Deo triumphs in inaugural Silica Sandport golf tourney

first_imgEMPHASISING that she is still in fine form, reigning two-time Guyana Open female champion, Joaan Deo, triumphed over a field of mainly male golfers to emerge winner of the inaugural Silica Sandport golf tournament.Deo, the only female competitor in the Medal Play format tournament which was contested Sunday last at the Lusignan Golf Club contends that she is ready for the upcoming Guyanan Open.She indicated that she had planned to perform well on Sunday, mentally preparing her for a great performance over the coming weekend’s Guyana Open tournament.Deo satisfied that she accomplished her plan and therefore by extension is serving all the female competitors notice that she intends to defend well!Lusignan Golf Club president, Hilbert Shields, was on hand to congratulate the winners and golfers on their good performance and to thank (Pandit) Haresh Tewari of Silica Sandport, for their timely sponsorship of this tournament, one week before the Guyana Open.Pandit Haresh, former Treasurer of the LGC, and himself an avid golfer who has won several trophies, was delighted to contribute to the preparation of golfers for this significant tournament of Saturday and Sunday November 4th and 5th coming.Golfers in the winners’ row were as follows. Best net places: 1st – Joaan Deo – Net 62, Handicap 21; 2nd – (Pdt) Rabindranath (Ravi) Persaud 66/21; and 3rd – Aleem Hussein – 68/17. Best Gross winner – Avinash Persaud, (defending Guyana Open male champion) parred the course for a second time within two weeks with score 72. Nearest to The Pin – approximately 3 feet -was Roger Rajkumar.last_img read more

WBB : Active 2-3 defense leads Orange to home win over Villanova

first_img Published on February 13, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Mark: mcooperj@syr.edu | @mark_cooperjr Comments Forty-three seconds passed, and Villanova still couldn’t find a quality shot. The Wildcats’ leading scorer, Laura Sweeney, missed a contested shot from the baseline, and even after a Villanova offensive rebound, it couldn’t get a decent look at the basket.Finally, as Sweeney drove in from the right side with the shot clock showing less than 10 seconds, Iasia Hemingway slapped the ball from her hands and grabbed the steal. Syracuse was without the ball for nearly a full minute but was never in danger of giving up points.‘That’s the beauty of tape,’ SU head coach Quentin Hillsman said. ‘You can go home and watch it and say, ‘What are we doing?’ … We figured out what we need to do to kind of get out on shooters when we play teams like that.’The Wildcats knocked down 13 3-pointers but attempted 36, and they never even got to the free-throw line Saturday. It all added up to a 70-49 blowout victory in Syracuse’s favor, snapping a three-game losing streak for the Orange. Syracuse clamped down defensively on Villanova, forcing it into bad shots against an active 2-3 zone. SU (17-7, 5-6 Big East) pulled away early in front of a Carrier Dome crowd of 1,713.The Orange forced Villanova (8-16, 0-11) into 21 turnovers and gave up just six points in the paint to an undersized Wildcats team. Syracuse scored 24 points in the paint offensively, led by 22 points and 9 rebounds from Kayla Alexander.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAgainst a Villanova team that lives and dies by the 3, SU’s defense hounded them to death.‘The good thing about playing Villanova is you know what they’re going to do,’ Hillsman said. ‘They’re going to swing the ball really quickly, and they’re going to shoot the ball from the perimeter, and you’re going to have to contest them.’Coming off a 16-point loss to DePaul in which the Blue Demons shot 13-of-23 from 3-point range, Syracuse got out on shooters and clogged the passing lanes. SU was ready for Villanova’s quick perimeter passing and skip passes.Hillsman said he watched tape of the DePaul loss, trying to find the solution to the problems in the perimeter defense. He figured it out, but he said he wouldn’t disclose his discovery.It was a solution that forced Villanova into missing eight of its first 10 3-pointers. By then, Syracuse was up 27-14.‘We knew that if they drove, they were going to pitch it,’ Hillsman said. ‘So we tried to stay home on the off-shooters.’Last season, Syracuse lost to a Villanova team that was 0-9 in the Big East. And though Villanova made 13 3s in last year’s win, it had a complementary inside game, as center Heather Scanlon scored 16 points.Saturday, there was no semblance of an interior presence. Scanlon’s only two shot attempts were missed 3-pointers, and she finished with four turnovers to two rebounds. Villanova head coach Harry Perretta said his forwards and centers were ‘kind of scared’ to face up against SU’s bigs.‘I sensed that they were trying to skip it out more, trying to look for an open player,’ Alexander said.Villanova’s only consistent scoring threat against the Orange zone was Lindsay Kimmel, who scored a career-high 21 points by knocking down seven 3s. But the rest of her teammates only made six.No matter how fast Villanova moved the ball around the perimeter, the SU defense was faster.Carmen Tyson-Thomas was in the middle of it all. She finished the game with three steals, which came mainly on the ‘skip’ passes Villanova’s offense relies on and one vicious block on a 3-pointer.‘We did know that they kept throwing skip after skip pass,’ Tyson-Thomas said. ‘So it was more of us playing up the floor and sticking to our players, and when we stuck with our players, we knew the skip pass was coming.’For an SU defense that looked like one of the best in the nation in nonconference play, this was a much-needed performance to improve morale. After holding seven opponents to 50 points or less in nonconference play, this is only the second team Syracuse has held to 50 or less in Big East play.And with five regular-season games to go and a losing record in Big East play, defensive performances like Saturday’s have to become normal again.‘Having five games left, every game is a must, it’s a must-win,’ Tyson-Thomas said. ‘So this game is no more important than the others, because we’ve got to win them all.’mcooperj@syr.educenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Publishing focused XLMedia sells Webpals Mobile asset

first_img XLMedia completes takeover of 101GreatGoals.com July 17, 2020 StumbleUpon Share The governance of London AIM-listed industry affiliate marketing publisher XLMedia Plc has confirmed the sale of Webpals Mobile, the firm’s app marketing subsidiary to Israel-based ad-tech and SaaS solutions provider PLYmedia.XLMedia governance has chosen not to disclose the terms of sale related to the transaction, detailing that company maintains its long-term strategy of focusing on ‘higher-margin publishing activities’.‘Webpals Mobile is focused on the promotion of apps which are not in the Group’s core verticals of gambling and personal finance’ – XLMedia details in its corporate update.Updating investors, XLMedia discloses that Webpals delivered ‘nil contribution’ to XLMedia’s 2018 EBITDA, with the net value of the asset consolidated on the firm’s balance sheets at ‘nil’ having accounted for its impairment charge within its 2018 accounts.Confirming the transaction, XLMedia Chief Executive Ory Weihs, commented: “The sale of Mobile marks an important step for our business as we focus our attention on our core publishing activities.  We remain committed to growing our Gambling & Personal Finance publishing networks, while continuing with complementary media activities, which we believe ideally places the Group to deliver sustainable and high margin growth.”This July, XLMedia governance confirmed the departure of Ory Weihs as corporate leader, to be replaced by Rakuten executive Stuart Simms as inbound CEO, starting 2 October. Related Articles XLMedia feels strain of Google deranking July 23, 2020 Share Submit Amit Ben Yehuda steps down from XLMedia August 13, 2020last_img read more

Clippers’ Doc Rivers defends Kawhi Leonard load management decisions

first_imgLOS ANGELES — Clippers coach Doc Rivers said he hadn’t paid attention to criticism Wednesday in reaction to the news that Kawhi Leonard would miss Wednesday’s showdown with Giannis Antetokounmpo and the Milwuakee Bucks – but he understands: Fans want to see stars play.“Listen, I am a fan of basketball as well, not just a coach, and so I feel for that, I understand that,” Rivers said before his team took the Staples Center court without Leonard, who had been ruled out – load management (knee) – and would be skipping the first game of a back-to-back for the second time this season, both times missing games broadcast nationally by ESPN.“We obviously have to do what’s right by our players,” Rivers continued. “We have to; it’s our duty. And for a fan, it’s just, it’s really a tough one and there’s no answer.”Under a conservative regimen last season with the Toronto Raptors, Leonard played 60 of 82 regular-season games. But he averaged 39.1 minutes in 24 playoff games and led Toronto to its first NBA title – defeating Milwaukee in the Eastern Conference finals along the way. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error After this season began, Rivers and Leonard suggested that because the superstar wing is healthier than he was a season ago, he would miss fewer games due to load management. But Wednesday’s absence was his second in eight games so far.“He feels great, but he feels great because of what we’ve been doing,” Rivers said. “He played a lot of minutes in the playoffs last year, so it’s not a health thing, really, (but) it is in some ways – we want him to just keep feeling better … it’s an 82-game schedule and guys are gonna miss games due to injuries, you know? And then due to injury prevention.”Theoretically, Rivers said, there would be fewer load management scenarios if games were not scheduled on consecutive days. But even then, stars will miss games.“It’s tough because sometimes you know guys get nicked and they shouldn’t play,” Rivers said. “There’s no way around it, there really isn’t. I’m not smart enough to have a solution to it. I’m just not.“We haven’t had one minute of practice yet with that full team on the floor, not one minute,” Rivers continued. “Clearly it’s not the way you would plan it. But it’s the way it is and that’s, like, real life to me. I tell my guys that all the time, ‘Deal with it, it’s life, let’s figure it out.’” Clippers vs. Mavericks Game 5 playoff updates from NBA beat reporters Kristaps Porzingis ruled out as Clippers, Mavericks set for Game 5; Follow for game updates “Organizations and teams have to figure out a way to manage a season, manage great players, manage minutes and bodies,” said Budenholzer, last season’s NBA Coach of the Year. “And Giannis is similar. We’re very conscientious of how we can keep them healthy and keep him playing well and being proactive and being aggressive. It’s not just the Clippers. A lot of teams are considering and doing things to make sure their whole roster is healthy.”GEORGE BACK ‘VERY, VERY’ SOONThe Clippers could be at full strength – with the services of All-Star wing Paul George for the first time – soon, Rivers said.“He’s very eager,” said Rivers, who said George, who is recovering from offseason shoulder surgeries, could possibly participate full bore in the Clippers’ next full practice, likely Saturday.“He tried to slip in the last couple of practices, he tried to just like sneak in one possession – unsuccessfully. But it’s good. You can see he’s worked all this time, he wants to play. He’s eager, he’s close, and I think all of us are looking forward to it.”center_img What the Clippers are saying the day after Luka Doncic’s game-winner tied series, 2-2 For Lakers’ LeBron James, Jacob Blake’s shooting is bigger issue than a big Game 4 victory Clippers hope they can play to their capabilities, quell Mavericks’ momentum Milwaukee coach Mike Budenholzer said he empathized with what the Clippers are dealing with. He and his staff face a similar challenge in keeping Antetokounmpo – the reigning league MVP – healthy and at his best.Related Articleslast_img read more

WHS Daily Bulletin: Prom RSVPs are due April 8

first_imgSubmitted to Sumner Newscow — Today’s Wellington High School bulletin for Friday, April 17, 2015:Friday•Tennis at Maize South, 3 p.m.•Mr. Crusader PageantSaturday•ACT Test.Today’s lunch: Chicken and Dressing, Mashed Potatoes with Brown Gravy, Green Beans, Biscuits, Pineapple and MilkMonday’s Lunch: Chicken Patty, Mashed Potatoes with Gravy, Green Beans, Pineapple Chunks, Hot Roll and Milk.Today’s News•Prom RSVPs were due April 8th. If you plan to attend prom and never RSVP’ed, you will have no dinner. Turn in your RSVPS ASAP to Ms. Ford.•Prom entertainment applications are due to Ms. Ford by Tuesday, April 21st.•Seniors and Juniors, today is the day to sign up for Service Day afternoon activities.  There is a list of activities in the commons by the bulletin board.  You will sign up for the 5 you wish to do, however each session is capped at 20 students.  Every effort will be made to get you in the sessions you wish to attend, but some substitutions may have to be made.•Students, if you have not signed up for service day morning, please do so by today. A location will be chosen for you if you do not choose for yourself.•Leadership applications are due today.  There’s a box in the office to turn them in.  If you didn’t get an application and want one please see Mrs. Defore.•The Mr. Crusader Pageant is tonight at 7 p.m. Cost will be $3 for students and $5 for adults. Come cheer on your favorite senior boy to hold the title of Mr. Crusader.•Attention All Senior English Students: You are now able to sign up for portfolio interviews.  The sign up sheet is outside Ms. Ford’s classroom.  Please sign up for a time slot this week and mark it on your calendar.  This is a requirement for the class.•Yearbook orders and money are due to Ms. Ford by the end of the day on Thursday, April 23.•The Jostens man will be here to deliver class rings on Thursday, April 23rd @ 11:00. If you still have a balance due on your ring, don’t forget to bring your final payment on delivery day. If you forgot to order your class ring on the original order day, you can order your class ring on delivery day. If you already have  a class ring and it needs to be resized or repaired, bring it on delivery day and the Jostens man will take care of it for you.•Help the Library create the ultimate young adult reading list by scanning the QR Codes on the flyers around the school. Let the Library know what books you want to read!  You can also go to: http://goo.gl/forms/yElq1CUx2b•Give us a hand and donate a can. There will be a food drive this week- class against class. The winning class will be served Ice Cream on service day. The deadline to bring cans will be on Tuesday, April 21st. Freshman take your cans to room 412- Mrs. Carroll. Sophomores to Room 105- Mrs. Bristow. Juniors to room 110- Ms. Hollas and Seniors to Room 208- Defore.•Juniors and Seniors: A few Prom Announcements–You can sign up for the dodge ball and obstacle course for after prom in the office.-If you would be interested in performing for your classmates at prom, please pick up an entertainment application from Ms. Ford or stop by the office.-Tickets are now on sale by the student entrance before and after school. They are $30.00.– You can sign-up out of town dates in the office.-If you are planning on attending After Prom, you must read and sign a student pledge sheet. You may pick up the forms in the office.-Please see Ms. Ford if you have any questions or concerns.•Senior Parents: If you are interested in purchasing a senior ad in the yearbook, contact Ms. Ford at ktford@usd353.com.•Seniors: You can turn in pictures for the Graduation video until May 1. We will not accept any pictures after May 1 unless previous arrangements are made.last_img read more

Blueliners on a roll entering Ice Breaker Women’s Hockey Tournament

first_imgNelson easily advanced to the final with wins over Prince George 13-1, Calgary 4-0 and Kamloops 4-1.Deb Morris scored six goals, including a hat trick, to lead the Blueliner offence. Jessie Tovey, also had a hat-trick, and Frances Maika, each scored four times.Other scorers included Shannon Sargent, Loreli Dawson, and Branwen Hainsworth.Nelson opens the Ice Breaker Friday at 8:15 p.m. against the Kelowna Dragons.The Blueliners meet Spokane and Vernon Vixens Saturday.The top four teams advance to Sunday’s playoff round.The final is scheduled for 2:45 p.m.Other teams entered include Trail Chix with Sticks, Nelson Thorman Drillers, Whitefish Wailers and Fernie Hustlers.sports@thenelsondaily.com By The Nelson Daily SportsWatch out for the Nelson Blueliners.The Heritage City Women’s Hockey team made short works of the opposition last weekend in Vernon and now appears to be the favourites heading into this weekend’s Ice Breaker Tournament at the NDCC Arena.The Blueliners won the Vernon Checker’s tourney by dumping Calgary Phoenix 5-1 in the final.last_img read more

Salmo’s Rollick shines on home course to capture Junior Golf stop

first_imgPlaying on his home course Riley Rollick is not going to get beat by anyone . . . not even Brenan Moroney.The home-course golfer fired a 3-over-par 75 to edge the Birchbank Moroney and Aiden Browell of Champion Lakes by two shots to capture Salmo stop on the West Kootenay Zone One Junior Circuit Saturday at the Salmo Golf course.Rollick carded three birdies on the day as players most players struggled with the testy Salmo greens. The tour now shifts to the Home of Champions region as the players tackle Rossland’s Redstone Saturday and Birchbank Sunday.In other Junior Golf News:Tyler McKay finished in the middle of the pack at the prestigious CB Pacific Junior Golf Tournament on Vancouver Island.McKay, with rounds of 75,78, 76, finished 35th overall in a field of 72 players at the 7000-yard course Crown Island Course in Courtney.Kevin Kwon from Swaneset GC won the tournament with rounds of 66, 71, 66.last_img read more

Abilene Christian Claims Both Tennis Player of the Week Awards

first_imgAlongside brother Jonathan, Josh Sheehy helped edge out the Cardinals’ and Islanders’ top-line doubles pairs. Sheehy is now 6-0 across singles and doubles play against Southland Conference opponents. Honorable Mention: Francois Kellerman, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Memishishi and teammate Sarh Adams surrendered just three points across the duo’s doubles triumphs, topping Lamar’s No. 1 duo 6-1 and earning a 6-2 victory over their Islander counterparts. Men’s Tennis Player of the Week – Josh Sheehy, Abilene Christian – Senior – Arlington, TexasNow tied for the team lead with 15 wins, including 14 at the No. 1 position, Sheehy didn’t drop a single set in either of his four matches last week. He defeated Lamar’s Axel Vila Antuna 6-4, 6-3 and took down Texas A&M-Corpus Christi’s William Mottet 6-4, 7-5, marking Sheehy’s 60th career No. 1 singles victory. Honorable Mention: Carlotta Romito, McNeese; Rhea Verma, Northwestern State; Sahaja Yamalapalli, Sam Houston State. Continuing its homestand with two 11:44 a.m. CT matches, Abilene Christian (18-4, 4-0 SLC) can claim the regular-season conference title with a win over Incarnate Word on Friday and will turn around to host UTSA on Saturday. FRISCO, Texas – Abilene Christian’s Josh Sheehy and Nini Memishishi are the Southland Conference Men’s and Women’s Tennis Players of the Week, the league announced Tuesday. Southland Conference Players of the Week are presented by MidSouth Bank.center_img Needing two wins to wrap up the regular-season conference championship, the Wildcats (12-8, 8-0 SLC) will travel to Northwestern State, who’s also 8-0 in league play, for an 11 a.m. match on Friday before visiting third-place Central Arkansas at 11 a.m. Sunday. Women’s Tennis Player of the Week – Nini Memishishi, Abilene Christian – Sophomore – Tbilisi, GeorgiaAfter beating Lamar’s Jasmin Buchta in straight sets, Memishishi found herself in trouble after being blanked 6-0 in set one by Texas A&M-Corpus Christi’s Carolina Bulatovic. Memishishi went on to win the final two sets to claim her third-straight singles win. Memishishi’s four total victories led the Wildcats to a 6-1 win over Lamar and a 5-2 win over Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, both at home. Abilene Christian extended its team win streak to four matches and secured a berth to the 2019 Southland Conference Women’s Tennis Tournament. Southland weekly award winners are nominated and voted upon by each school’s sports information director. Voting for one’s own athlete is not permitted. To earn honorable mention, a student-athlete must appear on at least 25 percent of ballots. Sheehy won all four of his top-line matches in a pair of 5-2 home wins over Lamar and Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, helping the Wildcats clinch a spot in the 2019 Southland Conference Men’s Tennis Tournament. This marks Sheehy’s fourth weekly honor of the season and the eighth weekly honor for the program this spring.last_img read more

Q&A with Abdon Nababan, outgoing head of Indonesia’s indigenous peoples alliance

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago holds its congress once every five years. The next one will take place this week in Tanjung Gusta village on the island of Sumatra.The Southeast Asian country is one of the planet’s most ethnically diverse, with hundreds of different languages spoken within its borders.After 10 years at the organization’s helm, Abdon Nababan will yield his position to someone new. This week in Sumatra at a rare congress of the world’s largest indigenous peoples alliance, thousands of tribal representatives from every corner of Indonesia will gather to determine the future of their movement. A new national leadership will be chosen, and Abdon Nababan, one of the group’s most instrumental characters since its founding nearly two decades ago, will finally step away.The Batak man from near North Sumatra’s giant Lake Toba has amassed a substantial resume. Since his election as head of the Indigenous Peoples Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN) in 2007, Nababan and his team have won a court battle that freed all customary forests from state control, mapped an area of indigenous territory the size of South Carolina, and successfully prodded the government to recognize the rights of nine communities to the lands they call home. They have raised the cachet of indigenous peoples in a society long run by a military dictatorship that seemed to want nothing to do with them, save for exploiting their natural wealth. This week, Joko Widodo will become the first president to deliver a speech at an AMAN congress, an emblem of how far the organization has come under Nababan’s watch.Mongabay spoke with Nababan ahead of the congress about the strategies he has employed, the qualities needed to lead AMAN and more.Abdon Nababan speaks at the Global Landscapes Forum in Paris in December 2015. Photo by Pilar Valbuena for CIFOR/FlickrAN INTERVIEW WITH ABDON NABABANMongabay: What is AMAN’s ultimate goal? To secure for every one of Indonesia’s indigenous groups the legal right to use and own the forests they live in?Abdon Nababan: I always start with myself. I began in this work from the environmental side. So that’s my main goal. But I know that the easiest, cheapest, most logical way to do that is to support indigenous peoples. I was working hard as an environmental activist but getting no results. So I looked back to my community.After university, I joined Walhi [Indonesia’s largest environmental pressure group] and became coordinator for forest investigations. I saw that the best forest we have is not in the national parks; it is the forest that is protected by indigenous peoples. And this good forest provides everything to those who protect it.I was involved in campaigns to mobilize action against [PT Inti Indorayon Utama, a paper milling firm in North Sumatra]. Part of the area was my ancestral land. So this movement became very personal. This is not somebody else’s problem; this is my community’s problem, my brother and sister’s problem. I realized we had to bring culture to the core of the environmental movement. Mongabay: You played a lead role in organizing the first indigenous peoples congress, held in the late 1990s as Suharto’s military dictatorship collapsed. Was it a challenge to unite hundreds of communities under a single platform?Nababan: The most important principle of AMAN is to respect differences, to bridge the gap between majority and minority. In AMAN, big ethnic groups have the same rights as small ones.Our platform called for an end to the militarization of indigenous lands. For company licenses to be revoked. For no more domination by imported religions. To stop transmigration. We wanted to dissolve the religion ministry and the transmigration ministry. When we brought all that together, people felt like this is our problem.Some said we should make it more moderate. I said no — for the new organization, we need really strong positions. How we play with that, that’s strategy.Petrus Asuy, a Dayak Benuaq man from Muara Tae village on Borneo, stands in the ruins of a farmhouse he says was demolished by an oil palm plantation firm that grabbed his community’s ancestral land. Photo by Philip JacobsonMongabay: AMAN’s initial stance was totally adversarial. Fast forward to the 2012 congress, where government officials attended for the first time. This time around the president himself will deliver a speech. What happened to bring that about?Nababan: I’m good at nurturing relations with good people. During the SBY era, I identified people inside, like Pak Kuntoro [Mangkusubroto, head of a now-defunct presidential unit on development oversight]. We could talk frankly about this movement; I trusted him. It wasn’t because ideologically we were similar. He came from the extractive industry; he was the minister of mining. And he clearly believes in the free market. But he has a good heart. I started from there.If I know good people, I try not to put them on that black side. I can be really critical of government while maintaining good relations with people. To assess our enemy and ourselves is very important. That’s the quality for leader of AMAN.Nababan, left, sits next to forestry minister Siti Nurbaya at the 2015 Nusantara Festival, an annual cultural event, in Bali. Photo by Cory Rogers for MongabayMongabay: Is it easy to approach government officials? Are they open to talking about these issues?Nababan: Not in their office. But if you know their family — maybe he or she is an indigenous person, and then you can learn about his group, and bring him back to his identity. Two or three years later, he or she will be your friend. Government officials are educated to be the enemy of indigenous peoples, but in their daily life they are doing indigenous things. Split personality, you know? My role is to bring him to real life. ‘Every year you go home to your village; what are you doing in your village actually?’ It’s about self-identification. You have to make them understand, ‘This is about me. This is about my forest, this is about my land, this is about my water.’ That ability is destroyed by school. So it should be restored. Officials are some of the most educated people, so they’re a little farther away. The more education you get, it requires greater effort.If you’re not strategic, you will spend energy on small small things. We have very limited resources. No money. Even to have new activists to work with us we have to have training, it’s very expensive. That’s why the situation forced me to be strategic. Mongabay: How have the strategies employed by AMAN evolved over the years?Nababan: If you see Indonesia, it’s a very huge country, with very diverse cultures and ecosystems. So the vision is about local sovereignty, how peoples can regulate and govern their own lives. Of course, indigenous peoples will have a different vision for that.The first strategy is how to make this movement feasible. How to make indigenous peoples feasible. We bring something different, from our daily life. That’s the meaning of the movement. If you are not feasible, you are not subject to anything. To say that you exist. And people can see you. Through mobilizations, actions, campaigns, demonstrations, blockades.And of course to do that you have to ask a lot of people to have new awareness about their identity as indigenous peoples. So education is the second thing, to educate more and more people to join the club. And then the third is advocacy. How to change your environment. The outside. The state. The nation. The World Bank. The government. Everything. In the end, we want to run the country based on our knowledge, our values.Recently cut rainforest tree in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for MongabayMongabay: Some say the government should maybe think twice before letting indigenous communities own their lands and forests, because they might sell them on to investors. Conservation biologist Erik Meijaard wrote in 2014: “What will communities or individual people do when they can get legal title to what was previously state-owned land?….I would think many will immediately sell their land to whoever is the highest bidder: likely industrial-scale companies investing in oil palm, pulp and paper, rubber, and mining.” Your response?Nababan: I don’t need to respond, because from what I learn about him, he doesn’t understand the history of colonization of indigenous peoples, the history of destruction of indigenous peoples. If he only looks at the current situation, he’s right. It happens. Because he visited the frustrated peoples with no hope. Maybe there’s no more forest. So that’s why I didn’t really have to say something about it. Because we can — with AMAN, with this big organization — we can show more cases the better, the best practices than what he found on the ground.Mongabay: Do you hear this from the government?Nababan: Of course. But we say, how many hectares? I can show you that a million hectares are still good forest because it’s protected by indigenous peoples. Show me Erik’s findings, how many hectares? Because from our participatory mapping we can show, this forest is still the best forest we have. Because their indigenous system still works. So the problem right now with many indigenous peoples, they are indigenous peoples, but their indigenous systems already broke. So we say don’t victimize the victim. Let’s empower their system. It’s not their fault. They are the victim of government policy — the policy to always hand out concessions to companies.The problem is there is no recognition, so it becomes nebulous, and then the elites try to sell the land. You know how their land market works. Because there’s no clear legality. Just put in the decree [that gives an indigenous community title to its land] that they cannot sell it. That’s the basic value.Mongabay: What about development in general?Nababan: We have no problem with development. The important thing is who controls the development: indigenous values or the greedy capitalist from Washington? If the community controls the model of development, I think no problems. They can grow themselves with development. But now development eats them. Because development is controlled by someone. So it’s a matter of what development you mean.A Dani man in Indonesia’s Papua, one of the most linguistically diverse regions in the world. Photo by Rhett Butler for MongabayMongabay: What qualities should AMAN’s next secretary general possess?Nababan: I think for next leadership, they don’t need like me. AMAN has come a long way. In the past if you say indigenous peoples rights, you are labeled anti-development, or communist, or if you are in Papua you are separatist. Today you can talk about indigenous peoples wherever you want.The challenge for AMAN is how to prevent the military from taking power again. They are still there, ready to take over Jokowi’s government. Because this government is too transparent. Military and also the conglomerates don’t like that. So that’s why the quality for leadership for AMAN for the next is like that, how to keep the civil society and the political party stronger, to consolidate the democracy against these military radical things. Not really talk about indigenous peoples but how to protect this from militarization, radicalization. They must have the capacity to build political alliances.Mongabay: What’s next for you?Nababan: I don’t know. My focus is on strengthening the local structure. So I need more time to travel. I’m really concerned with Papua. My heart is there. Because there is a civilization gap. And we have to have something to bring there, to bridge the gap. If not, no future for Papua. The militarization is still there. Papua is an indigenous island. It’s really genocide happening. Article published by mongabayauthorcenter_img Activism, Conservation, Environment, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forestry, Forests, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Reserves, Indigenous Rights, Interviews, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Forests last_img read more

Norway vexed as Brazil sends mixed message on Amazon forest protection

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Logging, Amazon Mining, Amazon Soy, Cattle Ranching, China’s Demand For Resources, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Featured, Forests, Green, Illegal Logging, Illegal Mining, Illegal Timber Trade, Industrial Agriculture, Infrastructure, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Mining, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Logging, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, timber trade, Tropical Deforestation Last week, Brazil’s President Michel Temer fully vetoed MP 756, and partially vetoed MP 758, two provisional measures which he himself introduced and which Congress approved that would have cut conserved Amazon lands by 600,000 hectares (2,316 square miles).Almost simultaneously, Brazil’s environmental minister, José Sarney Filho, announced urgent plans for the administration to introduce a new bill to Congress to dismember the same conservation units described in the vetoed MP 756.Also last week, Norway gave a stern warning to Temer on his visit to Oslo, telling him that Brazil could lose millions of dollars from the Amazon Fund if Brazil’s deforestation rates continue rising.7,989 square kilometers of Brazilian rainforest were lost between August 2015 and 2016. A rise in annual Amazon deforestation to 8,500 square kilometers would reduce Norway’s funding to Brazil to zero. Brazil defended itself, claiming preliminary annual data shows a recent leveling off of its deforestation rate. A Press conference in March 2017 in Oslo between president Michel Temer and prime minister of Norway Erna Solberg. Last week, Solberg sternly warned Temer that Brazil must show a more serious commitment to preventing deforestation or lose millions in funding from Norway. Photo by Beto Barata/PR published on FlickrLast week saw a busy, but contradictory, stream of actions likely to impact Amazonian forests. Brazilian president Michel Temer — supposedly at the urging of supermodel and environmentalist Gisele Bündchen — killed measures to dismember a national forest and national park in Pará state. But the day before the veto, his administration quietly announced plans to send a new bill to Congress to dismember the very same conservation units (CUs).At the end of last week, Temer traveled to Norway and met with that country’s prime minister. Oslo, citing a 29 percent increase in deforestation in Brazil between August 2015 and August 2016, warned Temer that his nation stands on the verge of losing millions of dollars in financial aid that Norway annually pays to Brazil to help rein in Amazon deforestation.This week, China announced plans to supply Brazil with a $20 billion fund for infrastructure development, including railways, to move soy and other grains from Brazil’s interior to the coast. Past large scale transportation projects have resulted in significantly increased deforestation.Wildlife in Jamanxim National Forest, Pará. Attempts by the agribusiness lobby to dismember this national forest in the Amazon would open vast now fully protected areas to private land ownership, large scale farming and mining. Photo by Assor Fuchs/ICMBio CollectionPresidential vetoHours before leaving for Russia to meet with Vladimir Putin last Monday, 19 June, President Temer vetoed two provisional measures (MPs) 756/16 and 758/16, (one in full, the other in part) which he himself had initiated, and which had gone through changes in Congress and been approved by both chambers in May.MP 756 was vetoed in full. It would have dismembered the National Forest of Jamanxim, in Pará state, reducing the area of fully protected lands by 486,000 hectares (1,876 square miles), and converting those lands to an Area of Environmental Protection, which allows for private ownership as well as mining and agriculture. The measure would also have decreased the size of São Joaquim National Park, in Santa Catarina state, from 49,000 hectares (189 square miles) to 39,000 (150 square miles).MP 758 was partially rejected. Under the legislation, 101,000 hectares (389 square miles) of Jamanxim National Park would have become an APA, but this portion of the measure was vetoed. However, the Official Gazette of the Union published on June 20 noted a reduction of 862 hectares (3.3 square mile) from the national park, as this item was not vetoed by president Temer. The publication doesn’t mention the land’s future use, but the 862 hectares would likely allow for the construction of the Ferrogrão railroad, parallel to the BR-163 highway. The new railway would transport soy and other commodities to the coast.In a message to Enuncio Oliveira, the president of the Senate, Temer explained his veto of MP 756 as having the potential to “compromise and weaken environmental preservation in a sensitive region of the Amazon.”Jamanaxim National Forest, shown before and after its proposed dismemberment. The future of the national forest remains very uncertain, despite Temer’s veto because the administration immediately announced a new bill that would similarly reduce the fully protected area in the park. Map by Maurício Torres. Data source: Brazilian Institute of the Environment and Renewable Natural Resources(IBAMA)When is a veto not a veto?The veto news, however, was met with apprehension by environmentalists. In a video released a day before the presidential veto signing, Environment Minister José Sarney Filho announced, along with Senator for Pará, Flexa Ribeiro — an important member of the bancada ruralista agribusiness lobby — that the government would be sending an urgent request to Congress for a new bill nearly matching the content of MP 756 that would reduce the Jamanxin National Forest by 300,000 hectares (1,158 square miles).According to Sarney Filho, Temer’s veto was necessary apparently not because of environmentalists’ pleas, but because the MPs had been approved without public hearings, leading the Federal Public Ministry (MPF), independent federal litigators, to promise to file suit against the measures in court if they were signed into law.The environmental minister claimed the new bill will aim at ending “land conflict” in the region. The disputed portions of Jamanxim National Forest and National Park have long been occupied by land thieves, who have cleared and raised cattle illegally on the federal lands. MP 756 / 758 seemed to be targeted at legitimizing those illegal land uses and claims.“It is a situation difficult to understand. The government will send a bill to the Congress that will have the same effect as the measures vetoed by Temer,” said André Guimarães, executive director of the Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM). The new bill will be “worse” he told Mongabay, as it could be even harder to defend against; unlike an MP, the new measure cannot be easily challenged by the MPF independent federal litigators.Norway Climate and Environment Minister, Vidar Helgesen (left), and Brazilian Environmental Minister Sarney Filho in a meeting in Brasília in March 2017 to sign a letter of intent for financing sustainable rural activities. Brazil stands to lose millions of dollars from Norway’s Amazon Fund if it can’t curb its deforestation rate. Photo by José Cruz/Agência BrasilIn a statement, Greenpeace Brasil declared: “The veto seems to be only a political maneuver, since minister Sarney Filho anticipated that the government would send a bill with identical content. This means that the veto serves only to transfer from the president to the Congress the responsibility of unprotecting this significant portion of the Amazon rainforest…. The MPs 756 and 758 were disfigured in their passage through Congress. In the same way, it is also expected that this [new] bill will receive amendments to unprotect other CUs [conservation units]. The government maneuver brings back the initial threat, with the aim of recovering all the text that was vetoed.”Meanwhile, journalist Fabiano Maisonnave reported in the Folha de S.Paulo newspaper last week that Rodrigo Maia, president of Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies, and serving as president in Temer’s absence to Norway, was planning to propose a bill replacing MP 756 on Friday 23 June, while the president was still abroad, in order “to spare Temer.”Maia then denied the story in a letter published in the Readers’ section of Folha de S.Paulo. Journalist Maisonnave said that the information contained in his story was obtained from a high-ranking member of the government’s environmental ministry. The story’s accuracy was further reinforced by the fact that the government had stated that a replacement bill would be presented by the end of last week, despite Temer’s absence. No such printed bill has been forthcoming as of today.When contacted by Mongabay, the communications office at the Ministry of the Environment said that the bill replacing MP 756 had still not been drafted. ICMBio, the agency responsible for the protection of federal conservation units (CUs), said that it is conducting meetings to address the matter.On Saturday, Sarney Filho announced that the new bill will only be sent to Congress if it is endorsed by ICMBio. However, the agency had announced earlier its plan to follow the lead of the Minister of the Environment, doing whatever he announced in his video concerning the MPs’ veto. As such, it remains unclear as to who will be the first to move the bill forward.A blue and yellow macaw. If deforestation rates continue rising in the Amazon, significant biodiversity, including plants and animals still not described by science, will likely be lost. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayNorway losing patience with Brazil’s forest preservation effortAnother factor may have influenced Temer’s decision to publically veto the MPs that would have reduced protections on vast areas of already protected Amazon rainforest. On Friday, 16 June, Norway’s Climate and Environment Minister, Vidar Helgesen, sent a letter to Sarney Filho, expressing strong concern about Brazil’s increasing deforestation rates and reminding the environmental ministry of the rules of Norway’s Amazon Fund. (It was the government of Brazil that unilaterally set up the rules when the fund was established, said Helgensen’s letter.)“Reversing [the worrying upward deforestation] trend will… determine the future of our results-based partnership,” Helgesen wrote. Based “on current [deforestation] trends, the results-based contributions that can be received into the Amazon Fund… are already significantly reduced. Even a fairly modest further increase [in Brazilian deforestation] would take this number to zero.”“As you are aware, a set of policy measures that have caused strong public reactions in Brazil are making their way to Congress,” he added. “In parallel, budgets for key institutions that provide vital services for forest protection are being cut and their mandate to operate effectively is [being] put under pressure.” Brazil recently made drastic cuts to FUNAI, the agency that monitors indigenous preserves that protect significant amounts of forest, and to IBAMA, Brazil’s environmental protection agency.Straight to the point, Helgesen wrote:“[A]s long standing allies, please allow me to observe that many of the dichotomies of the current debates in Brazil, seen from the outside, appear to be false…. The alternative to these dichotomies is a more… sustainable vision of rural development in Brazil.”Norway is the largest funder of the Amazon Fund, having donated US $1 billion to Brazil since its creation in 2008 to decrease deforestation. The resources are managed by BNDES, Brazil’s gigantic national development bank.Norway’s contributions to the Amazon Fund are based on results in reducing deforestation. “When deforestation increases, the reward… must necessarily be reduced. If Brazil would like to receive contributions to the Amazon Fund at the previous level — some hundred million dollars annually — they will need to drastically reduce the present rate of deforestation,” said Lars Løvold, Director of the Rainforest Foundation Norway.7,989 square kilometers of Brazilian Amazon rainforest were destroyed between August 2015 and July 2016, an increase of 29 percent over the previous year. Under current benchmarks, a rise in annual Brazilian Amazon deforestation of 8,500 square kilometers, or more, would result in a zero annual Amazon Fund payment from Norway. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabaySarney Filho defended Brazil’s record, telling Helgesen that preliminary data suggests that the 29 percent increase in the deforestation rate seen between 2015 and 2016 may have leveled off since then. Data, he said, “indicate that we may have stopped the rising curve of deforestation recorded from August 2014 through July 2016. We hope that the new data will soon reveal a downward trend,” Reuters reported.In Oslo, Prime Minister Erna Solberg met with president Temer last Friday. After the meeting, at a news conference, she expressed deep concern about the increased deforestation in the Amazon, as well as about the Lava Jato corruption investigation in Brazil, which recently put President Temer in its sights. On Monday, 26 June, Brazil’s top prosecutor charged President Temer with taking multimillion dollar bribes, which will likely further destabilize his government.Last week, Solberg confirmed Oslo’s reduction in its contribution to the Amazon Fund for 2017, a cut of 50 percent, to about US $60 million. She cautioned that if Brazil does “not reach the targets, [the transfer of funds will] be reduced or there will be no payments [at all].” The environmental cooperation agreement between Norway and Brazil is valid until 2020, and might not be renewed if Brazil’s deforestation rates continue to rise.Data released by Brazil’s National Space Research Institute (INPE) last November showed that 7,989 square kilometers of Brazilian Amazon rainforest were destroyed between August 2015 and July 2016. Under current benchmarks, a rise in annual Brazilian Amazon deforestation of 8,500 square kilometers, or more, would result in a zero annual Amazon Fund payment from Norway.In other news this week, China announced a $20 billion fund available to Brazil for the construction of railroads and other infrastructure to benefit soy and corn agribusiness, and rapidly move commodities from the interior to ports. Past large scale transportation improvements to Amazon infrastructure have led to markedly increased deforestation. China is a major buyer of Brazilian grains.Brazil’s contradictory forest protection effortsBrazil has promised to significantly curb its deforestation rates under the Paris Climate Agreement, but its actions in recent months could potentially undermine that goal.President Temer has also yet to decide whether he will sign the revised Terra Legal legislation, MP 759, called the Conversion Law Project PLC 12/16, a measure designed to help peasant families obtain small plots of land. The new version introduces loopholes allowing wealthy landowners to use the program, threatening the environment. Analysts say the new law, if passed, will allow another 20 million hectares (77,200 square miles) of the Amazon biome and 40 million hectares (154,440 square miles) of the Cerrado, savanna biome, to be legally cleared. Temer must make a decision by 4 July.The government has also made no move to reverse massive cuts to its environmental and indigenous agencies. Legislation that would drastically simplify and streamline the environmental licensing process for major infrastructure and agribusiness projects, reducing rainforest protections, also apparently continues to move toward passage.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Sunset over the Amazon. Though Brazil may lose millions of dollars from Norway’s Amazon Fund if deforestation worsens, China just announced a $20 billion investment in Brazilian infrastructure, including major railways to transport soy and corn to the coast. Development on such a large scale could seriously threaten the Brazilian rainforest. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / Mongabay Article published by Glenn Scherercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more