Brygga Henningsvær House / SKAARA Arkitekter AS

first_imgShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/960510/brygga-henningsvaer-house-skaara-arkitekter-as Clipboard Save this picture!© Marco Schön+ 20Curated by Paula Pintos Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/960510/brygga-henningsvaer-house-skaara-arkitekter-as Clipboard ArchDaily CopyAbout this officeSKAARA Arkitekter ASOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesOn FacebookHenningsværNorwayPublished on April 25, 2021Cite: “Brygga Henningsvær House / SKAARA Arkitekter AS” 25 Apr 2021. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesTechnowoodGRP Siding Façade SystemGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardMetallicsHAVER & BOECKERArchitectural Wire Mesh – MULTI-BARRETTE 8130Enclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsSealantsEffisusGutter Repair – TiteGutter3Aluminium CompositesSculptformAluminium Click-on BattensTiles / Mosaic / GresiteMargresPorcelain Tiles – Linea PrestigeMetallicsRHEINZINKZinc Roof Systems – Click Roll CapsTiles / Mosaic / GresiteTerrealTerracotta Cladding TileDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE UnilateralWindowsJoskoWindows and Sliding Doors – ONE SeriesMore products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Brygga Henningsvær House / SKAARA Arkitekter AS “COPY” Architects: SKAARA Arkitekter AS Area Area of this architecture project Manufacturers: GRAPHISOFT, Pollmeier, Aerogel Norge ASDesign Team:Marco Schön, Kim SkaaraClients:Families Carina and Einar BordewichEngineering:BorobyggCollaborators:AM Entreprenør AS, Aerogel Norge ASCity:HenningsværCountry:NorwayMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Marco SchönRecommended ProductsMembranesEffisusGutter Repair – AllTiteGutterWoodBruagBalcony BalustradesDoorsGorter HatchesRoof Hatch – RHT AluminiumDoorsLonghiDoor – HeadlineText description provided by the architects. This project shows the rehabilitation and transformation of a building used for traditional cod liver-oil production in Lofoten, Norway since 1939. Parts of the house and the Henningsvær pier were totally damaged after the winter storm “Berit” in 2011. The new addition fits indiscreetly to Henningsværs authentic environment and adapts the building pattern forming the neighbourhood, dominated by small-scale wharf buildings with pitched roofs.Save this picture!© Marco SchönBy using the same volume and roofscape, the new design stands as an echo of the original damaged section. Translucent aerogel panels on the roof, and facades, give a contemporary look that fits nicely in with the cultural heritage surroundings. In the dark hours and winter season, it lightens up as a soft-glowing lantern, giving life and activity to the pier. The highly insulating and translucent skin creates a unique feel in the interior.Save this picture!Plan – Ground floorSave this picture!Section – BBDiffused daylight flows in and gives a comfortable soft light, reducing sharp shadows. Carefully positioned large clear windows give interesting contrasts, framing the view to the surroundings, underlining the duality between the imaginary and the real outside world. The sculptural laminated wood constructions, combined with rough steel details, underline the traditional industrial detailing in the older section.Save this picture!© Rasmus Fjeldheim DaleSave this picture!© Marco SchönThe supplementary interior elements, such as the white kitchen modules, light wooden surfaces, and custom-made stairs with battens and wire mesh, show a concept carried through with consistency and high quality throughout. The beautiful hand-crafted wood and steel details are bathed in the soft interior light, emphasizing the contemplative atmosphere in the whole building.Save this picture!© Marco SchönProject gallerySee allShow less“It’s All About Continuing Our Cultures”: In Conversation With Wang Shu On Designing…ArticlesExploring New Forms of Collaboration Through Do-It-Together (DIT) ArchitectureArticles Share CopyHouses•Henningsvær, Norway “COPY”center_img Area:  120 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  Photographs:  Marco Schön, Rasmus Fjeldheim Dale Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Norway Photographs Brygga Henningsvær House / SKAARA Arkitekter ASSave this projectSaveBrygga Henningsvær House / SKAARA Arkitekter AS Houses 2020 Projectslast_img read more

Students given more time to sign next year’s rental contracts

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » Students given more time to sign next year’s rental contracts previous nextAgencies & PeopleStudents given more time to sign next year’s rental contractsThe 2021 student intake has normally signed their rental contracts by now for their accommodation but Covid means many are reluctant to commit.Nigel Lewis5th October 202001,328 Views The largest student lettings company in Lancaster is one of the first in the UK to give tenants more time to decide if they want to take up tenancies for next year as Covid continues to wreak havoc within further education.The city’s Students’ Union has been supporting a ‘Stop Housing Haste’ campaign in Lancaster to persuade student accommodation providers locally to be more flexible and enable tenants to sign tenancies for the next academic year much later than normal.This is the latest issue facing the student accommodation sector after this summer’s national campaign by the NUS to cancel the rental contracts of students told to go home by their universities.Lancaster Student Union’s lettings agency, Living, says it is leading by example. It would normally have issued contracts for the next academic year for the properties it manages, but it is now giving tenants until January to decide if they want to take up places within the 250 houses and flats it manages within the city on behalf of landlords, via a guaranteed rent scheme.The student union’s vice president Amy Merchant (left), says: “I am delighted that the delaying of contracts has been approved by Trustee Board.“I was mandated to do this by our student membership back in March as part of my wider ‘Stopping Housing Haste’ campaign, and being my manifesto priority, it was so crucial that this decision was passed.“It is vital that SU Living set a precedent on an issue that affects every single student at Lancaster.”Merchants says this reduce the stress on students by giving them more time to find the right housemates and still have safe, affordable accommodation options available to them later in the year.Read more about student accommodation and Covid.Lancaster Student Union NUS Amy Merchant student accommodation October 5, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

Leising: General Assembly concludes 2019 legislative session

first_imgOldenburg, In. — The Indiana General Assembly has adjourned, concluding the 2019 legislative session. Earlier this year, the Senate Republican Caucus developed our top legislative priorities. Below are the goals we set and the bills we passed to achieve them.Maintain a balanced budgetLike all hardworking Indiana residents who balance their checkbooks, we know responsible government means making tough choices and spending within our means. The General Assembly passed a two-year state budget with strong “rainy day” reserves in order to protect our state in the event of an economic downturn. The budget also continues our strong support of education.Protect vulnerable children Due in part to the drug epidemic, the Indiana Department of Child Services is struggling to keep up with the number of children needing services in our state. This session, we created measures aimed at improving services for vulnerable children and addressing the concerns of foster parents dealing with the court system. If we want more residents to become foster parents, it’s important our laws do not create roadblocks that discourage them.Support educationWith more than half of the state’s General Fund devoted to K-12 education, Indiana spends a higher percentage of its budget on education than all but two other states. We continued to put education first this session by increasing K-12 funding by $763 million. This increase includes an additional $539 million in tuition support, an increase in per-student funding and an increase in Teacher Appreciation Grants.Improve school safetyProtecting schools from violence takes vigilance on the part of every Indiana resident. Legislators have worked hard to improve school safety by making changes to requirements regarding the Indiana Safe Schools Fund and Indiana Secured School Fund. One bill passed this sessionallows grants through the Indiana Secured School Fund to be used to employ a law enforcement officer.Support workforce development To address Indiana’s long-term skills gap, the General Assembly has implemented many workforce-development reforms in recent years. This session, we continued our efforts to improve career prospects in Indiana. One initiative we implemented aims to strengthen high school career and technical education programs, make students and teachers more aware of Indiana’s in-demand careers, and reform adult job-training programs.For more information on legislation passed this session, click here.last_img read more

Oldenburg Academy 5K Lauf

first_imgEven though Freudenfest has been canceled, The 2020 Twister Lauf is still going on Saturday, July 18th at Oldenburg.starting at 9 AM. Proceeds will go towards OASIS.  Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more infoCourtesy of Twisters AD Patrick Kolks.last_img

Voter groups warn Iowa about errant felon database

first_imgDES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Two voter advocacy groups say Iowa must stop rejecting voter ballots from people misidentified as felons.The Des Moines Register reports that the Brennan Center for Justice and the League of Women Voters of Iowa told Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate that the rejections violate federal law. An attorney for the Brennan Center says the state could face civil action in federal court if the problems arising from the errant felon database aren’t fixed.The warnings were contained in a June 13 letter to Pate.Pate’s staff says he’s working on administrative rule changes that would require courts to provide conviction documents anytime someone is submitted for inclusion on the felon list.Iowa bars felons from voting unless the governor or president individually restores the right.last_img read more

U.S. court ruling complicates Trump’s elephant and lion policy

first_imgAnimals, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Biodiversity Hotspots, Carnivores, Cats, Conservation, Deforestation, Ecosystems, Elephants, Endangered Species, Environment, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Law, Environmental Policy, Environmental Politics, Extinction, Global Environmental Crisis, Green, Habitat, Habitat Degradation, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Hunting, Lions, Mammals, Mass Extinction, Over-hunting, Overconsumption, Rainforest Conservation, Trophy Hunting, Tropical Deforestation, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored A federal appeals court has found that the Obama administration did not follow proper procedures in 2014 when it banned importing elephant trophies from Zimbabwe. The USFWS failed to seek public comment at the time, among other infractions.This new ruling puts the Trump administration decision, made in November, ending the ban and allowing elephant trophy hunting imports, into question.Further complicating matters is Trump’s dubbing of the November USFWS decision as a “horror show,” and his putting of the policy on hold awaiting his response. To date, Trump has said nothing further.The way things stand now, U.S. hunters can import elephant trophies from South Africa and Namibia. They can import lion body parts from South Africa, Zimbabwe and Zambia. But the legality of importing elephant trophies from Zambia and Zimbabwe remains in limbo. Savannah elephant populations have plunged by 30 percent in just seven years, while forest elephant numbers have fallen by 62 percent in ten years, and lion populations have dropped by 43 percent in the last 21 years. Photo courtesy of USFWSOn December 22, a federal appeals court ruled that the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) did not properly follow procedures when it banned importing elephant “trophies” – including heads, tusks, or other parts – from Zimbabwe in 2014. While the ruling was aimed at an Obama Administration policy, its impact will likely influence how the Trump administration treats trophy hunting across Africa.Trump’s USFWS made waves in November when it announced that it was overturning the Obama-era ban, and would allow imports of elephant trophies from Zambia and Zimbabwe, the latter which was undergoing a coup at the time.Simultaneously, news broke that the administration had quietly okayed lion trophy hunting imports from Zambia and Zimbabwe as well.However, both these decisions were made to reverse the Obama administration ban – a protocol which the U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit has now rejected on a procedural point. The judge wrote that the Obama decision was essentially “rule-making,” meaning it required notice to the public and an open comment period, something the USFWS did not do. The Trump Administration followed by also failing to include a public comment period.“Thus these new findings [by the Trump Administration] are contrary to law,” Anna Frostic, Managing Attorney of Wildlife & Animal Research Litigation for The Humane Society of the U.S., explained. She added that the Trump administration’s recent reversal of the bans “have already been challenged in a case pending before the same federal district court judge who ruled on the 2014-2015 findings.”The lawsuit against the Obama USFWS ruling was brought by the National Rifle Association (NRA) and by Safari Club International – strident trophy hunting advocates. The pending lawsuit against the Trump USFWS was brought by the Center for Biological Diversity and the Natural Resources Defense Council.Carvings made from elephant ivory on display as part of the USFWS “Buyer Beware” exhibit located in Logan airport, Boston, Massachusetts. The exhibit is designed to educate travelers about the hazards of purchasing wildlife products abroad that are made from endangered or protected species. Photo courtesy of the USFWSThe president muddies the watersAll of this leaves the U.S. government’s current policy on trophy hunting imports up in the air, especially given that the administration is still waiting a decision from the president himself on the matter. Two days after the USFWS announced its new policy allowing elephant trophy imports from Zambia and Zimbabwe, President Trump tweeted that he was putting the decision on hold.“Big-game trophy decision will be announced next week but will be very hard pressed to change my mind that this horror show in any way helps conservation of Elephants or any other animal,” he tweeted.However, no decision was forthcoming. Six weeks have now passed since Trump’s tweet and he has not announced a decision either way, leaving everyone in limboThe Department of the Interior has said it will not allow trophies of elephants or lions from 2016 to 2018 to be imported. But Frostic said the department has not “formally rescinded” its November decision allowing imports.“We remain concerned,” she noted, adding that “trophy hunting of elephants and lions undermines the conservation of those species and cannot lawfully be permitted under the Endangered Species Act.”U.S. trophy hunters can currently legally import lion trophies from South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Photo by Ken Stansell / USFWSArguing a point of lawIn order for American trophy hunters to bring their quarries home, the government must find that the hunting “enhances” conservation under current U.S. laws.Proponents argue that trophy hunting brings in vital conservation revenue, especially in remote areas rarely visited by non-hunting tourists and where land might otherwise be converted to agriculture or overrun by cattle. Without trophy hunting, they say, significant chunks of unconserved lands across Africa could be lost.However, critics contend that trophy hunting is a bloodsport that has long outlived its usefulness – if it ever had any. In an age where savannah elephant populations have plunged by 30 percent in just seven years, where forest elephant numbers have fallen by 62 percent in ten years, and lion populations have dropped by 43 percent in the last 21 years, trophy hunting is now seen by conservationists as just one more high card in a deck already stacked heavily against Africa’s megafauna.Many conservationists argue that corruption and lax governance in many African nations means that little money gleaned from trophy hunters ever reaches the parks, rangers, local communities, or the animals needing protection.In recent years, the global public has also become increasingly outraged at the moral implications of wealthy trophy hunters killing endangered species.Still, conservationists remain split on the efficacy of trophy hunting in providing funding and land for species. Even though many scientists and activists – including Jane Goodall – have become increasingly outspoken against the practice.“There is ample scientific evidence showing that lions, leopards, and elephants in particular are highly imperiled and cannot sustain the loss of individuals to recreational hunting… Thus, it is highly concerning that American trophy hunters are fighting to minimize the federal government’s scrutiny of their efforts to slaughter thousands of animals in danger of extinction every year,” said Frostic.A new U.S. federal court ruling puts into limbo the legality of importing elephant trophies from Zimbabwe, as banned by the Obama administration in 2014, and as approved in November 2017 by the Trump administration. Photo by Muhammad Mahdi Karim as licensed under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2A legal quandaryWhile the DC federal appeals court found that the Obama Administration did not follow correct protocols in 2014, it also affirmed that the past administration’s decision – i.e. blocking elephant parts from Zimbabawe – was warranted by the evidence.So it remains to be seen how all of this legal wrangling will pan out in 2018. But for now, U.S. trophy hunters can import lion trophies from South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe (according to the most recent information on the USFWS website) and elephant trophies from Namibia and South Africa. Elephant trophy hunting imports from Zimbabwe and Zambia remain unsettled until the Trump administration clarifies its decision on that policy.“We are reviewing the decision,” Gavin Shire, Chief of Public Affairs with the USFWS, said in response to the DC district appeals court ruling.Meanwhile, lawsuits against the Trump administration’s USFWS trophy hunting import changes are already moving ahead through the courts.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Article published by Glenn Schererlast_img read more

Safe spaces: Tackling sexual harassment in science

first_imgConservation, Featured, Forestry, Forests, Rainforests, Research, Science, Social Justice, Tropical Forests, Women In Science Through this 3-month long investigation, Mongabay examined a variety of common situations in sciences where people are victimized by uneven power dynamics and abuses of authority in the sciences across the Americas.Most of those who spoke to Mongabay for this story asked to remain anonymous for fear of serious repercussions for their career.Though those interviewed were based throughout the Americas, Mongabay has received other tips from around the world describing a wide variety of abuses of power. Far away from the red carpets of Hollywood, an aspiring scientist in Guyana, South America, is being discouraged by her parents from going on a field trip because of worries for her reputation and safety. They’ve heard stories of what can happen to young women on such expeditions.“Often more than 90 percent of our field staff are male,” logistics assistant Natasha* told Mongabay. “I’ve heard reports of sexual harassment, and when females go along on these trips, particularly if they are young and unmarried, there’s a perception that because she’s with these men, she will be having sex. Valid or not, this is discouraging for women.”This is #metoo in the world of conservation. There are no shiny pins saying “Time’s Up.” No speeches. No applause. Just ordinary women beating back inappropriate sexual comments, unwanted advances and aggressive behaviour to progress in their chosen career.A field biologist conducts a survey for special status plants. NPS photo.In 2017, high-profile reports of sexual harassment at the hands of male scientists and professors rippled across the scientific community and even into the mainstream media, but they’re just the tip of the iceberg.Under the surfaceWhen Angela* heard the news reports about sexual harassment of scientists in Antarctica it brought back unpleasant memories of her own time at McMurdo, the largest US research center on the icy continent.“When I saw the headline, there were at least three people I was guessing it would be,” the life sciences doctor told Mongabay. “And Dave [Marchant, the man accused] wasn’t one of the three [I thought of]. That’s how rampant this problem is.”The choice to not speak out, said Angela, is often out of self-preservation.“Almost every woman I know in science has a harassment or discrimination story to tell – but, and I speak only for myself, we don’t want to make waves or open old wounds.”Recently, Scientific American published a comprehensive overview, Confronting Sexual Harassment in Science, highlighting moves by different US institutions to intervene in and prevent such behaviors. Another piece in Science magazine also dug into the issue.In one study cited, the Survey of Academic Field Experiences (2014), approximately two-thirds of respondents stated that they had personally experienced sexual harassment – defined here as inappropriate or sexual remarks, comments about physical beauty, cognitive sex differences, or other such jokes.A Mosaics in Science program participant conducts field work at Lava Beds National Monument. NPS Photo.More than 20 percent reported that they had personally experienced sexual assault.To get a sense of some of the issues at play, Mongabay spoke to a cross-section of women working in science across the Americas to hear their experiences.An unwanted lessonFor some of the women we spoke to, it began in the classroom.Just a couple of months into starting her PhD, conservation biologist Monica* was emailed explicit photos by her lab professor. “We’re talking sexual images, very inappropriate,” she told Mongabay. “I thought: this must be a mistake. But then it happened again.”While she said her gut reaction was to raise it with the dean, she ultimately decided not to – worried she wouldn’t get her PhD, would fall out with the university or have to start again. “So I never did anything about it. I just left his lab and started with my next advisor.”For others, the huge pressures to succeed manifested in unequal “consensual” relationships with senior staff.“I have several colleagues who were taken advantage of by their PhD advisers,” Natalia*, doctor of ecology, told Mongabay in an email exchange.“Whereas both parties may at different times perceive this as a ‘normal relationship’, so many times in retrospect (or even as it’s happening) the junior person feels that they have no choice to say no to sleeping with their adviser because it will impact everything – their entire career.”Alone in their fieldThe same power games, harassment and inappropriate behavior continue into the workplace.A graduate student conducts shorebird research at Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska. NPS photo.One of the women Mongabay spoke to described being harassed and belittled. In one instance, a high-level official asked her, “Why don’t you just go and have a family and kids?” Another woman recalled a male colleague who would try to initiate explicit conversations, such as “When did you lose your virginity?”For manager Aesha*, even networking has proved problematic. “There are a lot of risks,” she said. “I’ve found myself in situations where I’ve networked with someone, given them my number to keep in touch, and conversations around work quickly became inappropriate and sexual.”Setting boundaries and shutting down unwanted behavior in the field is even trickier.While on expeditions, Monica said she has experienced bullying by men who seemed to be intimated by her familiarity or comfort with the work or setting: “It’s pretty strong when someone immediately wants to undermine you and shake your confidence because they’re insecure.”This can also manifest when romantic advances are turned down. “A couple of times people have tried to discredit me in some way in my work or make up something because it was very clear they were not ok with being rejected,” she said. “It’s really hard because you can’t put out all these fires that other people have lit.”Reporting upThere is an impression among some people that sexual harassment, abuse and intimidation don’t happen in science, especially not in so-called “conscious” fields such as conservation and ecology.On the Essequibo River close to Iwokrama River Lodge. Photo by Carinya Sharples/MongabayScientist Raquel Thomas-Caesar told Mongabay she has found most educated men who care for the environment to be respectful and compassionate.But, she said, she was surprised on one occasion, many years ago, when a trusted, overseas colleague in a supervisory position made an unwelcome sexual approach.She said she never reported the incident as she dealt with the situation privately – but also because she didn’t feel confident that upper-level management would address the situation adequately.Today, Thomas-Caesar makes use of her current employer’s sexual harassment policy to discipline such behavior and there have been a few occasions where staff have been dismissed.Changing the climateHaving specific policies in place is important when tackling institutional sexual harassment, but the reporting process must also be clear, open and non-judgmental – and those found guilty properly penalized.In November 2017, the Huffington Post reported that an engineering professor at Princeton University had been found “responsible for sexual harassment”. His reported punishment: to attend training.“People are really mad on campus right now,” said Andrea Graham, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, in an interview with Mongabay in December. “They’re really angry at such a light punishment.” In response, the university has set up an advisory committee to review its sexual-misconduct policies.Meanwhile, in her own department, Graham chairs a Climate Committee that aims to promote transparency, diversity and inclusivity. The committee, set up in early 2016, is made up of two peer-selected graduate students, post-doctoral students, one staff member and three faculty members.“Just opening the conversation has been incredibly therapeutic and already productive,” she said. “Activism, or just actions, and cultural change induced by how awful things are right now maybe ultimately will make it all worthwhile. That’s what makes it feasible for me to march on despite the horrible news every day.”*Names have been changed to protect the identities of individuals.Carinya Sharples is a Guyana-based foreign correspondent. You can find her on Twitter at @carinyasharples.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Article published by Genevieve Belmakerlast_img read more

Deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon dropped 13 percent in 2017

first_imgA new analysis of satellite imagery and data finds 143,425 hectares of forest were lost in the Peruvian Amazon in 2017, down 13 percent from 2016.The analysis identified newly deforestation hotspots in the San Martín and Amazonas regions.The main causes of the loss of forest in the Amazon appear to be cultivation of crops, small- and medium-scale ranching, large oil palm plantations and gold mining. A recent analysis of satellite images gives a glimpse into Peru’s widespread deforestation in 2017. The analysis, which was produced by the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project (MAAP), found 143,425 hectares of forest were lost across the Peruvian Amazon during 2017 — the equivalent of 200,000 soccer fields.Deforestation was down 13 percent from 2016, but the analysis reveals new forest loss hotspots and conservationists remain concerned for the future of Peru’s forests. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored This story was initially published in Spanish on Mongabay Latam on Feb. 8, 2018.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the editor of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Satellite images of an area in southern Peru’s Madre de Dios region show the advancement of deforestation from 2016 to 2018. Images courtesy of MAAPMAAP’s report indicates the five most-deforested areas in Peru are spread throughout the country’s Amazonian regions, from Madre de Dios in the south to Ucayali and Huánuco and San Martín in the central part of the country to the Santa María de Nieva area in northern Peru’s Amazonas region.According to the analysis, the main causes of deforestation in these areas are small- and medium-scale ranching, large-scale oil palm cultivation and gold mining.Matt Finer, MAAP’s principal investigator, told Mongabay Latam that advancements in early deforestation alert systems have allowed them to quickly produce a complete panorama of what happened last year.“Historically, we had to wait months and years to know the levels of deforestation that had been reached every year,” he said. A recently deforested area in the Amazonas Region. Images courtesy of MAAPOverall, MAAP found there was 13 percent less deforestation in the Peruvian Amazon in 2017 than in 2016. But experts still worry about the future of the country’s forests. Claudio Schneider, Technical Director of Conservation International Peru, considers the amount of deforestation in Peru to be too high.“Although efforts have been made to improve monitoring — because now we have more reliable data about deforestation — there still isn’t enough being done to stop the loss of forests,” Schneider said.He said that it is a complex issue, and that the Peruvian Amazon continues to be a neglected area with weak governance.“As long as people don’t work in a territorial way, in the titling of the land and in coordination with Indigenous communities and other sectors of the population, the Amazon will continue to be, a little bit, no one’s land,” Schneider said. He added that this disorganization is an open door for illegal activities such as mining or indiscriminate logging.Schneider says that to advance the fight against deforestation, the Peruvian government should launch a stronger land titling campaign for communities that reside in the country’s forests. Article published by Morgan Erickson-Davis Agriculture, Deforestation, Environment, Forests, Gold Mining, Habitat Loss, Mining, Primary Forests, Rainforests, Research, Satellite Imagery, Tropical Forests Satellite imagery shows a new deforestation hotspot in the San Martín Region caused by the cultivation of oil palm. Images courtesy of MAAPIn the area around the Interoceanic Highway, deforestation totals 11,115 hectares and appears to be caused primarily by gold mining and agricultural activity, particularly in areas north of the highway. In Iberia, 3,220 hectares of forest were lost in 2017. In this area, the main drivers are the cultivation of corn, papaya and cacao, according to local sources.A large-scale agricultural project in northeastern San Martín resulted in the deforestation of 740 hectares during the last few months of 2017. According to MAAP, Peru’s National Forest Conservation Program, administered by the Department of the Environment, confirmed that there is a new oil palm plantation on the border between the regions of San Martín and Loreto.Another new deforestation hotspot is also located in the Amazonas Region, in Nieva District along the Bagua-Saramiriza Highway. In this area, 1,135 hectares of frest were lost in 2017. Deforestation in this area was due to crop cultivation and ranching, according to the report. The amount of deforested land has increased to 3,220 hectares in Iberia in Peru’s Madre de Dios region. Images courtesy of MAAPHe added that the satellite analysis has allowed them to learn that the same patterns and drivers of deforestation are repeated throughout many different areas of the country.In the Ucayali and Huánuco regions, MAAP estimates that deforestation affected 23,240 hectares in 2017. “In this area, the main drivers would be ranching and palm oil,” the report states.Madre de Dios, one of Peru’s most-deforested regions, once held a large area of forest that has been lost to the Interoceanic Highway, as well as a deforested area along its border with Brazil.last_img read more

Films celebrate big cats on World Wildlife Day

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Big cats is the theme of the global celebration of this year’s World Wildlife Day on March 3.A big cats film festival hosted by CITES and Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival at the UN headquarters in New York City will screen 16 films selected as finalists.Big cats are key apex predators that keep ecosystems healthy, and eight species are being celebrated for the event: the clouded leopard, jaguar, cheetah, leopard, lion, snow leopard, tiger and puma. Big cats around the world face many challenges, from diminishing prey populations and habitat degradation, to poaching for their meat and body parts. A current spike in the killing of Bolivia’s jaguars for the illegal trade in their teeth for jewelry is perhaps the most recent and egregious example of the latter.But there are notable efforts to raise awareness and galvanize support for these important apex predators led by some governments and NGOs like the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Panthera, National Geographic Society’s Big Cats Initiative, and many others.Cheetah with cubs. Photo courtesy of ZSLNow added to this list is an upcoming event for World Wildlife Day on March 3. A key celebration of this global event will be the International Big Cats Film Festival, on March 2 and 3, jointly presented by Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival and CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. The festival will be hosted at the United Nations headquarters in New York City and the Explorers Club, as well as many other places around the world.“When it comes to big cats, there is an urgent need for action, now,” Lisa Samford, executive director of Jackson Hole WILD, told Mongabay by email. “The International Big Cats Film Festival creates a bank of programming for free local events that raise awareness on a global scale to empower local stakeholders and cat conservation advocates as they address local issues. By working together, people around the world can impact public policy decisions governing wildlife trade, thereby really making a difference.”The event and related programming focuses on eight particular species: the clouded leopard, jaguar, cheetah, leopard, lion, snow leopard, tiger and puma.African lion. Photo courtesy of Julie Larsen Maher“These eight cats were chosen by CITES to underscore the systemic importance of these apex predators,” Samford said. “By saving these species and the habitats they range, we simultaneously impact the entire ecosystem of species that share their territories.”“Over the past century we have been losing big cats, the planet’s most majestic predators, at an alarming rate,” CITES secretary-general John Scanlon told Mongabay by email. “Big cats is not only the theme of this international film festival we’re co-organizing with Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival, but more importantly the theme of this year’s UN World Wildlife Day.“World Wildlife Day 2018 gives us the opportunity to raise awareness about their plight and to galvanize support for the many global and national actions that are underway to save these iconic species,” Scanlon added. “Through World Wildlife Day, the most important global annual event dedicated to wildlife, we will generate the level of attention big cats deserve to be sure they are with us for generations to come.“All species of wild cats, including big cat species, are protected under CITES through the regulation of international trade,” Scanlon said. “For nearly 20 years, CITES has highlighted the role of organized criminal activity in the illicit trafficking in Asian big cats, which have always been high on the CITES agenda, and over the last seven years we have seen our efforts to combat transnational organized wildlife crime at global level and on the front lines significantly enhanced.”Amur tiger and cub. Photo by Julie Larsen MaherIn an effort to reach as wide an audience as possible, the expanded definition of big cats is being used for World Wildlife Day, which includes not only lions, tigers, leopards and jaguars — the four largest wild cats that can roar — but also cheetahs, snow leopards, pumas and clouded leopards. Big cat species are found in Africa, Asia, and North, Central and South America, representing a virtually global distribution.Event organizers have released a list of the 16 finalists for the film festival; these will all be screened at the event and the winners announced.Readers who are not in the New York area or are outside the United States are invited to get involved by hosting a screening of the films in their own communities at a later date. Learn more about that here. Learn more about World Wildlife Day here. Article published by Erik Hoffnercenter_img Animals, Arts, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Cats, Cheetahs, Cites, Critically Endangered Species, Endangered Species, Film, Jaguars, Leopards, Lions, Snow Leopards, Tigers last_img read more

Study reveals the Pacific Garbage Patch is much heftier than thought — and it’s growing

first_imgA recent survey of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch revealed that the aggregated plastic there weighs in at 79,000 metric tons (87,100 short tons).The plastic is floating across an area larger than Mongolia at 1.6 million square kilometers (618,000 square miles).Around 75 percent of the pieces that are larger than 5 centimeters (2 inches) in length, and old fishing nets make up a minimum of 46 percent of the total mass.The scientists calculated that 94 percent of the 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic in the patch are microplastics. The great mass of castaway plastic collecting in the northern Pacific Ocean is much larger than past estimates, and it’s growing, according to a new study.As a species, we use and discard millions of tons of plastic each year, and a lot of it ends up in the ocean, where researchers estimate that it kills or injures 100,000 marine animals each year. And while some of it gets broken up and sinks, scientists have found that gyres — swirling areas in the world’s oceans where circulating currents meet — collect a lot of this waste.A recent survey of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, the largest of these collections, revealed that the aggregated plastic there weighs in at 79,000 metric tons (87,100 short tons). That’s between four and 16 times heavier than past estimates. As we continue to produce even more plastic, the patch is growing exponentially heavier by the year, according to measurements of its size over time.A map showing the location of the Pacific Gyre, the location of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Image by NOAA [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.What’s more, most of the plastic, floating across an area larger than Mongolia at 1.6 million square kilometers (618,000 square miles), are pieces that are larger than 5 centimeters (2 inches) in length, and some 46 percent of the total mass is made up of old fishing nets. These “ghost nets” effectively become deadly floating traps for all kinds of sea life.“I knew there would be a lot of fishing gear, but 46 percent was unexpectedly high,” Laurent Lebreton, an oceanographer with the nonprofit organization Ocean Cleanup and lead author of the paper, said in an interview with National Geographic News. “Initially, we thought fishing gear would be more in the 20 percent range.”But in fact, better than half of the debris that the team cataloged came from boats and ships at sea. The patch sits between Hawaii and California. Scientists think that it has collected so much plastic because of its location adjacent to the densely populated eastern shores of Asia and in an area that humans fish heavily.Laurent and his team were able to come up with a more comprehensive assessment of the composition of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch by adding a new dimension to their investigation. They shared their results on March 22 in the journal Scientific Reports.Previous probes of the garbage patch relied primarily on sampling nets and visual surveys of the garbage patch from boats. For this research, the team also took photographs of the patch from an airplane. From this bird’s-eye view, they write, they were able to more accurately count the large pieces of plastic, such as fishing nets or bottles.Filter-feeding marine animals, such as this whale shark, may face problems when they ingest microplastics in large quantities. Photo by Abe Khao Lak (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.They also sifted through more than 1.1 million pieces of debris from over 650 boat-based sampling trips. Virtually everything they picked up from the massive flotilla of garbage was plastic. And even though bigger pieces accounted for most of the heft, the scientists calculated that small bits called microplastics account for 94 percent of the 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic in the patch.Microplastics include additives found in some cosmetics, as well as stubborn fragments of larger, degrading plastic pieces. Small organisms like plankton and fish can ingest these tiny shards, and they’re in turn eaten by larger animals. Microplastics shimmy their way up the food chain until they reach the ocean’s top predators, where they could play havoc with their digestive systems. Once there, they also break down into toxic compounds, potentially causing serious health problems for animal species that are already battling other threats to their survival.Another recent study highlighted the danger that microplastics pose to filter feeders like manta rays and the world’s largest fish, the whale shark (Rhincodon typus).The Ocean Cleanup, based in the Netherlands, has launched a multimillion-dollar effort to develop the technology necessary to clear away half of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in the next five years. Now, with the nuanced understanding of the plastics that are trapped there that this new research provides, scientists say, we have a better idea of how to prevent our trash from ending up there in the first place.“The interesting piece is that at least half of what they’re finding is not consumer plastics, which are central to much of the current debate, but fishing gear,” marine ecologist George Leonard said in the National Geographic News article. Leonard, the chief scientist at the Ocean Conservancy, was not involved with this research.“This study is confirmation that we know abandoned and lost gear is an important source of mortality for a whole host of animals and we need to broaden the plastic conversation to make sure we solve this wedge of the problem,” he said.Plastic litters a beach in Singapore. Photo by vaidehi shah from Singapore (Litter on Singapore’s ECP) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons.Banner image of a whale shark by Arturo de Frias Marques (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0], via Wikimedia Commons.Follow John Cannon on Twitter: @johnccannonCITATIONSGermanov, E. S., Marshall, A. D., Bejder, L., Fossi, M. C., & Loneragan, N. R. (2018). Microplastics: No small problem for filter-feeding megafauna. Trends in ecology & evolution.Lebreton, L., Slat, B., Ferrari, F., Sainte-Rose, B., Aitken, J., Marthouse, R., … Reisser, J. (2018). Evidence that the Great Pacific Garbage Patch is rapidly accumulating plastic. Scientific Reports, 8(1), 4666.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page. Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by John Cannoncenter_img Animals, Biodiversity, Conservation, Ecology, Endangered Species, Environment, Extinction, Fish, Fishing, Microplastics, Oceans, Plastic, Pollution, Research, Saltwater Fish, Sharks, Sharks And Rays, Water, Water Pollution, Whale Sharks, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more