed studies.Natural streams and rivers are abundant on the way to the mining concessions. Communities depend on these water sources and fear they will be affected by mining activity. However, the State contends they will not be affected. Photo by Marlon PuertasIn June 2016, American mining engineer James Kuipers conducted a study in the area of the páramos at the request of MiningWatch Canada and the Environmental Defender Law Center, as well as social and community organizations in Azuay Province. Kuipers concluded that there is a risk of acid drainage and the leaching of heavy metals from the mine. According to Kuipers’ assessment, mining could result in arsenic contamination, degradation of water quality and abundance and habitat destruction.“The proposed Río Blanco project is a relatively small underground mining project with a highly sensitive economy and a short mine life,” Kuipers wrote in his assessment. “The economic and environmental information provided is not up-to-date. The impacts, particularly in relation to the acid rock drainage, arsenic discharge from the mining, and the characteristics of the mine after recuperation, have been underestimated and have not been identified or treated adequately.“We recommend that this project be submitted to additional economic and environmental analyses, and if it’s appropriate, someone should establish an adequate financial guarantee for the closure of these less-than-ideal conditions.”Mining in the páramosThe páramos are geological structures that have been conditioned for millions of years to become a place of storage for water released during the dry season. Klever Calle, a member of the Yasunidos Guapondeligm environmental group, explained that this is why it’s important to conserve them. Calle also discussed the páramos’ ability to capture carbon, and emphatically said their destruction will contribute to global warming. The ecosystem is also host to high biodiversity and home to endemic species found nowhere else in the world, according to Calle.The Río Blanco mining consession is inside Molleturo Mollepungo Protective Forest, which itself is inside the buffer zone of Cajas National Park – one of the last remaining large tracts of undisturbed forest in the western Andes mountain range.“Río Blanco is a bridgehead for the mining industry in our páramos,” said Calle, and in the last few months new mining concessions have been granted in the area.On August 11, 2016, Ecuador Vice President Jorge Glas —who is currently in pre-trial detention in Quito — began the construction phase of the mine in Río Blanco.“Today is a historic day because we’re beginning the first medium-scale mining project,” he said, claiming that there would be no effect on water sources in the area. “There have been 400 perforations with high-level techniques, with international laboratories specializing in water resource control. There are no aquifers; that is the truth,” he said. It was expected at the time that construction of the mine would be completed within a year.The residents of Río Blanco show their displeasure with the mining project. Photo by Marlon PuertasIt was estimated that the mine would be in full production by October 2017. But conflict with the community has impeded mine construction and operations, according to Junefield camp manager Iván Castro. He insists the violence is coming from the community.“We want to work and generate resources also for the State,” Castro said. “This is a company that has foreign capitals, but a significant percentage belongs to the State also.” Specifically, he put domestic ownership of the company at 49 percent. Also, Castro refutes the fears of the Río Blanco inhabitants about mining creating possible shortage of water. “The reality is that mining isn’t affecting anybody; they have their water, and we have our water. If we even have trout, we’re conserving the environment; we’re not hurting anyone. The people are arguing about something that isn’t going to happen,” said Castro, who added that the company has its rights and permissions settled.President Lenin Moreno’s administration hasn’t changed the mining exploitation plans it inherited from Rafael Correa. In fact, the Minister of Mining, Javier Córdova, holds the same position in the administration as he did during the previous presidency. Córdova was recently in Cuenca to turn in 84 work contracts to community members in the area. He said that as soon as the mine is constructed, production will begin. This is set to take place during the first quarter of 2018.The community of Río Blanco is composed of 80 families that depend on subsistence agriculture. Photo by Marlon PuertasMongabay Latam requested interviews with Córdova and the Ministry of the Environment but had received no responses by press time.This story was reported by Mongabay Latam and was initially published in Spanish on October 24, 2017.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Do protected areas work in the tropics?

first_imgTo find out if terrestrial protected areas are effective in achieving their environmental and socioeconomic goals, we read 56 scientific studies. (See the interactive infographic below.)Overall, protected areas do appear to reduce forest cover loss. But other ecological outcomes of protected areas, like biodiversity or illegal hunting, remain extremely understudied.The evidence on socioeconomic impacts is very thin. What limited rigorous research exists shows that protected areas do not exacerbate poverty generally, but anecdotal studies suggest that protected areas could be making other aspects of people’s well-being worse off.This is part of a special Mongabay series on “Conservation Effectiveness”. In 1986, Patricia Wright, then a budding primatologist, spent weeks combing the rainforests of eastern Madagascar in search of the greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus), a five-pound bamboo-eating primate that was feared extinct. It was only once she stopped over at a hotel in a small village for a night that her luck changed.Behind the hotel was a river, and across the river was a majestic rainforest where Wright spotted not only the greater bamboo lemur, but another species of bamboo lemur that was unknown to Western science.The discoveries were exciting. But droves of loggers were moving into the rainforest with axes to cut down the grand old trees and ship the wood to Europe — legally, it appeared.Worried that her beloved lemur-filled forest would soon be gone, Wright approached the director of what is now the Ministry of Environment, Ecology and Forests and pleaded her case. “The director told me that when he gave the timber concessions he didn’t know there was a new species to science and a rediscovered species in the forest,” Wright, now at Stony Brook University in New York, U.S., told Mongabay. “But now I was there to tell him that this forest is very special and should be protected.”To her surprise, the director suggested turning the forest into a national park, but only if Wright arranged the funds for it and did most of the legwork herself. Over the next five years, Wright raised more than $5 million and carved out the boundary of what would soon become Ranomafana National Park in consultation with people who lived around the forest. Finally, on May 31, 1991, the park was officially inaugurated with elders from 57 nearby villages attending the ceremony.Wright had gone in search of a lemur, but she had helped create a protected area. Twenty-five years later, Ranomafana National Park looks like an island of dense green being choked by waves of deforestation from all sides. “I know for sure that the rainforest wouldn’t exist today had it not been for the national park,” Wright said. “The north of the park, for instance, was all forest when we started. It’s all gone now.”National parks like Ranomafana and other protected areas have long been considered the one-stop solution to conserving terrestrial biodiversity and forests. They are seen as conservation success stories. But what happens after you create a protected area? Does establishing a protected area on paper really “protect” a forest? Do a park’s plants and animals thrive because of their forest home’s new legal status? And what happens to the people living in and around the park? We tried to find out by reviewing some of the scientific literature that looks at the effects of this popular conservation strategy.last_img read more

Reef bleaching five times more frequent now than in the 1980s, study finds

first_imgSevere coral bleaching is now happening about every six years, whereas in the 1980s, it took place every 25 to 30 years.Severe bleaching can kill the reef’s constituent corals.It takes at least a decade for a reef to recover from bleaching.Unless humans act to halt the rise of global temperatures, scientists predict that we’re headed for a time when bleaching might be an annual occurrence. Coral bleaching has accelerated to a clip at which established reefs can no longer keep up, reports a team of scientists Thursday in the journal Science.Severe bleaching can blot out the color of huge sections of reefs and lead to the death of the constituent corals, destabilizing entire ecosystems. It’s a phenomenon that’s now happening to tropical reefs five times more frequently than it did just a few decades ago, said Terry Hughes, an ecologist at James Cook University in Australia and the study’s lead author, in a statement. Previously, once every two to three decades was typical, and usually only at local scales; now, it’s occurring every six years.“Before the 1980s, mass bleaching of corals was unheard of, even during strong El Niño conditions,” Hughes added, “but now repeated bouts of regional-scale bleaching and mass mortality of corals has become the new normal around the world as temperatures continue to rise.”A little goby perches on bleached coral at the height of the 2016 bleaching event, Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef. Photo and caption by Greg Torda.Rising air temperatures, due in large part to the greenhouse gases emitted by human activity, have led to warmer oceans. Now, Hughes and his colleagues have shown that the dangers of bleaching have escalated over that relatively short amount of time by pulling together temperature data and recorded bleaching from across the tropics.“The climate has warmed rapidly in the past 50 years, first making El Niños dangerous for corals, and now we’re seeing the emergence of bleaching in every hot summer,” said coauthor C. Mark Eakin, an oceanographer at the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, in the statement.Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at the University of Western Australia conduct aerial bleaching surveys during the height of the 2016 El Niño event above Tallon/Jalan Island in Australia. Photo and caption by ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies/Steeve Comeau.In fact, temperatures at the sea surface during the cooler La Niña part of what’s known as the El Niño-Southern Oscillation cycle are on average hotter now than they were during the warmer El Niño part in the 1980s, the authors write.“When bleaching is severe and prolonged, many of the corals die,” said ecologist Andrew Baird of James Cook University in the statement. “It takes at least a decade to replace even the fastest-growing species.”It’s taking a devastating toll on reefs around the tropics, including Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.  Sections of the reef often referred to as “the world’s largest living organism” have been bleached on four occasions in just the past 20 years. And 2016 and 2017 marked the first-ever consecutive annual bleaching events on the Great Barrier Reef.A turtle swimming over a reef destroyed by the 2016 bleaching event. Photo and caption by ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies/Kristen Brown.“We hope our stark results will help spur on the stronger action needed to reduce greenhouse gases in Australia, the United States and elsewhere,” Hughes said.As things stand now, the authors predict that we’re headed for a time when bleaching might happen every year.“The climate has warmed rapidly in the past 50 years, first making El Niños dangerous for corals, and now we’re seeing the emergence of bleaching in every hot summer,” Eakin said. “Reefs have entered a distinctive human-dominated era — the Anthropocene.”CITATIONSHughes, T., Anderson, K., Connolly, S., Heron, S., Kerry, J., Lough, J., … & Claar, D. (2017). Spatial and temporal patterns of mass bleaching of corals in the Anthropocene. Science.Banner image of a turtle by ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/Kristen Brown.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Climate Change And Coral Reefs, Climate Science, Conservation, Coral Bleaching, Coral Reefs, Environment, Fish, Global Warming, Great Barrier Reef, Impact Of Climate Change, Marine Biodiversity, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Oceans, Research, Tropics, Wildlife Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Tropical forest fragmentation nearing ‘critical point,’ study finds

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Citation:Taubert, F., Fischer, R., Groeneveld, J., Lehmann, S., Müller, M. S., Rödig, E., … & Huth, A. (2018). Global patterns of tropical forest fragmentation. Nature.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Agriculture, Big Cats, Environment, Farming, Forest Fragmentation, Forest Loss, Forests, Fragmentation, Habitat Loss, Industrial Agriculture, Jaguars, Logging, Plantations, Predators, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Tigers, Top Predators, Trees, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis In addition to having severe repercussions for animals like jaguars and tigers that require vast tracts of connected habitat, forest fragmentation has a big carbon footprint.A new physics-based study finds fragmentation of tropical forests may be reaching a threshold past which fragmentation will shoot up sharply. At this threshold, even a relatively small amount of deforestation could lead to dramatic fragmentation – and significant habitat loss and greenhouse gas emissions.The team calculated that at current deforestation rates, the number of fragments will increase 33-fold in Central and South America by 2050, and their average size will drop from 17 hectares to 0.25 hectares. Deforestation in the tropics is caused by many different human activities that vary in intensity depending on location. In South America, industrial agriculture is the big driver of deforestation while smallholder farming is pockmarking Congo rainforest and logging for high-value timber species is having devastating effects on the forests of mainland Southeast Asia.Yet, despite the diversity of these activities, a new study published this week in Nature shows they have had a surprisingly similar overall impact on the world’s tropical forests – an impact that appears to be reaching a “critical point” past which the consequences may be catastrophic.The issue here is fragmentation. As humans move in and cut down trees, remaining forest is fragmented into smaller and smaller chunks that are increasingly farther away from each other. In addition to having severe repercussions for animals like jaguars and tigers that require vast tracts of connected habitat, forest fragmentation has a big carbon footprint.In order to find enough food, tigers need huge areas of habitat. Malayan tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) like the one pictured are critically endangered due primarily to forest fragmentation.Research published in 2017 revealed that the world’s tropical forests are currently cut up into around 50 million fragments, and their edges add up to about 50 million kilometers – which put together would make it about a third of the way from Earth to the sun. The study found trees at these fragment edges are much more likely to die than those in the middle of forests, potentially adding 31 percent more greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere.But what is the overall impact of these fragments, and what will they look like in the future? To find out, researchers at Germany’s Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) used physics to mathematically describe the fragmentation of tropical forests on a global scale. The team identified fragments via high-resolution satellite data that detects gaps in tree canopies and found fragmentation patterns in the world’s thee main rainforest regions – Africa, Southeast Asia and South/Central America – fit physic’s “percolation theory.”“[Percolation theory] states that in a certain phase of deforestation the forest landscape exhibits fractal, self-similar structures, i.e. structures that can be found again and again on different levels,” said biophysicist Andreas Huth, a coauthor of the study.The team discovered that forest fragments had similar sizes in all three regions, despite being caused by different activities. In Central and South America, they found 11.2 percent of forest fragments are smaller than 10,000 hectares; in Africa it was 9.9 percent, and 9.2 percent in Southeast Asia.“This is surprising because land use noticeably differs from continent to continent,” said Dr. Franziska Taubert, mathematician and lead author of the studyThe team’s results suggest that forest fragmentation is close to what they call a “critical point of percolation” in all three major rainforest regions. In physics, a critical point of percolation is also called a phase transition and happens when something is at the threshold of turning from one form into another – like when liquid water boils and turns into vapor.For forests, the critical point of percolation is the point at which the rate of fragmentation will shoot up dramatically. And the researchers found that the current number and size of fragments suggest that rainforests in all three regions are close to this critical point. They write that near this point, even “small additional amounts of forest loss in the near future would lead to a strong increase in the number of forest fragments.”The team calculated that at current deforestation rates, the number of fragments will increase 33-fold in Central and South America by 2050, and their average size will drop from 17 hectares to 0.25 hectares.The researchers say that in order to turn things around, fragmentation needs to slow way down and more areas need to be reforested than deforested – a tall order since data indicate forest loss continues to rise globally. However the authors offer a bit of hope, adding that “reforestation and protecting large forest areas nevertheless have potential to mitigate the consequences of fragmentation.”last_img read more

Public access to Indonesian plantation data still mired in bureaucracy

first_imgdata, Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Freedom of Information, Indonesia, Law, Mapping, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforests Indonesia’s agrarian ministry continues to hold out on releasing oil palm plantation data to the public, a year after the Supreme Court ordered it to comply with a freedom-of-information ruling.The ministry argues it is obliged to generate revenue from the release of such data, and that the lack of a payment mechanism prevents it from complying.It also initially dodged a request for similar data filed by the national mapping agency, citing the same reason, but complied after the anti-corruption agency intervened. JAKARTA — The Indonesian government has still not made publicly available its detailed maps and related documents on plantation companies operating in the country, a year after the nation’s highest court ordered it to do so in the interests of transparency.Linda Rosalina, a campaigner with the NGO Forest Watch Indonesia (FWI), which has been pushing the Ministry of Agrarian and Spatial Planning for the past three years to release the data, said there had been no progress in the year since the Supreme Court upheld a freedom-of-information order on the matter.“We’ve sent letters to the ministry, which they’ve replied to by saying the matter is being discussed internally,” Linda said. “We’ve sent letters asking for a meeting with the minister, Sofyan Djalil, and there’s been no response at all.”The battle began in 2015, when FWI filed a request with the ministry for data on right-to-cultivate permits for plantation and farming businesses, known as HGU permits.Each HGU permit includes details such as land boundaries, coordinates and the area of the concession, as well as the leaseholder’s name. The HGU documents are vital because withholding them enables land-grabbing, with companies often laying claim to community lands without showing their concession maps.FWI has reported an increasing number of land conflicts in plantation areas, from just 38 cases in 2013 to 723 in 2017.While maps for plantations are already published on the agrarian ministry’s website, those maps are not detailed enough to see the most recent legal status of those concessions.“The maps don’t say who the holders of the permits are and what kind of commodities” are being grown, Linda said.The ministry rejected FWI’s initial request, prompting the NGO in 2016 to bring its case to the Central Information Commission, or KIP, which processes freedom-of-information requests to the government. The KIP duly found in favor of FWI and ordered the ministry to release the requested documents.The ministry, however, appealed the order, arguing that releasing the names of leaseholders constituted a violation of the firms’ privacy. But the appeals fell flat as a series of courts, all the way up to the Supreme Court, sided with FWI.With the ministry refusing to cooperate, FWI has appealed to the national ombudsman, who is himself a former KIP commissioner. The NGO is also staging protests outside the minister’s office in an effort to force the ministry to release the data.“We filed a report with the ombudsman in August last year,” Linda said. “But to date the ombudsman still hasn’t given its recommendation. We don’t want to just sit still. That’s why we decided to launch a petition on petition on change.org.”The petition, begun two months ago, has now amassed more than 50,000 signatures. FWI has also launched a social media campaign with the hashtag #BukaInformasiHGU, or “release the HGU information.”An oil palm plantation in Malaysian Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Data paywallFor its part, the agrarian ministry insists there needs to be a mechanism in place to regulate how the public can access the data, which includes a paywall.Sofyan, the minister, said late last year that access to each piece of data should be priced at 50,000 rupiah ($3.50), per an existing regulation on state revenue. He said this kind of paywall for data was common practice in developed countries.The ministry also cited the lack of a payment mechanism for its initial refusal to provide HGU data to the National Geospatial Agency, or BIG, the Indonesian mapping authority.The BIG had sought the information to establish a single database for all government maps under its ambitious one-map policy. That project is expected to play a key role in resolving existing issues related to land ownership conflicts in the country. The government aims to launch the database in August, to coincide with the country’s independence anniversary.When the BIG eventually obtained the data it needed from the agrarian ministry, it was through the intervention of the national anti-corruption agency, the KPK.“The BIG came to the ministry, [but] the data wasn’t shared,” KPK commissioner Laode Muhammad Syarif said at a conference late last year. “Finally the BIG asked the KPK, and we asked [the ministry] to give [the documents] to the BIG.”Sofyan later said it was “not a problem” for the BIG to have access to the data, but that for the public there still needed to be a payment mechanism.Nurwadjedi, a deputy at the BIG in charge of the one-map policy, confirmed that some of the ministries that had submitted data to the BIG had revenue obligations with regard to the public release of the data. He said the office of the coordinating minister for the economy was drafting a regulation on a payment mechanism for public access to the maps in the one-map initiative.FWI’s Linda said the NGO had no objection paying for the HGU documents if the fee was reasonable. But she questioned whether the public should be charged for data that the freedom-of-information commission had already ruled constituted public documents.Suyus Windayana, the head of land data and information systems at the agrarian ministry, said he and other ministry officials had met with the ombudsman recently to discuss the release of the HGU data to FWI. However, he declined to disclose any details of the discussion.“We will be invited for another meeting [by the ombudsman] because we still have to talk about data security,” Suyus told Mongabay. Banner image: A patch of forest in Sumatra’s Riau province illegally cleared for an oil palm plantation. Photo by Rhett A Butler/Mongabay. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Hans Nicholas Jonglast_img read more

Indigenous environmental activist killed in Myanmar

first_imgActivism, Conservation, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Forests, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Rainforests, Tropical Forests Indigenous and environmental activist Saw O Moo was reportedly killed in Myanmar’s Karen State on April 5.According to the Karen Environmental and Social Action Network (KESAN), Saw O Moo, who worked with KESAN as a “local community partner,” was killed by soldiers with the Myanmar military while returning home from a community meeting to help organize humanitarian aid for villagers displaced by renewed hostilities between the military and the Karen National Liberation Army (KNLA), an armed ethnic group.Saw O Moo was one of the most active local community leaders pushing for the creation of the Salween Peace Park, a proposed 5,400-square-kilometer protected area to be led by indigenous peoples. “We will never forget his dedication in the ongoing struggle to build peace and protect ancestral lands,” KESAN said in a statement. Indigenous and environmental activist Saw O Moo was reportedly killed in Myanmar’s Karen State on April 5.According to the Karen Environmental and Social Action Network (KESAN), Saw O Moo, who worked with KESAN as a “local community partner,” had attended a community meeting that day to help organize humanitarian aid for villagers displaced by renewed hostilities between Myanmar’s military and the Karen National Liberation Army (KNLA), an armed ethnic group. Despite a nationwide ceasefire agreement signed in October 2015, recent hostilities between the two sides are said to have displaced as many as 2,300 local people.Saw O Moo was reportedly returning to his home in Ler Mu Plaw village by motorbike when he offered a ride to a soldier of the KNLA who was assigned to provide security for Karen civilians in the Ler Mu Plaw area. “At 5:20 PM, just as the two men were nearing Saw O Moo’s home in Ler Mu Plaw, they were ambushed and shot at by Burma Army soldiers at a place called Wah Klo Hta on the edge of the T’Ri Plaw plain,” KESAN reports.According to The Irrawaddy, the Myanmar military has denied any wrongdoing in the killing of Saw O Moo and claimed he was in fact a rebel fighter and that he had grenades on his person. The Irrawaddy reports that, in a statement released early Wednesday, the military says its troops “shot at two fleeing plainclothes men who were suspected of being involved in sabotage attacks and planting mines,” and that the troops had “captured one of the men dead.”The Irrawaddy also reports that Saw O Moo’s family has not been allowed to retrieve the community leader’s body, and that soldiers have fired upon anyone attempting to do so.A tribute to Saw O Moo posted by KESAN notes that:Since 2006, he worked as a local community partner with the Karen Environmental and Social Action Network. Saw O Moo will be remembered for his life-long passion and commitment to preserving Indigenous Karen cultural traditions, promoting customary land stewardship, and leading local community forest conservation activities as the Luthaw Paw Day Community Forest Coordinator.In his roles as Indigenous Wildlife Researcher and Kheshorter Community Forest Committee Advisor, Saw O Moo worked tirelessly to protect some of the last intact old-growth forest and endangered species habitat remaining in Burma. On August 9, 2017, Saw O Moo travelled to Yangon to help launch the Kheshorter Community Forest Documentary in commemoration of World Indigenous Peoples’ Day.Saw O Moo was also one of the most active local community leaders in the Salween Peace Park, a grassroots initiative to create a 5,400-sq. km Indigenous Karen reserve in Mutraw District. Saw O Moo was a member of the Salween Peace Park Committee and firmly believed in its vision for peace, biodiversity conservation, and cultural preservation.Despite the decades of conflict in the region, the Salween River Basin is “one of Asia-Pacific’s most biodiverse ecoregions,” home to species like the Asiatic black bear, sun bear, eastern hoolock gibbon, and Sunda pangolin, Demelza Stokes reported for Mongabay in 2016. Karen leaders like Saw O Moo have joined with local people and NGOs in calling for the creation of Salween Peace Park, envisioned as an indigenous-led protected area.“For us as Indigenous people, the Salween Peace Park represents our deepest desires and needs,” Saw O Moo said at a public consultation meeting in December 2017.“Saw O Moo’s death is yet another casualty of ongoing fighting that has broken out between the Burma Army and the Karen National Liberation Army,” KESAN said in a statement. “Since the fighting began on March 4th, over 2,300 villagers have been forced to flee their homes. Saw O Moo could have followed his wife and children into hiding in the forest, but he chose to remain at his home in Ler Mu Plaw to protect his people from the attacking Burma Army soldiers. For KESAN staff and all Indigenous Karen people of Mutraw, Saw O Moo’s death is an unspeakable tragedy. We will never forget his dedication in the ongoing struggle to build peace and protect ancestral lands.”Saw O Moo was killed by soldiers with the Myanmar military on April 5. Photo courtesy of KESAN.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Croatia reaches World Cup final for 1st time, beats England 2-1

first_imgMOST READ ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Cebuano KO artist looks to end fight early vs Mexican foe In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ LATEST STORIES Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Croatia’s Mario Mandzukic celebrates after scoring his side’s second goal during the semifinal match between Croatia and England at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, July 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)MOSCOW — When the final whistle blew and they knew they were going to their first World Cup final, the Croatians ran to their exuberant fans, jumping in their iconic red-and-white checkered jerseys.Mario Mandzukic scored the winning goal in the 109th minute and Croatia shocked England 2-1 Wednesday.ADVERTISEMENT Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWscenter_img Putin’s, Xi’s ruler-for-life moves pose challenges to West But football will not be coming home, and there will be no title to match the 1966 triumph at Wembley Stadium. Harry Kane & Co. will deal with the same disappointment that felled Shearer and Platt, Gazza and Wazza, Beckham and Gerrard.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Croatia, the first team in 28 years to come from behind to win a World Cup semifinal match, will play France for the title on Sunday in its biggest sporting moment since becoming an independent nation in 1991.France, which won its only title at home in 1998, will have an extra day of rest after beating Belgium 1-0 on Tuesday. Croatia will be coming off its third straight extra-time match.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’Croatia’s Ivan Strinic, right, challenges for the ball England’s Jesse Lingard, left, during the semifinal match between Croatia and England at the 2018 soccer World Cup in the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, July 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)Defender Sime Vrsaljko kept the score even by heading a shot off the goal line about 10 minutes before Mandzukic scored.Kevin Trippier curled in a free kick for England in the fifth minute. Ivan Perisic tied the score in the 68th minute. Report: Disney dropping the ‘Fox’ from movie studio names View comments Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Trump assembles a made-for-TV impeachment defense teamlast_img read more