Audio: David Suzuki on why indigenous knowledge is critical for human survival

first_imgAmazon Dams, Biodiversity, Climate Change, conservation players, Coral Reefs, Dams, Dead Zone, Environment, Flooding, Global Warming, Hydroelectric Power, Indigenous Culture, Indigenous Peoples, Interviews, Lemurs, Mammals, National Parks, Oil, Podcast, Pollution, Primates, Wildlife Suzuki is a biologist by training and a former professor of genetics who’s just as well known for his outspoken views on the need to protect nature. Suzuki is the author or co-author of more than 50 books and the host of the long-running science program The Nature of Things. He’s also the founder of the David Suzuki Foundation and the Blue Dot Movement, the latter of which aims to enshrine the right to a healthy environment in the Canadian Constitution.Mongabay interviewed Suzuki last year about the Blue Dot Movement, and we thought now, at the start of 2018, would be a great time to check in with him about what progress has been made, what environmental issues he thinks are most pressing as we forge ahead into the new year, and his plans to convene a gathering of First Nations keepers of traditional ecological knowledge with Western scientists.*Here’s this episode’s top news:Peru declares a huge new national park in the AmazonStudy: Amazon dams are disrupting ecologically vital flood pulsesGlobal warming, pollution supersize the oceans’ oxygen-depleted dead zonesBelize imposes offshore oil moratorium to protect reefsThere’s a new member of the lemur familyYou can subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast on Android, Google Play, iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, RSS and via Spotify. Or listen to all our episodes via the Mongabay website here on the podcast homepage.*Editor’s note 5/30/2018: The conference noted by Dr. Suzuki in the audio recording is now planned for February 2019.David Suzuki. Photo courtesy of the David Suzuki Foundation, licensed under CC BY 3.0.Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. On today’s episode of the Mongabay Newscast we feature a conversation with iconic Canadian scientist, author, television presenter, and activist David Suzuki.Mongabay interviewed Suzuki last year about the Blue Dot Movement, which aims to enshrine the right to a healthy environment in the Canadian Constitution, and we thought now, at the start of 2018, would be a great time to check in with him about what progress has been made.Suzuki also discusses the environmental issues he thinks are most pressing as we forge ahead into the new year and his plans to convene a gathering of First Nations keepers of traditional ecological knowledge with Western scientists. On today’s episode we feature a conversation with iconic Canadian scientist, author, television presenter, and activist David Suzuki.Listen here: Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworeckilast_img read more

More murders: Conservationists allegedly killed by soldiers in Cambodia

first_imgActivism, Crime, Environment, Forests, Illegal Logging, Illegal Timber Trade, Logging, Military, Murdered Activists, Protected Areas, Rainforests, trafficking, Tropical Forests Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Editor’s note: This story was updated Feb. 1 to include information and photos from a statement issued by the Wildlife Conservation Society.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Three people have been shot and killed by soldiers in northeastern Cambodia, apparently in retaliation for seizing equipment from illegal loggers.A police report names three individuals as responsible for the killings: a border police officer and two border military officers.Illegal logging and timber smuggling is commonplace between Cambodia and Vietnam, and officials from both countries are often complicit.Around 200 land activists were murdered worldwide in 2016, up from 185 in 2015. Three people have been shot and killed by soldiers in northeastern Cambodia, according to officials as reported by The Associated Press. Those killed were a conservation worker, a military policy officer and a forest protection ranger, reportedly because they had seized equipment from illegal loggers.Keo Sopheak, a senior environmental official in Cambodia’s Mondulkiri province, said the attack happened Tuesday afternoon as the conservation team was patrolling in Keo Siema Wildlife Sanctuary. Keo Sopheak said of the men killed was a Cambodian employee of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). The U.S.-based NGO is running a project at Keo Seima aimed at conserving its forests and wildlife through capacity-building initiatives with local communities.According to a statement provided by WCS, those killed were Ministry of Environment ranger Teurn Soknai, military police officer Sek Wathana, and WCS SMART officer Thul Khna.“Soknai was from the local Bunong Indigenous Community,” said Ken Serey Rotha, Country Program Director of WCS Cambodia. “He lived all of his life in Pu Cham village, O’riang District in Mondulkiri Province. He grew up surrounded by nature and wildlife and from a young age was aware of the importance of forests and excited by wildlife and conservation.  After gaining a bachelor’s degree in Human Resource Management from National University of Management, Cambodia, he worked for WCS as an assistant to the ecotourism project in KSWS for four years. As part of that role he developed the Jahoo Gibbon Camp near Andong Kralong village, at which tourists stay and bring extra income to this indigenous community. Jahoo is the Bunong word for female gibbon, a species that Soknai was passionate and knowledgeable about, frequently enthralling visitors with Bunong stories about the animal.  He joined the Ministry of Environment (MoE) to become a ranger in mid-2017 because he saw what was happening to the forest that he loved and wanted to protect it. Soknai was well-regarded in his village, and respected by colleagues and visitors because his passion for nature was clear for all to see. He is survived by a wife and two daughters of one and four years.” Photo courtesy of WCS Cambodia“Wathana, survived by his wife and daughters of two and five years, was born in Phnom Penh,” said Ken Serey Rotha, Country Program Director of WCS Cambodia. “After graduating from university he took a job at the Military Police as an Officer.  In 2016, he was moved to Keo Seima, and since 2017 he worked as a WCS counterpart and patrol team member. There he worked on the inter-agency patrol team with MoE rangers and the community patrol team, to protect the forest of KSWS. He was a hard-working and respected team member and will be missed by those who worked with him and knew him well.” Photo courtesy of WCS Cambodia“Khna grew up in Pen Meas, a rural village of rice farmers in Somroung Commune, Tramkork District, Takeo Province,” said Ken Serey Rotha, Country Program Director of WCS Cambodia. “He was the first member of his family to go to university, and graduated from the Royal University of Agriculture a bachelor’s degree in Forestry Science in 2016. He then went to Israel on a scholarship for 10 months to study GIS (Geographic Information System).  Khna joined WCS in 2017, as part of the GIS and SMART (Spatial Monitoring And Reporting Tool) team at WCS. He loved being part of this dynamic, young team exploring new ways of using spatial data for conservation. Part of his work involved improving the quality of monitoring data gathered by field teams, which he accompanied to the forest. Despite only being with WCS for less than a year, he was a popular member of the team and will never be forgotten. He is survived by his wife and one daughter of two and a half months.” Photo courtesy of WCS CambodiaKeo Sopheak said the three-person team had confiscated chainsaws and motorcycles from illegal loggers from Vietnam. He reportedly asserted that they were killed by soldiers: “The three were killed not by robbers or a guerrilla group but they were shot by government armed forces who backed the illegal timber cutting.”A report sent by Mondulkiri police chief Ouk Samnang to National Police Chief Neth Savouen and read by The Associated Press names three border security officials as responsible for the killings: Phal Penh, Keut Vehar and Ngur. Phal Penh was reportedly a border police officer while Keut Vehar and Ngur were border military officers.Illegal logging and timber smuggling is commonplace between Cambodia and Vietnam. According to the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA), a UK-based NGO, around 300,000 cubic meters of logs were smuggled from Cambodia to Vietnam between November 2016 and May 2017.Most of Mondulkiri province is officially protected, but satellite data from the University of Maryland show areas of heavy tree cover loss along its border with Vietnam. Officials on both sides of the border are often complicit, according to watchdog groups like EIA, and reap huge financial rewards for enabling timber trafficking.Tuesday’s alleged killings are hardly the first. In 2016, the most recent year for which data are available, around 200 activists were murdered around the globe as they tried to protect land from extraction activities like logging and mining, according to UK-based watchdog organization Global Witness. That number was up from 185 in 2015.“Every day, rangers and law enforcement staff risk their lives to protect wildlife and forests,” said Ken Serey Rotha, Country Program Director of WCS Cambodia. “We should not allow criminals to destroy the forests of Cambodia and to threaten and murder those working tirelessly to protect this country’s natural heritage.“Soknai, Wathana, and Khna will always be remembered as conservation heroes.” Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more

PHOTOS: The great Sandhill crane migration makes its annual stopover on the Platte River

first_imgArticle published by Mike Gaworecki Animals, Birds, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Environment, Impact Of Climate Change, Migration, Photos, Wildlife Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img The annual migration undertaken by sandhill cranes in North America is considered one of the world’s great natural spectacles, on par with Africa’s wildebeest migration and the “march of the penguins” in Antarctica.Nowhere is the sandhill crane migration more visible in all its majesty than on the Platte River in the U.S. state of Nebraska — you truly have to see it to believe it.You can hear many of the sounds of the sandhill crane migration on a recent episode of the Mongabay Newscast. It’s one thing to hear the migration, however, and quite another to see it. The annual migration undertaken by sandhill cranes in North America is considered one of the world’s great natural spectacles, on par with Africa’s wildebeest migration and the “march of the penguins” in Antarctica. And nowhere is the sandhill crane migration more visible in all its majesty than on the Platte River in the U.S. state of Nebraska — you truly have to see it to believe it.The migration is underway now, as the birds head to their breeding grounds in the northern United States, Canada, and Siberia after having spent the winter in Cuba, Mexico, and the U.S. states of California, Florida, Texas, and Utah. According to National Geographic, more than three-fourths of all sandhill cranes make a stopover at what’s known as a “migratory staging area” along a 75-mile stretch of the Platte River every year.The National Audobon Society has said that “The early spring gathering of Sandhills on the Platte River in Nebraska is among the greatest wildlife spectacles on the continent, with over a quarter of a million birds present at one time.”While sandhill cranes are the most common crane species, habitat degradation and other environmental changes at key migratory staging areas like the Platte River could have major impacts in the future.On a recent episode of the Mongabay Newscast, we spoke with researchers Ben Gottesman of the Center for Global Soundscapes at Purdue University and Emma Brinley Buckley of the Platte Basin Timelapse project about their work using camera traps and audio recording devices to document how the migrating sandhill cranes and other species that are important to the Platte River ecosystem are responding to changes in the environment wrought by climate change. You can hear many of the sounds of the sandhill crane migration (as well as chorus frogs, prairie chickens, and more) by giving the episode a listen:It’s one thing to hear the migration, however, and quite another to see it. Brinley Buckley has also photographed the cranes as they make their stopover on the Platte River, and captured other species besides. She was kind enough to share the following pictures with Mongabay.Sandhill crane silhouettes circling at sunset before roosting on the Platte River for the night. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Sandhill crane silhouettes circling at sunset before roosting on the Platte River for the night. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Sandhill cranes on the Platte River in central Nebraska. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Sandhill cranes on the Platte River in central Nebraska. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Sandhill cranes in flight over the Platte River. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.A roost of sandhill cranes waking up to a snow storm on the Platte River. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.A leopard frog sitting in the shallow waters of a slough. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.A lek of prairie chickens booming and dancing on conservation land managed by The Crane Trust. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.A prairie chicken. Photo Credit: Emma Brinley Buckley.Here is a soundscape timelapse video Gottesman and Brinley Buckley made, pairing audio and photos of the Platte River ecosystem:Follow Mike Gaworecki on Twitter: @mikeg2001FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

Global warming may poison monarch butterflies, study finds

first_imgCitation:Faldyn, M. J., Hunter, M. D., & Elderd, B. D. (2018). Climate change and an invasive, tropical milkweed: an ecological trap for monarch butterflies. Ecology.Banner photo: a monarch butterfly feeds on tropical milkweed. Photo by Korall via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 3.0)FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Monarch numbers have plummeted in recent decades and scientists think it’s due in large part to the reduction of milkweed in the U.S. and Canada from increased herbicide use, as well as deforestation of monarch overwintering grounds in Mexico.A recently published study finds a new threat: warming temperatures may be making milkweed, the only plant monarch caterpillars can eat, too toxic for the butterflies.The researchers estimate that at current warming rates in the southern U.S., tropical milkweed will be too toxic for monarchs within 40 years.Monarchs prefer tropical milkweed to native species and the plant is now widespread throughout the southern U.S. Monarch butterflies depend on milkweed and its poisonous compounds that are deadly to most other insects. But a new study finds global warming may be making the very plant monarch butterflies need to survive too toxic even for them.Their vibrant red-orange wings with contrasting black veins and white dots make monarchs (Danaus plexippus) easy to recognize not only to humans but also to birds on the lookout for a snack. It’s a warning that tells would-be predators an important message: Poisonous – do not eat.Monarchs get their protective poison from the milkweed plant, which is actually a group of species nested under the genus Asclepias. The great Swedish botanist and founder of modern taxonomy Carl Linneaus named this group after Asclepius, the Greek god of healing, because of the plant’s use in traditional medicine. But milkweed plants also have a deadly side. They produce compounds called cardenolides that are steroids capable of stopping the heart.Scientists believe milkweed plants produce cardenolides as a defense against plant-eating insects and other animals. But some species have coevolved around this defense. And some, like monarch butterflies, don’t just cope with these toxins – they’re able to sequester them in their tissue to make themselves poisonous and bad tasting to their own predators.A monarch caterpillar feasts on a milkweed leaf. Photo by USFWS Mountain-PrairieBecause of their unique defense, monarch butterflies are obligate feeders on milkweed, and their caterpillars cannot eat anything else. This relationship is a risky one, and monarchs seem to be paying a price; their numbers have plummeted in recent decades and scientists think it’s due in large part to the reduction of milkweed in the U.S. and Canada from increased herbicide use. (Other factors, like deforestation of monarch overwintering grounds in Mexico, may also be contributing to their decline.)But now, scientists say they have discovered another threat to monarchs. In a study recently published in the journal Ecology, researchers at Louisiana State University (LSU) put forth findings that indicate global warming may be making remaining milkweed plants more toxic.The study found that one of the monarch’s favorite milkweed species, Asclepias curassavica, commonly called tropical milkweed, responds to warmer temperatures by producing more cardenolides. The researchers say that monarchs prefer this species because it tends to have more cardenolides than milkweed native to North America, but that they can withstand these toxins only up to a certain point.“It’s a Goldilocks situation for monarch butterflies. Too few of these chemicals in the milkweed, and the plant won’t protect monarch caterpillars from being eaten,” said Bret Elderd, associate professor in the LSU Department of Biological Sciences. “But too high of a concentration of these chemicals can also hurt the monarchs, slowing caterpillar development and decreasing survival.”A monarch caterpillar tastes the flower of a tropical milkweed plant. Photo by Judy Gallagher via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY 2.0)Tropical milkweed is prized not only by monarchs but by humans as well. With its attractive, long-lasting orange flowers and leaves that don’t shed, gardeners often opt for this species over native species – planting it has even been touted as a way to help monarchs – and it is now widespread throughout the southern U.S. But at current warming trends, Elderd and his team found that tropical milkweed there may get too toxic for monarchs within the next 40 years. Or sooner, if heat waves hit the region.“If I’m a monarch butterfly, and I’m responding to past environmental conditions, I’ll lay my eggs on A. curassavica,” Elderd said. “But under conditions of global warming, I’ll be doing my offspring a disservice without knowing it.”This isn’t the first strike for tropical milkweed when it comes to monarch butterflies. Previous research found monarchs that were raised on tropical milkweed tended to change their migration behavior and have higher rates of disease and parasitic infection.Unlike tropical milkweed, swamp milkweed (Ascelpias incarnata) is native to North America and produces fewer toxic cardenolides. The researchers say this is a better choice for monarchs in a warming world. Image from the public domain.Elderd and his team hope their study will help further understanding of the complex impacts climate change may have on wildlife, and inform better decision-making on the part of conservationists.“Overall, we have shown the importance of examining how species interactions may respond to abiotic changes due to climatic drivers,” the authors write in their study. “This is particularly true for specialists and their response to global warming.“Without gaining proper insight into how these interactions shift as the planet warms, we may be unwittingly setting ecological traps.” Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Animals, Butterflies, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Extinction, Deforestation, Environment, Global Warming, Insects, Invertebrates, Plants, Research, Wildlife last_img read more

Sixes anytime and every time

first_imgGood things, it is said, come to those who wait, and although it is not so long ago, two years is long enough, long enough to make one wonder if it would never come back again. The reason is simply this: it may not be the best of cricket, not in its most sophisticated way, but it is cricket, and Twenty20 cricket is indeed enjoyable, especially when is served up a little at a time but at regular intervals. Twenty20 cricket is not for those who were born and grew up on delicate and rasping cuts, elegant drives, off the front-foot and off the back-foot, vicious pulls, swivelling hooks, screaming bouncers, deadly yorkers, tantalising flight, subtle spin, and mesmerising spin. Twenty20 cricket is for swinging bats, big hits, and acrobatic fielding, the vast majority of hits for sixes, intended or not, flying over the boundary and disappearing into the stands, sometimes into the night sky, for huge sixes. That, apart from the guarantee of a result, plus the carnival-type atmosphere at the matches, is the attraction of Twenty20, and that is the attraction of T20 World Cup number six which is now under way in India. That is why I enjoy it. There is never a dull moment, not even when the minnows are in action, when the skill is not so high. The ball still sails over the boundary, and the sight of them travelling far still excites. For the West Indies, the tournament begins next Wednesday when the 2012 champions take on England at the Wankede Stadium in Mumbai in a battle of two of the favourites. The starting favourites are India, Australia, South Africa, England, West Indies, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, and that’s not necessarily in that order. The favourites are plenty, but that’s the nature of the competition and that’s how close it promises to be. As we welcome this rendition of Twenty20 cricket and ponder the wonderful performances to come, the power-hitting of Chris Gayle, the elegance of Virat Kholi, memories of some of big-hitting deeds of the past come to mind. Records, they say, are made to be broken, but those who saw these tremendous big hits will never, ever forget them. In hitting the highest score ever, Sri Lanka’s batsmen went to town against lowly Kenya in the first tournament in South Africa in 2007 when they smashed the highest score of 260 for six, and India followed up with 218 for four against England, also in South Africa in 2007. And South Africa, despite the efforts of Gayle, who cracked 117, scored the third highest total when they romped to 208 for two off 17.4 overs replying to 205 for six in South Africa in 2007. That was the day when Gayle got “mad”, ripping fast bowler Shaun Pollock to ribbons, his four overs going for 52 wicketless runs. I wish I was there on any one of those occasions to see the balls sailing over the boundary, just as I wish I was there for the entire match between India and England when the teams piled up a combined 418 runs for the loss of 10 wickets off 40 overs for the highest match aggregate with India scoring 218 for four and England 200 for four. Probably the day I missed most, the one in Bangladesh last time out, the one which was that between two minnows, the one in which 382 runs were scored for the loss of eight wickets, was the one in which Ireland scored 189 for four and the Netherlands scored 193 for four of 13.5 overs. Sixes fell like rain from the sky. Probably the days I missed most of all, however, were the ones starring Brendon McCullum and Gayle, the two master hitters of T20 cricket, indeed of any cricket. In Bangladesh, in 2012, McCullum, batting for only 57 deliveries, slammed 123 runs with 11 fours and seven sixes out of 191 for three against Bangladesh, and before that, in South Africa in 2007, while batting for 58 deliveries, Gayle smashed 117 with seven fours and 10 glittering sixes against South Africa. Another dazzling display was that of Yuvraj Singh, a left-hander who, also in 2007, cracked 58 runs off 16 deliveries with seven sixes against England. With sixes being the heart of Twenty20 cricket, with each hit followed by loud bursts of music, flashing lights, and jumping spectators, probably the man of the T20 World Cup tournaments has been Gayle, the bravest and most destructive hitter of them all. One batsman has hit 10 sixes in an innings, and that is Gayle, who has also hit a total of 49, 18 more than second-placed Yuvraj Singh on 31; six batsmen have hit seven sixes in an innings, including Yuvraj Singh and Shane Watson; 13 batsmen have hit six sixes in innings. This time, it could be the same, except that one man, McCullum, is missing.last_img read more

SO NACHO! CHIPS ARE DOWN FOR THIEF WHO STOLE FROM PIZZA PARLOUR

first_imgA man who stole 11 bulk bags of nachos after he went on a drinking binge must have built up some appetite, a court has heard.Nacho a nice thing to do!Sebastian Andanowicz admitted to stealing the food along with 24 cans of lemonade to wash them down. Andanowicz, of Sylvian Park, appeared before Letterkenny District Court charged with stealing the goods from Dominos Pizza.The 33 year old, who had 24 previous convictions, was arrested at the rear of the restaurant at 9.10pm on February, 4th last.Solicitor Patsy Gallagher said his client had literally drank all of his money and went stealing food.“He basically drinks what he has and then has to feed himself,” said Mr Gallagher.Judge Paul Kelly said Andanowicz “must have worked up some appetite.”Mr Gallagher suggested that it would not do anybody any good if his client was jailed.But Judge Kelly said it might do the community some good if Andanowicz was taken off the streets for a while.He ordered the accused to do 120 hours community service for the first theft and jailed him for four months for the second but suspended the prison sentence for 12 months.SO NACHO! CHIPS ARE DOWN FOR THIEF WHO STOLE FROM PIZZA PARLOUR was last modified: March 17th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Dominos PIzzadonegalJudge Paul Kellyletterkennynachostheftlast_img read more

Raiders lose safety Karl Joseph to foot injury

first_imgALAMEDA — The Raiders got bad news Friday regarding Karl Joseph, the safety who made game-ending plays in each of their last two wins.Joseph intercepted a fourth-down pass from the Chargers’ Philip Rivers intended for Keenan Allen Thursday night, coming down in a heap before being mobbed by teammates. He spoke to reporters afterward, but appeared to be in discomfort and was spotted leaving the locker room on crutches.Karl Joseph: Game Ender#LACvsOAK | #RaiderNation pic.twitter.com/P5uCmtAzG …last_img

Android Market and Windows Phone 7 Marketplace are Today’s Fastest-Growing App Stores

first_imgTags:#Android#apps#Google#iPhone#Microsoft#mobile#Trends Related Posts Of course, this is growth only, not total number of apps. The iPhone clearly has everyone beat on that metric. It’s interesting, however, to see that the iPhone’s App Store only grew by 1% during January. Has it reached a saturation point? Are developers devoting their resources to launch on competing platforms now instead of creating more iPhone apps?Regional OverlapBut trends surrounding app growth and related pricing weren’t the only things Distimo examined this month – it also looked at regional distribution and top publishers.Windows Phone 7, however, shows a much more localized picture – countries have an overlap of between 44% and 69%. What this means, Distimo explains, is that users on Windows Phone 7 devices will have an easier time finding localized content than Android users. In cleaning out my inbox, post-MWC, I came across a report released earlier this month from research firm Distimo. The report finds that the two fastest-growing mobile application stores are now the Google Android Market and Microsoft’s Windows Phone 7 Marketplace. Android’s app store had a growth rate of 18% during the month of January 2011 while the WP7 Marketplace grew at a rate of 30%.In Microsoft’s store, more paid applications than free apps arrived (1,027 and 576 apps added, respectively) while in Android’s Market, that trend was reversed (16,150 free apps added compared with 6,847 paid apps).You can see this growth on the chart below: Multi-Store Distribution TrendsDistimo also looked at the distribution of apps across multiple app stores (iTunes, Android, Ovi, etc.). Here, the firm found that out of the 200 most popular applications that are available in at least 2 different stores, 147 publishers have at least one app in the Android Market. Meanwhile, only 57 of the top 200 publishers have an app on Windows Phone 7.Although this figure is lower than Android’s, it isn’t significantly lower than other app stores that have been around for longer, says Distimo. In the chart, you can see that the Windows Phone 7 app store rivals Palm’s App Catalog and isn’t too far behind Nokia’s Ovi Store. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement More details on top publishers (free and paid, apps vs. games) is found in the 25-page report available on Distimo’s website here. sarah perez The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more