Roads, dams and railways: Ten infrastructure stories from Southeast Asia in 2017

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Agriculture, Amphibians, Animals, Apes, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Cats, Conservation, Corruption, Dams, Deforestation, Ecology, Economics, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Politics, Fish, Fishing, Forests, Great Apes, Hunting, Infrastructure, Land Rights, Logging, Mammals, Mekong Dams, Mining, Oceans, Orangutans, Parks, Poaching, Pollution, Primates, Protected Areas, Rainforest Biodiversity, Rainforest Conservation, Rainforest Mining, Rainforests, Reptiles, Research, Rhinos, Roads, Tigers, Tropical Forests, United Nations, Water, Water Pollution, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Southeast Asia is one of the epicenters of a global “tsunami” of infrastructure development.As the countries in the region work to elevate their economic standing, concerns from scientists and NGOs highlight the potential pitfalls in the form of environmental degradation and destruction that roads, dams and other infrastructure can bring in tow.Mongabay had reporters covering the region in 2017. Here are 10 of their stories. Around the world, there’s a push for rapid infrastructure development, and nowhere is that truer than in Southeast Asia. Roads, seen by the World Bank as a “blunt instrument” for economic development, are perhaps the most visible sign of this coming storm, with 25 million kilometers (15.5 million miles) of roads slated for construction around the world by 2050. In Southeast Asia, local, regional and national governments are working on projects like the Pan-Borneo Highway, the Central Spine road to connect Kunming in China with Singapore, and the expansion of roadways to link small communities with big cities.While research doesn’t always show a firm connection between these developments and immediate economic benefits, poorly sited roads have been shown to open once-remote areas to hunting, agriculture and human settlement. Countries around the region are also working on dams for drinking water and hydroelectric power, railroads to shoulder the traffic burden from a growing population, and even new land created by pulling up sand and gravel from the sea floor.Throughout 2017, Mongabay’s staff and contributors have been talking with the scientists, community leaders and government officials involved in the decision-making process. And they’ve spent time on the ground working to understand the important impacts on the environment and the lives of the people who call these places home. As the year draws to a close, here’s a look back at 10 important stories on infrastructure in Southeast Asia from 2017.William Laurance (right) getting a briefing from a park guard about a planned superhighway in Nigeria. Photo by Mahmoud Mahmoud.1. An ‘infrastructure tsunami’ for Asia: Q&A with researcher William Laurance — Jan. 6, 2017Tropical ecologist William Laurance spoke with series editor Isabel Esterman about a “tsunami” of new development happening all over the world. In 2014, he and his team put together a global roadmap highlighting spots where roads could do the most environmental damage and others where they could help connect farmers to markets and benefit local economies. Since that time, the researchers, based at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia, have focused their efforts on Southeast Asia. They’re gathering finer-scale data about upcoming projects, creating relationships with NGOs, other scientists and government officials, and working to identify the environmental, social and economic costs of planned projects across a region replete with critically important tropical habitats.Workers for construction giant Italian-Thai atop a concrete structure that will support an overpass and the expansion of Highway 304. Work is expected to be completed in 2018. Thai authorities are counting on mitigation measures like wildlife corridors to reduce the road’s impact on wildlife. Photo by Demelza Stokes for Mongabay.2. Thap Lan: Thailand’s unsung forest gem under threat, but still abrim with life — Jan. 31, 2017Thap Lan National Park in Thailand is a bastion of biodiversity in Southeast Asia, providing a home for 112 species of mammals, 392 species of birds and 200 species of reptiles and amphibians. Asian elephants (Elephas maximas), king cobras (Ophiophagus hannah) and hornbills are all found in the park’s 2,236 square kilometers (863 square miles) of forest, and it’s a UNESCO World Heritage Site. But in addition to poaching and logging, the expansion of a highway that connects to Bangkok is encroaching on the park. Officials argue that a wider road is vital to the country’s development, and there are plans for wildlife corridors to allow animals to move around in the park. But conservationists worry that it’s not enough. Journalist Demelza Stokes takes us into the park for a look at how Thailand is working to balance conservation with economic development.Silent rusting mine machinery litters the Panguna mine site in Papua New Guinea, abandoned 28 years ago. Photo by Catherine Wilson for Mongabay.3. Rio Tinto walks away from environmental responsibility for Bougainville’s Panguna mine — April 6, 2017Local communities on an island in eastern Papua New Guinea are still dealing with the negative effects of a copper mine decades after it was shut down. In 1989, local landowners succeed in halting Rio Tinto’s operations at the Panguna open-pit mine, arguing that the company was polluting the local water supply and hadn’t adequately shared its profits. The government is trying to get Rio Tinto to fund a cleanup operation, but the company said that, since 2016, it no longer has a financial stake in the mine and therefore can’t be held responsible. Contributor Catherine Wilson sifts through the arguments for Mongabay.Danum Valley, a protected primary forest in Sabah. Photo by John C. Cannon.4. On the road to ‘smart development’ — May 25, 2017Critical questions about where to build roads and other infrastructure projects swirl in places like Malaysia, not just about the locations that will do the least environmental harm, but also where they’ll bring about the most social and economic good for local people. But the benefits are often overblown and the costs underestimated, said ecologist Bill Laurance as he and his team embarked on a new project in 2017. Their aim is to help policymakers get hold of the kind of data that puts those highly complex decisions in the simplest terms, allowing for infrastructure development that does the most good and the least harm. Staff writer John Cannon tagged along with Laurance and his colleagues on a recent trip to Malaysia and filed a dispatch in May.Protesters from Galesong hold a banner calling for an end to sand mining as they occupy the area slated for the Centre Point development in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photo by Wahyu Chandra/Mongabay-Indonesia.5. Sand mining, land reclamation meet fierce resistance in Makassar — July 10, 2017The government of the Indonesian province of South Sulawesi is intent on creating more space and a new “prestigious landmark” in the form of a series of artificial islands off its capital city, Makassar. The land-reclamation project needs 22 million cubic meters (777 million cubic feet) of sand and gravel, which has spurred local fishing communities into a campaign of resistance. They say the plunder of that much building material will crush their livelihoods, so they’ve tried to block dredging ships. A local NGO has also sued the government for not having a fisheries permit or an environmental impact assessment. Reporters Rahmat Hardiansya and Wahyu Chandra visited Makassar to get the full story.A baby Malayan sun bear (pictured here in Borneo), one of the many highly endangered species found in Kerinci Seblat National Park in Indonesia. Photo by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.6. Road projects threaten Sumatra’s last great rainforests — Aug. 7, 2017Often seen as a simple tool to bring quick economic benefits, roads also open up remote areas to environmental degradation and destruction. In 2017, officials on the Indonesian island of Sumatra moved forward plans to build a network of roads designed to connect local communities and provide evacuation routes from far-flung areas. But conservationists opposed blueprints to cut into several national parks on the island. These parks hold around 10,000 plant species and more than 200 mammal species, including the critically endangered Sumatran orangutan, which could suffer due to the acceleration of habitat loss that roads could introduce into their ranges. Staff writer Hans Nicholas Jong investigates for Mongabay.Elephants making use of a viaduct at the Kenyir Wildlife Corridor in Terengganu state in Peninsular Malaysia. Photo courtesy of G. Reuben Clements.7. Malaysia’s East Coast Rail Link a double-edged sword for environment, wildlife — Aug. 9, 2017In August, crews in Peninsular Malaysia started working on a new 600-kilometer (373-mile) railroad that will connect this part of the country’s east and west coasts. Funding for the $12.8 billion effort is coming from Chinese backers, and it’s hoped that the railway will ease the traffic burden on Malaysia’s roads. But it also cuts through important areas of forest and critical habitat for the region’s wildlife. The environmental impact assessment for the project reports that it will cause “severe fragmentation of habitats.” Contributor Kate Mayberry traveled to the area and tells the story for Mongabay.Tall, dense mangrove trees on the shore of Balang Island, near the site of a proposed bridge in Indonesia. Photo by Basten Gokkon/Mongabay.8. ‘Ecological disaster’: controversial bridge puts East Kalimantan’s green commitment to the test — Aug. 30, 2017The Indonesian province of East Kalimantan is working to connect its cities to more rural parts of Borneo in an effort to jump-start the economy. Currently, crews are working on the Pulau Balang Bridge to link Balikpapan with communities across Balikpapan Bay. In the works for nearly a decade, the project has raised the ire of conservationists worried about the damage the bridge might do to marine life in the bay and the wildlife within the remaining tracts of primary coastal forest. And local community members worry that the economic development promised by the government will go unrealized. Staff writer Basten Gokkon tells the story.A local leader protesting the construction of the Kaiduan Dam poses in front of artwork in a “Save Ulu Papar” shirt. Photo by Kenny Gotlieb for Mongabay.9. Cross currents: Mega-dams and micro-hydro offer two different futures for rural Borneo — Sept. 20, 2017Residents of villages along the Papar River in northern Borneo face an uncertain future. In January 2017, the infrastructure minister of the Malaysian state of Sabah announced that plans were moving forward to build the long-planned Kaiduan Dam to provide drinking water to people living in the state capital, Kota Kinabalu. But construction of the dam would require resettling several villages in the area. In the meantime, villages such as Longkogungan are installing their own infrastructure in the form of micro-hydropower systems to harvest energy as streams tumble through the mountains of the Crocker Range toward the sea. Reporter Kenny Gotlieb met with local leaders and shares their stories.Houses waiting for villagers resisting being moved for the dam at the New Kbal Romeas resettlement village. Photo by Jenny Denton for Mongabay.10. ‘If it’s going to kill us, OK, we’ll die’: Villagers stand firm as Cambodian dam begins to fill — Oct. 18, 2017Crews in Cambodia started construction of a new dam in September. The $800 million project will be the country’s largest generator of hydropower, but NGOs argue that the thousands of lives it will affect are too high a price to pay. They contend that losses to fishing communities both upstream and downstream of the dam will be disastrous. The government has already resettled many communities, but contributor Jenny Denton reports that 100 families have resolved to stay on their land, even as the waters rise around them.Editor’s note: William Laurance is a member of Mongabay’s advisory board.Banner image of Bornean orangutans by John C. Cannon.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by John Cannonlast_img read more

Webs under water: The really bizarre lives of intertidal spiders

first_imgAnimals, Arachnids, Biodiversity, Conservation, Habitat, Interns, Oceans, Research, Spiders, Wildlife Article published by Maria Salazar Scientists have discovered a 15th species of intertidal spider, a family of unusual arachnids that live in coastal habitats that are submerged during high tides.The newest species, named after singer Bob Marley, was discovered living on brain coral off the Australian coast.Scientists know that some species create air pockets with their hairs, while others build waterproof webs, but little is known about most of these fascinating spiders.Intertidal spiders face a number of threats, including rising sea levels due to climate change, and pollution. Spiders are one of the most ubiquitous creatures on Earth, found on every continent except Antarctica. Whether in underground caves in the Amazon or the icy climes of Mount Everest, there is a species of spider that has moved into practically every land habitat. But some arachnids are determined to not even let the oceans stand in their way — and scientists have just discovered a new one. A spider named for the late reggae legend Bob Marley is the newest member of the 15 known species of so-called intertidal spiders. These weird spiders inhabit the intertidal zone: a stretch of land that is submerged during high tide and exposed during low. Scientists from Australia’s Queensland Museum and the Zoological Museum at the University of Hamburg, Germany, first found Bob Marley’s spider (Desis bobmarleyi) in 2009 and described it last December. A male Bob Marley’s spider (Desis bobmarleyi), discovered in Port Douglas in Queensland, Australia. Photo by Robert Raven“The connection to Bob Marley was first through his song ‘high tide [or] low tide’ as these spiders live in the high tide low tide zone,” said Barbara Baehr, a research scientist from the Queensland Museum and the lead author of the paper.The mix of land and sea in the intertidal zone supports a wildly diverse set of habitats. For instance, Baehr found Bob Marley’s spider on brain corals in shallow reefs on the rocky Queensland coast. But another intertidal species, Desis formidablis, or the formidable spider, lives under boulders on rocky shores and hides in barnacle shells in South Africa. To date, scientists have recorded intertidal spiders along the coastlines of Australia, New Zealand, Southern Africa, the Pacific Islands and India. Bob Marley’s spider (Desis bobmarleyi) on a brain coral at low tide. Photo by Paul HoyeThe most well-known intertidal spider, the marine spider (Desis marina), a species from New Zealand, has been found to live in the holdfasts of bull kelp, a type of seaweed. Holdfasts are like the roots of plants, allowing the seaweed to attach firmly to rocky surfaces in the turbulent intertidal zone. Intertidal spiders shelter in these hideouts during the high tide, and come out during the low tide to feed on amphipods, tiny microscopic crustaceans with no shells.Surviving in this landscape is no mean feat, says David Schiel, professor of marine ecology at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. Schiel, though not an arachnologist, has studied other intertidal organisms extensively. He said that apart from adapting to breathing under and above water, animals in the intertidal zone need to survive constant changes in temperature and impact from wave action as well as extreme weather such as storms and cyclones. “Generally speaking, organisms have to be pretty tough and resilient to withstand these extremes, which can occur on a daily, seasonal and inter-annual basis,” he said. While organisms like barnacles, limpets and shellfish have evolved physical adaptations to survive in this wild environment, intertidal spiders are built much like their land relatives. So how do they breathe underwater? In 1967, Bruno Lamoral, an arachnologist from Natal Museum in South Africa, attempted to solve this mystery by studying the formidable spider. Lamoral found that the spider was able to stay underwater for up to 24 hours at a time, thanks to a remarkable adaptation: tiny water-repelling hairs on its body, known as hydrofuge hairs, that trap a layer of air around it. Desis formidablis, the formidable spider from South Africa, has tiny hairs that repel water and trap air when they are underwater. Photo by Sally Sivewright, www.scientistinlimbo.comLamoral believed the spider had more tricks up its sleeve. During his study, he noticed it managed to stay underwater even after the oxygen in the air film was used up, and speculated that the spider’s entire body acted like a gill, fixing oxygen from the water. Unfortunately, he wasn’t able to pinpoint how exactly this could happen.More than a decade later, in 1983, Donald Mcqueen and Colin McLay from the University of York in Canada and University of Canterbury, respectively, described more complex adaptations in their study of marine spiders in New Zealand. In some ways, bull kelp is an even tougher habitat because it is only completely exposed during extreme low tides. So unlike its South African cousin, the marine spider is sometimes submerged for days. Yet as Mcqueen and McLay found, they didn’t rely on physical gills.Instead marine spiders spun thick webs inside the holdfasts, which trapped enough air for them to survive the submergence. Examining the webs, the scientists realized the spiders chose spaces that could hold enough air for their body size. Those that didn’t, perished. The root-like holdfasts of the bull kelp in New Zealand can shelter Desis marina, the marine spider, underwater for several days. Photo by Stug Stug via Wikimedia Commons (CC-BY-SA-3.0To make the most of their stored oxygen, marine spiders also lowered their respiration rates, breathing less frequently than their land-dwelling cousins. They also used up to 90 percent of the oxygen in their nest. Thanks to these strategies, marine spiders are able to lead very full lives inside these kelp holdfasts. They hunt amphipods that also live in the kelp, move in with potential mates, and even nest under the sea. The spiders only really need the low tide to find mates. Unfortunately, research into the ecology of these fascinating creatures seems to have come to halt since the 1980s. Apart from the discovery of Bob Marley’s spider, the only new piece of recent information was a 2017 study reporting several new locations of the marine spider in New Zealand. Cor Vink, curator of natural history at Canterbury Museum in New Zealand and the lead author of that study, said records of the marine spider were very sparse, “but once we developed a good technique to find them they turned up to be in more places and greater numbers than previously known.” For the other 14 known species of intertidal spiders scattered around the world, even such basic information on distribution and population is missingAlthough unsure of why intertidal spiders are so poorly studied, Vink was excited by the discovery of the new species. “It’s interesting that new species are still being found in such unusual habitats,” he said.But how safe will those habitats be in the future?According to Schiel, populations of bull kelp are largely stable and grow mostly in places away from human habitation in New Zealand. However, this may not be the case for other spider habitats. “Because of their position between the land and full marine environment, intertidal areas are subjected to impacts in both directions,” Schiel said, citing a list of threats across the planet that include agricultural runoff, excess nutrients, fine sediments from the land, and rising water levels and temperatures from the sea — all of which could impact intertidal spiders. Vink believes these unusual spiders will continue to bewitch more scientists in the future. “There are so many interesting questions,” he said. “How does its web work in salt water? How does it survive submerged for so long? How does it sense when the tide is coming back in?” CitationsBaehr, B. C., Raven, R., & Harms, D. (2017). “High Tide or Low Tide”: Desis bobmarleyi sp. n., a new spider from coral reefs in Australia’s Sunshine State and its relative from Sāmoa (Araneae, Desidae, Desis). Evolutionary Systematics, 1, 111. Lamoral, B. H. (1968). On the ecology and habitat adaptations of two intertidal spiders, Desis formidabilis (OP Cambridge) and Amaurobioides africanus Hewitt, at. Annals of the Natal Museum, 20(1), 151-193. Mcqueen, D. J., & McLay, C. L. (1983). How does the intertidal spider Desis marina (Hector) remain under water for such a long time?. New Zealand journal of zoology, 10(4), 383-391. McLay, C. L., & Hayward, T. L. (1987). Reproductive biology of the intertidal spider Desis marina (Araneae: Desidae) on a New Zealand rocky shore. Journal of Zoology, 211(2), 357-372. Mcqueen, D. J., Pannell, L. K., & McLay, C. L. (1983). Respiration rates for the intertidal spider Desis marina (Hector). New Zealand journal of zoology, 10(4), 393-399. McLay, C. L., & Hayward, T. L. (1987). Population structure and use of Durvillaea antarctica holdfasts by the intertidal spider Desis marina (Araneae: Desidae). New Zealand journal of zoology, 14(1), 29-42. Vink, C. J., McQuillan, B. N., Simpson, A. H., & Correa-Garhwal, S. M. (2017). The marine spider, Desis marina (Araneae: Desidae): new observations and localities. The Weta, 51, 71-79. center_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredlast_img read more