10 mindboggling highspeed camera GIFs

first_imgSome of the most interesting things you’ll ever see are happening far too fast for you to properly appreciate. Slowing down even the simplest occurrence can reveal incredible complexity. With modern high-speed photography we can get a glimpse of such things. So here are 10 things that happen very fast slowed down for closer observation in GIF form.Click the gallery to see each one of the pics and then check out the full explanations of each animations below, without your browser being weighed down by all those hefty GIFs!Gelatin bounceFoods made predominantly of gelatin have a very specific consistency. It jiggles and has a lot of give, but you’ve probably never noticed just how much it can compress. In this GIF a cube of jello bounces off a smooth surface. It can almost completely flatten out because gelatin is a mixture of long protein segments that can interact with each other in solution, forming a semi-solid material.Welding up closeCreating a connection between two pieces of metal isn’t simply a matter of melting the material itself, but often involves depositing an additional metal to strengthen the connection. This GIF shows metal inert gas (MIG) welding. It uses an electrical current to heat the metal and the electrified wire. The drops in the GIF are the wire melting and mixing with the metal to strengthen the bond. Bonus, this GIF is perfectly looped so you can watch it forever.Cymbal crashCymbals are among the oldest known musical instruments, and they look especially cool in slow motion. Just think off the eons people were smacking cymbals with sticks and not seeing the flexing as the metal vibrates. Suspended cymbals like this one can vibrate longer, producing a drawn out, almost eerie sound.Tank firingTanks form the backbone of all modern land-based fighting forces on Earth. The projectiles fired from the M11 Abrams tank leave the barrel moving at over 1500m/s. This shell is actually an experimental kinetic impact round called the XM1111. It was designed to house a rocket motor that would carry it to a distant target with the aid of the stabilization fins you can see deploying in the GIF. The XM1111 was canceled in 2009.Striking a matchThis GIF shows a safety match being struck. Most matches sold today are of this variety, which are more stable than older “strike anywhere” matches. The match head here contains sulfur and an oxidizing agent like potassium chlorate. When dragged across the special striking surface containing red phosphorous. The friction of the strike converts some of the red phosphorous to white phosphorous vapor. White phosphorus spontaneously ignites and decomposes the potassium chlorate. This release of oxygen sets off the sulfur, which lights the match on fire.Egg meets mousetrapThis isn’t a GIF depicting an everyday occurrence slowed down, but it does have some everyday things in it. If you’ve ever wondered what a mousetrap looks like going off, this egg demonstration should do it. The spring-loaded trap is held open by an arm, which is released by pressure on the trigger. A mousetrap of this type can swing closed with the equivalent of several hundred pounds of force. The egg never stood a chance.Bullet striking a steel wallThis GIF is short and sweet — the bullet hitting the wall is a .30 (7.62mm) round with a soft copper jacket and lead core. The video is slowed way down so you can see what’s happening — the slowest guns capable of firing this round have muzzle velocities of nearly 400m/s. This is why it splinters so easily on impact. This differs from a full metal jacketed round that would remain mostly intact.PopcornPopcorn as a nice, friendly food, right? This GIF exposes the violent little explosion that turns an inedible kernel into popcorn. Each kernel has a small volume of water inside, be rigid outer shell is rigid. As the surrounding environment heats up, the moisture inside the kernel becomes steam and the pressure increases. At about 135 psi of pressure and a temperature of 180 °C, the kernel ruptures and the crisped starch explodes outward.Water balloon bounceWith just a little more force, this water balloon might have ruptured, but instead we’re treated to an almost hypnotic bounce. Containing water in the balloon give makes it seem to defy gravity when slowed down as all the momentum runs out at the top of each bounce.Luger firingThe Luger pistol was one of the first semi-automatic guns to be produced in the early 1900s. It used an exposed swinging arm to eject the spent casing after each firing, which allowed the next round to slide into place. The jointed arm needed to be kept clean, but was easy to repair when damaged. VIEW PHOTO GALLERY Gelatin bounceGelatin bounceGelatin’s semi-solid consistency is a result of long heterogeneous segments of protein bound to each other. Welding up closeMetal inert gas welding up close as the electrified wire is melted into the joint.Cymbal crashThe suspended cymbal vibrates and rings for a longer time for a drawn-out, wavering sound.Tank firingThe projectiles fired from the M11 Abrams tank leave the barrel moving at over 1500m/s.Striking a matchA safety match being ignited by white phosphorous vapor. Egg meets mousetrapThe egg never stood a chance. Bullet striking a steel wallA .30 (7.62mm) round with a soft copper jacket and lead core hits a wall.PopcornAt about 135 psi of pressure and a temperature of 180 °C, the kernel ruptures and the crisped starch explodes outward. Water balloon bounceWith just a little more force, this water balloon might have ruptured, but instead we’re treated to an almost hypnotic bounce. Luger firingThe exposed swinging arm to eject the spent casing after each firing, which allowed the next round to slide into place. Gelatin’s semi-solid consistency is a result of long heterogeneous segments of protein bound to each other.last_img read more