From conflict to communities: Forests in Liberia

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Certification, Climate Change, Climate Change And Forests, Community Development, Community Forestry, Environment, Featured, Forest Carbon, Forests, Land Rights, Palm Oil, Primary Forests, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest People, Rainforests, Redd, Redd And Communities, Resource Curse, Tropical Forests center_img Liberia holds 40 percent of West Africa’s Upper Guinean rainforest.National and international organizations have worked with communities and the country’s leadership to clean up the corruption that many say has pervaded outside investments in timber and commercial agriculture.Currently, the Land Rights Act, which would give communities more control over their forests, awaits approval, but its progress has been paralyzed, in part by this year’s elections. It’s no secret that natural wealth in many African countries often sparks conflict and precipitates decades of the suffering of local populations. Liberia’s ‘resource curse’ is no different.With more than 40 percent of the remaining Upper Guinean rainforest, the West African nation’s timber was the currency that financed a bloody 14-year civil war. Now, nearly 15 years after the end of the violence, the country continues to struggle in sorting out how best to use its forests to provide a boost to one of the world’s poorest economies.“The stakes are pretty high because there’s this link back to the conflict,” said Michael Beevers, a professor of environmental studies at Dickinson College in Pennsylvania who studies the conflict. The concern, he said, is that “if forests aren’t managed well, perhaps there could be a reversion back to conflict or lots of low-level conflicts.”A farmer walks along a road in Liberia. Photo by Cameron Zohoori/Creative Commons via FlickrCharles Taylor, who led the rebellion that began in 1989, funneled revenue from selling timber, as well as diamonds, iron ore, and rubber, into weapons purchases and building his own wealth. When he was elected president of Liberia in 1997, Taylor maneuvered so that eventually he had near-full control of Liberia’s resources, and he struck deals with companies willing to overlook an on-going civil war that killed 250,000 people and the human rights abuses of his regime.But even after the end of the war, control of Liberia’s forests remained in the hands of the government, not in the communities that depend on them. The international community, aiming to buoy the devastated Liberian economy – the war had shaved off more than 89 percent of its gross domestic product by 1995 – took a similar tack.The hope was that centralized control of timber resources, along with safeguards to ensure that the timber could not be used to stoke conflict, would encourage foreign investment. Then, the resulting job opportunities would trickle down, and the new economic development would improve living standards.That didn’t happen. Despite being given 1.6 million hectares of land for oil palm, timber, and mining, companies’ promises to invest in community development have gone unmet, according to researchers and NGOs.Shocks to the systemLiberia remains one of the world’s poorest countries, bereft the resilience to absorb the impact of jolts like the 2014 Ebola outbreak. It ranked 177th out of 188 countries in the UN Development Program’s Human Development Index in 2015, and the growth of the country’s gross domestic product, a key economic indicator, was negligible.Though deforestation remains low according to the Global Forest Resources Assessment 2015 for Liberia by the Food and Agriculture Organization, recent actions by the government have induced a backlash by communities, human rights organizations and NGOs. Between 2010 and 2012, officials granted logging licenses for nearly 60 percent of the country’s remaining untouched forests and covering around 25 percent of the land in Liberia. Many, if not most, were found to have been granted illegally, indicating widespread corruption. The scandal led President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to impose a moratorium on logging permits in the country in 2013.“They are playing on the weak governance we have,” said James Otto, program leader for the community rights and corporate governance program at the Sustainable Development Institute (SDI), a Liberian NGO focused on natural resources.“We have people in government who should be standing [at] the door and asking more questions and engaging with the companies,” Otto added.Because communities have not yet been empowered with a say in what happens to their land, he said that they’ve often been backed into deals that benefit big companies and no one else. He pointed to the acquisition of thousands of hectares of land for oil palm plantations by the Singapore-based company Golden Veroleum Liberia, known as GVL, from communities wracked with Ebola in 2014.According to The Guardian, the company got ahold of approximately 13,000 hectares in just two months at the height of the epidemic.“We were in crisis,” Otto told Mongabay. “There was Ebola. People were not supposed to come together and sit in meetings.” In fact, President Sirleaf had banned public meetings to reduce the chance of spreading the disease.GVL told The Guardian in 2015 that the signings of the memoranda of understanding with these communities was just the final step in a process that had begun before Ebola broke out in Liberia.The Ebola outbreak that began in 2014 decimated Liberia’s economy. Photo by UNMIL/Emmanuel Tobey/Creative Commons via FlickrA push for community controlIn the last decade, a groundswell of support for community control of forests has been building in the country. In step with research showing the importance of communities in forest conservation around the world, community advocates have been fighting for the passage of the Land Rights Act since 2009.“For the last 14 years, there’s been a real push to give communities more control and look at community rights as a central part of what’s happening in forests in Liberia,” Beevers said.The idea is to bring communities into the fold, allowing them some control over how their land is used. In nearly seven years of debate, the proposed law, which would move control over Liberian land from the Forestry Development Authority to the Land Commission, has gained the support of President Sirleaf and many lawmakers in government, as well Liberians around the country, Otto said.“It has been a resounding story across the country that they want ownership rights,” he added. “That has come out very clearly and strongly in almost all the community and regional consultations – that you give our land back to us, and this is the recipe for development and moving the country forward.”“I think it will lead the way for community benefits,” said Jeremiah Karmo, the director of the Forestry Training Institute and one of the authors of the 2015 FAO forests report.And it comes at a time when Liberians are developing a better understanding of this resource. “We are about to undertake a national forest inventory by next year. That will give us a good measure of what we have concerning our forests’…carbon,” Karmo said.Supporters of the Land Rights Act got a big boost when Norway promised $150 million to help stop deforestation, with payments coming through 2020 contingent upon Liberia’s reductions in carbon emissions. In addition to the climate change goals that these payments are meant to help achieve under the international strategy of “reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries,” or REDD+, the Norwegian agreement stipulates that some of that money must be used to bolster community forest management institutions.Instead of pushing a top-down agenda, just as the international community and the emphasis on timber extraction did after the civil war, these new multinational pacts support existing institutions and sentiments in the country, Beevers said.“They can start creating new norms [and] new behaviors that can be positive,” he added.The country has also signed a voluntary partnership agreement, or VPA, with the European Union’s Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade, known as FLEGT, facility. The agreement to ensure that timber arriving from Liberia to the EU is sustainably and legally harvested came into force in 2013.While the country is still in the process of implementing the reforms necessary to obtain full licensing from FLEGT, foresters in the country say that it’s already making a difference.“[The VPA is] helping to build our capacities with staff members,” said Joseph Tally, technical manager for the commercial forestry department at the Forestry Development Authority.Harvesting wood in Rivercess County, Liberia. Photo by Cameron Zohoori/Creative Commons via FlickrConcerns about the Land Rights ActTally also voiced concerns about the Land Rights Act and whether Liberians comprehend what the move might mean.“We hope that they understand that turning the forest completely over to the [Land] Commission that [doesn’t] have foresters or the knowledge of the forest,” Tally said. “They are turning the entire land over to communities and then we see there will be a conflict with the Forestry Development [Authority] also having a mandate to take care of the forest, to ensure that the forest is well supervised.”The Forest Development Authority is a government agency created by the Liberian Legislature in 1976 and is charged with managing Liberia’s forests.It appeared as if the Land Rights Act might pass in the second half of 2016, but progress has since stalled. And with Liberian’s going to the polls in October 2017, SDI’s James Otto said that politicians’ focus will likely be on getting reelected.“This government might not have the will or the time to pass the Land Rights Act,” Otto said.One of the reasons that the Land Rights Act has spent so much time in limbo is that many people are not sure how such diffuse control over a resource as large as the forests will play out.Beevers, who studies resource management after conflict and has written extensively about Liberia, said the results of such a sweeping move are difficult to predict.“There’s a worry that if communities have the final say, if they initiate anything, that things like protected areas could go away, because maybe they don’t want a protected area,” Beevers said. “There’s a worry that [the law] could work against conservation and biodiversity protection.”Traditional agroforestry in Liberia. Photo courtesy of Jason Taylor/The Source Project“At the same time, communities say, ‘Well, [forest management has] never worked anyway. It’s never benefited communities.’”What’s more, he added, the inclusion of many different viewpoints as communities’ voices are heard will be difficult. And concerns about shady practices by logging companies linger.“The more actors you bring to the table, the harder it is,” he said. “But in general that’s the best way to go.“If you’re building trust [and] you’re building cooperation amongst all these different actors, that’s where you’re going to get more of the trajectory towards peace, rather than a trajectory toward contentiousness and conflict.”The long process toward sorting out forest policy in Liberia has demonstrated how contentious issues making progress in land rights, conservation and economic development can be. But to Beevers’ mind, progress on these issues shouldn’t be viewed as a singular end goal.“I think we need to look at these issues as an on-going conversation,” he said. “That’s how we should be thinking about governance and managing resources.”And despite the difficulty, the fact that Liberia is sorting these issues out is a testament to how far Liberia has come.“This is a conversation that was completely impossible 10 years ago, and certainly before that,” Beevers said. “In the past, this discussion would never have happened.”CITATIONS:•    Beevers, M. D. (2015). Forest governance and post-conflict peace in Liberia: Emerging contestation and opportunities for change? Extractive Industries and Society, 3(2), 320–328. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exis.2015.07.007•    Beevers, M. D. (2015). Governing Natural Resources for Peace: Lessons from Liberia and Sierra Leone. Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations: April-June 2015, Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 227-246.•    FAO. (2015). Global Forest Resources Assessment 2015. FAO Forestry.•    Stevens, C., Winterbottom, R., Springer, J., & Reytar, K. (2014). Securing Rights, Combating Climate Change: How Strengthening Community Forest Rights Mitigates Climate Change. Washington DC: World Resource Institute, 64.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Ecologist wins Heinz environment prize for airborne mapping that informs policy

first_imgArticle published by John Cannon Ecologist Greg Asner of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory will receive a $250,000 award from the Heinz Family Foundation for his work to map rainforests and coral reefs around the world.Lawmakers and other key decision-makers use Asner’s research to guide policy in the United States, South America and Southeast Asia.Asner said he intends to put the funds toward marine education and outreach in Hawaii, where he began his career. It’s not uncommon to find ecologist Greg Asner flying transects over the rainforests of the Amazon or Borneo. His specially outfitted plane has helped map out the three-dimensional structure of these ecosystems, and it’s earned him the esteem of his fellow scientists for the insights that this type of data lends to our understanding the health and functioning of tropical forests.But these data also allow policymakers, government officials and conservationists to make decisions with a more complete picture of forests and the threats they face on an unprecedented scale.“This is critical, because until now, the hardest part has been the ability to measure and map and discuss and bargain and make policy decisions over areas that are large enough to have real impact,” Asner said in a statement.The CAO laser-guided imaging spectrometer data are fully three-dimensional, providing the structure and architecture of the forest, while simultaneously capturing up to 23 chemical properties of the canopy foliage. These colors indicate the diversity of canopy traits among coexisting tree species in the same hectare. Image and caption courtesy of Greg Asner, Carnegie Institution for ScienceHis work has caught the attention of the Heinz Family Foundation, who announced today that they will present him with a Heinz Award of $250,000 in October.“By providing us with remarkable detail on the complexity and fragility of our world’s forests, Dr. Asner is pushing us to respond with greater urgency to the need to protect these resources for the health and future of us all,” said Teresa Heinz, Chairwoman of the Heinz Family Foundation in a statement from the organization.From the beginning of his career, Asner has made it a priority to work with these decision-makers, who are often nonscientists.“We are using science at new scales to affect change not only in the scientific realm and the thinking of scientists, but also to have efficacy in the realms of conservation policy and environmental management,” Asner added. “If we can do that, then we know that our science has had an impact.”Asner leads the Carnegie Airborne Observatory (CAO) at the Carnegie Institution for Science, with his lab located at Stanford University.“With the Carnegie Airborne Observatory, we have developed scientific approaches for getting really high-end detail that tells us specifically what is going on in a very large geographic area,” Asner said.Carnegie Airborne Observatory-3 onboard laboratory includes navigation and data collection consoles, power and computing racks, and data capture facilities. Photo and caption courtesy of Greg Asner, Carnegie Institution for ScienceHis team uses a technique that Asner invented called “airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy,” that involved mounting imaging spectrometers on the CAO airplane, which allow them to measure the light reflected by the forest canopy. From the different wavelengths they measure, they can then tease apart unique signatures that open a window into the diversity of tree species in the forest. Asner hopes that one day soon, they’ll be able to mount their system on a satellite and produce monthly biodiversity maps covering the entire planet.Information from the CAO aircraft can also be used “to train” or “to make the Landsat data much more sensitive to the details” of what threats such as gold mining look like on the imagery to help agencies learn about the most pressing threats to forests in real time, Asner said. He and his team have developed a software package called CLASlite that allows scientists from all over the world — currently about 5,000 in 137 countries to whom they’ve provided the package for free — to monitor deforestation and forest degradation.In Peru, Asner’s team works directly with the Peruvian Ministry of the Environment, and his team’s surveys are helping authorities identify sections of the Amazon that house the highest levels of biodiversity so they can protect them. Another recent study demonstrated that keeping gold miners from destroying protected forests will require sustained — not just periodic — enforcement by government authorities.An orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) in Sabah, Malaysia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler / MongabayAsner’s surveys of the Bornean state of Sabah now provide Malaysian officials with data on the biodiversity, habitat and carbon stock present in the state’s forests. His collaboration with scientists on the ground there is also helping them better understand which forests support populations of the Critically Endangered Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus).He and his team have also made an impact closer to their home base.“In California, traditionally you have had field work and satellites to collect data, but both are mismatches in scale with the actual problem of managing California’s watersheds,” Asner said.“With the new methods and new instrumentation that we’ve developed, we can measure the impact of the recent drought, tree by tree, watershed by watershed, in utter detail, so that decisions can have real world applicability, from the single landowner who has a one-acre parcel all the way up to state and federal forest reserves.”Asner’s research helped inform Gov. Jerry Brown’s decision to declare a state of emergency to deal with the multi-year drought that California has faced.“Through the technology and scientific applications, [Asner] has developed, he is not only revolutionizing the way we understand the living world around us, he is equipping us with information that can be shared and directly used to inform policy change — at a time when that has never been more important,” Teresa Heinz said.Ecologist Greg Asner’s ultra-high-resolution maps of rainforests and coral reefs are informing environmental policy around the world. Photo by Spencer Lowell courtesy of the Heinz Family FoundationThe $250,000 award comes with no stipulations on how it should be spent, so Asner aims to invest it back into a place where science is informing conservation.“I’m going to put it toward marine education and outreach, mostly in Hawaii,” he told Mongabay. “Hawaii is where I started more than 25 years ago.”The state is another location where policymakers have taken notice of Asner’s work. CAO surveys have revealed that the islands’ coral reefs are dying off, and state agencies are now using that information to do what they can to slow or even reverse this worrying trend, in another example of basic science lending understanding to how we can best protect our environment.“This Heinz award is especially humbling, not just because so few receive it, but because it means that folks notice the impact my team and I have had on the applied side, which for us is ecosystem conservation and management, as well as the training of a wide range of professionals,” Asner said. “It inspires me to do more.”Banner image of Spencer Lowell courtesy of the Heinz Family Foundation.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.CITATIONSAsner, G. P., Martin, R. E., Knapp, D. E., Tupayachi, R., Anderson, C. B., Sinca, F., … & Llactayo, W. (2017). Airborne laser-guided imaging spectroscopy to map forest trait diversity and guide conservation. Science, 355(6323), 385-389.Asner, G. P., & Tupayachi, R. (2016). Environmental Research Letters, 12, 094004.Davies, A. B., Ancrenaz, M., Oram, F., & Asner, G. P. (2017). Canopy structure drives orangutan habitat selection in disturbed Bornean forests. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(31), 8307-8312. Amazon Biodiversity, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Mining, Amazon Rainforest, Animals, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Hotspots, Borneo Orangutan, Carbon Conservation, Carbon Sequestration, Charismatic Animals, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Conservation, Conservation, Coral Reefs, Critically Endangered Species, Deforestation, Drivers Of Deforestation, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Forest Carbon, Forests, Gold Mining, Governance, Government, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Law, Law Enforcement, Mammals, Marine Conservation, Marine Protected Areas, Mining, Oceans, Orangutans, Parks, Politics, Protected Areas, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Remote Sensing, Research, Rivers, Satellite Imagery, Saving Rainforests, Saving The Amazon, Threats To Rainforests, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Forests, Tropical Rivers, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Red Cloud’s Revolution: Oglalla Sioux freeing themselves from fossil fuel

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Alternative Energy, Clean Energy, Climate Change, Climate Change Politics, Climate Politics, Controversial, Corporate Role In Conservation, Corporate Social Responsibility, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Energy Politics, Environment, Environmental Activism, Environmental Ethics, Featured, Global Environmental Crisis, Green, Green Business, Green Energy, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Poverty, Poverty Alleviation, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, Sustainability, Sustainable Development Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Henry Red Cloud, like so many Oglalla Sioux young men, left the reservation to work in construction. When he returned home in 2002, he needed a job, and also wanted to make a difference. He attended a solar energy workshop and saw the future.Today, Red Cloud runs Lakota Solar and the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center, which have become catalysts for an innovative new economic network – one that employs locals and connects tribes, while building greater energy independence among First Nations.The company is building and installing alternative energy systems, and training others to do the same, throughout remote areas of U.S. reservations, thus allowing the Sioux and others to leap past outdated fossil fuel technology altogether.Henry Red Cloud’s company has another more radical purpose: it helps provide energy to remote Water Protector camps, like the one at Standing Rock protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). Solar power and other alternative energy sources are vital at such remote sites, as they power up cellphones, connecting resistors to the media and outside world. Henry Red Cloud, founder of Lakota Solar and the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center. Photo by Saul ElbeinIt’s high summer in South Dakota, and a cruel sun beats down with an endless floodtide of photons that burns skin through t-shirts and tinted car windows. That’s the way Henry Red Cloud likes it. To Red Cloud – descendant of a great Lakota insurgent chief, founder of Lakota Solar, and self-proclaimed “solar warrior” – that July sun is key to the independence of his fellow Lakota and native peoples across America; it also embodies a hot business opportunity.It’s July 5, the tail end of Red Cloud’s Energy Independence Day weekend, first announced in the wake of the Trump Inauguration, and meant to spread off-grid skills throughout Indian country – possibly with radical purpose.I walked out of the sun and indoors to find Red Cloud leading a solar workshop, holding forth to a group of eager indigenous participants about photovoltaic cells and the danger of phantom loads – the way in which many appliances continue drawing current even when switched off. “Vampire” loads are a constant suck on household energy, consuming electricity and thereby emitting carbon to no purpose – while also draining an off-grid setup with limited juice.A set up, like, say, the remote, off-grid camps at the Standing Rock Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) protests in 2016.Red Cloud offers up a hypothetical: “Let’s say you have a Water Protector camp, your solar array is charging, you notice the inverter is on, but nothing is plugged in.” The stocky 60-something instructor, with long ponytail and far-seeing eyes, frowns and shakes his head, indicating trouble. “Well, that empty power strip can draw more than your actual daily use,” draining down the batteries faster than they can charge.”A bearded man in his late 20s raises his hand. “That bad for the array?”“Well,” Red Cloud responds, “it’s not a problem if you know about it. Just plug in a couple cellphones,” and charge them up so protestors can reach out to the media from the remote site. That way, he says, at least now the array is doing some work.A solar technology training class gathered on Energy Independence Day Weekend, July 4, 2017, at Red Cloud’s factory on Pine Ridge Reservation. Photo by Saul ElbeinMan with a planAfter the workshop, Red Cloud shows me his innovations. A solar trailer, small enough to be pulled by a compact car, is mounted with panels and an inverter. We step into a show-house built out of compressed earthen blocks – the hydraulic press that makes them runs on diesel, the only machine Red Cloud owns that depends on fossil fuel.“And then there’s this,” he says, pointing to a plywood box with Plexiglas atop it, a 35V photovoltaic panel that sparkles in the sun. It’s a homemade solar furnace: in the brutal Dakota winter, it can generate a 190 degree Fahrenheit mass of air, along with enough energy to blow that warmth through a house, largely eliminating heating costs. He takes me to see the solar pumps that move running water through his two-story school building.Red Cloud’s training center and home is a model for something new and, not to put too harsh a word on it, revolutionary.His compound represents an all-in-one alternative energy lab and off-grid resistance camp set in the middle of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. That’s a highly unlikely place for energy innovation: Pine Ridge is America’s second poorest county, a sprawling and desolate collection of about 40,000 spread across the South Dakota Badlands. Most locals are so impoverished, and so estranged from the cash economy, that some 60 percent of them can’t afford to hook up to the electric grid.Gloria Red Cloud shows off a solar-powered floodlight she built for her car using about $100 in materials. Photo by Saul ElbeinThis solar furnace can generate a 190-degree mass of air, supplementing grid or wood heat in the brutal Dakota winter. Photo by Saul ElbeinWhich, to many Lakota leaders and especially Red Cloud, represents a huge opportunity – a chance for the tribe to leapfrog over the 20th Century energy economy of coal and natural gas burning power plants and regional transmission lines into a New Economy. The goal is to build an energy independent First Nation and modern lifestyle, beyond the reach of oil shortages, price hikes, and the environmental harm perpetuated by the U.S. fossil fuel-driven economy.For more than a decade, Red Cloud has been running Lakota Solar, an off-grid skills school and solar machine factory – one of Pine Ridge’s few locally owned business, and the heart of a business network that extends to a dozen other reservations.Over a thousand alumni have learned to build solar arrays, solar furnaces and solar-driven water pumps in his schools. To Red Cloud, these are practical skills that expand people’s economic and political options. But they’re also something mystical ­­– a key to a new personal and communal future. The two of us settle under a shade tree, and Red Cloud declares: “Number 45,” (that being his way of referring to U.S. President Donald Trump) “is changing a whole lot in our country. So we need to start banding together, natives and non-natives, and if we’re going to build this country let’s build it efficient.”He wipes his forehead. “We’re all waiting for something. What? I don’t know. But it’s time to get started,” he says.Portable solar arrays helped power the Oceti Sakowin Camp, which rose on the north end of the Standing Rock Reservation in the summer and fall of 2016 in opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. Though primarily powered by wood and gasoline, the camps also ran on a great deal of solar. Photo by Saul ElbeinAn independent traditionIn the early 2000s, Henry Red Cloud came home to the Pine Ridge Reservation and realized he had a problem. He’d spent years on the road, working seasonal construction, building with structural steel, interlocking the bones of skyscrapers “high above 5th Avenue” in New York City, and elsewhere, seeing much of America. But that wasn’t the world he wanted to live in.“I had all these hopes of going home, having a job, getting to spend quality time with my people,” he recalls.The word “home” for Red Cloud, and his moniker too, resonate with historic cadences. He is named for his five-times great-grandfather, the war-chief Red Cloud of the Oglalla Sioux. Though not a member of one of the traditional Oglalla ruling families, the original Red Cloud led a highly successful insurgency from 1866-1868 to prevent U.S. expansion into the productive buffalo grounds that the Lakota were then seizing from the Crow Indians.During that conflict – now remembered as the Powder River War or Red Cloud’s War – the Oglalla and their Cheyenne and Arapahoe allies, defeated a number of U.S. expeditionary forces, wiping out an 81-man cavalry unit in the worst American military defeat at the hands of Plains Indians up to the defeat of Custer’s 7th Calvary at Little Big Horn, Montana in 1876.The end of Red Cloud’s War resulted in the federal government signing the Treaty of 1868, ceding a vast territory to the Lakota that made up much of what is now the U.S. Midwest. Red Cloud then agreed to settle the Oglalla at Pine Ridge, and his fight ended there. When in 1876 the Hunkpapas under Sitting Bull rose against the U.S. in anger at the treaty’s violation, the elder Red Cloud stayed out, seeing no benefit in further battles against the Americans.The Oglallas have been at Pine Ridge since, renowned among the other Lakota and Dakota peoples for the extent to which they have proudly maintained their culture. It is still common to meet elderly Oglalla who speak only their tribal language well, and English with difficulty.One of the portable solar trailers that Red Cloud brought to Standing Rock. Photo by Saul ElbeinHere comes the sunAccording to Henry Red Cloud, what the Oglallas lack today, and badly need, is a thriving economy. When he came home in 2002, he found a reservation that relied on something roughly comparable to a colonial economy – indigenous settlements were largely dependent on franchise stores and chains that brought little money into the community, but which sucked out dollars to the benefit of faraway corporate headquarters. About the only jobs on the reservation were with the tribe – as police, in schools and government.With the initial intention of just making some cash, Red Cloud signed up for a solar installation course. It was a revelation.“I thought, as natives we’ve been embracing the sun for eons,” he says, offering the Sundance as an example, the most sacred rite of the Plains Indians, in which devotees dance ecstatically for four days, exposed to the elements, without sleep, food or water.“We have always believed in living off the land,” he says. After graduating from that first solar course, he decided there was no reason that this native self-sufficiency shouldn’t be reestablished.He took more solar courses, learned more about alternative energy and green technology. He started working as a solar installer, always expecting to run into other Native Americans who had enjoyed the same epiphany he had. “But there weren’t any,” he recalls.“I encouraged my brothers to come [and learn from me], but people can’t just get up and [come to my workshops]. Everyone is doing something, like making handicrafts or gathering wild food, to help their families survive. They can’t leave their families for 19 days. So I thought, what if I bring this knowledge here, to Indian Country?”By 2004, he had learned solar installation; by 2005 he was making his own solar machines; by 2006 he had founded Red Cloud Renewable Energy and was employing locals to make solar panels to sell to the other tribes. Meanwhile, his alternative energy training school began turning out graduates.Water protectors planting cedar trees in the path of the Dakota Access pipeline in September 2016. Mounting an effective resistance opposition against pipeline projects in remote areas requires that activists be able to operate – and stay connected to the web. To Henry Red Cloud, off-grid solar is the ideal technology to meet that need. Photo by Saul ElbeinFinding an alternative to the devil’s choiceFor Red Cloud, solar and renewable energy are to the New Economy what the sun is to an intact ecosystem – the basis of everything, offering perpetual sustenance. A place as “underdeveloped” and remote as Pine Ridge, he says, has always presented its First Nation inhabitants with a devil’s choice: either continue in poverty, or sacrifice your culture to the world coming in from outside – usually the malls-and-suburban model of 20th Century America.“But out here we’re rural,” Red Cloud says, pointing to the far horizon. “We’re the West of the West. At night you have a sky full of stars. You can see thunderstorms coming from 100 miles away. We have no Interstate, no banks, no nothing. And that’s how I like it – being able to go to the hills and see as far as the naked eyeball can see. I wouldn’t want to see mainstream America flood this place.”So, Lakota Solar and the Red Cloud Renewable Energy Center have become catalysts for an innovative economic network – one that employs locals and connects tribes, while building greater independence.Ten years on, Red Cloud employs a dozen people at around $12 an hour, well above the U.S. minimum wage of $7.25 per hour. The products they make, they sell to other tribes, who add their own innovations to the mix. The nearby Rosebud Sioux have “gone to the next level,” says Red Cloud, installing residential-scale wind and rooftop solar. But they also buy their solar furnaces and photovoltaic arrays from Red Cloud. Lakota Solar is now the main supplier for three other native-owned small businesses – a solar-powered paper recycling company and two solar installation firms.The alternative energy systems Red Cloud builds, and boosts, are what’s known as “grid-tie.” For now, they tie into the conventional electricity grid, providing a household, depending on its solar setup, with anywhere from 40 to 80 percent of their power. The systems are designed to be small scale and supplemental, offering a bit more power (or a bit more saved cash) to families that otherwise might go without, or fall short.A mid-range residential setup from Lakota Solar goes for $3,500 and lasts about 30 years; that’s drastically below the $25 to $35 thousand dollar average cost for solar arrays found in the rest of residential America. His systems don’t pay the entire electric bill, Red Cloud says, “but it’s still money saved that goes back into the community. It’s enough to help build our own economy here.”While not the be all, or end all, these inexpensive solar installations offer more than just extra electricity to High Plains reservations. For Red Cloud and other Native American leaders, these solar solutions possess a deep philosophical appeal, extending beyond economic or environmental motives, and extending into the communal, and even to the nearly spiritual.“People don’t like being on the grid here,” Red Cloud says, “because they’ve been coexisting with the earth – the sun, the wind – for most of their history.” Clearly, the man who came back to the reservation in 2002 has found his way home, and he’s now bringing his people home too.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.Campers at Oceti Sakowin in September 2016, sit on “Facebook Hill.” The height, being the highest point in the camp, was the only place to reliably receive the cell service that tied the “water protectors” to the rest of the world, including social media. Charging stations there used diverse forms of renewable energy including solar panels, bicycle generators, or the windmill seen here in the background. Photo by Saul ElbeinAt an action in September 2016, activists threw rocks into a trench dug for the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). Building on the earlier anti-Keystone XL protests, the no-DAPL demonstrations often framed the fossil fuel economy as a “black snake” threatening the future of the world. Solar is seen as a way of breaking free of the grip of both oil and transnational energy companies. Photo by Saul Elbeincenter_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

Drought-driven wildfires on rise in Amazon basin, upping CO2 release

first_imgAgriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon Conservation, Amazon Destruction, Amazon Soy, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Cattle Ranching, Climate Modeling, Controversial, Corruption, Deforestation, Disasters, Drivers Of Deforestation, Environment, Environmental Crime, Environmental Politics, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forest Fragmentation, Forest Loss, Forests, Fragmentation, Green, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Meat, Megafires, Monitoring, Pasture, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Ranching, satellite data, Satellite Imagery, Saving The Amazon, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Tropical Deforestation, wildfires “The authors did a really good job in showing that during droughts, fire activity increases disproportionally across the Amazon ­– even when deforestation rates are in decline,” says Paulo Brando, a researcher at The Amazon Environmental Research Institute (IPAM) and the Woods Hole Research Center, Massachusetts, U.S.“This study suggests a decoupling between deforestation fires and drought-induced fires,” added Juan-Carlos Jimenez-Munoz, a remote sensing expert at Spain’s University of Valencia. “This finding has important implications because policy actions focused only on reducing deforestation may be insufficient to reduce carbon emissions.”INPE’s Aragão says he was surprised to find that increases in forest fire rates were decoupled from deforestation to such a high extent: “This is a critical result, as policies for curbing deforestation will not be effective for reducing fires if the processes are not connected” with escalating drought due to climate change.Although the new study doesn’t quantify the reasons for this decoupling, Aragão suggests that severe forest fragmentation, caused by human activity, makes it easier for fires to spread into neighboring forests during drought, meaning that curbing deforestation has little benefit in preventing wildfires. Amazonian forests hold an estimated 269 miligrams of carbon per hectare, which can be released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide during a forest fire, adding to global warming.Slash-and-burn agriculture in Brazil. Forest clearing is often done by local hired laborers who work for wealthy elite ruralists who wish to convert forests to cattle ranches. The world’s rising demand for beef helps drive these fires and the Amazon deforestation they bring. Photo by Alzenir Ferreira de Souza, CC0 1.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Inefficient_Farming_Techniques.jpgA map of “heat points” monitored by satellite in the Amazon biome between 31 July 2016 and 1 August 2017. Heat points do not denote the size of a wildfire, but only location. Source: INPEHowever, cautions Brando, “these results do not mean that deforestation is not an important driver of fire activity.” The findings show, “that the historical deforestation has already increased forest flammability across the entire region.”The El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is a naturally occurring climate cycle that alters global weather patterns when it brings warm water to the central and eastern Pacific Ocean. (During the opposite La Niña phase, cooler waters flow to the same areas.) These changing ocean temperatures alter the strength of trade winds and during an El Niño result in lower rainfall over the Amazon basin.The last El Niño peaked in 2015, and was linked with one of the most severe Amazonian droughts ever recorded. Tree death due to the drought was so severe that the Amazon rainforest – the lungs of the planet – ceased to absorb carbon dioxide altogether, though the Amazon began to function as a carbon sink again after the event.Aragão found that this powerful ENSO combined with two other oceanic processes to produce 2015’s unusually severe drought. The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) alter ocean temperatures in the Pacific over much longer time-scales than ENSO (cycling over tens or hundreds of years), but the three cycles coincided in 2015 to produce a particularly dry year. During that drought, many Amazonian trees died or shed their leaves, providing large amounts of tinder for fires. “Forests, exposed to drier and hotter climate, [produce] an increased amount of fuel, turn[ing] Amazonian forests into a fire prone system,” the INPE researcher says.In the past, tropical rainforests like those in the Amazon were thought to be too wet to see repeated large-scale fire seasons. As climate change escalates, that is no longer true. The 2015 drought and fires were so severe that the Amazon ceased being a carbon sink for a time. Photo courtesy of IBAMAClimate change is expected to enhance the natural swings brought by ENSO, AMO and PDO cycles in future, meaning that the Amazon can expect more droughts like the one it saw in 2015, according to Aragão.The synergy between increasing drought, dryer forests, and more fragmented forests helps create the fuel needed for fires. However, there is another key component required to make more forest fires happen: a source of ignition.The majority of wildfires occurring in the Amazon today, are ignited by people, says Aragão. Typically, they are set using slash-and-burn techniques by local labor hired by wealthy elites to do pasture clearing. Used in this manner, fire becomes a significant deforestation driver, a complex problem propelled by land thieves, cattle ranchers, Brazilian meat processors, along with the world’s insatiable demand for beef. Meanwhile, the Brazilian government offers only weak enforcement to prevent this intentional deforestation, and under the Temer administration has heavily defunded environmental enforcement and firefighting agencies.“With more droughts, it is very likely that fire incidence will also increase if no policy actions are taken to curb ignition sources,” Aragão predicts.“To reduce the likelihood of wildfires, we need to reduce deforestation and have an aggressive strategy to transition from fire-dependent agricultural systems to fire-free ones,” agrees Brando.The researchers say the Brazilian government should seek to become more aware of changing fire dynamics in the Amazon, and plan mitigation strategies that increase forest resilience against drought, including the curbing of forest fragmentation, while simultaneously preventing deforestation due to cattle ranching, soy production, and for other agricultural purposes.The maintenance of healthy, intact forests, they conclude, is the only way to help assure ecosystem resilience in the face of intensifying climate change-driven droughts, to prevent more forest fires, and hold down greenhouse gas emissions.Citation:Aragão, L. E., Anderson, L. O., Fonseca, M. G., Rosan, T. M., Vedovato, L. B., Wagner, F. H., … & Barlow, J. (2018). 21st Century drought-related fires counteract the decline of Amazon deforestation carbon emissions. Nature communications, 9(1), 536. Doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-02771-yFEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.If climate change continues to worsen unchecked, and forest degradation continues unabated, then Amazon fires are likely to increase. Those fires would also increase the release of carbon, worsening climate change, which in turn could intensify Amazon drought even more, leading to even more fires. Photo courtesy of IBAMA Despite a 76 percent decline in deforestation rates between 2003 and 2015, the incidence of forest fires is increasing in Brazil, with new research linking the rise in fires not only to deforestation, but also to severe droughts.El Niño, combined with other oceanic and atmospheric cycles, produced an unusually severe drought in 2015, a year that saw a 36 percent increase in Amazon basin forest fires, which also raised carbon emissions.Severe droughts are expected to become more common in the Brazilian Amazon as natural oceanic cycles are made more extreme by human-induced climate change.In this new climate paradigm, limiting deforestation alone will not be sufficient to reduce fires and curb carbon emissions, scientists say. The maintenance of healthy, intact, unfragmented forests is vital to providing resilience against further increases in Amazon fires. Looking up at the Amazon canopy in Amazonas, Brazil. Intensifying drought in the Amazon is drying out the forest, creating fuel. However, most wildfires are ignited by people, often to clear land for cattle. Photo credit: alextorrenegra on Visualhunt.com / CC BYIntensifying droughts in the Amazon basin are now a primary determinant of increases in forest fires, a reality that will hinder Brazil’s efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions solely by limiting deforestation, according to a new study published in Nature Communications.An international team of researchers led by Luiz Aragão of Brazil’s National Institute for Space Research (INPE) combined satellite data with greenhouse gas emission inventories and historical climate data to assess and compare the impact of drought and deforestation on forest fires in the Brazilian Amazon between 2003 and 2015.They found that forest fires are becoming increasingly common, and they linked that increase to more frequent and severe droughts in the region. Those fires release a massive amount of greenhouse gasses to the atmosphere: the team calculated that forest fires in Brazil currently release around 450 teragrams of carbon each year – roughly one third the emissions produced by Amazonian deforestation.Despite a 76 percent decline in deforestation rates between 2003 and 2015, fires were 36 percent more common during the 2015 drought than in the preceding 12 years. The study adds weight to research published in 2015 suggesting that a previously reported link between deforestation and an uptick in forest fires is beginning to become less important than the link between forest fires and drought.The Amazon’s São Félix do Xingu area is as large as Austria. It saw nearly 10,000 fires in 2017. The region has just eight dedicated fire fighters, but future budget cuts could impact that even further. Photo courtesy of IBAMANumber of fire hotspots in Brazil, 6/1998-9/2017. Source: INPE Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

Tech and collaboration are putting indigenous land rights on the map

first_imgThe Map Builder software in action. The Map Builder section begins at 6:45. Video courtesy of the Global Forestry WatchLinking indigenous land rights and environmental welfareResearch shows how “tenure-secure” indigenous lands demonstrate lower rates of deforestation and can forestall conflict by demonstrating established land claims.“Where indigenous people have rights to their land, they’re really good stewards of that land,” said Ryan Sarsfield, Latin America Commodities Manager with Global Forest Watch at the World Resources Institute. “Our research in the Amazon Basin shows that average annual deforestation rates are two to three times lower within documented indigenous forests than on similar lands that are not formally recognized by the state.”Sarsfield described in an email the “really dynamic” changes in land use in Paraguay over the last couple of decades. “There’s been an expansion of soybeans in the east, and then movement towards expansion of cattle in the west, in the Chaco region,” he said. “And that has resulted in an explosion of deforestation, explosion of the cattle industry, a lot of which is going for export. And in the process, there’s been a lot of expansion of cleared areas within existing ranches and a lot of buying and selling of ranches, and indigenous people have been pushing back for their land rights in many of these places.”Alberto Vázquez, president of the Asociación de Comunidades Indígenas de Itapúa (ACIDI), of the Mbya Guaraní people, together with Amada Martínez, member of the Asociación de Comunidades Ava Guaraní de Alto Paraná (ACIGAP), of the Avá Guaraní Paranaense people, presenting a regional map and the location of their lands. Photo credit: Ryan Sarsfield, WRI/GFW Amada Martínez taking a close look at a map of her community’s lands. Photo Credit: Ryan Sarsfield, World Resources Institute/Global Forest WatchAccording to Don Hipólito Acevei, President of FAPI, the groups collected tribal lands data through a series of internal coordination meetings.“We contracted, thanks to the support of USAID and WRI, experts in GIS, who received copies of the titles and plans of the communities’ insured lands,” Acevei told Mongabay. “In the case of indigenous communities with claims procedures, their members brought copies of their efforts where the data on the property claimed were stipulated. The work was carried out through coordination of the platform…by FAPI, but with the participation of several indigenous organizations, also civil society organizations and international NGOs…” (Quote translated from Spanish by the author.)Sarsfield and Acevei described how collaboration and standardization using clear protocols, precise data, and participatory management were key to making the smartphone-accessible map.Mirta Pereira, legal advisor of FAPI; Alberto Vázquez; Sindulfo Miranda, president of the Che Iro Ara Poty association, of the Mbya Guaraní people; and Amada Martínez discussing maps during the planning workshop. Photo credit: Ryan Sarsfield, WRI/GFW“The platform cannot guarantee the validity of regional territorial rights,” Acevei explained, “but I think it can serve as an inspiration so that the information is used to connect us with other [indigenous] peoples, since the borders of the countries are dividing the peoples. The people know where their ancestral territories are located, and through the platform they can see the location of the lands they have [already] legalized and they lands they claim. This information is also of vital importance for the State and for regional and local governments.” (Quote translated from Spanish.)While several of Paraguay’s indigenous groups have taken to the courts to challenge forced displacement from their homes by cattle ranching and agricultural development, there is hope that the process of mapping territorial claims using the Tierras Indígenas platform would prevent transgressions from happening in the first place.The interactive platform informs not only indigenous community members about their territorial rights, but also members of the government and the private sector. It is publicly accessible, which means that companies and government institutions can review land claims prior to launching prospective activities in the region.Taguide Picanerai, of the Ayoreo Totobiegosode people, and member of the Organización Payipie Ichadie Totobiegosode (​OPIT), together with Jorge Acuña, GIS technician, of the organization Gente Ambiente y Territorio (GAT), comparing paper and digital maps of the Chaco. Photo credit: Ryan Sarsfield, World Resources Institute/Global Forest Watch“If land is accurately represented,” Sarsfield noted, “or at least the confusion around titling is represented, and indigenous people are better able to defend their claims and be transparent about their claims, there’s going to be better outcomes for indigenous people and for stewardship of the environment that they carry out.”It’s still too early to analyze the effects of the Tierras Indígenas platform on forest conservation. But the project has already helped to establish transparency and legitimacy for indigenous land claims and has helped to increase visibility and community development for indigenous groups.According to Acevei, “[The project] has impacted [indigenous communities] very positively because there was no map of indigenous communities that could show secured and claimed indigenous lands. The communities are [now] visible, and so are their rights. Also, companies and other actors will be able to show and talk about possible projects that can impact the lives of communities.” (This quote has been translated from Spanish by the author.)President of FAPI, Don Hipolito Acevei, speaks to the press during the official launch of the Tierras Indigenas platform on November 28, 2017. Photo credit: Marcelo Matsumoto, World Resources Institute“We had groups in the private sector who developed risk models for Paraguay, and they wanted to be able to fit the data into their risk models as part of their sourcing criteria,” Sarsfield said. “There was a pre-existing demand for data that could be used for those in the private sector who really are making an effort to avoid conflict involved in indigenous lands. That data’s already in their hands, and we filled that need by having the data available in the first place.”One of the challenges of implementing the platform, according to Sarsfield, was being able to accurately and precisely display disputed land claims so that users – from government officials to corporations and members of civil society – could accurately interpret its status. The platform, launched in November 2017, is being continuously updated with new data.Cowboy takes his cattle through a palm savanna. in Paraguay’s Bajo Chaco. Photo credit: Peer V, CC 3.0Conserving the ChacoWhen asked about how the platform can contribute to the conservation of the Gran Chaco ecoregion, Acevei replied, “The biggest challenge is how to protect the territories and their resources in a space where land use change for economic activity is being planned. For this reason, the real importance of indigenous lands to maintain forests and their resources is demonstrated through the platform. And you can also see where they are claiming lands to be legalized by the State as soon as possible, because it is a human right of indigenous communities.” (Quote translated from Spanish by the author.) Tierras Indígenas’ advanced mapping technology is bringing South America’s Chaco ecosystem into the spotlight and allowing indigenous groups to digitally map out their territories in an effort to protect their forests.Mapping indigenous land rights and forest change requires collaboration among various stakeholders and standardization of data collection, using clear protocols, precise data, and participatory management.By accessing the Global Forest Watch and Tierras Indígenas platforms, users can view forest change in particular areas within the Gran Chaco ecoregion, as well as the legal status of indigenous land claims to those same areas. Dwarfed both in size and fame by the Amazon rainforest, the Gran Chaco, South America’s second largest vegetation complex, is a diverse  mix of thorny dry forest and palm savannahs stretching across the far reaches of Bolivia, Brazil, Argentina, and Paraguay. It is home to over 150 mammalian species, including the giant armadillo and giant anteater (both currently listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN’s Red List of Threatened Species).The giant anteater, native to South America, is one of numerous mammalian species residing in the Gran Chaco ecoregion. Photo credit: Sémhur, License art libreThe Gran Chaco is also home to roughly 250,000 indigenous people, stemming from around twenty different ethnic groups, who are embroiled in a bitter battle to lay claim to their ancestral forested lands – before they disappear.Mapping deforestation and the Gran Chaco AmericanoThe forests and savannahs of the geographically diverse Gran Chaco Americano have been suffering a largely silent extinction – until recently.Expansive clearings for cattle grazing in the Pargauayan Gran Chaco are visible from above. Photo credit: Peer V CC 3.0Advanced mapping technology is bringing the Chaco into the spotlight. Indigenous groups are digitally mapping their territories in an effort to protect their forests from the encroachment of cattle ranching and soy farming, which threaten both wildlife and indigenous livelihoods.In Paraguay, a game-changer for indigenous communities has been Tierras Indígenas (TI), an interactive map and online platform launched by Paraguay’s Federación por la Autodeterminación de los Pueblos Indígenas/Federation for the Self-Determination of Indigenous Peoples (FAPI) on November 28, 2017.Nebelino Chagavi Etacore, of the Ayoreo Totobiegosode people, member of the Organización Payipie Ichadie Totobiegosode (OPIT), presenting during the launch of the platform. The TI map indicates tree cover loss in pink. Photo credit: Ryan Sarsfield, World Resources Institute/Global Forest WatchThe TI platform combines Global Forest Watch’s digital Map Builder software and data and expertise from both Global Forest Watch (GFW) and thirteen different indigenous groups, the platform enables interested groups to map the extent and legal status of their lands and resources.The Map Builder tool allows users to use the GFW data and tools to create their own interactive digital map using specified data layers and personalized styling, which can be shared over social media and submitted to the map gallery.The software builds on GFW’s extensive data and tools to document land use change and deforestation, using interactive layers to display tree cover, land use types by industry, and other aspects of forest change on a global scale. By accessing these tools, TI users can view forest change (deforestation, forest growth, and reforestation) in particular areas within the Gran Chaco region, as well as land claims made to those areas. Forests, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Mapping, Open-source, Remote Sensing, satellite data, Technology, Wildtech FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Article published by Sue Palminteri Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

FSJ resident to appeal rejection of accessible cabs

first_imgFort St. John has a handyDART, but it doesn’t run after 5:00 p.m. or on Sunday or holidays.He now plans to appeal the Board’s decision, with additional support from the Association for Community Living’s clients. A year ago, Mike Brewer, owner of Plaisance Transportation Solutions, applied for handicapped accessible taxi licenses for Fort St. John, as well as executive airport and limousine services.His request was turned down by the Passenger Board of Transportation saying he didn’t show public need, despite providing letters of approval from city council, the Association for Community Living as well as the Mayor’s Disability Advisory Committee.- Advertisement -Brewer is requesting that there be two accessible cabs in Fort St. John, although he says he’s willing to go to one if he has to.Teco Cabs, who have a near monopoly on Fort St. John’s taxi industry, submitted an objection to the Transportation Board.They say the city has enough taxis and only requires between 7 and 10 of their 23 cab fleet.Brewer says the Association for Community Living offered a handicapped accessible bus to both Fort St. John Taxi and Teco Cabs, but was turned down, being told it wasn’t profitable.Advertisement Brewer disagrees.He says the cost of a van is feasible if it is licensed both as a regular cab as well as an accessible one.”They said I would put them out of business, basically. Okay, if your business is that hot that you say you’ve got a good taxi service, you run a good taxi service, why are you afraid of a little competition.”Brewer first saw the need for accessible taxis when he watched a man’s wheelchair get stuffed into the back of a taxi outside of a local bar.Advertisementlast_img read more

Province wants more permanent workers settling in the north

first_img“If we have an excellent training program and we still don’t have enough BC workers, then, of course, it’s always appropriate to have an immigration system that allows workers to come here and have the full rights of other workers.”City Council is now waiting for the completion of a staff report on the challenges and opportunities associated with a pilot program. The BC Federation of Labour appears to be a supporter of the Provincial Nominee Program. Originally launched in April of 2012, the two year pilot project was then extended to the end of March, of next year.It is back in the news locally, because Fort St. John has been approached by the province to consider developing a pilot which would focus on the attraction, settlement, retention and integration of immigrant families to the city.Rather than being a search for temporary workers, it is a proposal to attract permanent residents to Northeast BC in an attempt to fill what has been described as the area’s skilled labor shortage.- Advertisement -Acknowledging this shortage of workers, the BC Federation of Labour has been putting pressure on the provincial government to redirect 25% of apprentices towards  public and LNG projects.“Our very first priority should be jobs for British Columbians and Canadians,” President of the BC Federation of Labour Irene Lanzinger says. “We do have an unemployment rate at close to 6% and we are not doing as much as we should to train our own citizens in British Columbia to take these jobs.”BC has a history of workers from other countries coming in, and Lanzinger says hiring foreign workers is an appropriate practice, so long as the government has looked after its own citizens first.Advertisementlast_img read more

CORRIGAN BROTHERS CHANGE NAME IN HONOUR OF LETTERMACAWARD MAN MCHUGH

first_imgIrish band the Corrigan Brothers  have become the “Carl McHugh Brothers” to honour the Donegal man and Bradford City hero for the Capital One Cup Final in Wembley. The Brothers enjoyed a huge hit with “There’s No One As Irish As Barack Obama” which notched up ten million hits on You Tube.Now the brothers, whose Bradford song “There’s no Team as Wembley as Bradford City” has captured the imagination of many Bradford fans, are delighted to wear the masks that will raise much needed funds fo the Bradford Burns Research Unit.The masks have been produced by Bradford fan John Barker and his wife Frances who run a print company in Bradford.Lead singer Ger Corrigan said “We spoke with Frances last week and she sent us on some of the Carl McHugh masks, we are very proud of Carl here in Ireland as are all the people in Donegal. “The masks are really high quality and we are thrilled to become the Carl McHugh Brothers for the week. I think the Swansea goalkeeper will be spooked by the masks if the game goes to penalties”.The Brothers are delighted with the reaction to their Bradford song.Ger continued “We have made some great friends and have had some great fun, Bradford’s name is on this cup and it is a great honour to have an association with this Final, now let’s get masked up and show Wembley how much Bradford can add to the occasion”if anyone would like to purchase direct they can either email at this address or rodleyb@aol.com we will despatch same day. The face masks cost £1.50 each or a pack of all 5 players, (Carl McHugh, James Hanson, Matt Duke, Nakhi Wells, Gary Jones) for £5.There is also a mask for Mark Lawn (Joint Chairman of BCFC). CORRIGAN BROTHERS CHANGE NAME IN HONOUR OF LETTERMACAWARD MAN MCHUGH was last modified: February 18th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Carl McHughCorrigan BrothersdonegalLettermacawardWEMBLEYlast_img read more

YOUNGER PRIESTS ARE AFRAID TO GO OUT IN PUBLIC IN DONEGAL – TOP CLERIC

first_imgA leading priest has revealed how younger priests in Co Donegal are afraid to be seen in public because of the recent child abuse scandals.Fr Paddy Dunne, communications officer with the Diocese of Raphoe, said young clerics are facing a very difficult time.“I know of some younger priests who are afraid to come out or to be seen in public. They stay at home. “I know priests in Dublin who have been spit on because they were recognized as priests but thankfully that has not happened here.“Some of the younger priests in Donegal feel ashamed because of what has happened in the past – the abuse.“It’s a shame because these younger lads didn’t know any of this stuff was going on and have no responsibility for it,” he said.Fr Dunne admits the church is facing a “doomsday scenario” with a decrease in the numbers of priests in Donegal. A number of parishes including Drumkeen and Drumoghill already do not have a priest because of a shortage in numbers.Fr Dunne said that such parishes will not have a full-time priest because of the shortage and due to the fact that a number of priests are overseas.“We definitely do not have the numbers of priests we used to have and we do not have the same numbers coming in.“It’s definitely going to be a problem in the future. It’s very difficult for people because they are used to having a priest living among them as a member of their community,” he said.Some of the country’s most notorious paedophile priests came from Donegal including Fr Eugene Green. Fr Dunne said he does not know the extent of sexual abuse which was carried out by priests in the Diocese of Raphoe in the past.“I can only presume that all of that information will come out in the audits.“I do know that Bishop Boyce handed over all the files. There is always the possibility that some details may not have been handed over.“But if people know anything then they can contact the commission (on child abuse),” he said. EndsYOUNGER PRIESTS ARE AFRAID TO GO OUT IN PUBLIC IN DONEGAL – TOP CLERIC was last modified: August 6th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Fr Paddy Dunnepriestsraphoe dioceselast_img read more

MacLOCHLAINN ELECTED AS CHAIRMAN TO KEY OIREACHTAS COMMITTEE

first_imgPadraig MacLochlainn TD has been elected Chair of the Oireachtas Joint Committee on Public Service Oversight and Petitions.Speaking after his election, Sinn Fein’s Deputy Mac Lochlainn thanked his colleagues on the Committee for electing him Chairman.“I expect the Committee will continue working collaboratively and productively across party lines to hold our government departments and public bodies to account for the services they provide to the public. I hope to lead the Committee in becoming a robust champion on behalf of the citizens we serve. “I wish to pay tribute to the outgoing Cathaoirleach Peadar Tóibín TD, whose careful stewardship and commitment led to the launch of a new petitions system in September. This is a significant innovation, in that for the first time in the 93 year history of the Oireachtas, citizens now have a direct route to influence the parliamentary agenda. We have since received a steady flow of petitions from individuals and groups around the country, on a wide variety of topics.“An empowering feature of the petitions system is that it is open and accessible to every single citizen. And history proves it often takes the resolve of just one or two civic minded people to make a stand and effect substantial change.The petitions system, working to its full potential, can make the parliamentary system more accessible and more participative,” he said.“I would argue that, contrary to much public commentary, our parliamentary process is already relatively open. With Leinster House receiving over 100,000 visitors a year, Irish people know well how consequential to their lives the business of the Oireachtas is. We can watch every minute of Oireachtas business live and read the record of the parliament online. Our Committee will help channel the appetite of Irish people for public engagement in a structured and meaningful way. “Another important feature of our work is the engagement with the various Ombudsmen. In December, our Committee heard a forceful and candid contribution from Emily O’Reilly which criticised the Department of Health for not implementing recommendations by her office.“We as a committee will use the full extent of the power at our disposal to ensure that there is full compliance with the law and that citizens’ rights are vindicated. We look forward to engaging with the Minister for Health James Reilly TD at our next meeting on 6 February.”MacLOCHLAINN ELECTED AS CHAIRMAN TO KEY OIREACHTAS COMMITTEE was last modified: January 30th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more