Why You Should Come To The Local Energy Convergence Next Monday

first_imgFacebook5Tweet0Pin0By Ramsey ZimmermanOn Monday January 30th, two concepts converge:  “local” and “energy”.  If you want to save energy and save money at home, in your business, or in the way that you buy stuff, or if you just want to enjoy a good time with friends, food, drinks, fun, art and music, come out to the Olympia Center next Monday afternoon and evening for the Local Energy Convergence (www.localenergynow.org).Two local groups are celebrating their customers’ recent success and presenting opportunities for more progress in this new year:  Sustainable South Sound’s Buy Local Program; and Thurston Energy, a joint program of the Thurston Economic Development Council and the Thurston Climate Action Team.So what’s in it for you?Save Energy and Save MoneyThurston Energy empowers people to use energy efficiency and renewable energy to save energy and save money in their homes and in their businesses.  The Buy Local Savings book has over $3,500 worth of coupons to local stores so that you can save money while supporting our local economy.  Dive in to these two concepts, and live a more sustainable life.Learn How Others Have Done ItMore than 600 homeowners and 100 businesses have worked with Thurston Energy, and around 4,000 people have gotten Buy Local Savings Books.  In the afternoon, the “Local Energy for Local Business” session will feature four local businesses that have taken successful steps to reduce their energy usage, save money on operating costs, use renewable energy, and offer their customers local discounts to build their businesses.  Hear and learn how they did it, and move your business along on the pathway to savings.See Ideas Drawn into Living PicturesThroughout the day, Claire Bronson, a graphic artist, will be drawing pictures and diagrams that capture concepts as living pictures.  If you are a visual person, or if you enjoy watching artists at work, this process of Graphic Recording will take the day to a whole new level.  Claire will also work with guests one-on-one during the evening to draw their thoughts, experiences and desires related to Local Energy.Gather Tons of ResourcesThere will be nearly 20 resource tables set up by Sponsors that cover the gamut of ways that you can further save energy and save money on local goods, in your home, or in your business.  Sign-up for Thurston Energy’s HomePLUS energy evaluation services (with low price offers that will disappear soon).  Sign-up for a business energy walk-through from Thurston Energy or get assistance from the EDC Business Resource Center.  Get your 2012 Buy Local Savings Book.  Get information about saving water, reducing solid waste, composting food waste, and using transit.  Talk to contractors who can do efficiency projects for you, and folks who can install solar power for electricity or hot water generation.  Talk to local credit unions about financing new projects or buying more fuel efficient (or electric!) cars.  Everything you need to save energy and save money will be in one place!The Afternoon is Affordable … the Evening is Free!The afternoon business session starts at 1:30 and is only $30 to learn from local experts.  The evening celebration starts at 4:30 is free to friends of Thurston Energy and the Buy Local Program.Celebrate Our Community’s SuccessGet ready for a fun-filled evening.  By 4:30 we’ll be switching to the “Local Energy Celebration”.  Thurston Energy and Buy Local South Sound both know that the credit for their success belongs to the customers that have taken action to save energy and save money and build our local economy.  So come join that celebration!Sample Lots of Great Local Foods and DrinksThere will be lots of great things to eat and drink.  Eat bagels from Bagel Brothers, pizza from Old School Pizza, smoked salmon from Sea-atco, fresh bread, pesto from Anne’s Pesto, fruit and veggies, cupcakes from the Bearded Lady and many other yummy things.  Enjoy wine and beer from Fish Brewing Company.Bring the Family for Fun Kids’ Activities and Live MusicThis will be a family-friendly event.  The Hands-On Children’s Museum is bringing a craft project for kids to learn about energy in a fun and interactive way.  Games from Wind Up Here will be on hand for older kids to play.  And throughout the evening, a local band will play rock and blues favorites.Bring Friends and Colleagues and Meet New Ones So come out to the Local Energy Convergence and bring your friends that might want to save energy, save money, and have a fun evening.  It will be a great time of celebrating recent accomplishments, looking forward to more great work in the future, and just plain enjoying the evening!last_img read more

Rebel road expansion brings deforestation to remote Colombian Amazon

first_imgArticle published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon People, Amazon Rainforest, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, coca plantations, Community Development, Deforestation, Drug Trade, Environment, Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Infrastructure, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Roads, Tropical Forests The 138-kilometer road was carved illegally through rainforest and used by the FARC rebel group to transport coca, from which cocaine is produced.Officials from city governments have begun a project to widen and pave the road, saying it will help communities transport agricultural goods to markets.Conservationists decry the move, citing research finding road expansion opens “a Pandora’s box of environmental evils” that includes land-grabbing, illegal road development and accelerated deforestation.A Colombian governmental agency recently ordered all construction on the road stop until further environmental studies could be performed and greater restrictions applied. However, an official said construction activity has not ceased. MIRAFLORES, Colombia – “We can’t move like we used to,” said Joaquin Dajada, a twenty-something displaced member of the Nukak indigenous community, the last contacted nomadic group in Colombia. “The colonists won’t let us on their land to hunt or fish. We don’t have enough to eat.”Anthropologists believe the Nukak community is facing extinction. In addition to diseases introduced by settlers, Dajada explains that the community is threatened by the loss of their “sacred territories” where they used to hunt and fish. Road construction in the region also worries Dajada, who says that building more roads will bring “more invaders looking for land to knock down more forests… it’s the colonists’ fault we are here… they have left us nothing.”Anthropologists estimate the Nukak originally numbered around 2,000. But by 2012, they had declined to less than 600. Photo by Taran Volckhausen for MongabayMembers of the nomadic Nukak first emerged from the jungle in 1988, claiming they were chased off their land by encroaching colonists and armed groups. They arrived in Calamar, which is the last stop on a paved road that pushes southeast to the Colombian Amazon department of Guaviare.However, cutting 138 kilometers deeper into the thick, virgin rainforest from Calamar, there is another unofficial road. This road connects Miraflores, a poverty-stricken rural municipality of around 10,000 settlers and indigenous peoples, to the rest of the country.Road vs. rainforestEncouraged by the Colombian peace process promising infrastructure advancement across the country, local citizens and municipal governments of Miraflores and Guaviare have started construction to expand the road to Miraflores. But critics worry this road expansion will result in environmental damage by increasing deforestation along the road.Depending on whom you ask, the road that connects Miraflores to the rest of the country was illegally built either by rubber workers or by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the country’s oldest and largest rebel group. Until recently, the road was primarily used to transport coca-related shipments to and from Miraflores. Coca is the notorious precursor of cocaine; its dried leaves are also chewed to relieve pain, hunger, thirst and fatigue.The road, maintained by the FARC to transport coca, was until recently invisible from the air above. Photo credit: CDASecurity conditions along the road remain poor to this day. Earlier this month, a Colombian delegate of the United Nations’ monitoring and verification mission was kidnapped, allegedly by the FARC’s 1st Front dissident group, along the road in the hamlet of Barranquillita after meeting with locals to promote a coca crop substitution program. As of publication, efforts to locate and rescue the delegate have been unsuccessful.Colombia is currently in the midst of a peace process with the FARC. Praised as the end of the Western Hemisphere’s longest-running armed conflict, 7,000 members of the FARC have already arrived in 26 transition zones where they are expected to soon lay down their weapons. However, six of the FARC’s approximately 50 units – the 1st Front among them – have rejected the peace process in order to maintain control over criminal operations such as illegal gold mining, coca cultivation and drug trafficking.The road sits on a somewhat-protected forest reserve located between two highly protected areas: Nukak Natural Reserve and Serrania de Chiribiquete Natural National Park. Alerted to the situation in March 2017 by satellite images and a leaked video that showed local officials touting the benefits of coming road construction, environmental government agency Corporation for Sustainable Development of the North-East Amazon (CDA) ordered all construction on the road to be ceased until further environmental studies could be performed and greater restrictions applied.Despite the order to halt construction, however, CDA Director César Meléndez said deforestation along the stretch of roadway has not slowed, construction contracts are still pending and expectations for road expansion remain as high as ever.“They haven’t stopped widening the road, which is being expanded from a small track for mules and four-wheelers into a 40- to 50-meter-wide roadway,” Meléndez said. “More unsettling from an environmental standpoint, however, is that capitalist land speculators, who know development is coming, are buying up land from the local campesinos, cutting down the jungle, and planting pastures.”Despite an order to halt construction, the road development process continues, according to the CDA. Photo was taken in March by the CDA.Lax laws in a dangerous placeAccording to Wilfredo Pachón, local CDA Director in San Jose de Guaviare, much of the clearing of rainforest along the road to Miraflores is happening because the landowners believe “at some point they will be able to formalize their holdings.”The laws protecting the forest reserve, in Pachon’s opinion, are too flexible; they lack the restrictions necessary to stop landowners from clearing the forest. He said the municipality needs stronger environmental land use laws to establish the end of the agricultural frontier. He even suggested expanding Chiribiquete Natural National Park to protect the forest along the road.“People who live in the national parks know they can’t have property, because the law doesn’t allow for it,” Pachon said.Furthermore, he said the area around the road, which is nearly completely controlled by the FARC’s 1st Front , lacks the formal institutional and state security presence necessary to enforce the law and prosecute those violating it.“The law surrounding forest reserves is more flexible than national parks,” Pachón said. “In the reserve, speculators buy the land informally by going to a notary, making up some public documents and taking possession… however, there is little transparency nor a public registry, which means it’s impossible to open investigations and find out who is clearing the rainforest for financial gain.”According to Pachón, land cleared for grazing is worth three times more than when it was forested. Furthermore, he said many landowners have paid extortion fees to local armed groups such as the 1st Front, which provide them protection from the area’s de facto authority. This means that even investigating cases of deforestation can be a dangerous endeavor.Connecting Calamar to Miraflores, the road skirts intact forest landscapes, which are areas of primary forest large and unconnected enough to still retain their original wildlife communities.Satellite imagery from Planet Labs captured in September 2016 shows a section of the road (indicated by a red rectangle in the map above) surrounded by plots of cleared land.Imagery from March 2017 indicates more land was deforested in the preceding six months.Illegal deforestation of a plot of land adjacent to the road. Photo courtesy of CDAOn April 9, the CDA went out on an operative with police and military escort to identify various deforestation focal points in a region of the department known as “Panguana.” On the way back, on a stretch of road between San Jose and Calamar, the caravan was hit by a roadside explosive. No CDA officials were hurt in the attack, but the bomb killed one soldier and wounded four others. Authorities from the military said the attack was likely carried out by dissident members of the FARC rebel group.Miraflores, the former ‘world capital’ of coca cultivationThe town of Miraflores was established on the banks of the Vaupés River in the 1930s by campesino settlers who came to the area to tap trees for rubber and trap wildlife for fur. In the 1970s, lured by rumors of easy money, settlers began pouring into the municipality to take part in the region’s growing marijuana cultivation industry. Although coca would replace marijuana within a few years, the Amazonian frontier municipality became dependent on an illicit economy that would eventually be overtaken by the FARC and other illegal armed groups.At one point in the 1990s, coca cultivation became so prevalent in Miraflores that it was declared “the world capital of coca,” according to CDA’s César Meléndez. This prompted the U.S.-backed anti-narcotics Plan Colombia, which relied heavily on aerial spraying of potentially carcinogenic glyphosate herbicides on coca fields, to take aim at Miraflores. While Colombia’s High Court recently ruled the program led to the devastation of local campesino and indigenous communities, it succeeded in pushing coca cultivation out of the region. Today, as a result, there are fewer coca cultivators and residents in the area than there used to be; many of the shops are shuttered, and the majority of the inhabitants live in poverty.Along with much of the rest of the country, coca cultivation is picking back up in the municipality. Miraflores locals complain there are no viable options for them economically other than coca cultivation, partly because of a lack of reliable transportation infrastructure to bring their agricultural products to market. The mayor of Miraflores, Jhonibar Cumbe, argues that the road to Miraflores “already exists” and the municipality has the right to maintain it. He said the roadway becomes necessary during the summer months when the water level lowers in the Vaupes River, making cargo transportation by water impossible.Photo courtesy of CDA“This road already exists… it’s part of a multi-modal transportation network that also includes river and air,” Cumbe said in an interview. “Without a good roadway, Miraflores is not going to make it.”While Cumbe said that Miraflores was only “maintaining” the road directly outside of the municipality and that they didn’t “destroy any trees,” the mayor’s office development plan shows that Miraflores aims to work with the state of Guaviare to “construct, maintain and pave” the entire 150-kilometer roadway leading to the town, as well as the network of roads to hamlets in surrounding municipalities.Guaviare’s Director of Planning, Hector Solano, also argued that the government in the region has a responsibility to its citizens to improve road networks in order to expand the local economy and address the high costs of bringing agricultural products to market. Agriculture, particularly cattle ranching, has been an increasingly important sector of the local economy in recent years.“We are an agricultural department, which the countryside [needs] to be productive,” Solano said. “The only way we’re going to pull off rural development in the region is through roadways.”Roadway expansion means more deforestationBill Laurance, a distinguished research professor and Australian Laureate at James Cook University in Australia, has been studying the deforestation effects of road development and infrastructure projects in tropical rainforests for the past 35 years. In his view, building roads in the tropics, while providing undeniable economic benefits, opens “a Pandora’s box of environmental evils” that includes land-grabbing, illegal road development and accelerated deforestation.According to a 2014 study that Laurance coauthored, 95 percent of all forest destruction in the Amazon occurs within five kilometers of a road. The problem, Laurance and his colleagues wrote, is that one road generally turns into more roads, like the ribs coming off the spine of a fish, causing even greater deforestation over wider swaths of land. As evidence of the heavy impacts roads can have on the rainforest, Laurance points to the 1970s construction of the first paved highway through the Amazon that left behind a “400-kilometer-wide swath of forest destruction today.”Paving may make things even worse. Laurance referenced a 1992 study examining deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon he conducted that indicated paving roads can induce five times more deforestation than unpaved ones. In the study, highway proximity emerged as the single most important predictor of deforestation, precisely for the same reason the local economy supports them: they promote efficient, year-round access to forested regions.“The sad news is that roads—especially paved roads—are the enemies of forests,” Laurance said. “While we can’t blow up all the roads that have already been built, by far the best thing is not to build them in the first place—at least not if you want to conserve the forest and its wildlife.”During 2015 the Paris Climate Summit, Colombia reiterated its pledge to bring the Amazon deforestation rate down to zero by 2020. If left unchecked, however, Laurance told Mongabay that expanding the Miraflores road will make Colombia’s pledge to the global community virtually impossible to fulfill.“The only way to limit deforestation would be for government to closely monitor and control all the illegal logging, deforestation, mining, hunting, land speculation, fires, land grabbing, drug production, and illegal building of secondary roads,” Laurance said. “Controlling activities along the entire paved road would require an incredible sum of government money and effort, and I simply don’t believe that would happen.“It would be like trying to pay off an enormous debt, and it would have to be paid again and again, every year.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

New investor guide aims to help navigate social and environmental risks of commodities supply chains

first_imgProcuring agricultural commodities has become a much more difficult business function for food makers and agribusiness conglomerates to perform amidst rising global temperatures and unpredictable weather patterns, as well as increasingly widespread groundwater depletion and soil erosion, all of which affect agricultural productivity and raise the cost of sourcing in-demand raw materials.Engage the Chain offers guidance to investors on how to evaluate the level of risk in their portfolios, and also includes a number of examples of the types of threats these environmental and social impacts can pose to companies that, unwittingly or not, find their supply chains associated with them, from reputational and brand damage to litigation and running afoul of regulators.Ceres developed the guide through a peer review process that included input from top investors, a number of companies involved in the global commodities trade, and environmental NGOs. Six years ago, Boston, Massachusetts-based NGO Ceres started tracking resolutions filed by shareholders asking food and beverage companies to report on how they are managing the risks that come with sourcing the agricultural commodities used in their products.Since then, the group reports, there’s been a marked uptick in the number of resolutions aimed at requiring companies to make information available to investors about the financial risks posed by the impacts of their supply chain. “All told, 130 sustainability-focused resolutions have been filed with food and beverage companies since Ceres started tracking them six years ago, and they have grown from a handful filed in 2011 to 23 filed in 2017,” the organization recently announced.And whereas these types of shareholder resolutions were once almost exclusively aimed at fossil fuels companies, that is not the case any more. “Restaurant brands Kroger, Domino’s and Kraft Heinz, for example, all received shareholder proposals this proxy season asking them how they were managing the reputational risks associated with sourcing commodities like palm oil, and Latin American beef and soy – the production of which is routinely linked to the destruction of tropical forests,” Ceres noted.While beef, palm oil, and soy are the subject of much scrutiny these days, Ceres has released a new investor guide, called Engage the Chain, that goes well beyond those staples, covering the environmental and social impacts of eight different agricultural commodities: beef, corn, dairy, fiber-based packaging, palm oil, soybeans, sugarcane, and wheat. The guide also includes a number of examples of the types of threats these environmental and social impacts can pose to companies that, unwittingly or not, find their supply chains associated with them, from reputational and brand damage to litigation and running afoul of regulators.Allan Pearce, a shareholder advocate with Trillium Asset Management, said that the investor guide is a welcome and timely resource.“Commodity-based agricultural production is emerging as a key driver of climate change, deforestation, water pollution and biodiversity loss, while also subjecting hundreds of millions of people employed in agriculture around the world to harsh working conditions and poverty,” Pearce said in a statement “Many companies don’t understand the full extent of these impacts in their agricultural supply chains, which is alarming because these can pose real financial risk.”Procuring agricultural commodities has become a much more difficult business function for food makers and agribusiness conglomerates to perform amidst rising global temperatures and unpredictable weather patterns, as well as increasingly widespread groundwater depletion and soil erosion, all of which affect agricultural productivity and raise the cost of sourcing in-demand raw materials. Meanwhile, a number of environmental groups are calling out issues like deforestation and forced labor whenever they find them lurking in a company’s supply chain. These issues can impact a company’s bottom line in a number of ways — but research has shown that many companies don’t even have systems in place to monitor their supply chains for environmental and labor abuses in order to stay ahead of any financial risks they could face as a result.A report released last December by London-based non-profit CDP found that many companies are greatly underestimating the extent to which they might be exposed to deforestation risks through their operations, for instance. CDP surveyed 187 companies — including major consumer-facing companies Colgate Palmolive, L’Oréal, McDonald’s, and Marks & Spencer in addition to global commodities traders like Archer Daniels Midland and Bunge — to find out what strategies they employ to safeguard against deforestation creeping into their supply chains. Though the four agricultural commodities most often linked to deforestation — cattle products, palm oil, soy, and timber products — are necessary for nearly one-fourth of those companies’ revenues, just 42 percent of them reported that they regularly evaluate their supply chains in order to determine how their growth strategies might be impacted by the future availability or quality of commodities.“If a company cannot trace its supply chain, it cannot begin to address the substantial risks, including potential involvement in illegal practices, that lie hidden several tiers down,” Adam Kanzer, managing director at Domini Impact Investments, said in a statement. “We hope that Engage the Chain will provide one more link in the chain of accountability.”Investors in agricultural or consumer companies can now turn to Engage the Chain for guidance on how to evaluate the level of risk in their portfolios. Ceres developed the guide through a peer review process that included input from top investors, a number of companies involved in the global commodities trade, and environmental NGOs.“Commodity sourcing is an increasingly challenging business function for food companies,” David Bennell, director of food and capital markets at Ceres, noted in a statement. “Engage the Chain was designed with investors for investors to help them reduce their exposure to the mounting reputational, operational and other material risks embedded in agricultural supply chains.”Oil palm seedlings in Sumatra, Indonesia. The production of palm oil has been linked to vast amounts of deforestation as well as human rights and labor abuses in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett Butler.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Agriculture, Beef, Cattle, Climate Change, Deforestation, Environment, Palm Oil, Pulp And Paper, Soy, Supply Chain, Sustainability, Timber last_img read more

To Counter Wildlife Trafficking, Local Enforcement, Not En-Route Interdiction, Is Key (commentary)

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animals, Anti-poaching, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Law Enforcement, Poaching, Researcher Perspective Series, Wildlife, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img The global poaching crisis has induced large segments of the conservation community to call for far tougher law enforcement. Many look to policing lessons from decades of counter-narcotics efforts for solutions.Boosting enforcement of wildlife regulations is overdue, as they have long been accorded the least priority by many enforcement authorities and corruption has further eviscerated their enforcement in many critical wildlife supply, transshipment, and demand countries.But better and tougher law enforcement is not a silver bullet. In fact, some designs of interdiction modeled on counter-narcotics efforts, including the current conservation community emphasis on greater en-route seizures of smuggled wildlife, can be outright counterproductive.The point in the smuggling chain at which enforcement and interdiction take place matters enormously. In the case of drugs — a non-depletable resource than can be produced in very large volumes indefinitely — seizing drugs close to production, such as in Colombia, Afghanistan, or Myanmar, is not very effective in terms of the cost of their replacement and knock-on effects on retail prices. Seizing drugs close to consumption and retail markets, such as in the United States or Europe, boosts prices much more, thus discouraging some users.However, for political, social, and justice reasons, interdiction in Colombia or Afghanistan that targets drug smuggling organizations and focuses on semi-processed or processed drugs, destruction of processing labs, and arrests of traffickers is still preferable to eradicating the drug crops of poor farmers. Hundreds of thousands of farmers in drug-cultivating countries depend on drug cultivation for their livelihoods. They will mobilize to oppose eradication, and may thus support militant groups, such as the Taliban, that provide them with protection. Moreover, in addition to prioritizing interdiction over eradication, in the case of drugs, it’s important that interdiction be designed to reduce smugglers’ proclivity toward violence and their capacity to corrupt institutions and penetrate political systems. It should also seek to limit the access of militant groups to drug revenues.Like drug crop eradication, preventing poor, marginalized indigenous communities from subsistence hunting or even participating in global wildlife trafficking is ethically questionable and can become politically unsustainable.But, unlike with drugs, focusing interdiction on en-route transshipment is highly problematic. All traffickers, whether in wildlife or drugs, assume they will lose a certain percentage of contraband to enforcement efforts, and therefore will simply pay for the production of larger volumes to cover their predicted losses. They even welcome eradication and seizures since enforcement boosts prices and makes stockpiles more profitable. The traffickers’ ability to increase and adjust supply to offset losses is one of the reasons why prices of drugs have not gone up high enough to reduce the capacity and motivation of consumers to purchase them. Seizures are thus highly unlikely to bankrupt traffickers of drugs or wildlife.Yet increasing the volume of animals poached in order to maintain supply despite law enforcement is a most undesirable and counterproductive side-effect of combating the illegal wildlife trade. Traffickers of rare parrots from Indonesia, whom I encountered during my research, for example, fully expected a 90 to 95 percent mortality rate as a result of their smuggling methods. To evade law-enforcement agencies, they stuffed the parrots into plastic bottles with GPS trackers and threw them into the sea so as to retrieve them on open waters outside the reach of naval interdiction. The fact that less than 10 percent of the parrots survived was not a deterrent to this appalling method, as profits on the remaining specimens were more than sufficient.In fact, prices can be boosted by scarcity so much that absorbing huge losses and driving a species close to extinction can be profitable and attractive for traffickers. The rarer the species, the greater its value. Law enforcement must avoid creating those transshipment inefficiencies that motivate smugglers to organize the poaching of many more animals so as to deliver even a few to the market.Rather than focusing on en-route interdiction, shutting down the retailers of illegal wildlife commodities is critical. Although retail may merely be driven underground, reducing the visibility, accessibility, and advertisement of retail markets helps drive demand down. Shutting down online and social media websites of illegal wildlife products is equally imperative.But the single most effective form of law enforcement in countering wildlife trafficking and poaching is enforcement within areas where the species occur to prevent animals from being killed or removed from the wild in the first place.Such in situ enforcement, however, often runs into the challenge that local populations can be willing participants in poaching for global smuggling networks. If local populations have not internalized laws and consider them an illegitimate imposition of Western values that hamper their socioeconomic survival and advancement, enforcement becomes costly both politically and morally, as well as in terms of resources.Despite claims that today’s wildlife trafficking is all about organized crime groups, in situ law enforcement must be accompanied by socioeconomic aid policies, such as ecotourism, financial transfers, or sustainable trophy hunting, in order to motivate local communities to comply with and internalize wildlife conservation.The White Rhinoceros was on the brink of extinction at the end of the 19th century, but the species has rebounded since then, with approximately 20,000 White Rhinos in Africa today. However, this conservation success story “is being undone by the high levels of rhino poaching since the mid-2000s,” according to TRAFFIC, the wildlife trade monitoring network. Photo by Rhett Butler.Dr. Vanda Felbab-Brown is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and author of The Extinction Market: Wildlife Trafficking and How to Counter It (Hurst-Oxford University Press, 2017).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Indonesian police bust Chinese nationals with 200 kg of turtle shells

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animal Cruelty, Animals, Conservation, Crime, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Marine, Marine Animals, Reptiles, Sea Turtles, Turtles, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Police in eastern Indonesia have arrested two Chinese men for illegally being in possession of 200 kilos (440 pounds) of turtle shells, which they believe was headed to China.All turtle species are protected under Indonesian law, and the possession or trade in their parts is punishable by up to five years in prison and $7,000 in fines. The estimated value of the seized shells was $13,200.The bust highlights the continued role of the city of Makassar as the main gateway for traffickers moving wildlife products out of the biodiversity haven of Papua, where the suspects say they obtained the turtle shells. MAKASSAR, Indonesia — Police in Indonesia have arrested two Chinese men with the illegal possession of 200 kilograms (440 pounds) of valuable turtle shells, believed to have been headed for China.Acting on a tip from residents, officers in the city of Makassar, on the eastern island of Sulawesi, arrested Chen Jianyi, 25, and Zhong Qiushan, 31, at their home in the city late last month. The pair said they obtained the turtle shells from Sorong on the island of New Guinea, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Makassar.Donna Briadi, the head of the Makassar Police’s special crimes unit, said officers seized dozens of shells from a range of turtle species, but did not elaborate. Under Indonesia’s 1990 conservation act, all turtle species in the country are protected. Poaching, habitat destruction or trade in turtles or their parts is punishable by up to five years in prison and fines of up to 100 million rupiah ($7,000).Donna said one of the men had been charged, while the other one was being treated as a witness. He did not specify whether it was Chen or Zhong who had been charged, but said police were looking into whether they were part of a larger trafficking syndicate. The seized shells had an estimated value of 180 million rupiah ($13,200), according to police.A hawksbill turtle swimming in the northern waters of Sulawesi island. Photo courtesy of Bernard Dupont/Flickr.The seizure of the turtle shells, typically used in fashion accessories such as sunglass frames, is the latest wildlife trafficking bust in Makassar, the closest major city to Papua, as the Indonesian half of New Guinea is known. Papua is Indonesia’s least-developed region, and is home to a rich array of wildlife, including birds of paradise, exotic reef fish, and highly endangered sea turtles.Traffickers moving wild animals and their parts out of Papua typically transit through Makassar, according to Andry Indryasworo Sukmoputro, an official at the Makassar field office of the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.Most traffickers, he said, prefer moving their illegal cargo by boat to avoid scrutiny from airport and quarantine officers.“And if the smuggling is carried out through the air, [they] do a deal with the airport officers,” Andry said.The NGO Greenpeace has previously published reports on the illegal turtle trade in Makassar. One report, from 1984, showed that some 593 tons of turtle products, or more than half of Indonesia’s turtle exports, were shipped out of the city since 1978. A later report said there were 15 operators illegally exporting turtle shells from Makassar in 1990.The trade in turtle shells has been banned worldwide since 1973, and much of the “tortoiseshell” in use today is synthetic or an imitation. Prior to that, the material came primarily from the Hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata), a species listed by the IUCN as “Critically Endangered,” or nearly extinct in the wild. ProFauna, an NGO operating in Indonesia, says genuine turtle shells continue to be sold in the country for as little as 80,000 rupiah (less than $6) per kilogram.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published here on our Indonesian site on Feb. 12, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Climate change imperils tiny animal in the world’s most extreme continent

first_imgSoil researchers have found that a microscopic nematode is vanishing from Antarctica’s Dry Valleys — and they believe it’s because of climate change.Scottnema lindsayae thrives in super-arid landscapes where little else can make it, but melting ice makes for a wetter environment that’s unsuitable for this soil dweller and allows its competitors to flourish.Researchers are also concerned that as Antarctica warms, it will become increasingly vulnerable to invasive species. Every Antarctic summer between December and January, a group of biologists heads out into the vast wilderness. They do not look for the giant whales or the emperor penguins that are typically associated with the region. They show no interest in the ice that covers almost the entire continent. Instead, they head to the largest ice-free region of Antarctica and poke around the soil. While the rest of the world waits for the latest news about melting glaciers, researchers from the McMurdo Dry Valleys Long-Term Ecological Research (MCM LTER) project have been studying tiny animals that live in the Antarctic soil.But isn’t Antarctica all ice? “Let’s not forget Antarctica is a whole continent,” says Walter Andriuzzi, a soil scientist and a post-doctoral researcher at Colorado State University.While ice dominates the continent, it does melt sometimes, creating small pools of water or a few patches of land that house minuscule but hardy life-forms such as microbes, moss and lichen. Indeed, some parts of the Antarctic Peninsula are so free of ice in the summer that two species of flowering plants grow there.But it is the McMurdo Dry Valleys that draw Andriuzzi and his colleagues. Located across McMurdo Sound from Mount Erebus, the Dry Valleys feature a chain of mountains that are frozen at the peaks, but whose valleys form about 4,800 square kilometers (1,850 square miles) of land that’s ice-free all year round. Here, water is restricted to some of the most saline frozen lakes in the world and ephemeral streams from melting ice during the two months of summer; the higher elevations are so hostile that scientists have compared them to the surface of Mars. The rest is really just a very, very cold desert. The McMurdo Dry Valleys as seen on the map are the largest ice free zone in the Antarctic. Photo by USGS via Wikimedia Commons (public domain).Yet tiny microscopic animals, each interesting in its own way, have managed to adapt to this extreme environment. These include rotifers, tardigrades (or water bears) and Andriuzzi’s speciality, nematodes, or roundworms. But change is coming: a new study by Andriuzzi and colleagues finds that increasing warming due to climate change may be overturning Antarctica’s nematode populations.Some parts of the Dry Valleys have been compared to Mars, but even this extreme desert life persists. Photo by David Saul, via Wikimedia Commons (public domain).Humans are most familiar with the parasitic kinds of nematodes such as hookworms, but nematodes are actually one of the most diverse animal groups in the world, with over 40,000 species described so far. They are found on land and water, and can eat a range of things including algae, microbes and fecal matter. Whatever the diet, most species play an important role in adding and removing nutrients from the soil and sea floor. Most are a few millimeters long, but some, like those in Antarctica, can only be viewed under a microscope.Adult male of the nematode Scottnema lindsayae seen under a microscope. Photo by the McMurdo LTER “Soils” team.The soils and surrounding waters of the Dry Valleys are home to three known species of nematodes. Eudorylaimus antarcticus is found in streams and occasionally in the soils close to water. This species is possibly the only predatory nematode in the landscape. Plectus murrayi is found exclusively in water and feeds on microbes. And finally, Scottnema lindsayae, also a microbe feeder, is Andriuzzi’s favorite nematode.All of these species survive the 10 months of extreme cold before the short summer thaws the streams thanks to anhydrobiosis — a process Andriuzzi calls a metabolic marvel. When all liquid water freezes in the Antarctic, these animals enter a state of dehydration and remain like that until water becomes available again.But S. lindsayae is able to survive in even less water than the other species, because it can remain dehydrated for longer and will very quickly come alive if even a little water is available. This allows the nematode to survive in soils further away from the lakes and streambeds, in the driest parts of the Dry Valleys. Scottnema lindsayae which can thrive in the extremely arid soils of the Dry Valleys is one of the most common nematodes on Antarctica currently. Photo by the McMurdo LTER “Soils” team.“This ability to quickly exploit transient favorable conditions gives it an important advantage over other species,” Andriuzzi says.But this advantage may not last if the continent keeps warming. Andriuzzi and his team of soil scientists, who jokingly refer to themselves as worm herders, have been monitoring soil animals from three of the Dry Valleys for years (Taylor, Miers and Garwood valleys) and collecting information on temperature cycles and soil moisture in the region, coinciding with a period of warming in the Dry Valleys since 2001.Soil scientists from the MCM LTER project, examining equipment before setting out into the Dry Valleys in Antarctica. Photo by Byron Adams.Cycles of cooling and warming are common to the Antarctic, but with climate change Andriuzzi believes that warming events are potentially becoming more frequent and lasting longer. These warming events appeared to be causing a population decline of the mighty S. lindsayae. Frequent or extended warming can lead to ice thawing faster and more water becoming available. This is great for the rotifers, tardigrades and other nematodes in the landscape, but not for S. lindsayae. For a nematode perfectly suited to survive in this arid habit, too much moisture is kryptonite.With water now creeping into the dry soils, Andriuzzi says several things might be going wrong for these roundworms. For one, the salts in the soil could dissolve in the water and come in contact with the animals, drawing out any fluids through their cell walls, leading to what is called osmotic shock.Where water levels have increased, the water-dwelling P. murrayi might also have moved in to compete with S. lindsayae for their shared prey, microbes.An additional threat could come from the predatory nematode E. antarcticus, which the researchers speculate may be feeding on juvenile S. lindsayae.“The superior ability of Scottnema lindsayae to go in anhydrobiosis probably comes at some cost, and in fact we know that it has an unusually slow life cycle for a nematode,” Andriuzzi says. Essentially, the nematode might not be able to recover if its population takes a hit.A separate study by a graduate student from the same lab, Ashley Shaw, found that E. antarcticus was very likely to occupy the top spot in the Dry Valleys’ soil food chain. The only thing protecting S. lindsayae from this voracious predator is the very dry soil, but the melting ice could change that.With changing climate and increased soil moisture, the predatory Eudorylaimus antarcticus could prove to be a threat to the microbe feeding Scottnema lindsayae. Photo by the McMurdo LTER “Soils” team.Overall, the spread of moisture in the landscape could mean that creatures now restricted to the streams and lakebeds could gain more ground, leading to greater diversity in the soils of the Dry Valleys. This sounds like a good thing, but Andriuzzi says the newcomers are not increasing in abundance nearly as fast as S. lindsayae is declining.“It’s as if a garden that used to have only daisies is starting to have a few daffodils and dandelions, but also many bare patches,” he says.Antarctica has been of interest to terrestrial biologists for a long time, particularly in the context of climate change.“There are very good scientific reasons for studying change in Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems,” says Peter Convey, a terrestrial biologist with the British Antarctic Society, who is not connected with the nematode study.Convey says the terrestrial ecosystems of the Antarctic have the same components, but in a simpler form, as the temperate or tropical ones that people are more familiar with. That makes it easier to understand how they respond to changes in temperature and precipitation.“If we can understand where in their structure polar terrestrial ecosystems are sensitive, we can hope to transfer this knowledge and see if it applies in the same way in more complex systems,” he says.But in a world with rising extinction rates, could one tiny soil dweller losing ground be so bad?Diana Wall, a professor at Colorado State University and head of this research project in the Dry Valleys, emphasizes the importance of the soil animals. She says creatures like nematodes are a main part of the soil food web. Andriuzzi says previous studies have shown that in low-diversity soil ecosystems, a decline in the dominant soil animals can lead to changes in the carbon cycling.And then there is the possibility of other outcomes, such as the arrival of invasive species, already a concern in some other parts of the Antarctic. Invasive animals or plants could arrive “attached to footwear, clothing, equipment, rucksacks, camera bags, cargo, vehicles,” Convey says.A warmer, wetter Antarctica will also make invasive species’ survival more likely.“Remember that we’re talking of communities with only a handful of species of animals,” Andriuzzi says, “so even the arrival of a single new one — or the disappearance of a resident one — could have big implications.”CITATIONSAndriuzzi, W. S., Adams, B. J., Barrett, J. E., Virginia, R. A., & Wall, D. H. (2018). Observed trends of soil fauna in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: early signs of shifts predicted under climate change. Ecology. Shaw, E. A., Adams, B. J., Barrett, J. E., Lyons, W. B., Virginia, R. A., & Wall, D. H. (2018). Stable C and N isotope ratios reveal soil food web structure and identify the nematode Eudorylaimus antarcticus as an omnivore–predator in Taylor Valley, Antarctica. Polar Biology, 1-6. Treonis, A. M., & Wall, D. H. (2005). Soil nematodes and desiccation survival in the extreme arid environment of the Antarctic Dry Valleys. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 45(5), 741-750. Virginia, R. A., & Wall, D. H. (1999). How soils structure communities in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. BioScience, 49(12), 973-983. Climate Change, Global Warming, Interns, Research Article published by Maria Salazarcenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Two dozen Latin American countries sign agreement to protect environmental defenders

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored The Principle 10 treaty deals mainly with the defense of environmentalists, promoting transparency in public access to environmental information, and shoring up environmental democracy and justice.The principles were approved on March 4 in the so-called Escazú Agreement in Costa Rica, by 24 countries from around Latin America and the Caribbean. It must now be ratified by the member countries.Environmental activists have hailed it as a massive step forward in the protection of environmental defenders, in a region where such advocates face the greatest threats to their lives. A photograph of Berta Cáceres, a Honduran national who was murdered two years ago for fighting against a controversial hydroelectric project, stood out at the negotiating table in Escazú, Costa Rica. And it was there where a regional agreement on access to information, public participation and access to environmental justice, known as Principle 10, was approved.The presence of Cáceres’s image was a poignant reminder of a key aspect of this international treaty: special measures that governments should take to protect environmental defenders. Regionally, Latin America saw the most environmentalists killed anywhere in the world in 2017, according to Global Witness.The so-called Principle 10 brought together 24 representatives from Latin American and Caribbean countries in Costa Rica. Photo: DARThe Escazú Agreement (formally called the Regional Agreement on Access to Information, Public Participation and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters in Latin America and the Caribbean) was approved on March 4. A total of 24 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have signed on, and it remains open for others to join.The commitments related to the protection of environmental defenders are set forth in Article 9 of the Escazú Agreement. The article, titled “Human Rights Defenders on Environmental Issues,” specifies that each country “guarantee a safe and propitious environment in which individuals, groups and organizations that promote and defend human rights in environmental matters can act without threats, restrictions and insecurity.”It also indicates that adequate and effective measures will be taken to recognize, protect and promote all the rights of human rights defenders in environmental matters. It commits to appropriate, effective and timely measures to prevent, investigate and punish attacks, threats or intimidation.A long road“This is a historic moment for Latin America and the Caribbean,” said Carole Excell, director of the Office of Environmental Democracy at the World Resources Institute (WRI). “The countries of the region have the opportunity to approve a legally binding environmental rights agreement that will not only help prevent and punish attacks against environmental defenders, but will also make it easier for millions of people to access environmental information and participate in the making decisions that affect their lives.”The process to reach the agreement began six years ago, Excell told Mongabay in an interview.“We have reached the end of an important negotiation because this treaty is the first time developing countries [have signed an] agreement that deals specifically with environmental rights, citizen participation and the right to justice,” she added.Andrea Sanhueza Echeverría, a representative of the public for Principle 10, said she believed the agreement would have real impact. Representatives of governments and civil society participate in the negotiations, the latter being called representatives of the public.“This agreement will change the rules of the game on how decisions are made in environmental matters in Latin America and the Caribbean,” Sanhueza said. “Once the [public] comes into force, it can be part of the decisions on projects and policies that will affect them.”Representatives of governments and civil society met to negotiate an agreement for environmental democracy. Photo: DARSanhueza said it was a binding agreement that governments must comply with legally once signed and ratified in each of their countries.“The region had already made considerable progress in terms of access to public information, but in terms of citizen participation, our countries still have very poor mechanisms,” she said.She also noted that the groundwork for the agreement began in 2012, when 10 countries committed to the process of environmental democracy. The negotiations that culminated in the new agreement began in 2016.As it stands, the agreement to protect environmental defenders is historic. “It will be the first international treaty in the world that recognizes the situation these people are living and offers guarantees for their better protection,” Sanhueza said.The negotiations of Principle 10 began in 2016 and culminated on March 4, 2018. Photo: Natalia Gómez.Nations commitFor the treaty to enter into force, 11 of the 24 governments of the nations that approved the agreement must ratify it in their respective countries. The committed countries are expected to sign it by September 2020. In some countries, including Costa Rica, Chile and Colombia, which are scheduled to hold elections this year, ratification of the agreement will depend on the new government that comes into power.Danielle Andrade, a lawyer from Jamaica with who represents clients in domestic civil society cases, said she was optimistic about the agreement’s impact in her country. “This treaty will be able to strengthen its laws, especially those that allow the public to participate in the decisions that affect the environment,” Andrade said.Patricia Gualinga, Kichwa Sarayaku leader from Ecuador, threatened for denouncing the violation of the rights of the Amazonian peoples. Photo: Courtesy Patricia Gualinga.A spokesperson for the Peruvian Ministry of Environment told Mongabay that throughout the negotiation process, Peru favored a legally binding agreement. The agreement still has to be presented to Peru’s congress for ratification.Peru also joined Costa Rica and Paraguay in supporting the proposal to recognize the term “human rights defenders in environmental matters.”Peru’s approval of the Escazú Agreement comes shortly after it signed off on its National Human Rights Plan 2017-2021, on Jan. 31. The latter includes the design and execution of policies in favor of special protection groups, such as human rights defenders. Peru says it is committed to generating a registry of risk situations for human rights defenders and implementing a mechanism for their protection.The Deputy Minister of Strategic Development of Natural Resources of Peru, Fernando León Morales, participated in the negotiations in Costa Rica. Photo: DAR.Isabel Calle, director of the Environmental Policy and Governance Program of the Peruvian Society of Environmental Law, describes the Escazú Agreement as an international instrument that regulates standards for access to information and environmental justice in Latin America and the Caribbean.Discrepancies in treaty approvalNatalia Gómez, from the Colombian NGO Asociación Ambiente y Sociedad and a participant at the negotiations, said her country had “been regressive” in the negotiations, even though it signed the base document in 2013.Gómez, who is an expert on environmental democracy, said Colombia backed down on two issues during the talks in Costa Rica. One dealt with a monitoring committee that proposed that any citizen could monitor and communicate to this committee in compliance with the treaty in their country. Colombia requested that that article be deleted.“Mexico also adopted this position, but after negotiations a consensus was reached, but the paragraph that you can receive communications about compliance with the agreement was excluded,” Gómez said.Guadalupe Campanur, from the indigenous community of Cherán, in Mexico, was murdered on January 17, 2018. Source: Facebook.Another issue flagged by the Colombian government was related to the request to include an article that allows governments to have so-called “reservations.” This allows each government the possibility to sign the agreement but choose which articles of the treaty it accepts and which to not adopt. Thus, each country can pick and choose how the agreement is applied in its jurisdiction, Gómez said.Colombia and Mexico are among the countries with the highest number of murders and threats to environmentalists, according to a 2017 Global Witness report. So the bid to allow countries not to ratify some articles worried the other governments and environmentalists at the negotiations.In the end, the push to include such an article faltered, and the Escazú Agreement was approved excluding any reservations.“Colombia has regressed on these issues because, although our constitution has many mechanisms for citizen participation in environmental matters, it is currently going through a crisis as more and more communities carry out prior consultation processes for mining in their territory,” Gómez said. “I think the government is worried about this situation.”Although she questioned whether everything that civil society participants had hoped for was achieved, Gómez said she considered the Escazú Agreement was a hopeful advance.The countries that approved the Agreement of Principle 10 must now ratify the treaty in their respective nations. Photo: DAR.Included among the specific actions for governments to take are the recognition of environmentalists’ work, the non-criminalization of their actions, and the guarantee of access to information. In many cases, socio-environmental conflicts are caused by a lack of information on the projects within a community.Vanessa Cueto, coordinator for governance and environmental management at the Peruvian NGO Law, Environment and Natural Resources, said the clause referring to environmental defenders was not considered at the beginning of the negotiations and it was civil society that encouraged its adoption. Cueto said transparency in information was often not taken into account, despite the fact that timely access is important to help prevent rights violations.“It is a subject that is violated every day, not only in the prior consultation processes, but in the environmental impact study processes for megaprojects,” she said. “It is important that local populations have timely information from the promulgation of the investment project and we hope that one of the effects is the reduction of environmental conflicts.”Now it is up to the governments to ratify the agreement so that the document signed in Costa Rica is translated into concrete actions in the defense of environmental rights.Banner image: The countries that approved the Agreement of Principle 10 must now ratify the treaty in their respective nations. Photo: DAR.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Latin America (Latam) team and was first published in Spanish on our Latam site on March 8, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Amazon Rainforest, Environmental Activism, Environmental Heroes, Forest People, Forests, Governance, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Deforestation, Tropical Forests center_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

In Bali fish die-offs, researchers spot a human hand

first_imgAnimals, Aquaculture, Environment, Fish, Fish Farming, Fisheries, Fishing, Freshwater Animals, Freshwater Ecosystems, Freshwater Fish, Lakes, Nutrient Pollution, Pollution, Water Pollution Mass fish die-offs are not uncommon in the volcanic lakes that dot Indonesia, including Bali’s Lake Batur, which sits in the crater of an active volcano.While sulfur releases, steep temperature gradients and other natural phenomena are responsible for some of the bigger die-offs, researchers have identified the chemicals from excess fish feed as the main culprit for the more frequent die-offs caused by oxygen depletion.Similar die-offs in other lakes around Indonesia have also been traced back to household and industrial waste, as well as agricultural runoff and fish farms. Researchers have warned that more than a dozen lakes could die out as soon as 2025 as a result of this chemical assault. DENPASAR, Indonesia — Tilapia is a mainstay of Balinese cuisine, but hundreds of thousands of the freshwater fish choke to death regularly in the resort island’s largest lake, for reasons that researchers say are entirely preventable.Mass fish die-offs are not uncommon in the lakes that dot the string of seismically active islands making up Indonesia, but tend to be the result of natural phenomena. In Lake Batur, a couple of hours drive east from Denpasar, Bali’s capital and biggest city, the sudden release of sulfur from the bottom of the crater lake last year led to the deaths of 15 tons of tilapia and cost local aquaculture farmers some 400 million rupiah ($29,000).The first reported mass die-off at Batur, which sits in the caldera of an active volcano of the same name, was in June 2011, and left officials scooping up more than 3 tons of dead fish in just a couple of days. An investigation at the time concluded that the incident was caused by a steep temperature gradient between the air and the water, which generated waves that churned up the mud from the lakebed, killing the fish.Now, however, researchers at Bali’s Udayana University have identified a human factor behind a string of regular die-offs at Batur. The modus operandi: A depletion of oxygen in the water near the surface of the lake. The culprit: Fish feed. Lots of fish feed.Lake Batur has seen a boon in aquaculture and agriculture since the 1990s. Photo courtesy of William Cho/Wikimedia Commons.The researchers discovered that the lake contained untenable levels of chemicals — nitrites, sulphides and sulphates — introduced into the water from fish feed. Concentrations of these chemicals were particularly high in fish farms and parts of the lake close to an agricultural waste dump and residential areas.There are about 180 aquaculture operations dotted across Batur, with nearly 9,000 floating steel-framed cages between them, holding primarily Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Fish pellets that go uneaten sink past the cage mesh and into the lake below, dissolving in the water.To prevent further die-offs, the researchers recommended installing finer nets below the cages to catch these pellets. They also suggested stocking the cages with plants that would absorb the excess nutrients introduced by the fish feed.“The farmers must start to manage their cages properly to reduce the risks,” said Gede Raka Angga Kartika, one of the researchers.Water contamination from household and agricultural waste, as well as aquaculture, regularly kills the fish in Lake Batur. Photo courtesy of William Cho/Wikimedia Commons.The incidents at Batur are hardly Indonesia’s only mass fish asphyxiations. Similar incidents have occurred at Lake Maninjau in Sumatra and in the reservoirs of western Java. One of the biggest recent die-offs linked to oxygen depletion took place in Lake Toba’s Haranggaol Bay, in North Sumatra. The blame there, as at Batur, was pinned on an excess of fish feed, as well as sewage and leached chemicals from detergents and fertilizers.Water contamination from fish farms, household and industrial waste, and deforestation have put more than a dozen Indonesian lakes, including Batur, Toba and Maninjau, at risk of dying out, some as early as 2025, researchers warn.Banner image: Recurring mass fish die-offs occur at Bali’s largest lake, Batur, because of chemicals introduced by fish feed that starve the water of oxygen. Photo by Suka Merta/Mongabay-Indonesia.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Calls for change in handling abuse allegations at top conservation group

first_imgAmazon Conservation, Conservation, Corruption, Endangered Environmentalists, Featured, Forests, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforests, Saving Rainforests, Tropical Forests, Wildlife Conservation Information provided to Mongabay shows a history of employees at CI who feel twice victimized — first by what they describe as “bullying and harassment,” and a second time by consequences if they report up.Although CI advertises myriad policies about workplace ethics and protections, many say they are still afraid to speak up for fear of retaliation.Staff also say that they are crippled by uncertainty about privacy rights and fear possibly destroying their careers or being branded a “troublemaker.” Despite that, staff have found ways to tell management time and again that not enough is being done to protect people in their organization. There are two versions of the story, and both of them are true. In one version, Conservation International (CI) is an idealistic, energetic and challenging place to work and grow if you want to help save the planet. The pay is on the high side for comparable non-profits or global conservation organizations. It’s also prestigious: its CEO dines with world leaders, its board includes movie stars, and it just announced a partnership with NASA and legendary grunge band Pearl Jam. It gets funding from USAID, the National Science Foundation, NOAA and the U.S. Department of State.In the other version of the story, current and former employees of one of the largest environmental non-profits in the world say the organization is not adequately addressing allegations of workplace bullying and harassment that stretch back years.“I was told once that women can’t budget, I was called stupid in front of colleagues and harassed to the point of tears during meetings,” current staffer Rebecca* said. She also said she has faced professional retaliation, even while receiving outstanding performance reviews and trying to solve workplace problems from within the CI system.She said in her several years at CI, which took her to multiple country offices, she also witnessed other colleagues suffer or advocate similarly. “I could have tried to find a lawyer, but I didn’t want money to stay quiet, I wanted things to change,” she said.In a months-long investigation that unearthed information spanning nearly two decades, Mongabay conducted more than half a dozen extensive background interviews with current and former CI staff about their experiences with the organization. We also analyzed over 150 pages of public and private documents, and more than a dozen videos. The records show that years of staff complaints of bullying, sexual harassment and abusive behavior by management have not led to significant or effective changes in institutional practices. Documents provided to Mongabay also show that numerous individuals within executive leadership, upper-level management, and legal and human resources departments have long been well aware of the complaints.Rebecca said that although she loves her mission-driven work at the non-profit, she can’t reconcile that with the negative aspects. “I can’t shake the other experience I’ve had at CI — the years of bullying and verbal abuse. We say we’re working for human well-being and then the human well-being within our organization is lacking.”A river from healthy forest area meeting a river downstream from logging sites near Sabah Malaysia. Photo by Mongabay.Rebecca said her work ethic was questioned when she was “too exhausted from working overtime to even think clearly.” She said she was propositioned for sex by a country director from one of CI’s South American offices “in front of a CI board member who didn’t even flinch.” She said she’s also witnessed and personally experienced male managers joking about oral sex and pornography, and asking probing, personal questions about relationship and marital status.Erin* is a former CI staffer who worked at CI over 10 years ago with a small team that was eventually almost completely dissolved.Erin said she initially went to work for the organization because its mission aligned with her personal and professional ideals and goals. That proved to be a more complex alignment than she’d realized, particularly given CI’s diverse spectrum of workplaces around the world.“You have different social norms in different places,” she said. “There’s a culture of fear. People don’t speak out that much.”So information continues to get passed around through the organization’s grapevine, along with experienced advice on how to deal with the most difficult characters. Former staff also remain in close touch with some of their ex-colleagues and are trusted sounding boards.“Everyone at CI has their favorite anecdote about harassment and bullying that they share over drinks when prompted,” Rebecca said. “You often hear at happy hours that people are being treated badly, the work expectations are unreasonable, their work is being insulted in front of other people, they are being told they aren’t good enough. They are being told inappropriate comments about women or people of other nationalities.”Many point to career and financial pressures as major factors in deciding whether or not to speak up, though. “Employees continue to keep quiet for fear of retribution or blacklisting in the industry,” Rebecca said.That’s a reaction shared by almost every current or former CI staffer who came forward to be interviewed for this story**: not one of them would agree to use their real name on the record. That includes those who said they “had only positive experiences” while at CI. The most-cited reason was fear of negative professional repercussions.Mongabay also combed over five dozen employee evaluations on popular employment review sites Glassdoor.com and Indeed.com in search of repetitive scenarios that either aligned with positive and negative accounts of staff we spoke to, or threw the veracity of those accounts into question. There were no major variations from the more than half a dozen accounts we gathered of both positive and negative experiences.In an email, a Glassdoor spokesperson explained that the process to moderate the more than 80 reviews posted about CI on the website involves a multi-step evaluation before publication. Anonymity is protected under Glassdoor’s privacy policy and community guidelines.CI does frequently promote various avenues to make complaints, including its Ethics Hotline, legal and human resources departments, and even executive-level management. The hotline is a phone number and email run by third-party corporation Navex.The non-profit also requires staff to report any issues that violate its policies on sexual harassment and other workplace ethics. How many actually put that requirement into practice is unclear.“I meticulously documented things,” Rebecca said. “I submitted things through the ethics hotline … I spoke to a lot of people. They just saw this as 100 small incidents. The end result is that it was not appropriately addressed.”Her decision to speak out also made her more aware of what was happening with others.“The more I reported harassment, and the more I talked to HR, the more I realized I wasn’t the only one,” she said. “There are countless individuals that have been known [as] toxic bullies that eventually just left because they got a better offer from somewhere else or retired out.”Now she and other CI staffers say they want their organization to provide more robust management, human resources and sexual harassment training, greater confidentiality protections, and a more standardized chain of command for reporting up. They also want a consistent practice of using outside third-party investigations in serious cases, and for protections to extend to field staff and those who work with their partner organizations globally.‘It was emotional abuse’On more than one occasion, a manager with allegations of abuse or harassment against them at CI has been let go, though complaints don’t seem to be the main factor when managers facing allegations are fired. More often than not it’s been left up to the employee who is complaining to pick a path: fight or flight.Multiple former and current staffers who have gone through CI’s complaint process more than once told Mongabay they spent years repeatedly discussing their issues with everyone from a human resources representative to a member of the executive team. Meetings were set up. Confidences were established. Recommendations were given. But problems continued for those staffers and others.Former CI staffer Tom* worked for the non-profit full-time for more than two years before he quit in early 2015 because of what he describes as an “emotionally abusive supervisor.”“She left a trail of destruction behind her,” Tom said, adding that his supervisor’s reputation was well known and he was warned from day one on her team. “So many people came up to me and said, ‘I advise you to start looking for another job right now because you have no idea what mistake you’ve made.’”The warnings proved true, he said, and over a period of about a year he went to human resources four times looking for help.Tom added that he believes many other people made complaints about the same supervisor around the same time. About six months into his position, he got an unexpected promotion and raise. It seemed things were looking up and the problems had been resolved.Then an approved vacation request for a few days off turned into a nightmare, he said, as his supervisor demanded, “You need to be available to me while on vacation.” He said the moment his vacation began, his manager began to frantically call and email, asking him to complete an urgent assignment. Then HR began to call and email. Nowhere near a computer at the time and with a fading cellphone battery, he started receiving frantic messages that the vacation had to be canceled to finish “an important task.” Tom made a detour to respond. He was stunned to find his boss was asking him to make a title slide for a PowerPoint presentation.“Everybody knew,” Tom said, adding that the situation for him became a matter of surviving toxic doses of manipulation. “It was, in a way, an abuse of power. You know you’re in a situation where someone abuses power, and you start wondering, ‘Is it something I did wrong? Am I making the project fail? Am I not working hard enough?’”The final straw was an assignment that dropped into his lap with a one-month deadline just two weeks before his winter vacation. He said he had to work over the holidays to finish on time, all while HR continued to advise him to get another job. Within less than two months of finishing that assignment — he said he was exhausted, depressed and at his wit’s end — he finally quit. After he left, a majority of his colleagues from his team also quit independently of one another.“Many, many people have come before me,” Tom said. “It was never about performance, it was emotional abuse.”Finding skeletons in the closetToday, CI works with more than 2,000 in-country partners, according to its website. Its annual budget is hundreds of millions of dollars a year, according to tax filings.Yet staff say that over time, they feel that things like management training and protecting employees has taken a backseat to funding pressures. CI partners financially and programmatically with some of the largest philanthropic organizations in the world, but complaints of employee mistreatment at Conservation International have persisted for years.“CI-HQ needs sexual harassment training!” wrote one employee in October 2010 to CI’s online anonymous suggestion box. “I have witnessed and heard about multiple instances of harassing behavior in the last six months. None of the individuals (all women in their 20s) who experienced this harassment were comfortable approaching anyone in a position of authority about it. The training … should be made mandatory here.”The response to the complaint of harassment was simply: “We currently have no plans to institute training on this topic but will consider doing so if we have reports of harassment at CI.”In 2012, a suggestion to create an ombudsman position as a neutral third party to address issues was not taken up, but CI did conduct its first staff survey that year. In the second and most recent staff survey, in 2014, a total of 630 people responded. The survey results show that 40 percent of respondents didn’t think workplace rules were being applied equally to everyone. Areas of top concern included accountability and “fear of speaking up.”Beyond that, some say that CI continues to make unacceptable allowances for cultural and gender differences in their diverse organization.“We need to be equitable and fair, both within our external programming and internally,” said Amanda*, a longtime CI staffer in management at HQ. “To me the most tangible way is to … do some sort of mandatory workshop that is self-reflective and begins to shift the culture.”In the summer of 2017, CI did host a Gender Summit near its U.S. headquarters over a period of several days, but it was focused on gender-related issues in programming. However, an after-report summary written by the 14 attendees included a suggestion about gender issues in CI’s workplace. The suggestion stemmed from a discussion that took place within the group during the summit and particularly focused on stories from South Africa, Peru and Bolivia, according to CI field staffers who attended.“If we don’t walk the walk, we can’t talk the talk,” they wrote. “Unfortunately, there are still many inequities and work cultures at CI that are not equally supportive of women and men, and other social groups.”They also noted that “there still remains prominent issues within field offices and headquarters that impede the realization of the internal culture we desire. This is a red flag issue that should be prioritized within CI’s HR department and among leadership.” The report noted an intention to bring “some of the main issues and recommendations” to executive management in a letter. The letter was never sent, according to sources familiar with the situation.Fast-forward to today: There has been little significant institution-wide training for sexual or other harassment, or for bullying and abuse. There are discussions and promises from the top that a new survey and some kind of training are on their way this year, and CI confirmed to Mongabay that a minimum two-hour sexual harassment training is required within the first year of employment. The spokesperson also said that during management events, such as the annual week-long internal training, it includes the topics of sexual harassment and what it describes as “other ethics matters.” It said both CI staff trainers and external experts are used.In the meantime, an array of issues persists for both men and women, and sources told Mongabay that there is a fear associated with reporting up, even with anonymity or having true confidentiality when dealing with a complaint. Staff that have used the oft-advertised anonymous Ethics Hotline say that in their experience, any report there can, and sometimes does, get passed around among different relevant individuals.“I think a lot of people … don’t trust it [the hotline]. So in theory you call this number and it works in multiple languages,” Amanda said. “I think in practice … people just don’t trust it or understand where the complaint is going.”However, according to a former upper-level manager within the HR department at CI who departed earlier this year and asked not to be identified, the anonymous option on the hotline is trustworthy.For Amanda, she believes that a fear of power plays a role in not reporting up.“When you’re looking at the breakdown in field programs, most women are in the lower, entry and mid-level positions,” Amanda said. “And in the discussions I’ve had with a number of them there’s limited opportunity for advancement and there can be issues of bullying or not being respected in part because of their gender.”Nonetheless, she and many others at CI remain optimistic. CI’s staffing numbers do reflect the strong presence of women within the organization. According to the most recent information provided by the non-profit, women make up half of their global staff, and over half of CI’s 17 senior vice presidents are women.“I have hopes that this new leadership will take a more proactive approach than the last one did. But we’ll have to see,” Amanda said.Responses from CI’s new leadershipCurrent CEO M. Sanjayan took the reins from co-founder Peter Seligmann, who had served as CEO since the organization’s founding in 1987, last May. He was joined by new president Jennifer Morris and executive vice president Sebastian Troëng.The problems are widespread enough that Sanjayan has weighed in on the issue more than once during his first nine months at the helm of CI. In fact, he has personally offered to field complaints, and sources say he has gotten quietly involved multiple times, but they haven’t yet seen any broader change beyond their personal cases.He’s also publicly encouraged discussion and often reiterated CI’s strict policies and avenues for reporting issues.During an all-staff meeting on Oct. 30, 2017, Sanjayan, Morris and Troëng briefly addressed a question about harassment and gender equality in the workplace. Sanjayan said the HR department knows “it’s time to do a refresher on inclusion and make sure there’s absolute clarity.”The next day, during a Women’s Network meeting, sources say Sanjayan showed up unannounced to ask women there if the #metoo movement is relevant to CI. The Women’s Network is a professional networking and support group within CI that was founded in 2010. Opened to men in mid-2017, it is run and populated largely by about 200 mid-level female staff, most of whom have little or no institutional power.In a written response to Mongabay, CI spokesperson Jenny Parker said that the non-profit wants to be part of the “global conversation underway” about issues of harassment and abuse and that executive leadership is committed to reinforcing “our core workplace values, which do not tolerate harassment of any kind.”Parker added that CI does enforce its policies for inappropriate behavior. “Every complaint of harassment, bullying, or any other inappropriate behavior is taken seriously, investigated thoroughly, and dealt with promptly,” Parker said. She added that any new information would “warrant review and any necessary action.”* Current and former CI staffers interviewed for this story asked that their names and other identifying details not be used out of concern over negative professional repercussions. ** Editor’s note (April 6, 2018): After this story was published, one of the former CI employees contacted for this article reached out to Mongabay indicating a willingness to be used as a named source. The former CI employee, who wasn’t interviewed or used as a source for the story, “only had positive, empowering, respectful experiences with male colleagues”. Based on this information, we updated the story April 6 by adding the word “almost” to this sentence: That’s a reaction shared by almost every current or former CI staffer who came forward to be interviewed for this story.Genevieve Belmaker is a contributing editor at Mongabay. You can find her on Twitter at @Gen_Belmaker. With additional reporting by Lauren Crothers and Carinya Sharples.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Genevieve Belmakercenter_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Indonesia’s dying timber concessions, invaded by oil palms, top deforestation table

first_imgBanner image: A logging road cuts through a tropical forest in Borneo. Photo by Rhett A. Butler. Deforestation, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Indonesia, Logging, Palm Oil, Plantations, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Logging, Rainforests, Selective Logging, Timber, timber trade, Tropical Forests Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong A study shows that selective-logging leases accounted for the highest rate of deforestation in three provinces studied from 2013 to 2016.While the discovery came as a surprise, the researchers attributed part of that deforestation to the illegal encroachment of oil palm plantations into many of these timber concessions. Another factor is the cutting of more trees than permitted by logging operators.Environmentalists warn the problem could get even worse if the government follows through on plans to lift a ban on exports of unprocessed logs, which has been in place since 1985 (with a brief hiatus from 1997 to 2001). JAKARTA — The rate of deforestation in selective-logging concessions in parts of Indonesia has unexpectedly overtaken those of pulpwood and oil palm concessions, a new study shows.A study by the NGO Forest Watch Indonesia (FWI) in the provinces of North Sumatra, East Kalimantan and North Maluku showed a combined loss of 7,180 square kilometers (2,770 square miles) of these forests between 2013 and 2016. Seventy-two percent of that deforestation occurred in areas under one of four types of concessions: selective logging (for timber); pulpwood (typically acacia, to make paper); oil palm; and mining.Selective logging, which the researchers believed to be a declining industry relative to the booming oil palm and pulpwood industries, experienced the highest rate of deforestation over the study period, losing 838 square kilometers (323 square miles) of natural forest. This was followed closely by mining concessions (833 square kilometers), palm oil concessions (760 square kilometers) and pulpwood concessions (370 square kilometers).“We considered the selective-logging industry to be comatose … largely replaced by acacia plantations and then oil palm plantations,” FWI campaigner Agung Ady Setiawan told Mongabay. But the study, he said, showed otherwise — and the culprit was the latter industry.Selective-logging concessions, known by the Indonesian acronym HPH (Hak Pengusahaan Hutan), are the backbone of Indonesia’s historically important timber industry. But that industry has been on a steady decline due to competition from other countries across Southeast Asia and an export ban on unprocessed logs imposed by the government since 1985. (The ban was briefly lifted from 1997 to 2001, but has remained in place ever since.)In 2000, selective-logging concessions occupied 640,000 square kilometers (247,100 square miles) of forested area in Indonesia, contributing $9 billion a year to the economy. By 2015, the concessions had shrunk by less than a third, to 206,200 square kilometers (79,600 square miles). Of the 269 selective-logging companies registered in the country, only 178 are still active.Palm oil plantations, meanwhile, have experienced a boom in the past four decades, from just 3,000 square kilometers (1,160 square miles) of concessions in 1980 to 116,000 square kilometers (44,800 square miles) in 2016, according to the Indonesian Palm Oil Association (GAPKI).Unlike acacia and oil palm plantations, the cutting of trees in HPH concessions is selective, with only commercially valuable trees larger than a certain diameter allowed to be felled. This leaves other trees standing for long-term generation. Between two and 20 trees are typically removed from each hectare of forest once every few decades.This generally leaves more than 90 percent of the trees standing, and the remaining vegetation recognizably constitutes a forest.That, said FWI’s Agung, was what made the discovery of the high rate of deforestation in selective-logging concessions such a surprise.Upon closer inspection, FWI found that in many cases, the selective-logging concessions had been illegally converted into oil palm plantations, with the operators relying on a dearth or, in the case of abandoned concessions, complete lack of monitoring by the authorities.This was the case in at least one of the selective-logging concessions studied in the district of South Tapanuli, in North Sumatra, said FWI researcher Mufti Fathul Barri.“We assume that this is the cause of deforestation in some HPH concessions,” he said. “There are many HPH concessions that are left unmonitored and unmanaged by the owners, and so they’re converted into oil palm plantations by locals or other companies.”The takeover by the oil palm plantations has also triggered conflicts with residents, the study found.In other cases, the deforestation in HPH concessions was due to more trees being cut down than were permitted. FWI said this was the case in two selective-logging concessions in Obi Island, North Maluku. One of the concessions lost 48 square kilometers (18 square miles) of natural forest in the three-year study period, while the other lost 41 square kilometers (15 square miles).“Based on our analysis, deforestation is shifting to the eastern part of the country,” which includes North Maluku, Agung said. “This pattern [of deforestation in HPH concessions] used to happen in Sumatra and Kalimantan [Indonesian Borneo] 10 to 20 years ago. Now it’s happening in HPH concessions in eastern Indonesia because this part of the country still has thick and lush forests.”The government is considering once again lifting the ban on exports of unprocessed logs from HPH concessions, as a means of reviving the timber industry. It argues that with low domestic prices for timber, the industry needs access to the overseas market.Environmental activists, however, warn that this will only speed up the rate of deforestation in selective-logging concessions.“It’ll become deforestation permitted by law,” Even Sembiring, the policy assessment manager at Walhi, Indonesia’s largest environmental NGO, told Mongabay. “The protection of HPH concessions is still weak, as we can see from many former concessions being converted into oil palm plantations, because the managers don’t bother to reforest their concessions.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more