Audio: David Suzuki on why indigenous knowledge is critical for human survival

first_imgAmazon Dams, Biodiversity, Climate Change, conservation players, Coral Reefs, Dams, Dead Zone, Environment, Flooding, Global Warming, Hydroelectric Power, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Peoples, Interviews, Lemurs, Mammals, National Parks, Oil, Podcast, Pollution, Primates, Wildlife Suzuki is a biologist by training and a former professor of genetics who’s just as well known for his outspoken views on the need to protect nature. Suzuki is the author or co-author of more than 50 books and the host of the long-running science program The Nature of Things. He’s also the founder of the David Suzuki Foundation and the Blue Dot Movement, the latter of which aims to enshrine the right to a healthy environment in the Canadian Constitution.Mongabay interviewed Suzuki last year about the Blue Dot Movement, and we thought now, at the start of 2018, would be a great time to check in with him about what progress has been made, what environmental issues he thinks are most pressing as we forge ahead into the new year, and his plans to convene a gathering of First Nations keepers of traditional ecological knowledge with Western scientists.*Here’s this episode’s top news:Peru declares a huge new national park in the AmazonStudy: Amazon dams are disrupting ecologically vital flood pulsesGlobal warming, pollution supersize the oceans’ oxygen-depleted dead zonesBelize imposes offshore oil moratorium to protect reefsThere’s a new member of the lemur familyYou can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, Google Play, iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.*Editor’s note 5/30/2018: The conference noted by Dr. Suzuki in the audio recording is now planned for February 2019.David Suzuki. Photo courtesy of the David Suzuki Foundation, licensed under CC BY 3.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we feature a conversation with iconic Canadian scientist, author, television presenter, and activist David Suzuki.Mongabay interviewed Suzuki last year about the Blue Dot Movement, which aims to enshrine the right to a healthy environment in the Canadian Constitution, and we thought now, at the start of 2018, would be a great time to check in with him about what progress has been made.Suzuki also discusses the environmental issues he thinks are most pressing as we forge ahead into the new year and his plans to convene a gathering of First Nations keepers of traditional ecological knowledge with Western scientists. On today’s episode we feature a conversation with iconic Canadian scientist, author, television presenter, and activist David Suzuki.Listen here: Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

Indonesian police bust Chinese nationals with 200 kg of turtle shells

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Animal Cruelty, Animals, Conservation, Crime, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Crime, Marine, Marine Animals, Reptiles, Sea Turtles, Turtles, Turtles And Tortoises, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation, Wildlife Crime, Wildlife Trade, Wildlife Trafficking Article published by Basten Gokkoncenter_img Police in eastern Indonesia have arrested two Chinese men for illegally being in possession of 200 kilos (440 pounds) of turtle shells, which they believe was headed to China.All turtle species are protected under Indonesian law, and the possession or trade in their parts is punishable by up to five years in prison and $7,000 in fines. The estimated value of the seized shells was $13,200.The bust highlights the continued role of the city of Makassar as the main gateway for traffickers moving wildlife products out of the biodiversity haven of Papua, where the suspects say they obtained the turtle shells. MAKASSAR, Indonesia — Police in Indonesia have arrested two Chinese men with the illegal possession of 200 kilograms (440 pounds) of valuable turtle shells, believed to have been headed for China.Acting on a tip from residents, officers in the city of Makassar, on the eastern island of Sulawesi, arrested Chen Jianyi, 25, and Zhong Qiushan, 31, at their home in the city late last month. The pair said they obtained the turtle shells from Sorong on the island of New Guinea, some 1,400 kilometers (870 miles) east of Makassar.Donna Briadi, the head of the Makassar Police’s special crimes unit, said officers seized dozens of shells from a range of turtle species, but did not elaborate. Under Indonesia’s 1990 conservation act, all turtle species in the country are protected. Poaching, habitat destruction or trade in turtles or their parts is punishable by up to five years in prison and fines of up to 100 million rupiah ($7,000).Donna said one of the men had been charged, while the other one was being treated as a witness. He did not specify whether it was Chen or Zhong who had been charged, but said police were looking into whether they were part of a larger trafficking syndicate. The seized shells had an estimated value of 180 million rupiah ($13,200), according to police.A hawksbill turtle swimming in the northern waters of Sulawesi island. Photo courtesy of Bernard Dupont/Flickr.The seizure of the turtle shells, typically used in fashion accessories such as sunglass frames, is the latest wildlife trafficking bust in Makassar, the closest major city to Papua, as the Indonesian half of New Guinea is known. Papua is Indonesia’s least-developed region, and is home to a rich array of wildlife, including birds of paradise, exotic reef fish, and highly endangered sea turtles.Traffickers moving wild animals and their parts out of Papua typically transit through Makassar, according to Andry Indryasworo Sukmoputro, an official at the Makassar field office of the Ministry of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries.Most traffickers, he said, prefer moving their illegal cargo by boat to avoid scrutiny from airport and quarantine officers.“And if the smuggling is carried out through the air, [they] do a deal with the airport officers,” Andry said.The NGO Greenpeace has previously published reports on the illegal turtle trade in Makassar. One report, from 1984, showed that some 593 tons of turtle products, or more than half of Indonesia’s turtle exports, were shipped out of the city since 1978. A later report said there were 15 operators illegally exporting turtle shells from Makassar in 1990.The trade in turtle shells has been banned worldwide since 1973, and much of the “tortoiseshell” in use today is synthetic or an imitation. Prior to that, the material came primarily from the Hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata), a species listed by the IUCN as “Critically Endangered,” or nearly extinct in the wild. ProFauna, an NGO operating in Indonesia, says genuine turtle shells continue to be sold in the country for as little as 80,000 rupiah (less than $6) per kilogram.This story was reported by Mongabay’s Indonesia team and was first published here on our Indonesian site on Feb. 12, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

UN’s Tauli-Corpuz, accused of terrorism in her native Philippines, plans to keep investigating ‘atrocities’ against indigenous peoples at home

first_imgActivism, Endangered Environmentalists, Environment, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights Victoria Tauli-Corpuz is one of the most prominent figures in the global movement for indigenous rights.This month, Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s administration included her name on a list of suspected terrorists, along with a number of other environmental and human rights defenders.The Philippines is already the most dangerous country in Asia in which to be an environmental defender, with 41 murders recorded last year. Tauli-Corpuz fears it may be getting worse. After Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the United Nations special rapporteur on indigenous rights, was included on a list of some 600 people the government of her native Philippines wants declared as terrorists, her colleagues described the move as “retaliation” for her speaking out against recent attacks on indigenous Lumad communities on the country’s main southern island of Mindanao.“I agree with that totally,” Tauli-Corpuz told Mongabay in a phone interview on March 16, citing a series of vitriolic remarks aimed at U.N. rapporteurs by the administration of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte since last December, when she publicly condemned the displacement and killings of Lumads in Mindanao. The region has been under a state of martial law since Islamist militants took over the city of Marawi there in May. (The U.N. special rapporteur on extrajudicial killings, Agnes Callamard, has also provoked Duterte by criticizing the deaths linked to his war on drugs.)Tauli-Corpuz is the highest-profile name on a petition filed in court this month by the Philippine justice ministry accusing hundreds of people, many of whom are indigenous leaders and environmental activists, of being communist guerrillas associated with the New People’s Army, the armed wing of the Communist Party of the Philippines. Tauli-Corpuz insists she has no connection with either group.A Kankana-ey-Igorot woman from the mountainous Cordillera region in the northern Philippines, Tauli-Corpuz has become one of the most prominent figures in the global movement for the recognition of indigenous rights. She worked for years as a community organizer on her home island of Luzon, and helped lead the successful push to get the U.N. General Assembly to adopt the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007.Tauli-Corpuz also chaired the Cordillera Peoples Allliance, a federation of indigenous peoples’ organizations, in the early 1990s. The list of alleged terrorists, meanwhile, includes a handful of former CPA officials. One of them is Joan Carling, who is now co-convener of the Indigenous Peoples Majors Group for Sustainable Development, which coordinates indigenous participation in international forums. Carling is also an expert member of the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.“I have fought for human rights and, in particular, the rights of indigenous peoples my entire life,” Carling said in a statement posted to Facebook, adding, “I therefore denounce this unfounded and false accusation, which not only poses a risk to my security, but is also an affront to the exercise of the fundamental rights and freedoms associated with democratic governance, and to the human rights obligations of the Philippine government.”“I call on the international community to show solidarity and express their concern to the Philippine Government,” Carling added.Joan Carling at the World Conference of Indigenous Women, in Lima, Peru, in 2013. This month she was included on a list of suspected terrorists in her native Philippines. Photo courtesy of Digital Democracy/Flickr.Anyone designated a terrorist in the Philippines can be subject to government monitoring of their movements and communications. The state can freeze their bank accounts.The petition comes at a time when President Duterte is overseeing a vicious war on drugs in which thousands of alleged dealers and users have been slain by police and vigilantes since he took office in 2016. Carlos H. Conde, Philippines researcher for Human Rights Watch, called the petition a “virtual government hit list.” “There’s a long history in the Philippines of the state security forces and pro-government militias assassinating people labeled as [New People’s Army] members or supporters,” he said. AMAN, the main indigenous rights organization in neighboring Indonesia, accused Duterte of “criminalizing” indigenous leaders. AMAN said it was “deeply disturbed to see how the Philippines, once an inspiration to indigenous organizations throughout the world … has descended into being a virtual police state, where any individual or organization who challenges the Executive is accused of terrorism.”Thousands of Lumads have been forced from their homes during the past two years, said Tauli-Corpuz, whose position at the U.N. mandates her to conduct fact-finding missions in countries where indigenous rights are under threat. While this is partly to do with the ongoing military crackdown on the insurgency in Mindanao, the violence is also the result of conflict between indigenous communities and companies eyeing their ancestral lands, especially for mining and, increasingly, oil palm plantations. The government has announced plans to add 10,000 square kilometers (3,860 square miles) of oil palm, an area larger than Puerto Rico, almost all of it in Mindanao.“They send the paramilitary groups, who are also sometimes members of those communities, and then they tell them to get out of those communities,” Tauli-Corpuz said. “Maybe the idea is to get them out so there will be no people supporting the guerrillas. I guess that’s their thinking. But how can you displace people who have been in their territory since time immemorial?”Tauli-Corpuz said she was “constantly trying to raise this issue with the government so that they will be able to do something about it. We are also of course talking to some of the politicians who speak out against these kinds of atrocities.”“It’s not just displacements, it’s also killings,” she said. “Recently there have been several indigenous people and also leaders who have been assassinated.”The Philippines is already the second most dangerous country in the world, after Brazil, in which to be an environmental defender, according to Global Witness. Forty-one activists were slain in the Southeast Asian country in 2017, the NGO reported. Tauli-Corpuz fears the climate may be worsening under Duterte. “It’s very dangerous now for anyone who wants to protect the environment or defend their lands, because of these kinds of extrajudicial means of going against people who are resisting and protesting.”Banner image: Victoria Tauli-Corpuz on a panel in Geneva in 2015. Photo courtesy of UN Geneva/Flickr.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Philip Jacobsonlast_img read more