Scientists give humanity ‘second notice’ to shape up or suffer the consequences

first_imgAnimals, carbon, Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Emissions, Climate Change, Deforestation, Environment, Extinction, Forests, Fossil Fuels, Global Warming, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Oceans, Research, Trees Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored In a paper published this week in Bioscience, scientists issue a second warning to humanity to adopt more sustainable practices and check in on how the world has fared since the first warning was published in 1992.They found most environmental problems have gotten far worse during the past 25 years.The paper puts forth ways in which humanity could improve its relationship with the natural world. If we don’t, the scientists warn we are “jeopardizing our future.”More than 15,000 scientists from 180 countries have signed the paper in support. Scientists have issued a second warning of impending doom for the natural world if humanity does not make significant changes in how we treat the planet. The warning is presented in a paper published this week in Bioscience, and serves as a follow-up on a similar declaration by scientists in 1992.The first “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity” was authored in 1992 by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) and signed by 1,700 scientists, including most living Nobel laureates in the sciences. It called out the “collision course” between humans and the natural world, pointing to evidence of “critical stress” to the planet’s various systems, from the ocean and atmosphere to forests and soil. It describes how this stress manifested in depletion of ozone, water, fish stocks, soil productivity and biodiversity.They urged fundamental changes to be taken in order avoid catastrophe. Among them: moving away from fossil fuels to renewable sources of energy, halting deforestation and the loss of species, more efficiently managing resources, stabilizing the human population, eliminating poverty and ensuring gender equity.“A great change in our stewardship of the earth and the way of life on it is required, if vast human misery is to be avoided and our global home on this planet is not to be irretrievably mutilated,” the 1992 declaration stated.The Kihansi spray toad (Nectophrynoides asperginis) is considered extinct in the wild.In “World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice,” Bill Ripple, director of the Trophic Cascades Program at Oregon State University, and his colleagues looked at how humanity has progressed toward the targets put forth over the past 25 years. With one exception – stabilization of the ozone layer through strict regulation of ozone-depleting chemicals – they found that not enough progress has been made to avert the massive environmental problems apparent in the late 20th century.In fact, they found most of these problems have gotten far worse.Two big trends were “especially troubling” to the researchers. One is the significant uptick in greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels, deforestation and agricultural practices. The other is extinction.The release of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide is driving global warming. Forests are big carbon sinks and deforestation has been widely acknowledged to be a major source of atmospheric carbon. Yet, while international conservation programs like REDD+ are seeking to curb deforestation and, with it, climate change, forests are still being lost at an ever-increasing pace. A recent analysis of satellite data showed global tree cover loss rose more than 50 percent from 2015 to 2016.Since 1992, the world has also marched headlong into a mass extinction — the sixth such event in 540 million years. Researchers estimate species are being lost at a rate at least 100 times faster than historical levels, with habitat loss, over-hunting and climate change just a few of the many human-caused drivers behind the event.The scientists warn that these consequences won’t just be felt by the natural world – they will also affect us.“Humanity is now being given a second notice, as illustrated by these alarming trends,” write Ripple and his colleagues in their declaration. “We are jeopardizing our future by not reining in our intense but geographically and demographically uneven material consumption and by not perceiving continued rapid population growth as a primary driver behind many ecological and even societal threats.”The scientists again implore humanity to alter its behavior before it’s too late. As in the first “Warning,” Ripple and his co-authors suggest more than a dozen concrete goals. These include the establishment of effective protected areas that would encompass a significant proportion of terrestrial, aquatic and aerial habitats, halting the degradation of forests and other native land cover and restoring those that have already been degraded; shifting diets to plant-based foods; reducing fertility rates by ensuring access to family planning services; and developing new green technologies.The paper has been widely endorsed internationally, with more than 15,000 scientists from 180 countries signing their support for it.“Soon it will be too late to shift course away from our failing trajectory, and time is running out,” Ripple and his colleagues write. “We must recognize, in our day-to-day lives and in our governing institutions, that Earth with all its life is our only home.”Citations:Ripple, W. J., Wolf, C., Galetti, M., Newsome, T. M., Alamgir, M., Crist, E., … & Laurance, W. F. World Scientists’ Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice.Banner photo: Micronesian kingfisher (Todirhamphus cinnamominus), which is extinct in the wild.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davislast_img read more

Study reveals the Pacific Garbage Patch is much heftier than thought — and it’s growing

first_imgA recent survey of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch revealed that the aggregated plastic there weighs in at 79,000 metric tons (87,100 short tons).The plastic is floating across an area larger than Mongolia at 1.6 million square kilometers (618,000 square miles).Around 75 percent of the pieces that are larger than 5 centimeters (2 inches) in length, and old fishing nets make up a minimum of 46 percent of the total mass.The scientists calculated that 94 percent of the 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic in the patch are microplastics. The great mass of castaway plastic collecting in the northern Pacific Ocean is much larger than past estimates, and it’s growing, according to a new study.As a species, we use and discard millions of tons of plastic each year, and a lot of it ends up in the ocean, where researchers estimate that it kills or injures 100,000 marine animals each year. And while some of it gets broken up and sinks, scientists have found that gyres — swirling areas in the world’s oceans where circulating currents meet — collect a lot of this waste.A recent survey of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, the largest of these collections, revealed that the aggregated plastic there weighs in at 79,000 metric tons (87,100 short tons). That’s between four and 16 times heavier than past estimates. As we continue to produce even more plastic, the patch is growing exponentially heavier by the year, according to measurements of its size over time.A map showing the location of the Pacific Gyre, the location of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Image by NOAA [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.What’s more, most of the plastic, floating across an area larger than Mongolia at 1.6 million square kilometers (618,000 square miles), are pieces that are larger than 5 centimeters (2 inches) in length, and some 46 percent of the total mass is made up of old fishing nets. These “ghost nets” effectively become deadly floating traps for all kinds of sea life.“I knew there would be a lot of fishing gear, but 46 percent was unexpectedly high,” Laurent Lebreton, an oceanographer with the nonprofit organization Ocean Cleanup and lead author of the paper, said in an interview with National Geographic News. “Initially, we thought fishing gear would be more in the 20 percent range.”But in fact, better than half of the debris that the team cataloged came from boats and ships at sea. The patch sits between Hawaii and California. Scientists think that it has collected so much plastic because of its location adjacent to the densely populated eastern shores of Asia and in an area that humans fish heavily.Laurent and his team were able to come up with a more comprehensive assessment of the composition of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch by adding a new dimension to their investigation. They shared their results on March 22 in the journal Scientific Reports.Previous probes of the garbage patch relied primarily on sampling nets and visual surveys of the garbage patch from boats. For this research, the team also took photographs of the patch from an airplane. From this bird’s-eye view, they write, they were able to more accurately count the large pieces of plastic, such as fishing nets or bottles.Filter-feeding marine animals, such as this whale shark, may face problems when they ingest microplastics in large quantities. Photo by Abe Khao Lak (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.They also sifted through more than 1.1 million pieces of debris from over 650 boat-based sampling trips. Virtually everything they picked up from the massive flotilla of garbage was plastic. And even though bigger pieces accounted for most of the heft, the scientists calculated that small bits called microplastics account for 94 percent of the 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic in the patch.Microplastics include additives found in some cosmetics, as well as stubborn fragments of larger, degrading plastic pieces. Small organisms like plankton and fish can ingest these tiny shards, and they’re in turn eaten by larger animals. Microplastics shimmy their way up the food chain until they reach the ocean’s top predators, where they could play havoc with their digestive systems. Once there, they also break down into toxic compounds, potentially causing serious health problems for animal species that are already battling other threats to their survival.Another recent study highlighted the danger that microplastics pose to filter feeders like manta rays and the world’s largest fish, the whale shark (Rhincodon typus).The Ocean Cleanup, based in the Netherlands, has launched a multimillion-dollar effort to develop the technology necessary to clear away half of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in the next five years. Now, with the nuanced understanding of the plastics that are trapped there that this new research provides, scientists say, we have a better idea of how to prevent our trash from ending up there in the first place.“The interesting piece is that at least half of what they’re finding is not consumer plastics, which are central to much of the current debate, but fishing gear,” marine ecologist George Leonard said in the National Geographic News article. Leonard, the chief scientist at the Ocean Conservancy, was not involved with this research.“This study is confirmation that we know abandoned and lost gear is an important source of mortality for a whole host of animals and we need to broaden the plastic conversation to make sure we solve this wedge of the problem,” he said.Plastic litters a beach in Singapore. Photo by vaidehi shah from Singapore (Litter on Singapore’s ECP) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.Banner image of a whale shark by Arturo de Frias Marques (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannonCITATIONSGermanov, E. S., Marshall, A. D., Bejder, L., Fossi, M. C., & Loneragan, N. R. (2018). Microplastics: No small problem for filter-feeding megafauna. Trends in ecology & evolution.Lebreton, L., Slat, B., Ferrari, F., Sainte-Rose, B., Aitken, J., Marthouse, R., … Reisser, J. (2018). Evidence that the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is rapidly accumulating plastic. Scientific Reports, 8(1), 4666.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Fish, Fishing, Microplastics, Oceans, Plastic, Pollution, Research, Saltwater Fish, Sharks, Sharks And Rays, Water, Water Pollution, Whale Sharks, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more