Detectives investigating Derry death study PM results

first_img WhatsApp Newsx Adverts By News Highland – October 18, 2011 Detectives investigating Derry death study PM results Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Google+ Pinterest Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Facebook Twitter LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton center_img WhatsApp Google+ Pinterest Detectives in Derry investigating the circumstances surrounding the death of Caolan Page in the city at the weekend are studying the results of a post mortem examination which was completed earlier today.Police are also continuing to examine CCTV footage and interviewing a number of potential witnesses about what happened in the area of Magazine Street in the early hours of Saturday morning.Following the completion of the post mortem examination, Caolan’s remains have been released to the Page family to allow a funeral to take place. RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleBT completes major broadband project in DerryNext articleDonegal election candidate didn’t return expenses details – SIPO News Highland Twitter Facebook Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margeylast_img read more

Governor Douglas to sign Clean Water Day proclamation

first_imgGovernor Jim Douglas will sign Vermont s Clean Water Day proclamation, June 18 at 1:15 p.m., at a demonstration and tour of innovative and underutilized agricultural practices in the Rock River watershed in Franklin. Clean Water Day celebrates the work of Vermonters to improve water quality around the state and renews the commitment to the goal of clean water for all Vermonters. The stewardship of Vermont s waters is everyone s responsibility farmer and city dweller; year-round resident and seasonal visitor and Vermonters take this responsibility seriously, the Governor said.Join the Governor, Franklin County farmers, the Farmers Watershed Alliance, UVM Extension Service, USDA s Natural Resources Conservation Service, the agencies of Natural Resources and Agriculture, and Friends of Missisquoi Bay at this annual event to celebrate farmers progress in agricultural advances to protect water quality.WHAT: Governor Douglas to sign Clean Water Day proclamationWHEN: Thursday, June 18, 2009 1:15pmWHERE: Windfall Acres, hosted by Wayne and Nancy Fiske10:30 a.m.: Gather at Windfall Acres, welcome & refreshments11:00 a.m.: Field Walk1:15 p.m.: Signing of the Clean Water Day proclamationDirections to Windfall Acres, Durkee Road:From St. Albans, exit 20 off Rt.89, take Route 207 north to Highgate Center; turn rightHead east on Route 78 for 3 miles, turn left on Franklin Road, go 4 miles; turn rightGo 0.1 miles on Durkee Road, meet at equipment shed on right side of roadlast_img read more

Trojans fall to Arizona with O’Neill suspended

first_imgIt might not have been under ideal circumstances, but longtime assistant coach Bob Cantu finally got the opportunity to lead the Trojans.Cantu, the associate head coach who has been with USC (19-14, 10-8) for 10 seasons under five different head coaches, was promoted after Athletic Director Pat Haden suspended head coach Kevin O’Neill for the remainder of the Pac-10 tournament following an incident with an Arizona fan at a local hotel.Cantu’s first test came against the top-seeded Wildcats (27-6, 14-4) in the semifinal of the Pac-10 tournament on Friday, as the Trojans fell despite a late rally, 67-62.USC refused to place the blame for the loss on O’Neill.“[O’Neill] is a big part of our team, but he is not going to go out there and play for us,” said junior forward Nikola Vucevic.Displaying leadership in his coach’s absence, senior guard Marcus Simmons, a captain, posted a career-high 20 points on 8-of-11 shooting.“Everyone who knows Marcus knows what he is capable of,” said junior guard Jio Fontan. “He broke out today.”The team responded well initially under Cantu, who only found out that he was coaching the squad three hours before tipoff. With Arizona deciding to double-team Vucevic, Simmons found himself open, and scored eight points in an 11-0 USC run that gave the Trojans an early 15-9 lead.By halftime, the Wildcats led 33-28 on 56 percent shooting from beyond the arc.Arizona led by as many as 12 points in the second half. The Trojans, however, battled back, cutting the Wildcats’ lead to three with 48 seconds left on a three-pointer by Fontan.After two free throws by Arizona sophomore Derrick Williams, Vucevic converted a lay-up, making the score 65-62 Arizona with 4.7 seconds.Williams then made two free throws to put the Wildcats up five points, and with no timeouts remaining, USC did not have enough time to make up the deficit.Vucevic bounced back after only recording seven points and five rebounds in the quarterfinal game against Cal. He had 16 points and 12 rebounds, recording his twenty-first double-double, which leads the Pac-10.The Trojans’ lack of depth hurt them down the stretch. Arizona had 10 players log seven or more minutes, compared to only six for USC. The Wildcats had 23 points off the bench, while the Trojans had four.Williams, the Pac-10 Player of the Year, appeared motivated after the Trojans held him to a season-low eight points in the last meeting between the two squads. He finished with 20 points and six rebounds.Arizona advances to the championship game of the Pac-10 tournament to face the winner of No. 7 seeded Oregon and No. 3 seeded Washington on Saturday at 3:00 p.m. at Staples Center.The Trojans must now wait until Selection Sunday to find out if they are one of the 68 teams chosen to play in the NCAA tournament, or if they will compete in the NIT tournament.“We have some great wins,” Cantu said about USC’s tournament resume. “Everybody’s saying we have bad losses, but I personally think that great wins mean more than the bad losses when you look at the big picture.”last_img read more

Biden Leads the Democrat Field Before Debates in Detroit

first_imgJen and Bill will talk with Eric Trump tomorrow morning at 8:45 about tonight’s debate and what to expect from the leading dem Joe Biden tomorrow night. Former Vice President Joe Biden is surging among Democrats running for president.A new national Quinnipiac Poll shows Biden leading among Democrats and those leaning Democrat with 34%.Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren is second at 15%, followed by California Senator Kamala Harris at 12% and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders at 11%.Round two as 20-Democrat presidential candidates are set to debate in Detroit.Tonight’s lineup: Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg, Beto O’Rourke,Amy Klobuchar, John Hickenlooper, Steve Bullock, Tim Ryan, John Delaney and self-help author Marianne Williamson.last_img

Locals fear for their lives over planned dam in Indonesia’s Leuser Ecosystem

first_imgDeforestation, Energy, Environment, Forestry, Forests, Indonesia, Infrastructure, Palm Oil, Plantations, Protected Areas, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Threats To Rainforests, Tropical Forests Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Plans to build a hydroelectric power plant in northern Sumatra call for the flooding of large swath of the Leuser Ecosystem, an ecological hotspot home to critically endangered tigers, rhinos and orangutans.For residents, the fear is that the dam, to be built in a geologically unstable area, will collapse.Local communities reliant on fishing also worry that the damming of rivers to fill the reservoir will hurt their livelihoods. ACEH TAMIANG, Indonesia — Maksum, a resident of Aceh Tamiang district in northern Sumatra, Indonesia, can still vividly recall when a flash flood hit the area 11 years ago this month.The 2006 disaster left a trail of destruction in its wake, claiming the lives of 28 people and forcing more than 200,000 from their homes.Today, he is increasingly concerned that a similar catastrophe looms on the horizon — one driven not by natural forces, but by a massive hydroelectric power plant planned for construction here.The 428-megawatt (MW) dam will be 173.5 meters (570 feet) high, with a reservoir capacity of 697.4 million cubic meters (24.6 billion cubic feet). The plans also call for the flooding of 40 square kilometers (15.4 square miles) of land in the Leuser Ecosystem, one of the world’s largest expanses of tropical rainforest and an ecological hotspot celebrated as the last place on Earth where orangutans, rhinos, tigers and elephants coexist in the wild.Maksum, like the majority of residents here, lives near the banks of the Tamiang River, which will be blocked to fill the reservoir. For him, the dam only portends disaster.“We don’t want [the dam to be built] because if the dam collapses, it’ll become a bomb,” he said. “And the Aceh Tamiang people already went through a flash flood on December 22, 2006. We don’t want another disaster to hit us again because it will destroy our development.”The Leuser Ecosystem in Indonesia’s Aceh province, in northern Sumatra. The area contains Mount Leuser National Park. Image by Agungdwinurcahya/Wikimedia CommonsThe risk of a dam failure is high, according to Rudi Putra, an environmental activist from Aceh Tamiang. He said the land in the Leuser Ecosystem, including in the planned dam location, was unstable and prone to landslides.“Every year, there are hills in Leuser that disappear because of landslides,” Rudi said. “Such a high dam is not suitable because of the unstable land condition.”He said he first noticed the problem when investigating the loss of forest coverage in areas far from human settlements, which he initially suspected was caused by illegal encroachment.“To make sure, we deployed a team. Once we arrived at the location, we found out that the forest was gone due to a landslide,” Rudi said.Exacerbating the problem, the site for the dam is also close to a geological fault line that makes it prone to earthquakes, he added.“I can’t imagine what will happen if the dam collapses,” he said.Other residents are worried that the dam will affect their livelihoods, which have traditionally relied on fish from the river system that will be dammed.“If the river is dammed, the number of fish will decrease,” said Kamal, a resident. “Where should we turn to for our livelihoods?”Despite the mounting concerns about the dam’s construction, the provincial government body responsible for reviewing environmental impact assessments (EIAs) has approved the project.In a Dec. 28, 2016, hearing, the Aceh EIA Analysis Commission deemed the development plan acceptable and environmentally suitable, and called only for a revision of the documents to reflect the advice of members of the technical team and the EIA commission.Construction has not yet begun, pending various other requirements, including an environmental permit and a forest use permit, according to the Indonesian Forum for the Environment (WALHI), an NGO.WALHI Aceh advocacy head Muhammad Nasir said the necessary permits were expected to be issued by the end of this year. If everything goes as scheduled, the dam will go into operation by 2025.“WALHI Aceh opposes the dam’s environmental impact analysis because it occupies a large swath of forest,” Nasir said. “It’s better for the project to be canceled to save the environment and the people.”The area is also already under threat from deforestation and encroachment for palm oil and pulp and paper production, and the planned dam is one of several large-scale infrastructure projects putting more pressure on the Leuser Ecosystem, which covers 26,000 square kilometers (10,038 square miles) and is home to some 105 mammal and 382 bird species, many found nowhere else on Earth.A smaller, 180 MW hydropower dam is also planned for South Aceh district, on the western flank of the ecosystem. The Kluet 1 project is a Chinese-Indonesian joint venture with total investment of 5.6 trillion rupiah ($412 million). Banner image: A Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae), one of the Leuser’s iconic species. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.This story was first reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team, with an earlier version published on our Indonesian site on November 25, 2017. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Trees are much more than the lungs of the world (commentary)

first_imgAdaptation To Climate Change, Agriculture, Agroforestry, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Commentary Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agroforestry is a technique of growing trees and shrubs with crops, and is the focus of a new Mongabay series.Beside carbon sequestration, increased food security, biodiversity, topsoil depths, medicine and fiber production, plus other benefits accrue to agroforestry.Roger Leakey has studied, taught, and written about agroforestry techniques for decades and makes the point that trees are much more than ‘the lungs of the planet,’ but rather they also function like the skin, heart, kidneys, and intestines of the Earth, while acting as pharmacies, factories, and food pantries for humans.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. There are two important answers to the question “why do we need more trees in farmland?” One is global and one is local.Globally, trees are often recognized as the ‘lungs of the world’ because they exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide with the atmosphere. However, this is an understatement. If we think in these terms, trees are also the kidneys of the world as they regulate the flow and use of water by intercepting rain and releasing it slowly to the ground where it can either run off into rivers, or enter the groundwater. Plants can then absorb it for use in photosynthesis. This absorbed water is then transpired back to the atmosphere and blown on the wind until it falls as rain somewhere else.Cacao under mixed species forest shade, including Irvingia gabonensis (African mango) in Cameroon. Photo courtesy of Roger Leakey.Thus, trees are also like the skin of the world, being the interface between the vegetation and the atmosphere for the exchange of gases and water.Similarly, trees are like the intestines of the world exchanging nutrients between the soil and the vegetation, fueling the nutrient and carbon cycle.Finally, they are like the heart of the world, as they drive the ecosystems that make the world healthy and function properly. They do this by providing a very large number of niches for other organisms to inhabit, both above and below ground. Recent evidence has reported 2.3 million organisms on a single tree – mostly microbes – but also numerous insects and even bigger animals like mammals and birds. Others also live in the soil or, due to the microclimates created by the physical stature of the tree, on the associated herbs and bushes. It is all these organisms that provide the ecological services of soil formation and nutrient recycling, feeding off each other and creating an intricate web of food chains.All this is important for the maintenance of nature’s balance that prevents weed, pest, and disease explosions. They also provide services like pollination, essential for the regeneration of most plants, not to mention the very topical regulation of carbon storage essential for climate control.Cacao agroforest with fruit tree shade. Photo courtesy of Roger Leakey.At the local level, in addition to these ‘bodily functions,’ trees produce a wide range of products useful to us, and are often traded in local markets. There are literally tens of thousands of trees that produce edible and/or useful products – sources of items of day-to-day importance for us. So, we can also think of trees as shops, civic services, and industries. Thinking in this way, a treed landscape becomes similar to a town made up of supermarkets full of everyday needs; a bank providing annual interest on investment; a drug store or health clinic for medicines; a water tower; an art gallery; a zoo full of wildlife; a guardian of culture like a museum; a hotel providing rest for migrants; a tourist center for over-wintering or summer breeding habitat; a nightclub for nocturnal creatures; factories for fertilizers, pesticides and drugs; an energy provider, and even a skyscraper affecting the flow of wind around the other buildings.Using this analogy, we can see that by destroying trees we destroy facilities and functions important for life. Conversely, by planting trees we can multiply the products and services we need for a ‘good life’ in many different ways. In some places, trees are grown in large monoculture plantations, replicating the concept of a housing estate or industrial complex. This can be very productive but isn’t necessarily good for the environment. Alternatively, they can be grown at different densities and in different species configurations and for different products in association with food crops, livestock and cash crops.Some agroforestry fruits and nuts (1-7) and products (8-23) currently being marketed. Photo courtesy of Roger Leakey.This mixed cropping is known as ‘agroforestry’, a farming system which thrives off diversity and maximizes the availability of all the different benefits of trees and their services. In this way, agroforestry is highly beneficial to us – Homo sapiens – a dominant species in this agroecosystem. Agroforestry harnesses numerous environmental, social and economic benefits for our complex lifestyles.This is especially important in the tropics and sub-tropics where poverty-stricken subsistence farmers struggle to feed their families and scratch a living off highly degraded land. In this situation, it can be described as hunger busting since it can improve food crop yields on exhausted soils; farmer-friendly as it has numerous social benefits including enhanced livelihoods; wildlife-friendly as it provides habitat; climate friendly as it mitigates climate change and controls water flows; wealth-promoting by producing marketable products for businesses and industries, and health-giving by producing nutritious and medicinal products. So, we could create a new, green, and much more sustainable economy.Looking to the future, there are easily enough useful tree species for agroforestry to play all of the above roles in any corner of the inhabited world, very few of which have been cultivated to date. Interestingly, each of these species contains inherent 3- to 10-fold genetic variability at any one site, so it is easy to find and propagate individual trees that display an infinite number of useful and marketable traits suitable for a new array of businesses and industries.Multifunctional agroforestry landscape in Vietnam. Photo courtesy of Roger Leakey.However, we have hardly begun to identify the economic possibilities and need to do much more to explore all this potential. Maybe if we pursue this line of thinking, we can create useful and environmentally healthy rural landscapes which are as diverse as their urban counterparts, and create win–win–win scenarios combining better land husbandry, social empowerment, and income generation. I believe agroforestry has a bright future, but we need to learn how to manage this resource so that all people can share the benefits in harmony.I hope this colloquial expression of the value of trees explains why agroforestry is becoming increasingly recognized as being critical if we are to manage our planet sustainably. This is particularly vital where currently the land has been deforested and degraded because trees are considered to get in the way of modern mechanized agriculture, in which monocultures are the order of the day.Roger Leakey is Vice Chairman of the International Tree Foundation, Vice President of the International Society of Tropical Foresters, and is author of “Living with the Trees of Life – Towards the Transformation of Tropical Agriculture” (2012) and “Multifunctional Agriculture – Achieving Sustainable Development in Africa.” Learn more about his work at www.rogerleakey.com.This article is part of a new Mongabay series about the global scope of agroforestry, see all the features here.center_img Article published by Erik Hoffnerlast_img read more

Brazil ignored U.N. letters warning of land defender threats, record killings

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Glenn Scherer United Nations rapporteurs sent two letters to the Temer administration in 2017. The first warned of threats to human rights activists in Minas Gerais state. The second condemned the record number of environmental and land defender killings in Pará state last year. Brazil ignored both letters.The State Public Ministry (MPE), the independent public prosecutor’s office in Minas Gerais, had requested the inclusion of six laborers and their families in the Protection Program of Human Rights Defenders, of the Secretariat of Rights of the Presidency in May, 2017.The laborers say they were threatened by representatives of Anglo American Iron Ore Brazil S.A., a subsidiary of London-based Anglo American, a global mining company. In March Anglo American Brazil reported a mineral duct rupture which contaminated the Santo Antônio and Casca rivers, and riverside communities.908 murders of environmentalists and land defenders occurred in 35 countries between 2002 and 2013. Of those, 448, almost half, happened in Brazil. In 2018 so far, at least 12 Brazilian social activists and politicians have been slain — twice as many as compared to the same period in 2017. Shocked members of the Akroá-Gamellas indigenous group just after a brutal assault by Brazilian farmers in April 2017. Photo by Ruy Sposati / CimiIt has come to light only this month that the administration of Brazilian president Michel Temer failed to respond to two letters sent by United Nations rapporteurs in 2017 warning of pending threats to, and condemning the murders of, human rights activists in Minas Gerais and Pará states. That’s according to the U.N. Human Rights office in Geneva.Last November, the U.N. warned about the threats six peasants and their families received in Conceição do Mato Dentro, Minas Gerais, after they opened a lawsuit against the operations of Anglo American Iron Ore Brazil S.A. in that state. The company is a subsidiary of Anglo American, a global mining firm based in London.The State Public Ministry (MPE), the independent public prosecutor’s office in Minas Gerais, had previously requested the inclusion of the laborers in the Protection Program of Human Rights Defenders, of the Secretariat of Rights of the Presidency in May, 2017. One of them, Lúcio da Silva Pimenta, was reportedly threatened and expelled from his land several times without receiving compensation by representatives of Anglo American. The company did not respond to Mongabay’s request for comment.Anglo American of Brazil is currently waiting for licensing approval in order to begin the expansion of the Sapo iron mine, which is part of the Minas-Rio Project/System that connects the mine (located near the town of Conceição Mato Dentro), to the export terminal Port of Açu, in São João da Barra, Rio de Janeiro, via a 529 kilometer (328 mile) mineral duct.This month’s Anglo American Brazil mineral duct rupture contaminated two Brazilian rivers, and impacted two communities along those waterways. Photo Fala Chico blogOn 12 March, the company halted iron ore production in Minas Gerais after the rupture of a mineral duct in the rural area of Santo Antônio do Grama, which leaked 300 tons of mining material into a local stream, said Anglo American. The Secretary of State and Environment (SEMAD) of Minas Gerais said that the heaviest ore contamination occurred in the Santo Antônio River, while the Casca River was also effected.According to London Mining Work, an alliance of organizations that supports communities impacted by London-based mining companies, ammonia is added to the Minas-Rio duct, allowing ore powder to remain suspended in water for transport in the pipeline. When leaks occur, as happened this month, toxic ammonia and other pollutants can end up in waterways.Earlier this month, the Minas Gerais State Public Ministry (MPMG) filed a public civil action in court against Anglo American requesting R$400 million (US$121 million) in damages compensation to the communities of Conceição do Mato Dentro, Dom Joaquim, and Alvorada de Minas (MG), where Anglo American operates. The MPMG argues that the company has brought social and environmental impacts to the towns, including increased violence, criminality, water shortage, pollution and inequality.Lúcio da Silva Pimenta, a small scale farmer whose land in Minas Gerais was reportedly taken by Anglo American Iron Ore Brazil S.A. Photo by Joana Tavares / Brasil de FatoBrazil holds record for land defender killingsIn a second unanswered letter, the U.N. denounced the murders of ten rural workers by police in the municipality of Pau D’Arco, Pará, and the killing of a human rights advocate, all occurring between May and July 2017.“Over the last 15 years, Brazil has seen the highest number of killings of environmental and land defenders of any country, up to an average of about one every week. Indigenous peoples are especially at risk,” declared U.N. rapporteurs Victoria Tauli Corpuz (Rights of Indigenous Peoples), Michel Forst (Human Rights Defenders), John Knox (Environment), and Francisco Eguiguren Praeli (Rapporteur of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, IACHR), in the 2017 document.“We are particularly concerned about future [indigenous] demarcation procedures, as well as about indigenous lands which have already been demarcated,” said the U.N.An investigation by Global Witness has identified 908 murders of environmentalists and land defenders in 35 countries between 2002 and 2013. Of these, 448, almost half, happened in Brazil.In 2018 so far, at least 12 social activists and politicians have been slain in Brazil, including Rio de Janeiro councilwoman Marielle Franco, killed last Wednesday. That’s twice as many as compared to the same period in 2017. Over the last five years, 194 activists have been killed in Brazil, according to the O Estado de S.Paulo newspaper.The Brazilian Ministry of Human Rights was contacted for comment by Mongabay, but did not respond.“The omission of the Brazilian government regarding the U.N. letters is a clear indication that it is not concerned with the lives of human rights and environmental defenders of the country, nor with the deepening of violence against indigenous peoples, quilombolas [communities of runaway slave descendants] and peasants,” Cleber Buzatto, executive secretary of the Catholic Church’s Indigenous Missionary Council (CIMI), told Mongabay.Kum’tum, a leader of the Akroá-Gamellas, who was wounded in the April 2017 attack. Indigenous and environmental leaders are often targeted by Brazilian ruralists attempting to settle land disputes with violence. Photo by Tiago Miotto / CimiConstant menaceA member of the Gamela people, Kum’tum was attacked last April, along with others of his indigenous group in Viana, Maranhão state. They were attempting to occupy a portion of their ancestral lands claimed by farmers, when they were assaulted by men armed with machetes and firearms. Two indigenous people had their hands cut off, some were shot, including Kum’tum. He told Mongabay: “Violence has been increasing as soy plantations, eucalyptus [tree farms], mining and livestock expand. Places where people and communities lived are being torn [apart] with the advance of these sectors.”The Gamelas people have received several additional death threats against them if they continue trying to recover and demarcate their tribal lands.“The killings are the end point of the violence, but while alive we are assaulted, called bums and thieves, and the government does nothing about it,” said Kum’tum, who now lives in a recovered Gamela area. “When the night comes, I wonder what might happen, who will be next, and hope that the dawn will come soon.”FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.A grieving Akroá-Gamellas woman just after the April attack. Members of the indigenous group were assaulted by Brazilian farmers while trying to occupy their indigenous ancestral territory in Maranhão state. The hands and feet of some victims were cut off with machetes. Photo by Ruy Sposati / Cimicenter_img Agriculture, Amazon Agriculture, Amazon People, Controversial, Corporate Environmental Transgressors, Corporate Responsibility, Corruption, Environment, Environmental Crime, environmental justice, Environmental Law, Environmental Politics, Ethnocide, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forests, Green, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Cultures, Indigenous Groups, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Industrial Agriculture, Land Conflict, Land Grabbing, Land Rights, Land Use Change, Law, Murdered Activists, Regulations, Saving The Amazon, Social Justice, Soy, Threats To The Amazon, Violence last_img read more

AI can ‘help us move mountains’ for people and planet, Watson developer says

first_imgAgriculture, Artificial Intelligence, conservation players, Interviews, Software, Technology, Technology And Conservation, United Nations, Wildtech Article published by Erik Hoffner IBM Master Developer Neil Sahota believes artificial intelligence (AI) can help humanity ‘move mountains’ in terms of improving lives and the environment.Sahota helped develop Watson, the supercomputer which is now being used in a variety of useful ways, like predicting crop yields for farmers in Africa.In this interview with Mongabay, he shares multiple examples of AI being used by actors ranging from the UN to NASA and NGOs, for good. Neil Sahota is an IBM Master Inventor and World Wide Business Development Leader in the company’s Watson Group. He works to create solutions powered by Watson, the supercomputer that he helped to develop which famously competed on the TV quiz show Jeopardy! against two human champions in 2011 and won. Sahota is a big believer in the power of artificial intelligence (AI) to improve the lives of people and the health of the environment, and while technology won’t solve all human or ecological problems, it has an important role to play, prompting Mongabay to ask him for an interview.An Interview with Neil SahotaErik Hoffner for Mongabay: At our conservation tech site Wildtech, we increasingly publish news about how AI and machine learning can be applied to conservation, from using eBird to track songbird populations to applications that can curtail illegal rainforest logging. What are your favorite examples of how AI can aid the environment?Neil Sahota: One of my personal passions in life is efficient water usage and conservation. In my pursuit of AI for Social Good, I’m always looking for opportunities in water management. One favorite example is Project Lucy, where IBM Watson is using AI to enhance African infrastructure, including water management in terms of dealing with water scarcity, and helping to maximize water use in agriculture. Imagine developing new farming techniques to grow more with less water! Another great example is Optimized System Controls of Aquifer Resources (OSCAR) by JEA where they’re boosting their water management capabilities by moving to “just-in-time” water. This is a great example of where they’re using AI to predict consumption patterns and prepare accordingly. In the future, they might be able to leverage AI and these consumption patterns to improve consumer behavior. Thus, they could help improve water conservation from two different points.Project Lucy infographic courtesy of IBMMongabay: How has Watson begun to be used for social good?Neil Sahota: We’ve started an across the board initiative called IBM Watson for Good. This spans across a lot of different domains like Project Lucy and Chatbots for Good which provide free help in some areas of law, therapy, and quitting smoking to name a few. In addition, the environment is a big focus for IBM Watson. We’re looking at solutions [to] better understand nature’s ecosystems. It’s a lot of ground to cover which is why we’ve opened up our technology for people to use, especially for social good. Hopefully by enabling people and organizations, we can build more sustainable and eco-friendly solutions much quicker. Mongabay: I’ve also read that the cognitive computing of Watson’s ‘sister’ in Africa (“Lucy”) is being used for applications like improved waste collection in Nairobi. Can you say more?Neil Sahota: Lucy is about possibility, and the work in Africa is showing how real these possibilities are. AI technology is opening up whole new opportunities that may allow us to improve things more dramatically than we realized. Take the waste collection in Nairobi for example. Improving route maps and adding sensors seem like obvious ideas today. However, Nairobi is the 4th most congested city in the world in terms of traffic and also suffers from poor conditions on some streets. By leveraging AI, the trucks can limit their exposure to potholes, bumps, and other obstacles to reach more locations for waste pickup, which has led to a reduction in the number of garbage heaps in the city. In turn, the trucks are helping the city to collect road condition information so that they can improve how they allocate infrastructure repairs. Likewise, Lucy is helping by using “telephone farms” (sensors that stream data on variables like soil moisture levels which are analyzed and sent back to farmers on mobile devices) in Kenya to collect crop data. With this type of infrastructure and cognitive computing power, Lucy is able to provide analytics and recommendations to the farmers on water usage, insect control, and yield forecasts.Mongabay: How do the AI program development teams you’re associated with decide what data to collect, and how are the end users involved in determining the need?Neil Sahota: AI is really about training. We have to establish the basic rules for decision making or “ground truth.” Think of it as teaching a child. We’re going to have our own perspectives on what’s trustworthy, important, and right. Thus, even if you have four organizations trying to improve crop yields using AI, they might have slightly different recommendations because each one will have a slightly different ground truth. As a result, the data (and access to data) is very important, but what’s even more important is the training strategy for the AI.AI data processing helps researchers assess the health and conservation status of vulnerable koala populations.Mongabay: You’re also working with the United Nations to develop a model and set of metrics to encourage nations and NGOs to pursue AI solutions for a more sustainable world. How exactly is the UN tapping AI for achieving things like the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)?Neil Sahota: According to the U.N., there’s about a $US 5-7 trillion shortfall in investment to fulfill the SDGs. To bridge this gap, we’re looking at emerging technologies like AI to help. To entice governments and enterprises, the UN is developing a model to show the benefits of AI investment for initiatives aligned with the SDGs. The focus is twofold: 1) motivate more innovation, and 2) incentivize people to think about social good, in conjunction with commercialization. As a way of spurring adoption, we’re looking at a set of metrics that would give enterprises, agencies, and even countries an “SDG score” so they can gauge how successful their efforts have been so far.Mongabay: And individual governments like Singapore are using this kind of tech for things like beach protection now, yes? Neil Sahota: There are lots of examples of how artificial intelligence can help us protect our environment. Singapore’s beach protection is great example of how a government committed to environmental protection and which makes the investments can do a lot of good. Another great example is NASA’s Pre-Aerosol Clouds and Ocean Ecosystem (PACE) which is using machine learning to track the distribution of phytoplankton. While this may not sound like much, it actually has a profound impact on CO2 levels, and in turn, climate change and how plant and wildlife get impacted. Digital Crust is another great example of AI for environmental protection. It’s focused on a better understanding of subsurface processes in the planet which help understand impacts on groundwater and aquifers.MODIS/Aqua true color image showing riverine outflow and phytoplankton blooming in the Gulf of Alaska, with clouds to the south and snow-covered land in the north over Alaska on April 12, 2017. Credit: NASA GSFCAcross these examples, AI is helping us to consume lots of real-time data and look at millions of variables and analyze millions of possible trade-offs and outcomes. As a result, we are developing a much better understanding of what’s happening to the environment, what could happen to environment, and what steps we can take to improve or avoid environmental issues.Mongabay: What do you hope computational computing/AI/machine learning can be used for next, in terms of reshaping how people understand and use resources sustainably, to fight hunger, etc?Neil Sahota: My hope is the AI will help us as people become what I call “sustainably integrated.” At a macro level, people generally understand the big challenges we face. At a micro level, it’s much more difficult to recognize the impacts. For example, I stopped shaving with water to reduce my water consumption. When people hear this, they often say it doesn’t move the needle. In the grand scheme of things, it probably doesn’t. On average, we use about 1 gallon of water to shave our faces.However, what if my attitude inspired 100 people to do the same thing? Ok…. But does 100 gallons of water per day move the needle? What if those 100 people inspire 100 people each? Does 10,000 gallons per day move the needle? At some point, it does. This is where I hope we can leverage AI. If we had a little AI sustainability assistant to increase our awareness and help us change our behavior, even in a few small ways, it would really add up across the entire population. This won’t just move the needle for us; it’ll help us move mountains.This interview has been edited for clarity.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post.center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

Cute Dinosaur Forced to Support Evolution

first_imgKnee-high to a human, little Eodromaeus looks like a pet, but its discoverers are making the claim that it represents an early stage in dinosaur evolution.  Do the facts support this claim?    National Geographic announced a “nasty little predator from dinosaur dawn found.”  The BBC News said that Eodromaeus, whose name means “dawn runner” (indicating that the discoverers [Paul Sereno and team, U of Chicago] embedded their interpretation of its evolutionary context into the creature’s name), “casts light on birth of the dinosaurs.”  The news articles went on to discuss how this little fossil fellow, dated at 230 million years old, was the forerunner of T. rex and all the monsters that would emerge in the millions of years to come.    The dinosaur certainly looks well-equipped for running and taking care of itself, but the BBC article claimed, “Even though their descendents may have gone on to great things, neither of the creatures were dominant in their time, and the researchers believe their eventual rise may be down to blind chance, and perhaps some unknown environmental catastrophe.”  Stuff happens.    When interpretation outruns the bones, it’s helpful to go to the original source material.  The discovery paper in Science1 contains some assumptions that should be kept in mind when evaluating the claims that Eodromaeus is the ancestor of the great dinosaurs.  For one thing, the dates: Sereno’s team used radiometric dating of the Ischigualasto formation in Argentina to insert the particular level of the rock into the geological time scale.  The caption of their chart contains on the right side “A current geologic time scale, which assumes an average rate of sedimentation between radioisotopically dated horizons.”  What if that assumption is not valid?  The resulting evolutionary picture could change drastically.    Another glaring observation from their chart is decreasing diversity with time.  If we take their long-age interpretation of the formation, the evidence contradicts evolutionary predictions – and their paper basically admits it [bracketed portions added]:One explanation for the rise of dinosaurs has been that a few key features led gradually to the competitive dominance of dinosaurs [i.e., traditional Darwinism].  This view has been overtaken by a hypothesis of noncompetitive replacement [stuff happens], in which their rise is split into two successive episodes of extinction and noncompetitive infilling of vacant ecospace [opportunity-knocks Darwinism].  In the replacement hypothesis, the earliest dinosaurs are regarded as particularly rare (1 to 3% of terrestrial vertebrates), their abundance and diversity increasing successively at the Carnian-Norian and Triassic-Jurassic boundaries coincident with mass extinction of rhynchosaurs, traversodontid cynodonts, and dicynodonts and later of (noncrocodyliform) crurotarsal archosaurs.    In contrast, the fossil record from Ischigualasto indicates that early dinosaurs in the latter half of the Carnian (231 to 228 Ma) were more common and diverse than previously thought, equaling the percentage of dinosaurian genera in the late Norian fauna from the overlying Los Colorados Formation (Fig. 4).  Thus, in terms of taxonomic diversity, dinosaurs did not increase their percentage among terrestrial vertebrates toward the end of the Triassic in southwestern Pangaea.They went on to note that the disappearance of the other creatures (assuming their timeline) had nothing to do with the rise of dinosaurs: “The disappearance of rhynchosaurs at the Carnian-Norian boundary was not linked to an increase in dinosaur diversity but rather coincided with the local extinction of dinosaurs.”  It’s not like the dinosaurs were taking advantage of space vacated by the unlucky ones that had gone extinct, in other words (vacated perhaps due to their lack of Darwinian fitness).    The authors furthermore hinted that apparent increase of body size of later dinosaurs might be an artifact of preservation.  “Increased body size probably enhanced the preservation potential of late Norian dinosaurs, which are also recorded from many more sites than late Carnian dinosaurs,” they said.  Is there evidence for the conventional story that dinosaurs started small, like Eodromaeus, and gradually became the monsters we associate with dinosaurs?  “We cannot evaluate whether the increase in body size was gradual or rapid,” they said, “as there are no dinosaurs in the section between late Carnian [230-228 mya] and late Norian [226-225 mya] faunas” (brackets added).    They noted with some puzzlement the apparent haphazard distribution of herbivores and carnivores from location to location, part of which they attribute to “taphonomic bias” (luck of the draw with what gets preserved as fossils).  It’s not clear, therefore, that the dots can be connected in just one way.    Moreover, Eodromaeus was a well-developed, complex creature with fast legs and grasping claws, in no way inferior to later dinosaurs in terms of complexity and fitness.  What was there for evolution to do?  Notice what they said about this critter:The discovery of Eodromaeus, the reinterpretation of Eoraptor as a sauropodomorph, and the faunal record of the Ischigualasto Formation provide additional evidence that, by mid Carnian time (~232 Ma), the earliest dinosaurs had already evolved the most functionally important trophic and locomotor features characterizing ornithischians, sauropodomorphs, and theropods.  These attributes are thus unlikely to have functioned as the competitive advantage to account for the dominance of dinosaurs in abundance and diversity in terrestrial habitats some 30 million years later in the earliest Jurassic (~202 Ma).  Eodromaeus increases the range of salient theropod features present in the earliest dinosaurs, and Eoraptor shows that the enlarged naris, basally constricted crowns, and a twisted pollex were present in the earliest sauropodomorphs.The bulk of evolutionary advances thus must have appeared all at once in the earliest dinosaurs, according to their own timeline, with later evolution just variations on the theme.  Is this what Charles Darwin envisaged?    In addition, other paleontologists didn’t react as jubilantly as the press.  They sound downright worried.  Michael Balter in the same issue of Science said this fossil “rattles the dinosaur family tree.”2  He quoted Sereno “No one, even ourselves, predicted this repositioning.”  It means that the sauropods and theropods both appeared together.  Another paleontologist worried, “‘Only further research by independent teams can evaluate’ this radical shakeup of the early dinosaur tree.”1.  Martinez, Sereno, Alcober et al, “A Basal Dinosaur from the Dawn of the Dinosaur Era in Southwestern Pangaea,” Science, 14 January 2011: Vol. 331 no. 6014 pp. 206-210, DOI: 10.1126/science.1198467.2.  Michael Balter, “Pint-Sized Predator Rattles The Dinosaur Family Tree,” Science, 14 January 2011: Vol. 331 no. 6014 p. 134, DOI: 10.1126/science.331.6014.134.The main take-home message from this comedy of puzzles is that the Darwinian story comes first, and the data are props for it.  The data clearly do not indicate long ages of gradual increases in complexity and diversity, as Darwin would have imagined.  For all the facts show, these extinct creatures could have all appeared suddenly fully-formed, varied a little over the years with no new genetic innovation, and then perished together.  But no: in today’s paleontology, bones must be rounded up and commanded, like reluctant slaves, to build temples for Charlie.    When the evolutionists have to admit that, according to their own timeline, they cannot see any progress, or any indication whether “stuff happened” gradually or rapidly, they have left science behind and are dealing in tall tales.  Don’t be confused by jargon like “infilling of vacant ecospace.”  What?  Is some hidden real estate agent pushing animals to evolve so they qualify for vacant government housing or something?  This is ridiculous.  It’s obfuscation by linguistic verbosity negating semantic lucidity.  They’re talking about miracles – miracles of chance, “the rise of dinosaurs” for no apparent reason other than sheer dumb luck, with all the major features of dinosaurs present from the beginning, and calling it evolution.    Unfortunately, the science news reporters take this all as gospel truth and dish it out to the public with no critical analysis whatsoever.  That’s why we’re here, to expose how Darwin Brand Sausage is made.  You never sausage a confused mess.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Dry weather taking its toll on Ohio crops

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The rain this weekend was much needed, but the extended dry conditions in many pockets around Ohio created lasting damage in some fields. Corn is showing the signs of drought stress in a growing number of fields around Ohio. This Union County corn is showing signs of the dry weather. Corn rolled tight in Union County Shelby County has been suffering from an extended dry period. Shelby County cornlast_img