Oxford announces COVID-19 protocols for Michaelmas

first_imgTeaching, living, and research spaces will be adapted to allow for adequate social distancing. One-way signage, modified timetabling, and increased ventilation will be employed in all university sites. Capacity limits will be in place in university libraries. A new ‘seat-finder’ app will be introduced in order to make it easier for students to find available study spaces. In situations where social distancing is not always possible, such as laboratory work, the University plans to implement further protective measures such as Perspex screens. Several new policies have also been announced to reduce the risk of infection among students and staff during Michaelmas term. Cleaning regimes will be enhanced with new facilities open for hand-washing. Face coverings are to be required for both students and staff during in-person teaching and in shared indoor spaces. However, there will be exceptions on some grounds, such as disability. Students living in college accommodation and sharing facilities will be grouped into ‘households’. In an email to students seen by Cherwell, Balliol College Master Helen Ghosh explained that the measure was intended to “minimise the number of students who have to self-isolate if any one of them gets COVID-19.” Oxford University has published further information concerning its plans to ensure the health of both students and staff for the upcoming academic year. Priority testing, mandatory face coverings, and additional welfare support are among the key measures announced. In partnership with the NHS, the University is creating a new in-house COVID-19 testing service for students and staff. Two sites – one in the city centre and one in Headington – will be opened in September, ready for the start of Michaelmas term. Anyone who suspects they may have caught the virus will be able to book a test at either location online and receive the results within 24 hours of the test being taken. Although Oxford University has committed to maintaining medical confidentiality throughout the process, those who test positive may be asked to voluntarily disclose their recent contacts as part of the track and trace protocol. In addition to these measures, the University has also pledged assistance students adversely affected by COVID-19 and its consequences. Welfare support will be available for students required to self-isolate during term or upon arrival to the UK from abroad. Students who are unable to take part in face-to-face teaching will be allowed continue learning online. Vulnerable staff will also be given the option to teach remotely if necessary.last_img read more

Rockies’ trade deadline plans are ‘more complicated’ because of recent struggles, general manager says

first_imgThe Rockies aren’t sure about their trade deadline plans.Colorado remains in playoff contention but has lost four in a row and 11 of its last 13 games. General manager Jeff Bridich told reporters this week the team was still evaluating its options. “Honestly, what it really comes down to is the onus is on me,” Bridich said. “All these guys in uniform are my decisions. That’s not lost on me whatsoever. So, I certainly know I can have an effect, and the front office can ultimately have an effect. This time period coming up with the deadline is one of those time periods of the year where that effect can be felt from a roster perspective.”The Rockies also could look to sell, but they haven’t made Jon Gray or Scott Oberg available yet, according to MLB Network. MLB trade rumors: Potential sleeper moves Astros, Yankees, Phillies could make to bolster rotations MLB trade rumors: Rangers ‘likely’ to move Mike Minor; Phillies, Brewers interested in starter “The way that we’ve looked at the deadline in the past, especially in the recent past, is that if we are truly competing, if we’re showing signs as a team of being a legitimate competitor for being a postseason team, we’re going to do what we can to add to that and strengthen the team,” Bridich said, via MLB.com. “Right now, it feels different. That’s disappointing.”Despite the recent struggles, the Rockies are just 3 1/2 games out of the second National League wild-card spot. The team, however, does not seem like a serious threat to win a championship this season. Related News “This group right now is struggling and playing, objectively, just really bad baseball,” Bridich said. “We’re finding ways to lose, collectively as a group, instead of finding ways to win. That does make any sort of trade deadline decisions more complicated.“There’s really no facet of our game, at this level, that is high quality right now. So, there is really no group within the group that stands out. It all needs addressing. It’s all sub-par.”Bridich said Colorado may not make any additions because there are no “quick fixes,” yet nothing has been ruled out. Nolan Arenado says next Cubs-Rockies series could get ‘spicy’last_img read more

Tree-dwelling animals can ‘climb’ away from climate change, study finds

first_imgArticle published by Shreya Dasgupta Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A new study has found that the temperature within a tropical forest varies considerably, with tree canopies experiencing wider extremes of heating and cooling compared to the ground or soil.The range of canopy temperatures in tropical forests at the bottom of mountains overlaps considerably with those at the top of the mountains, which suggests that canopy animals likely have the physiology that might allow them to move across a mountain gradient freely unhindered by the climate.This implies that tree-dwelling tropical animals might be more resilient to climate change, according to the study. Animals that live in trees in the tropics are likely to be better at crossing mountains and dealing with climate change compared to ground-dwelling animals, a new study published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment suggests.In the tropics, mountains are typically considered to be barriers for lowland animals. According to a popular hypothesis put forward by ecologist Daniel H. Janzen in 1967, this is because the tropics have a relatively steady climate, with temperatures never getting too hot or too cold. Tropical organisms there tend to be adapted to very narrow ranges of temperatures. So an animal adapted to warm temperatures living at the bottom of a mountain might not be able to tolerate the colder temperatures it encounters as it moves higher up.“Think about a layered cake,” Brett Scheffers, an assistant professor in the department of wildlife, ecology and conservation at the University of Florida, Gainesville, U.S., told Mongabay. “One band represents a range of temperatures, the next band represents another range of temperatures and so on. There’s not a lot of overlap between those bands. What this means is that animals living on the bottom of a mountain will likely never have experienced temperatures at the top of the mountain and vice versa.”This suggests that tropical animals could have a harder time “escaping” from a changing climate because of the temperature constraints that mountains impose.Trees within Mossman Gorge, a lush rainforest in Queensland, Australia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler.However, temperatures within a tropical forest are not uniform. Trees, for instance, create large vertical temperature gradients — that is, it is cooler at the base of a tree, under its shade, compared to the top of the tree that’s that exposed directly to the sun.To see what this variability means for tropical animals’ ability to adapt to climate change, Scheffers and his colleagues monitored temperatures of the soil, ground and canopy of tropical forests across mountains in Madagascar, the Philippines and Australia.Overall, the team found that tree canopies experienced a wide range of temperatures compared to the soil or the ground. This implies that animals living in trees are exposed to a wider variety of temperatures than those living near the ground: During the day, canopy animals are under the hot sun, while at night, the lack of vegetation above exposes the animals to colder temperatures compared to ground-dwelling creatures.Previous studies have found that this is often the case. In the rainforests of Panama, for example, researchers have found that ants living in the canopy can tolerate heat that is 3.5 to 5 degrees Celsius (6.3 to 9 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than ant species living in the constant shade near the ground.Scheffer’s study also found that the range of canopy temperatures in forests at the bottom of mountains overlapped considerably with those at the top of the mountains. By contrast, there was very little overlap in soil or ground temperatures between lowland and upland forests.“Since the climate [of the canopy] is shared across mountains, it suggests that canopy animals likely have the physiology that allows them to move across a mountain gradient freely unabated by climate,” Scheffers said. “And this movement has implications for where the animals can go, which could ultimately impact the speciation or extinction of the species.”In short, tree-dwelling tropical animals are more likely to be able to move across mountain passes and “climb” away from climate change than ground-dwelling animals, Scheffers said.“The hypothesis and data are very reasonable,” Janzen, currently at the University of Pennsylvania, told Mongabay. “My concept applies to any instance that compares things in more fluctuating environments with those in more constant environments. My old example was the case that I could spot back then. Were I to write the same paper today, I would have simply listed more of these contrasts, and understory versus canopy is certainly one of them.”However, not all tree-dwelling animals might be successful at dealing with environmental stress, Scheffers warns.“There may be exceptions to the rule,” he said. “We are putting out a perspective about what might be happening out there. And we hope that lots of people test it, challenge it.”Malabar giant squirrel. Photo by Udayan Dasgupta / Mongabay.Citation:Scheffers, B.R. and Williams, S.E. (2018). Tropical mountain passes are out of reach – but not for arboreal species. Front Ecol Environ 2018; doi: 10.1002/fee.1764.center_img Animals, Biodiversity, Birds, Climate Change, Climate Science, Conservation, Environment, Forests, Green, Insects, Mammals, Rainforest Conservation, Research, Tropical Forests, Wildlife last_img read more

Restoration optimism: Bringing nature back (commentary)

first_imgBiodiversity, Commentary, Conservation, Ecological Restoration, Ecosystem Restoration, Ecosystems, Editorials, Environment, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Researcher Perspective Series, Restoration, Rewilding Article published by Mike Gaworecki As we hear tales of environmental destruction from across the world, some conservationists are working not just to conserve what is left, but to put back what has been lost.A new website, www.restorationevidence.org, is working to gather the evidence for what works (and what doesn’t) to restore habitats and biodiversity globally. Run by the Endangered Landscape Programme and the Conservation Evidence project (where I work), the website aims to support decision-making by conservationists by providing them with concise summaries of scientific work.This will help those planning and implementing restoration projects globally to make the best possible decisions about how to spend restoration funds.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. I sit huddled in the hide, the sharp winter air stinging my cheeks and making my eyes tear up. Blinking, I catch sight of movement in the reeds. Out steps a bittern — a strange, heavy brown heron, once extinct in these parts. Cameras click excitedly around me as the bird slowly walks out of a patch of reeds, crosses bare ground, and then disappears again, swallowed by the swaying vegetation.Grinning from ear to ear, I am exhilarated by this close sighting. But the best part is knowing that, a little over 20 years ago, there were no hides, no reeds, and no bitterns; this was a carrot field, the peat soils drained and plowed. But, thanks to clever restoration efforts, nature has come back to Lakenheath Fen in the east of England.It gives me a huge sense of optimism to know that habitat loss is not the only possible direction of travel — habitat gain is also possible, even in manicured, intensively farmed Europe.Habitat restoration is a hot topic right now. Robin Chazdon, Executive Director of the Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation, gave a plenary talk at at the International Congress for Conservation Biology entitled ‘Is Restoration the New Conservation?’ (A similar talk can be viewed here.) She is one of the leaders of PARTNERS, People and Reforestation in the Tropics, which aims to research the human and environmental impacts of restoration. ‘Rewilding’ is also big news, from Europe to South America, with ‘Feral’ by George Monbiot sparking debates on what bits of nature we want to restore, where, and how. And the Endangered Landscapes Programme, as part of its aim to support large-scale landscape restoration, has launched a website gathering the evidence on what works to restore lost habitats and species.Work to replant forest in Anamalais, India. Photo Credit: Claire Wordley.Restoration is firmly on the global environmental policy agenda, as well. Target 15 in the Strategic Plan of the Convention on Biological Diversity promotes the restoration of at least 15 percent of degraded ecosystems; countries around the world are getting behind this agenda, including through the Bonn Challenge, a global aspiration to restore 150 million hectares (more than 370 million acres) of degraded and deforested lands by 2020. Billions of dollars are being spent on efforts to restore degraded land, so how can we spend this money most effectively?Restoration Evidence is a subsection of www.conservationevidence.com that deals solely with habitat restoration. The website splits restoration efforts into what works for habitats (e.g., the vegetation), and what works for taxa (e.g., birds). Aiming to eventually cover restoration for all habitats and taxa globally, the main completed sections on Restoration Evidence so far cover forests, peatland vegetation such as bogs and peat swamp forests, and shrublands and heathlands, with information on how well restoration efforts work for target taxa including birds, bees, and amphibians. This website aims to reach new audiences by providing a resource for those specifically involved in habitat restoration projects.What is restoration?Restoration can mean many things to many different people. For the Restoration Evidence project, it means enriching habitats with biodiversity and restoring ecosystem processes — whether that means getting habitats closer to how we think they were, or, where conditions have changed or the ‘baseline’ is unknown, creating new biodiverse habitats. This flexible definition aims to ensure that the Restoration Evidence website has value for a range of potential users.For example, a forest restoration program may report on the five-year results of natural regeneration of forest at one site and a tree planting program at another site. Neither of these sites will look like a forest after five years, but it can be useful for other people to know whether the trees were larger, or survived better, in naturally regenerated versus planted areas.Equally, in some places we may not know what the habitat was ‘originally’ — this may have changed many times over millennia — but it may be that creating a wetland in this area is thought to be a good idea to help migrating birds, so this ‘restoration’ project may really be habitat creation.What is evidence, and why does it matter?The evidence collected on www.restorationevidence.org comes from academic scientists, NGOs, and government agencies around the world. All evidence has to meet two criteria to be included: that it tests a conservation intervention experimentally, and that it measures the results quantitatively (using numbers). The emphasis on an experimental approach includes only the evidence that best examines the causal relationships between an action and the results.Forest in Anamalais, India. Photo Credit: Claire Wordley.Do we really need more evidence? Don’t we know what to do already? Well, as the Conservation Effectiveness series here on Mongabay found, it can be quite hard to tell how well even widely used conservation interventions, such as protected areas and payments for ecosystem services (PES), actually work. Before we plow huge amounts of time, money, and effort into a strategy, it seems like a good idea to sit down and try to learn from the experiences of others.As more projects use well-designed trials to test whether their approach actually produced the desired outcomes, we can start to combine these experiments to get an overall picture of whether or not an intervention worked, and under what circumstances. Some of the actions explored on restorationevidence.org worked fairly reliably, like re-wetting peat; others worked well in some places, but not in others, such as spreading moss fragments; and others seemed not to work very well at all, such as adding root-associated fungi to peat swamp seedlings.As well as learning what works and what might not work, we can start to see what we don’t know. For some important restoration interventions, the effectiveness is still unknown, as they have not yet been tested. Furthermore, some areas (such as the tropics) are underrepresented in the number of published studies testing restoration efforts. Examining the impact of more interventions, especially in the tropics – and publishing the results — could help make future restoration efforts more successful.Restoring natural habitats can be challenging, but having the best available evidence for different restoration practices to hand should make it easier for those involved in bringing nature back to pick winning strategies. As more interventions are tested — and across more parts of the world — habitat restoration can become even more effective, and we can get better at bringing nature back.Evening at Lakenheath Fen in the UK. Photo Credit: Claire Wordley.Dr. Claire Wordley is a researcher with the Conservation Evidence group at the University of Cambridge. Her background includes working on the responses of tropical bats to forest fragmentation and agricultural activity. This led to an interest in researching how to make conservation change happen, and she now works at Conservation Evidence working with NGOs and government agencies to see how they can best use and produce scientific evidence.The Endangered Landscapes Programme is funded by Arcadia, a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin, and is managed by the Cambridge Conservation Initiative.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

On an island of plenty, a community tempered by waves braces for rising seas

first_imgFor generations, the indigenous Papuans on Indonesia’s Auki Island have depended on rich coastal ecosystem around them for sustenance and livelihoods.But when an earthquake and a tsunami struck the area in 1996, they realized they needed to do more to protect these resources to sustain their way of life.A decade later, they enshrined practices such as sustainable fishing in a local regulation, which to date has already shown positive results for the islanders and the environment.But the threat of another disaster — rising sea levels as a result of global warming — looms over the community. This time, they’re preparing through mitigation programs, including protecting mangroves. AUKI, Indonesia — “We ladies have eyes on our feet,” Susanti Maryen says after a morning spent collecting saltwater clams and snails at a beach in Auki, an islet off the northern coast of Papua, in Indonesia’s far east.She’s only half joking: clamming here, a way of life for generations, involves traipsing the beach and finding, just by feel, the small crustaceans hidden in the sand underfoot.While the women of Auki forage for the community’s food along the shore, the men are taught to fish from a young age. What they don’t eat, they sell; Susanti says a plate of saltwater clams can fetch 50,000 rupiah ($3.70), or double that during the off-season.In this sense, the Papuans of Auki are like the myriad other coastal communities spread out across the thousands of islands that make up Indonesia, each hewing to age-old traditions of subsistence that revolve around the bounty of the sea. The waters and coasts of Cenderawasih Bay, where Auki is located, are home to 95 species of coral, 155 fish species and seven types of mangrove.The inhabitants of Auki Island in Indonesia’s Papua province have for generations depended on the rich resources of the sea and coastal ecosystem around them. They have a regulation in place to manage these resources in a sustainable way. Photo by Ridzki R. Sigit/Mongabay-Indonesia.But foraging for clams hasn’t always been easy for the women of Auki. Susanti, now 50, remembers when a magnitude-8.2 earthquake struck the region on Feb. 17, 1996. It was followed by a tsunami that washed over parts of Auki and nearby islands.The twin disaster not only destroyed many houses there, but also laid waste to the coastlines the residents had always been able to depend on; for a period after the quake and tsunami, there were no shellfish of any kind to be found on the devastated beaches.“The earthquake and tsunami caused erosion; the coastlines changed, and even new coral islands emerged,” says Matheus Rumbraibab, the chief of the indigenous council in Auki.But the disaster also brought with it a valuable lesson for the people of Auki: that they needed to better protect the natural resources, in the sea and on the coast, that were so central to their lives.In the years since, they learned how to adapt to the new conditions wrought by the quake and tsunami. In 2006, 10 years after the disaster, they decided to formalize those practices in a regulation governing the protection of Auki’s coastal ecosystems, which today covers mangroves, seagrass and coral reefs, among others.In Auki, it is forbidden to cut mangrove trees, which the islanders realize are crucial to help mitigate the rising sea levels spurred by global warming. Photo by Ridzki R. Sigit/Mongabay-Indonesia.The regulation includes prohibitions on fishing in certain areas of the sea around Auki, to allow fish stocks to replenish; in other areas, fishing is permitted, but catches are capped. Beyond these zones, Auki’s fishermen can operate freely, but may not use destructive methods such as blast fishing or poison fishing.The system in force here is a miniature of the Indonesian government’s own policy of staking out and managing marine conservation zones, but with a key difference: here in Auki, the people get to discuss and decide on the zones.The women, for instance, are responsible for monitoring the population of marine animals along and just off the coast every six months. They submit the figures to local authorities, who use them to compile routine reports. These reports, in turn, serve to warn the fishermen of any decline in the population of a particular species.“We wanted the population of saltwater clams, snails and reef fish to recover, that’s why we decided to regulate fishing and collecting,” says Frans Wandosa, the Auki village chief.A magnitude-8.2 earthquake 22 years ago devastated the islands in Papua’s Cenderawasih Bay, including Auki. Image courtesy of the USGS.Faithfully practicing this sustainable way of life for the past two decades has borne fruit for the people of Auki, particularly over the last three years, when saltwater clams have bloomed beyond the restricted zones.Residents of nearby islands have also adopted similar regulations, Frans says. But he’s also aware that despite the success in protecting local marine resources, the people of Auki and the other islands face a threat more relentless than a one-off earthquake and tsunami: rising sea levels as a result of global warming.“I think a portion of Auki’s coast will end up underwater,” Frans says. “That’s why we’ve established a program to gradually move people’s houses to higher parts of the island.” The villagers have gone along with the program; many still remember losing their homes to the tsunami.They also have plans in place to protect the coastal vegetation to mitigate the impact from rising sea levels or tsunami waves. The 2006 regulation bans the felling of mangroves, and also requires residents to report first before cutting any other trees on the island.“We keep asking the village authorities, representatives of indigenous communities and religious leaders to remind the people not to cut down trees,” Frans says.Susanti Maryen is one of the women on Auki who depend on the natural resources from its coastal ecosystems. Photo by Ridzki R. Sigit/Mongabay-Indonesia.At her home on a January evening, Susanti cooks the saltwater clams gathered earlier that day. A small portion will be for dinner; the rest she will sell at the local market the next day.Even here, on the stovetop of her kitchen, the sea is ever-present.“The trick to getting the clams to open up,” Susanti says, “is to cook them in seawater.”This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published here, here and here on our Indonesian site on Jan. 28, Feb. 9 and Feb. 10, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Adaptation To Climate Change, Climate Change, Coastal Ecosystems, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Environment, Fisheries, Global Warming Mitigation, Indigenous Communities, Mangroves, Marine Conservation, Marine Ecosystems, Mitigation, Seagrass Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Basten Gokkonlast_img read more

How Tibetan Buddhism and conservation efforts helped Eurasian otters thrive in a city of 200,000 people (commentary)

first_imgAnimals, Commentary, Conservation, Conservation and Religion, Editorials, Environment, Habitat Destruction, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Mammals, Pollution, Religions, Researcher Perspective Series, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) is now locally extinct in most of its former range in China due to hunting for its pelt, water pollution, and habitat destruction.Recently, researchers recorded a healthy population of otters in Yushu, Qinghai, a city of 200,000 people.What allowed this population to survive? Besides conservation efforts, Tibetan Buddhism traditions also played a vital role in reducing hunting and maintaining freshwater ecosystem health.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. In China, where most rivers are deprived of large mammals due to habitat destruction and over-exploitation, a healthy population of Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra) was recently found to thrive right in a city of over 200,000 people, due mainly to the joint support of conservation initiatives and Tibetan Buddhism.Yushu, located on the eastern Tibetan Plateau, is the capital city of the Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture. Two rivers — Zhaqu and Changu — flow through the city to join the Tongtian River in the east, the headwater of the Yangtze river. During a one-month survey, researchers from Shanshui Conservation Center recorded Eurasian otter activities 66 times with seven camera traps. Over 200 spraints (otter dung) and footprints were also discovered along 45 kilometers (about 28 miles) of river, indicating a thriving population of the species.The Eurasian otter used to be heavily hunted for its pelt. As it is now listed under CITES Appendix I and the Schedules of Nationally Protected Fauna and Flora in China, stricter law enforcement has reduced hunting. Even so, its population continues to decline, according to the IUCN, and the species has become locally extinct in most of its former range in many parts of the country. Being a top predator of the freshwater ecosystem, the Eurasian otter is susceptible to pollution and habitat destruction, both of which are common in most waterbodies in China. So, what spared this population in Yushu from the fate of disappearing?Overlooking the Yushu city from the Kyegu Monastery (结古寺). Photo Credit: Chen PENG.One unique fact about Yushu is that over 95 percent of its population is Tibetan. Consequently, this area is heavily influenced by Tibetan Buddhist traditions, which support the conservation of individual organisms and habitats in many ways.A fundamental component of Buddhism is love and compassion for all living beings. It comes from the idea of reincarnation and the belief that an animal could be one’s parent, sibling, or friend in another life. While meat consumption is necessary for local herders to survive in the harsh climate of Tibet, many choose to eat larger animals like yaks, so that fewer lives are taken. For this reason, many locals do not eat fish or other aquatic creatures, securing ample food sources for the otters.Also, the locals believe that cutting trees on sacred mountains will offend mountain gods, and, similarly, polluting water sources will infuriate the water gods. By protecting sacred natural sites in Tibetan Buddhism, people are also conserving important wildlife habitats.What’s more, the demand for otter pelts in the Tibetan region has been drastically reduced in recent years due to the advocacy of religious leaders against the use of animal fur.Baima Wenci, a staff member of the Shanshui Conservation Center, placing a camera trap outside an otter den. Photo Credit: Yifan (Flora) HE.With pro-nature cultural traditions combined with effective conservation initiatives, the chances of survival for otters become even higher. Since the late 20th century, the Chinese government has set conservation as a priority in the Sanjiangyuan region, a 316,000-square-kilometer (more than 78-million-acre) area that includes the headwaters of three great Asian rivers: the Yangtze, the Yellow, and the Mekong. Over 40 percent of the land in this area has been designated as the Sanjiangyuan Nature Reserve, and a series of conservation projects are in place, including grassland restoration, a firearm ban, and anti-poaching measures. Being part of the Sanjiangyuan region, Yushu benefits greatly from these projects.This is not the first time that Tibetan Buddhism has been found to support conservation goals. His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, the head of the Karma Kagyu School of Tibetan Buddhism, published a paper in Conservation Biology in 2011 discussing how Buddhism shares many values with the environmental movement. In the case of snow leopards (Panthera uncia), researchers demonstrated that Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and sacred mountains offer valuable habitat protection to this iconic species in the area. When domestic sheep and yaks are killed by snow leopards, local herders often show great sympathy and understanding towards the predators. Retaliatory killing rarely occurs here, in sharp contrast to other areas in China with frequent human-wildlife conflicts.Camera trap photo of an otter. Photo Credit: Shanshui Conservation Center.Of course, from a conservationist’s perspective, traditional values have many facets, and not all are beneficial. In the same rivers where the otters live, people have been releasing fish as a practice of sparing lives that were to be slaughtered. Most of these non-native fish would die, but a few carp species appear to be doing well, raising concerns over invasive species. Conservationists working in this area must address these kinds of challenges in ways that the local people are willing to accept.While the otters in Yushu benefit from both Tibetan traditions and conservation actions, they still face a number of threats, including levee construction, water pollution, and growing traffic in the city. To better understand the impact of human activities on the otter population, Shanshui Conservation Center will continue its efforts in monitoring and research. Eventually, Center staff hope to inform actions such as habitat restoration, anti-poaching, and native fish conservation, based on their findings.Camera trap photo of an otter. Photo Credit: Shanshui Conservation Center.CITATIONS• Dorje, O. T. (2011). Walking the path of environmental Buddhism through compassion and emptiness. Conservation Biology, 25(6), 1094-1097. doi:10.1111/j.1523-1739.2011.01765.x• Gomez, L., Leupen, B. T., Theng, M., Fernandez, K., & Savage, M. (2016). Illegal Otter Trade: An analysis of seizures in selected Asian countries (1980-2015). TRAFFIC.• Li, F., & Chan, B. P. L. (2017). Past and present: the status and distribution of otters (Carnivora: Lutrinae) in China. Oryx, 1-8.doi:10.1017/S0030605317000400• Li, J., Wang, D., Yin, H., Zhaxi, D., Jiagong, Z., Schaller, G. B., … & Xiao, L. (2014). Role of Tibetan Buddhist monasteries in snow leopard conservation. Conservation Biology, 28(1), 87-94. doi:10.1111/cobi.12135• Roos, A., Loy, A., de Silva, P., Hajkova, P. & Zemanová, B. 2015. Lutra lutra. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2015: e.T12419A21935287. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015-2.RLTS.T12419A21935287.en. Downloaded on 07 March 2018.• Shao, Q., Liu, J., Huang, L., Fan, J., Xu, X., & Wang, J. (2013). Integrated assessment on the effectiveness of ecological conservation in Sanjiangyuan National Nature Reserve. Geographical Research, 32(9). doi:10.11821/dlyj201309007Yifan (Flora) He is a recent Master’s graduate from the School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Michigan, soon to join Conservation International as a social science coordinator. In early 2018, she volunteered at the Shanshui Conservation Center, working on Eurasion otter monitoring, human-wildlife conflict resolution, and ecotourism development in the Sanjiangyuan region in Qinghai, China.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

PHOTOS: The great Sandhill crane migration makes its annual stopover on the Platte River

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Birds, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Environment, Impact Of Climate Change, Migration, Photos, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The annual migration undertaken by sandhill cranes in North America is considered one of the world’s great natural spectacles, on par with Africa’s wildebeest migration and the “march of the penguins” in Antarctica.Nowhere is the sandhill crane migration more visible in all its majesty than on the Platte River in the U.S. state of Nebraska — you truly have to see it to believe it.You can hear many of the sounds of the sandhill crane migration on a recent episode of the Mongabay Newscast. It’s one thing to hear the migration, however, and quite another to see it. The annual migration undertaken by sandhill cranes in North America is considered one of the world’s great natural spectacles, on par with Africa’s wildebeest migration and the “march of the penguins” in Antarctica. And nowhere is the sandhill crane migration more visible in all its majesty than on the Platte River in the U.S. state of Nebraska — you truly have to see it to believe it.The migration is underway now, as the birds head to their breeding grounds in the northern United States, Canada, and Siberia after having spent the winter in Cuba, Mexico, and the U.S. states of California, Florida, Texas, and Utah. According to National Geographic, more than three-fourths of all sandhill cranes make a stopover at what’s known as a “migratory staging area” along a 75-mile stretch of the Platte River every year.The National Audobon Society has said that “The early spring gathering of Sandhills on the Platte River in Nebraska is among the greatest wildlife spectacles on the continent, with over a quarter of a million birds present at one time.”While sandhill cranes are the most common crane species, habitat degradation and other environmental changes at key migratory staging areas like the Platte River could have major impacts in the future.On a recent episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we spoke with researchers Ben Gottesman of the Center for Global Soundscapes at Purdue University and Emma Brinley Buckley of the Platte Basin Timelapse project about their work using camera traps and audio recording devices to document how the migrating sandhill cranes and other species that are important to the Platte River ecosystem are responding to changes in the environment wrought by climate change. You can hear many of the sounds of the sandhill crane migration (as well as chorus frogs, prairie chickens, and more) by giving the episode a listen:It’s one thing to hear the migration, however, and quite another to see it. Brinley Buckley has also photographed the cranes as they make their stopover on the Platte River, and captured other species besides. She was kind enough to share the following pictures with Mongabay.Sandhill crane silhouettes circling at sunset before roosting on the Platte River for the night. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Sandhill crane silhouettes circling at sunset before roosting on the Platte River for the night. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Sandhill cranes on the Platte River in central Nebraska. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Sandhill cranes on the Platte River in central Nebraska. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Sandhill cranes in flight over the Platte River. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.A roost of sandhill cranes waking up to a snow storm on the Platte River. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.A leopard frog sitting in the shallow waters of a slough. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.A lek of prairie chickens booming and dancing on conservation land managed by The Crane Trust. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.A prairie chicken. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Here is a soundscape timelapse video Gottesman and Brinley Buckley made, pairing audio and photos of the Platte River ecosystem:Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Wildlife trade detective Samuel Wasser receives prestigious Albert Schweitzer Medal

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Samuel K. Wasser, a conservation biologist at the University of Washington, U.S., has pioneered ways of using DNA from animal feces to track wildlife poachers.In recognition of his achievements, the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI) has honored Wasser with the Albert Schweitzer Medal, an award that “recognizes outstanding achievement in the advancement of animal welfare.”In a brief Q&A, Wasser told Mongabay that it was “heartening” to win the Albert Schweitzer Medal, and that he is proud to see his work make a difference in the world. From dogs to poop, Samuel K. Wasser has used it all to monitor wildlife and track down poachers.A conservation biologist at the University of Washington, U.S., Wasser has pioneered methods that use DNA from elephant dung to identify poaching hotspots and pinpoint where seized ivory originates from — work that’s been instrumental in prosecuting some of Africa’s biggest ivory poachers. He has also spearheaded the use of detection dogs to sniff out the feces of wild animals over large landscapes. This innovative strategy has helped researchers monitor the health of threatened species without needing to actually spot any individuals in the wild.In recognition of his achievements, the Animal Welfare Institute (AWI) has awarded Wasser with the Albert Schweitzer Medal. The medal, instituted in 1951 in honor of the philosopher and theologian Albert Schweitzer who would go on to win the Nobel Peace Prize a year later, “recognizes outstanding achievement in the advancement of animal welfare.” Past recipients of the medal include British primatologist Jane Goodall and American biologist Rachel Carson.U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell of Washington presented the award to Wasser in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., on April 10.“Dr. Wasser’s groundbreaking work has paved the way for remarkable strides in the fight against wildlife trafficking, especially ivory trade,” Cathy Liss, the AWI president, said in a statement. “The Animal Welfare Institute feels privileged to have this opportunity to acknowledge his accomplishments with the Albert Schweitzer Medal.”Samuel Wasser examining seized ivory. Photo by Kate Brooks.Mongabay caught up with Wasser, who said it was “heartening to win the Albert Schweitzer Medal.”A brief Q&A with Wasser follows.Mongabay: Can you give us a bit of background on how you first became interested in studying wildlife?Samuel K. Wasser: I loved animals all my life. I started working in Africa at 19 years of age, studying how migratory ungulate herds impact lion social structure and hunting patterns in the Serengeti-Mara Ecosystem. Then, I was hooked.What inspired you to develop non-invasive methods to monitor the distribution and physiological health of wild animals?During my doctoral dissertation on baboons in southern Tanzania, I became interested in how the environment impacts the timing of reproduction in baboons. I pioneered methods to measure stress and reproductive hormones in baboons to do that. That led to tools to measure nutrition hormones, DNA and even toxins in feces.How did you come up with the idea of training dogs to sniff out animal feces? What kinds of species can the detection dogs identify from scat?Realizing how much biological information was available in scat and how accessible scat is in the wilderness, I was searching for a method that could increase access to these samples across large wilderness areas in an unbiased manner. Detection dogs were the answer. They have an extraordinary ability to detect samples from their scent. Since detection is incentivized by the reward of a couple minutes of play with their ball, the dogs are actually searching for ways to get their ball. The means to that end is locating the target samples associated with that reward. That makes detection dog sampling virtually unbiased because the dogs get their ball regardless of the sex of the target species or the degree to which the sample is hidden, features that typically bias other forms of sampling (for example, trapping, hair songs, camera traps).Our dogs have been used to detect dozens of species. Examples include: grizzly bears, killer whales, right whales, pocket mice, northern spotted owls, Jemez [Mountains] salamanders, wolves, caribou, moose, coyote, cougar, bobcat, lynx, fisher, pangolins, jaguar, maned wolves, tapir, tigers, lions, cheetah, invasive plants, and even chemical in the environment like PCBs [polychlorinated biphenyls].Wasser’s detection dogs can track several species, including killer whales. Photo by Jane Cogan.What prompted you to develop techniques to determine when and where an elephant was killed by poachers?My baboons work was in the most heavily poached part of Africa, the Mikumi-Selous Ecosystem in southern Tanzania. My work there began in 1979, the same year that poaching began to skyrocket and continued for another 20 years. Throughout that time, we frequently ran across poached elephants, or had to leave the field because we heard gun shots nearby. I wanted to do something about it. When my lab pioneered methods to get DNA from feces, I realized that was the answer. I could collect elephant scat across Africa and use the DNA in the scat to map elephant genetics across the continent. If I could then get DNA from ivory, I could match the ivory genotypes to the DNA reference map to determine where seized ivory was poached.Do you feel disheartened to see the current levels of poaching in Africa? How do you stay motivated?It is horrible to watch and it just doesn’t stop. What keeps me going is that my work is making a difference and I am very proud of that.Is there anything else that you would like to add?I could not have done this work without great partners: Bill Clark was my mentor and paved the way for me to apply these methods to actual ivory seizures. My incredible staff at the Center for Conservation Biology work tirelessly to genotype these samples. Governments like Kenya, Uganda, Mozambique, South Sudan, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Taiwan, and others who gave me access to their ivory seizures, INTERPOL who supported many of these sampling efforts, many donors like U.S. State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics [and] Law Enforcement Affairs, World Bank, Vulcan, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime, Woodtiger Fund, the Bosack Charitable Foundation and others for continuous support, and my most recent collaborators, U.S. Homeland Security Investigations.Samuel Wasser with elephant tusks. Photo courtesy of Samuel K. Wasser/Animal Welfare Institute.Samuel K. Wasser receiving the award from Senator Cantwell and AWI president Cathy Liss. Photo by Kristina Sherk. Animals, Conservation, Deforestation, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Green, Happy-upbeat Environmental, Illegal Trade, Interviews, Mammals, Poachers, Poaching, Wildlife, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking center_img Article published by Shreya Dasguptalast_img read more

Cute Dinosaur Forced to Support Evolution

first_imgKnee-high to a human, little Eodromaeus looks like a pet, but its discoverers are making the claim that it represents an early stage in dinosaur evolution.  Do the facts support this claim?    National Geographic announced a “nasty little predator from dinosaur dawn found.”  The BBC News said that Eodromaeus, whose name means “dawn runner” (indicating that the discoverers [Paul Sereno and team, U of Chicago] embedded their interpretation of its evolutionary context into the creature’s name), “casts light on birth of the dinosaurs.”  The news articles went on to discuss how this little fossil fellow, dated at 230 million years old, was the forerunner of T. rex and all the monsters that would emerge in the millions of years to come.    The dinosaur certainly looks well-equipped for running and taking care of itself, but the BBC article claimed, “Even though their descendents may have gone on to great things, neither of the creatures were dominant in their time, and the researchers believe their eventual rise may be down to blind chance, and perhaps some unknown environmental catastrophe.”  Stuff happens.    When interpretation outruns the bones, it’s helpful to go to the original source material.  The discovery paper in Science1 contains some assumptions that should be kept in mind when evaluating the claims that Eodromaeus is the ancestor of the great dinosaurs.  For one thing, the dates: Sereno’s team used radiometric dating of the Ischigualasto formation in Argentina to insert the particular level of the rock into the geological time scale.  The caption of their chart contains on the right side “A current geologic time scale, which assumes an average rate of sedimentation between radioisotopically dated horizons.”  What if that assumption is not valid?  The resulting evolutionary picture could change drastically.    Another glaring observation from their chart is decreasing diversity with time.  If we take their long-age interpretation of the formation, the evidence contradicts evolutionary predictions – and their paper basically admits it [bracketed portions added]:One explanation for the rise of dinosaurs has been that a few key features led gradually to the competitive dominance of dinosaurs [i.e., traditional Darwinism].  This view has been overtaken by a hypothesis of noncompetitive replacement [stuff happens], in which their rise is split into two successive episodes of extinction and noncompetitive infilling of vacant ecospace [opportunity-knocks Darwinism].  In the replacement hypothesis, the earliest dinosaurs are regarded as particularly rare (1 to 3% of terrestrial vertebrates), their abundance and diversity increasing successively at the Carnian-Norian and Triassic-Jurassic boundaries coincident with mass extinction of rhynchosaurs, traversodontid cynodonts, and dicynodonts and later of (noncrocodyliform) crurotarsal archosaurs.    In contrast, the fossil record from Ischigualasto indicates that early dinosaurs in the latter half of the Carnian (231 to 228 Ma) were more common and diverse than previously thought, equaling the percentage of dinosaurian genera in the late Norian fauna from the overlying Los Colorados Formation (Fig. 4).  Thus, in terms of taxonomic diversity, dinosaurs did not increase their percentage among terrestrial vertebrates toward the end of the Triassic in southwestern Pangaea.They went on to note that the disappearance of the other creatures (assuming their timeline) had nothing to do with the rise of dinosaurs: “The disappearance of rhynchosaurs at the Carnian-Norian boundary was not linked to an increase in dinosaur diversity but rather coincided with the local extinction of dinosaurs.”  It’s not like the dinosaurs were taking advantage of space vacated by the unlucky ones that had gone extinct, in other words (vacated perhaps due to their lack of Darwinian fitness).    The authors furthermore hinted that apparent increase of body size of later dinosaurs might be an artifact of preservation.  “Increased body size probably enhanced the preservation potential of late Norian dinosaurs, which are also recorded from many more sites than late Carnian dinosaurs,” they said.  Is there evidence for the conventional story that dinosaurs started small, like Eodromaeus, and gradually became the monsters we associate with dinosaurs?  “We cannot evaluate whether the increase in body size was gradual or rapid,” they said, “as there are no dinosaurs in the section between late Carnian [230-228 mya] and late Norian [226-225 mya] faunas” (brackets added).    They noted with some puzzlement the apparent haphazard distribution of herbivores and carnivores from location to location, part of which they attribute to “taphonomic bias” (luck of the draw with what gets preserved as fossils).  It’s not clear, therefore, that the dots can be connected in just one way.    Moreover, Eodromaeus was a well-developed, complex creature with fast legs and grasping claws, in no way inferior to later dinosaurs in terms of complexity and fitness.  What was there for evolution to do?  Notice what they said about this critter:The discovery of Eodromaeus, the reinterpretation of Eoraptor as a sauropodomorph, and the faunal record of the Ischigualasto Formation provide additional evidence that, by mid Carnian time (~232 Ma), the earliest dinosaurs had already evolved the most functionally important trophic and locomotor features characterizing ornithischians, sauropodomorphs, and theropods.  These attributes are thus unlikely to have functioned as the competitive advantage to account for the dominance of dinosaurs in abundance and diversity in terrestrial habitats some 30 million years later in the earliest Jurassic (~202 Ma).  Eodromaeus increases the range of salient theropod features present in the earliest dinosaurs, and Eoraptor shows that the enlarged naris, basally constricted crowns, and a twisted pollex were present in the earliest sauropodomorphs.The bulk of evolutionary advances thus must have appeared all at once in the earliest dinosaurs, according to their own timeline, with later evolution just variations on the theme.  Is this what Charles Darwin envisaged?    In addition, other paleontologists didn’t react as jubilantly as the press.  They sound downright worried.  Michael Balter in the same issue of Science said this fossil “rattles the dinosaur family tree.”2  He quoted Sereno “No one, even ourselves, predicted this repositioning.”  It means that the sauropods and theropods both appeared together.  Another paleontologist worried, “‘Only further research by independent teams can evaluate’ this radical shakeup of the early dinosaur tree.”1.  Martinez, Sereno, Alcober et al, “A Basal Dinosaur from the Dawn of the Dinosaur Era in Southwestern Pangaea,” Science, 14 January 2011: Vol. 331 no. 6014 pp. 206-210, DOI: 10.1126/science.1198467.2.  Michael Balter, “Pint-Sized Predator Rattles The Dinosaur Family Tree,” Science, 14 January 2011: Vol. 331 no. 6014 p. 134, DOI: 10.1126/science.331.6014.134.The main take-home message from this comedy of puzzles is that the Darwinian story comes first, and the data are props for it.  The data clearly do not indicate long ages of gradual increases in complexity and diversity, as Darwin would have imagined.  For all the facts show, these extinct creatures could have all appeared suddenly fully-formed, varied a little over the years with no new genetic innovation, and then perished together.  But no: in today’s paleontology, bones must be rounded up and commanded, like reluctant slaves, to build temples for Charlie.    When the evolutionists have to admit that, according to their own timeline, they cannot see any progress, or any indication whether “stuff happened” gradually or rapidly, they have left science behind and are dealing in tall tales.  Don’t be confused by jargon like “infilling of vacant ecospace.”  What?  Is some hidden real estate agent pushing animals to evolve so they qualify for vacant government housing or something?  This is ridiculous.  It’s obfuscation by linguistic verbosity negating semantic lucidity.  They’re talking about miracles – miracles of chance, “the rise of dinosaurs” for no apparent reason other than sheer dumb luck, with all the major features of dinosaurs present from the beginning, and calling it evolution.    Unfortunately, the science news reporters take this all as gospel truth and dish it out to the public with no critical analysis whatsoever.  That’s why we’re here, to expose how Darwin Brand Sausage is made.  You never sausage a confused mess.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Sun: A farmer’s friend…and enemy

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Here in the office of Ohio’s Country Journal and Ohio Ag Net, it is painfully clear that I’m the youngest employee around. From the jokes about millennials to the life stories I have yet to relate to, let’s just say the age gap is, well, noticeable.Now that my inexperience is on full display, let’s talk something I have faced that’s unique for my age. Skin cancer has been found on my body twice in my life so far. Both times it was melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The discovery is a bit out of the ordinary for a 23-year-old like me as the average age for melanoma diagnosis is 63, according to the American Cancer Society. We’ve kept a close eye on it ever since and that vigilance has brought me a better understanding of the dangers and precautions associated with sun exposure, something we should all keep in mind.It’s in that spirit that we recently spoke with Ohio State University Dermatologist Dr. Alisha Plotner. She said for farmers especially, the subject is too vital to overlook.“It’s an extremely important topic because we know that farming is one of the highest risk occupations when it comes to skin cancer. The reason for this primarily is just that on a normal day, there is lots of UV exposure to be had by the farmer who’s working outdoors. Whether it’s continuous outdoors in the field or in and out for buildings, there’s just a lot of cumulative UV exposure, which we also know as one of the greatest risk factors for skin cancer. It actually is the greatest risk factor — that combined with skin type,” she said. “We also know that people who have fair skin and light eyes are at particularly high risk for developing skin cancer. So it’s really critical that people in these high risk occupations are aware of the risk of skin cancers.”Plotner said no matter an individual’s background, a general knowledge of skin cancer risk is a must-have.“There are three most common types of skin cancers. Two are very clearly related to excessive UV exposure over time. That’s your most common — basal cell skin cancer and also your squamous cell skin cancer, your second most common type. Then we have melanoma, which we also know that UV exposure is a risk factor for the development of melanoma,”  Plotner said. “Melanoma is a particularly concerning type of skin cancer because it can be deadly, especially when it’s invasive and so it’s very important for farmers to be aware at the health risk of the occupation.”Unlike many cancers, there are easy steps to lower the risk for such complications down the road.“Make time for a reduction of UV exposure and there are really three ways to do that,” Plotner said. “Sun avoidance, I tell all my patients, is first line. But that’s not really practical in most cases on a normal day-to-day basis because the job requires you spend some time outdoors. I encourage my patients to do UV intense activities earlier in the morning and later in the afternoon and evening if possible. If you’re arranging your work day, try to do those UV intense activities earlier in the morning, before about 10 o’clock in the morning or after 3 o’clock in the afternoon if your job would allow you to do that. Number one is just UV avoidance.”Plotner said, if possible, choose to work under some sort of shaded area like a tree or other structure offing a break from the sun in the heat of the day.“The second thing that you can do is sun protective or UV protective clothing. Unlike sunscreens, these UV protective clothing are UPF instead of SPF rated. You want to look for something that has a UPF 50. Over the years, these have really evolved — they’re very lightweight clothes. Often times my patients will be worried they’ll be hot, but we find sometimes quite the opposite by keeping UV off of skin, sometimes they’re even cooling,” she said. “So I recommend a wide brimmed hat that has at least a 3-A serious procedure: Joel Penhorwood’s arm after removing a mole that was melanoma.inch brim all the way around the head to reduce UV exposure to the face and the neck. Also, I really like sun protective clothes like a long sleeve sun shirt which would provide protection for the arms and the neck as well. By wearing a sun shirt, it eliminates the need to put on a greasy sunscreen.“And then finally I recommend sunscreen for exposed areas, so I would really encourage all of our farmers to just make it a part of their regimen when they’re getting ready for the work day in the morning, just to put at least a SPF 30 or higher sunblock on the exposed areas. Ideally we recommend reapplication throughout the day.”Plotner said she is commonly questioned on which sunscreen to wear and what SPF is best. She said surprisingly, a higher number isn’t always the best.“SPF stands for Sun Protection Factor and it’s a measurement of the degree a sunscreen’s able to reduce a patient’s threshold to burn,” Plotner said. “SPF 30 is the level recommended by the American Academy of Dermatologists. What an SPF 30 sunscreen does is it blocks about 97% of UVB, which are the burning rays. Now you can go higher on your sunblock. If you go to an SPF 50 or 70, you’re blocking maybe about 1% or 2% more rays but there is no sunscreen that blocks 100% of all of the UV rays.”Plotner said SPF 30 with reapplication every two hours stands as the general recommendation.“There are some patients who may have sun sensitive skin conditions, what we would call photosensitivity. In some cases, we’ll recommend those patients go higher and maybe choose an SPF 50 or 70, but for the general population, SPF 30 blocks 97% of UVB rays and that’s what we recommend,” she said.As far as which type of sunscreen to choose, Plotner said the “one that they’ll actually wear.” She noted that since the FDA now regulates sunscreens, there are uniform requirements sunscreens across the board now have to meet. Anything from a stick to a lotion is acceptable and sprays are also fine if used liberally enough.The removal surgery left a serious scar on Joel’s arm.“There are so many different formulations of sunscreen available that I recommend the patient experiment with the different types and find one that they’ll like and that they’ll use,” Plotter said. “Several years ago, the FDA came out and regulated sunscreens and the nice thing is that there’s now some standardization so if you go to the drugstore and you pick something that’s listed as a sunscreen, then it has to meet certain minimum criteria.”“How much sunscreen should I use? The simple answer is more than you think. Most people apply sunscreen too sparingly.”Approximately a shot glass full of sunscreen is the recommend amount to cover the entire body of an adult at the beach. Plotner said the amount would be less for farmers whose skin would be mostly covered by clothing. A quarter of a shot glass full is enough to spread between the arms face and neck.“Essentially you want to put on a layer of sunscreen that’s so thick that you can see it when you first put it on the skin and that you really have to rub in so that it evaporates.”After getting in the rhythm with those precautions, Plotner said that self skin checks are still recommended.“We recommend that you check over your own body and if you see any spots that are sore, any non-healing spots, any spots that look like persistent pimples, spots that are evenly persistently itchy or scaly that aren’t going away within a matter of weeks — those could be signs of a basal cell or a squamous cell type of skin cancer and you should have those checked,” she said. “The other things to look for on your own skin would be moles that are irregular in shape, that are large in size, that are of irregular color — so if they have multiple color throughout or if they have dark colors like blacks or blues — and then any mole that is changing. So if it just doesn’t feel right to you, it always makes sense to err on the side of caution and to get it checked.”A baseline skin exam should never be out of the question, Plotner said. Though there are some more predisposed to a checkup. Those that have personally had skin cancer should be checked at least once a year. Individuals who have a family history of melanoma or a strong family history of other types of skin cancers should be examined as well.“Just sun protect. It’s really going to pay off down the road. I mean there’s so many people in their sixties and seventies that are growing multiple skin cancers in areas that you don’t want to be thinking about having a surgery on like the nose, by the ears, the ear,” she said. “Some of these patients just say if I only would have known. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”last_img read more